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JURASSIC WORLD

HOLDS BOX OFFICE


DATEBOOK PAGE 17

WINS AT
SENDING A MESSAGE SPIETH
CHAMBERS BAY
EMANUEL AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OPENS
DOORS AFTER SHOOTING
NATION PAGE 7

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

www.smdailyjournal.com

Monday June 22, 2015 Vol XV, Edition 265

Senior living project nears grand opening


Residence in Burlingame perseveres through financial challenges, prepares for opening doors to residents
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

As Burlingame officials look to establish


the region near Mills-Peninsula Medical
Center as a hub for elderly care, a new senior
living facility once plagued by financial
strife is nearing its grand opening.
Sunrise Senior Living is slated next week
to celebrate opening its doors to residents,

across the street from the medical center and


near The Trousdale, another large-scale
housing project designed to serve memory
loss patients.
Elected officials and members of the local
medical community will gather Thursday,
June 25, for a ribbon-cutting ceremony at
Sunrise Senior Living, 1818 Trousdale
Drive.
The event marks the culmination of a

nearly decade-long process, during which


time the four-story, 79-unit project had
stalled, from being approved in 2006 and
halting years later due to the economic
downturn.
Jeff Slichta, senior vice president of operations at Sunrise Senior Living for the western region, said he was excited that the
65,000-square-foot facility will soon be
able to offer care to nearly 100 residents

who will live on the premises when it is


operating at full capacity.
We are thrilled to bring the Burlingame
community this new building, he said.
Sunrise Senior Living will offer roughly
80 jobs to local residents, who will begin
serving the first patient who moves to the
facility Monday, June 29.

See PROJECT, Page 18

Poll shows
supportfor
school tax
Election expert warns support will
drop if city has sales tax measure
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL

Carlmont Nursery owners Bob Tyler and his son Ray Tyler overlook the quaint grounds of their Belmont store thats slated to
close after more than 50 years of service.

Carlmont Nursery says goodbye

Local voters are willing to support a bond measure for the


San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District, according to initial polling results, but to maintain the necessary
support officials may need to consider scaling back the tax
rate they target.
Pollster Brian Godbe presented results Thursday, June 19,
from a survey of prospective local voters to the district
Board of Trustees which indicated officials would likely be
successful in an effort to pass a bond measure in the coming
fall election.
But the election expert encouraged officials to proceed
with caution regarding the rate of revenue the district aims
to generate from the bond measure, which would be used to
build more classrooms to house the projected enrollment

See TAX, Page 18

Tyler family business closes after 50 years in Belmont Auto recall bill put on hold
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Lush with hundreds of Japanese


maples, a trickling stream, winding
gravely path and friendly faces, the
family-owned Carlmont Nursery will
be closing after more than 50 years in
Belmont.
Bob Tyler, his wife Mary and son
Ray have dedicated their lives to running the specialty store spread over
three-quarters of an acre at the
Carlmont Village Shopping Center.
With Bob and Mary Tyler both 80
years old, and Ray Tyler, 58, seeking

to ease into semi-retirement by focusing on his landscape business, the


family opted not to renew their lease
and will close the long-standing establishment in September.
In 1962, Bob Tyler purchased the
nursery and carefully cultivated a business that specializes in Japanese
maple trees as well as bamboo.
Visitors are greeted by hundreds of
plants with a variety of colorful leaves
that Bob Tyler said he tediously studied
before translating the foreign names
into English.
Having passed his green thumb
down to both his sons, Bob Tyler said

hes proud to have owned one of the


Peninsulas premier nurseries.
To be successful, you have to treat
customers the same way you want to be
treated when youre out spending your
own money, Bob Tyler said, adding
his job was a pleasure because youre
outdoors, around plants, around nice
customers. You couldnt ask for anything better. And Im glad my son took
over.
Ray Tyler said he appreciates the
loyal customers whove made his job
enjoyable.

See NURSERY, Page 20

Assemblyman Rich Gordon tables


legislation, consumer group relieved
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Despite receiving significant support


in the Legislature, Assemblyman Rich
Gordon decided to table a bill aimed at
instituting auto-recall regulations for
used cars until a more comprehensive
approach can be found to improve consumer protections.
Rich Gordon
Although new car dealers have long
been prohibited from selling recalled vehicles, similar pro-

See BILL, Page 20

FOR THE RECORD

Monday June 22, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day


If you look at life one way,
there is always cause for alarm.
Elizabeth Bowen, Irish author

This Day in History

1945

The World War II battle for Okinawa


ended with an Allied victory.

In 1 6 11 , English explorer Henry Hudson, his son and several other people were set adrift in present-day Hudson Bay by
mutineers aboard the Discovery; their fate remains unknown.
In 1 8 1 5 , Napoleon Bonaparte abdicated for a second time as
Emperor of the French.
In 1 8 7 0 , the United States Department of Justice was created.
In 1 9 11 , Britains King George V was crowned at
Westminster Abbey.
In 1 9 3 7 , Joe Louis began his reign as world heavyweight
boxing champion by knocking out Jim Braddock in the
eighth round of their fight in Chicago. (A year later on this
date, Louis knocked out Max Schmeling in the first round of
their rematch at Yankee Stadium.)
In 1 9 4 0 , during World War II, Adolf Hitler gained a stunning
victory as France was forced to sign an armistice eight days
after German forces overran Paris.
In 1 9 4 4 , President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the
Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly
known as the GI Bill of Rights.
In 1 9 5 9 , the Swedish film Wild Strawberries, written and
directed by Ingmar Bergman, opened in New York.
In 1 9 6 5 , movie producer David O. Selznick (Gone with the
Wind) died in Los Angeles at age 63.
In 1 9 7 7 , John N. Mitchell became the first former U.S.
Attorney General to go to prison as he began serving a sentence for his role in the Watergate cover-up. (He was released
19 months later.)
In 1 9 8 4 , the British airline Virgin Atlantic began operations.
In 1 9 9 5 , the docudrama Apollo 13, starring Tom Hanks
and directed by Ron Howard, had its world premiere at the
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly
Hills, California.

Birthdays

Author Dan Brown


Sen. Dianne
Actress Meryl
is 51.
Feinstein is 82.
Streep is 66.
Actress Prunella Scales (TV: Fawlty Towers) is 83. Singeractor Kris Kristofferson is 79. Movie director John Korty is
79. Actor Michael Lerner is 74. Actor Klaus Maria Brandauer
is 72. Fox News analyst Brit Hume is 72. Singer Peter Asher
(Peter and Gordon) is 71. Actor Andrew Rubin is 69. Actor
David L. Lander is 68. Singer Howard Eddie Kaylan is 68.
Singer-musician Todd Rundgren is 67. Sen. Elizabeth Warren,
D-Mass., is 66. Actress Lindsay Wagner is 66. Singer Alan
Osmond is 66. Actor Murphy Cross is 65. Actor Graham
Greene is 63. Pop singer Cyndi Lauper is 62. Actor Chris
Lemmon is 61. Rock musician Derek Forbes is 59. Actor Tim
Russ is 59. Rock musician Garry Beers (INXS) is 58.

REUTERS

Melitina Staniouta of Belarus performs during the rhythmic gymnastics individual clubs final at the first European Games in
Baku, Azerbaijan.

In other news ...


Alaska island dog mysteriously
crosses water to mainland
KETCHIKAN, Alaska Ed and
Renee Schofield were surprised when
they got a call from the pound in
Ketchikan.
They were indeed missing their
chocolate Labrador, Bently. But the
Ketchikan Gateway Borough animal
shelter is a long swim from their home
on Pennock Island.
The Schofields were told Wednesday
that Bently was found at the U.S. Coast
Guard base and identified by his tattoo,
The Ketchikan Daily News reported.
The couple lives on the southern end
of the island, across the water from the
base. But they say the lab doesnt like
to swim and couldnt possibly make it
that far.
No way would he swim over to the
Coast Guard base, Ed Schofield said.
Thats a long swim, and he doesnt
even know whats over there.
Schofield adopted the lab as a puppy
from the Pat Wise Animal Shelter about
three years ago. He has lived on
Pennock Island almost his entire life.
Hes not a swimmer, said Renee
Schofield from her home on Pennock.
... For him to go all the way over
there is just weird.
Ed Schofield believes someone must
have pulled up to their dock on
Pennock and the dog either jumped in
or was taken.
The Schofields say they hope Bently

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

June 20 Powerball

2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


All Rights Reserved.

SRIBK

SNARTD

KINGMAN, Ariz. Arizona detectives holding a free trash collection


event got more than just garbage. They
also got their man.
The Kingman Daily Miner reports
Sunday that detectives working at the
June 6 event in Kingman spotted a
familiar vehicle in line.
Authorities say they saw the same
vehicle five days earlier at the home of
20-year-old Trenton Drake White, who
is suspected of illegal dumping.
They say White allegedly dumped
600 pounds of construction and household trash in the desert.
Detectives approached White. They
said he admitted dumping the items.
He was arrested on two unrelated misdemeanor warrants for failure to pay
fines and driving on a suspended
license.
But he now also faces a felony charge
of illegal dumping.
The Mohave County Attorneys
Office will review the case.

Man attacked with machete


while riding bike in Los Angeles
LOS ANGELES Los Angeles
police say a man is expected to survive
after being pulled off his bicycle and
attacked by a suspect wielding a
machete and three others.

10

16

57

20

15
Powerball

35

36

56

68

8
Mega number

June 20 Super Lotto Plus


4

12

31

33

34

23

24

31

37

Daily Four
4

Daily three midday


7

14

Officer Lilliana Preciado says the


four suspects got out of a green sedan
and assaulted the bicyclist early
Sunday in the Pico-Union area.
She says during the attack, one of
the suspects began hacking at the victim with a machete. The victim was
able run away. The suspects returned to
the green sedan and drove away.
City News Service says the victims
exact condition was not released but
the man is expected to survive.
Investigators have not released suspect descriptions.

Boy, 16, arrested after wild


car chase in Ventura County
SIMI VALLEY Authorities say a
16-year-old boy suspected of stealing a
car was arrested after leading officers
on wild nighttime pursuit without
headlights that ended when he crashed
into a tree in Ventura County.
Police in Simi Valley said a sergeant
decided to call off the high-speed chase
early Sunday, considering it too dangerous after the suspect ran several red
lights.
Officers later found the driver at the
scene of the crash. His passenger ran
into a nearby apartment complex,
where he was soon found. No injuries
were reported.
The Ventura County Star reports the
suspect was arrested on suspicion of
auto theft, DUI and felony evading. His
name was not released because he is a
teenager.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

June 19 Mega Millions

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

CADYE

Illegal-dumping suspect
nabbed at trash collection event

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles,


one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

will stay home now.

Daily three evening

Mega number

The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,


No. 11, in first place; Winning Spirit, No. 9, in
second place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third
place. The race time was clocked at 1:43.29.

Mo nday : Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog and


drizzle in the morning. Highs in the upper
50s to mid 60s. West winds 10 to 20 mph.
Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Breezy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 20 to 30 mph.
Tues day : Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Breezy. Patchy
fog in the morning. Highs in the lower to mid 60s. West
winds 20 to 30 mph...Becoming northwest 10 to 20 mph in
the afternoon.
Tues day ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Breezy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows
in the lower 50s. West winds 20 to 30 mph...Becoming 15
to 20 mph after midnight.
Wednes day : Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog.

TANWED
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Saturdays

Ans.
here:

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: AGAIN CARGO MEADOW MODULE
Answer: When they ran out of lettuce for salads, he
told the kitchen staff to ROMAINE CALM

The San Mateo Daily Journal


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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Parking permits coming to San Carlos


DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Parking permits will be required in East


San Carlos starting in January if the City
Council approves the plan at its meeting
Monday.
A condition for approval for the Transit
Village requires the implementation of a
residential parking program for streets
east of Old County Road.
Transit Village developer Legacy
Partners has already provided $10,000 to
help offset the initial costs, which include
the hiring of a full-time community service officer to enforce the program during
its one-year pilot. Signs will also be
installed as part of the program.
The city is expected to spend about
$98,000 on the program.
Details of the program include:
The permit parking area shall include
the streets east of Old County Road to
Industrial Road and extending north from
Hall Street to Northwood Drive;

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
The permits shall be free to residential
property owners within the boundaries of
the permit parking area;
A majority of property owners in the
permit parking area must provide written
consent before the program will be implemented; and
The program shall be ready for implementation before the commencement of
construction of the Transit Village development project (anticipated in late summer 2015).
Starting Jan. 1, parking will be restricted to two hours between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
without a residential parking permit.
The program will also provide permits
for employees of nearby businesses.
The proposal is to start the program as a

pilot, which includes all of the blocks


south of Holly Street, according to a staff
report by Public Works Director Jay
Walter.
These blocks currently experience more
parking by commuters and others from
outside the neighborhood. Launching the
program as a pilot in this smaller area
allows it to be refined before it is implemented in the entire Greater East San
Carlos neighborhood, according to
Walters report.
Each household will be allowed to have
two parking permits with the option to
apply for more.
The Transit Village is a mixed-use development on three floors that will feature
202 rental units, shops, a public plaza and
multi-modal transit center on land owned
by SamTrans.
The San Carlos City Council meets 7
p.m., Monday, June 22, City Hall, 600
Elm St., San Carlos.

Irish priest, official thank Bay Area for support


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO Irish officials and


religious leaders on Sunday thanked San
Francisco Bay Area Catholics and others for
the support and care given to the families of
six young people killed when a balcony
collapsed in Berkeley last week.
Irelands Minister of State for the
Diaspora Jimmy Deenihan said the support
shown to the Irish families while they were
in the Bay Area helped them cope with their
loss.
Thank you sincerely on behalf of the
Irish people and the Irish government,
Deenihan said during a Mass at St. Marys
Cathedral Church Sunday.

Olivia Burke, Eoghan Culligan, Niccolai


Schuster, Lorcan Miller and Eimear Walsh,
all 21-year-olds from Ireland and Ashley
Donohoe, 22, of Rohnert Park, California,
were killed Tuesday when the balcony they
were standing on snapped off the fifth floor
of a Berkeley apartment building during a
birthday party. Thirteen people were tossed
50 feet to the street below. The other seven
remain hospitalized.
Father Brendan McBride of the Irish
Immigration Pastoral Center in San
Francisco said during the homily that four
of the bodies have returned to Ireland and
that another will be taken home on Monday.
Donohoe was buried Saturday in Sonoma

County, where she was from, after a memorial celebrating her life and that of her
cousin and best friend, Olivia Burke.
McBride urged those present Sunday to
keep praying for the families of those who
died and the seven who remain hospitalized.
Its in this community of friendship that
we share our burden, McBride said.
Continue to pray for them and support
them.

Monday June 22, 2015

Police reports
Hedge your bets
Workers were seen cutting down and
pruning trees on Holly Road in
Belmont before 10:22 a.m. Wednesday,
June 17.

FOSTER CITY
Vandal i s m. A house and vehicle were
severely egged on Shearwater Isle before
3:32 p.m. Wednesday, June 17.
Trafc hazard. Several young people were
seen running into trafc while playing with
NERF guns at Beach Park Boulevard and
South Vega Circle before 6:57 p.m. Tuesday,
June 16.
Di s turbance. A man was seen holding a
sign displaying obscenities at Foster City
Boulevard and Triton Drive before 12:19
p.m. Tuesday, June 16.
Sus pended l i cens e. A Redwood City man
was cited and later released for driving with a
suspended license on East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 7:56 a.m. Tuesday, June
16.

BELMONT
Fraud. A victim of fraud suffered a lost of
over $300 on Carlmont Drive before 11:32
a.m. Monday, June 15.
Burg l ary . A car was broken into on
Concourse Drive before 8:29 p.m. Monday,
June 15.
Arres t. A person was arrested for driving
with a suspended license on Ralston and
Furlong avenues before 11:15 p.m. Monday,
June 15.
Ani mal cal l . A friendly black lab was found
at the park on Ralston Avenue before 8:19
p.m. Tuesday, June 16.

Monday June 22, 2015

STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Crews slow spread


of huge Southern
California wildfire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BIG BEAR LAKE Summer arrived in


California on Sunday with fire season in full
swing, as crews knocked down dozens of
small blazes throughout the state and
slowed the spread of a huge forest fire that
churned through old-growth timber in the
San Bernardino Mountains.
Firefighters working amid sweltering
conditions in steep terrain were aided by a
fleet of water-dropping aircraft in attacking
flames in the mountainous wilderness about
90 miles east of Los Angeles.
That blaze held steady at 25 square miles
and was 15 percent contained Sunday as it
pushed east toward the Mojave Desert, U.S.
Forest Service officials said.
Nearly 1,900 firefighters were working
the fire. None had been reported injured
since the flames broke out for unknown reasons on Wednesday near one of the many
permanent camps along state Route 38. The

fire forced several hundred people to leave


the camps and vacation homes.
The National Weather Service issued a
heat advisory for high temperatures through
Sunday evening because of a strong highpressure system stalled over the region.
Mountain temperatures were predicted to
range from 90 degrees at 6,000-foot elevations to 100 degrees at 3,000 feet. Humidity
levels were low, which makes vegetation
easier to burn.
About 400 buildings, including old cabins, were threatened, but none were lost.
The winds pushing the fire east carried the
smoke into the desert and the Coachella
Valley, where air-quality levels reached
unhealthy levels Friday, the South Coast
Air Quality Management District said.
The fire could eventually reach the desert,
said Lyn Sieliet, a U.S. Forest Service fire
spokeswoman. Ten fire engines and a bulldozer were sent to patrol the Morongo
Valley and Pioneertown areas at the east end

REUTERS

A hot shot crew cuts a fire line at the Lake Fire in the San Bernardino National Forest.
of the mountain range.
The fire was not threatening Big Bear
Lake, a year-round mountain resort destination to the north of the fire.
Wildfires were sparking up across the
state, although most areas dodged serious
destruction.
A blaze that burned at least two homes
near Santa Margarita, just northeast of San
Luis Obispo, grew to about 1. 8 square

miles. Helicopters were taking water from


nearby Santa Margarita Lake to dump on the
blaze, which was 15 percent contained.
Several hundred residents were evacuated
at the height of the fire Saturday afternoon,
the San Luis Obispo Tribune reported.
A 920-acre fire in Madera County
destroyed three structures and brought the
evacuation of a handful of homes. It was 35
percent contained.

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LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

Police: Zero tolerance


for illegal fireworks
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

More than 150 California inmates have died of drug overdoses since 2006, with a high of 24 in 2013. Moreover, the sharing
of intravenous needles often spreads hepatitis C infections, which killed 69 inmates in 2013 alone.

Illicit drugs rampant in


California state prisons
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VACAVILLE California inmates are


dying of drug overdoses at nearly triple
the national rate and its unclear whether
the tough steps state officials took this
year to stop illicit drugs from getting
into prisons are having any effect,
though they are prompting criticism
from civil rights advocates.
The Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation is spending $8 million
this year on drug-detecting scanners and
a new breed of drug-sniffing dogs while
also employing strip searches on visitors suspected of carrying drugs.
Corrections officials believe the
stepped-up efforts are discouraging
smuggling, but the data thats available
so far doesnt support that more than
6,000 scans have been done on visitors

and employees at 11 prisons since


December without finding anyone with
drugs.
The state doesnt track if anyone has
been arrested because of the dog searches and waited until mid-May to begin
tracking the number of arrests made
using any of the new procedures.
Meantime, criticism is mounting
about false-positive results by the scanners and dogs that can lead to strip
searches. Concerned lawmakers who
oversee state prisons included language
in the California budget plan passed this
week that would end the searches and
require an evaluation of the departments
other efforts.
Its a humiliating process, can be
easily used to humiliate and demean people, and was only for visitors, often
women, Democratic Sen. Loni
Hancock, said of the strip searches.
There are many concerns about the

dogs, which have historically been


emblematic of intimidation of many
communities of color, most notably
during the civil rights movement.
But no one wants to see drug deaths,
and she said the evaluation will show
which of the new programs are effective.
More than 150 California inmates
have died of drug overdoses since 2006,
with a high of 24 in 2013. Moreover,
the sharing of intravenous needles often
spreads hepatitis C infections, which
killed 69 inmates in 2013 alone.
Corrections Secretary Jeffrey Beard
recently told lawmakers that drugs are
rampant in the prisons.
What we are trying to do is send a
message to people to not try to smuggle
drugs in to the institution, he said in an
interview. If we dont do this, were
going to have people keep dying, were
going to have continued violence in the
prisons.

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Police announced Wednesday they will take a zero tolerance approach toward people possessing illegal fireworks.
Anyone possessing illegal fireworks is subject to arrest
and a fine of $1,000, according to police.
The announcement comes as a reminder, ahead of the
Fourth of July holiday, that it is illegal to possess any firework within Pacifica city limits that is not approved by the
California State Fire Marshall as safe and sane, according
to police.
During the upcoming holiday, many citizens frequent the
beach areas of Pacifica. Police want to remind citizens and
party-goers that the only beach area permitted for safe and
sane fireworks is the area immediately west of the north
parking lot of Linda Mar Beach to approximately 10 feet
east of the tideline and immediately north of the Taco Bell
restaurant to the prolongation of the north end of the north
Linda Mar Beach parking lot, police said.
Safe and sane fireworks will be allowed in the south
Linda Mar Beach parking lot and the south Rockaway Beach
parking lot as alternative sites, police said.
Residents may enjoy the beaches for recreational activities and then use the parking lot to display legal fireworks,
according to police.
Motor vehicles will not be allowed in the south Linda Mar
Beach parking lot or the south Rockaway Beach parking lot
on the Fourth of July in order to accommodate the area for
use of legal fireworks.
Safe and sane fireworks are banned from Rockaway
Beach, Sharp Park Beach and the beach in the area of Manor
Drive and Esplanade Avenue, police said.

COUNTY GOVERNMENT
San Mateo Co unty Parks
will host a second community
meeting to learn what park users
want to see in a redesigned Fl o o d
Co unty Park. The meeting will
be 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. June 23 at
the Fai r Oak s Co mmun i t y
Center, 2600 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
San Mateo County Park staff and design firm Gates +
As s o ci ates will present information on the redesign
project goals and timeline and then guide participants
through several idea gathering and sharing exercises.
Spanish translation and child care services will be available on site.
To receive regular updates about the Flood Park
redesign and other park information visit
www.SMCoParks.org.

Monday June 22, 2015

STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Health insurer Cigna rejects


Anthem Inc. takeover bid
By Brandon Bailey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO Health insurer Cigna


Corp. has rejected a $47 billion offer to be
acquired by its larger rival, Anthem Inc.,
saying the terms of the bid are inadequate
and woefully skewed in favor of Anthem
shareholders.
Cignas sharply worded rejection came
just one day after Anthem went public with
its cash-and-stock offer, which amounts to
about $184 for each Cigna share or about an
18 percent premium on Cignas closing
stock price on Friday.
The proposed deal would make Anthem an
even bigger giant in an industry that many
see as ripe for consolidation, as insurers
struggle to cut costs in the face of new regulations and technological advances.
Anthem has said the combined companies
would have annual revenue of more than
$115 billion and provide insurance for
about 53 million people.
Its unclear if the talks are dead. Cigna said
Sunday that a deal with Anthem under the
right circumstances would provide substantial benefits to consumers, doctors and
investors in both companies. But in a letter
signed by two top Cigna officials, the

Bloomfield, Connecticut-based company


added that it was deeply disappointed with
Anthems latest offer and cited a number of
obstacles to an agreement.
Among them are Anthems failure to
address questions about possible regulatory
hurdles and the massive breach of Anthem
customer data that was revealed earlier this
year, according to the letter signed by David
Cordani, Cignas CEO, and Isaiah Harris Jr.,
the chairman of Cignas board.
Cigna also complained in the letter about
Anthems lack of a growth strategy, while
boasting that Cignas stock has outperformed that of its larger rival in recent
years.
A spokeswoman for Indianapolis-based
Anthem declined comment Sunday.
Anthem has been in talks with Cigna
since last summer. It went public with its
latest proposal on Saturday after four earlier
bids were rejected. Anthem said one prior
sticking point has been the role that
Cordani would play in the combined companies.
Cigna objected Sunday that Anthem wants
its CEO, Joseph Swedish, to assume outsized responsibilities as president, CEO,
chairman and head of integration for the
combined companies which Cignas letter called disconcerting and risky.

Drought worsens health crisis


in one Central California town
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

EAST PORTERVILLE Residents of East


Porterville and experts say not having running water and breathing increasingly dusty
air because of the drought is worsening
health issues.
The town of 7,500 people has no central
water system and families rely on shallow
private wells, which have been drying out as
the drought worsens. Doctors in the area say
they have seen a spike in respiratory illnesses, including chronic bronchitis, allergies and asthma, the Fresno Bee reported
Sunday.
A 75-mile drive southeast of Fresno, East
Porterville gained notoriety after becoming
one of the first Valley communities to suffer
from the drought. It remains the hardest hit,
now with around 700 homes, or about 3,000
people, reporting well failures.
Data shows the number of patients visiting

the emergency room at nearby Sierra View


Medical Center in Porterville complaining of
breathing issues has increased by more than
25 percent since 2010.
We are seeing that these individuals are
having more trouble as far as breathing is
concerned and they are coming in to see us a
little bit more frequently than we are used to,
hospital spokeswoman Ramona Chiapa said.
We suspect that it is due to the drought.
John Capitman, executive director of the
Central Valley Health Policy Institute, said
the drought has already created a public
health emergency in terms of the worsening
air quality. But he said it will take a few years
before health researchers can really demonstrate any other drought impacts on health.
This community and others nearby are
already plagued by drinking water high in
nitrates, a contaminant that comes from septic systems, fertilizers, dairies and decomposing vegetation.

REUTERS

A gay couple prepares to get married in West Hollywood.

Couples, officials, foes


readying for U.S. gay
marriage court ruling
By Dan Sewell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CINCINNATI With a U. S. Supreme


Court ruling on same-sex marriage expected
any day now, gay couples in states with
bans are making wedding plans, courthouse
officials are getting ready for different scenarios and steadfast foes are working on
their strategies to keep up the opposition.
Marriage license bureaus are bracing for a
rush of applicants if the court overturns
bans. Meanwhile, theres been a series of
planning sessions by groups that intend to
explore religious objection responses to
protect traditional marriage limited to
heterosexuals.
Gay couples, such as Ethan Fletcher and
Andrew Hickam of Cincinnati, are gearing
up for a quick run to the courthouse in Ohio,
Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee the
states involved in the cases that were argued
in April before the justices. Theyre among
14 states that ban same-sex marriage, and if
the high court rules in favor of gay marriage, it would apply nationally.
Fletcher, 31, a University of Cincinnati
senior academic adviser, and Hickam, 30, a
GE Aviation engineer, have arranged to take
off work to get their license if the decision
allows immediate same-sex marriages and
will then plan a formal wedding. They
became engaged nearly two years ago but
decided against getting married in another
state as long as there was the possibility
they could do it at home.
Well, we live here and we pay taxes here
and our families live here, said Fletcher,
adding that they want his grandmother and
Hickams mother to be able to attend. We
didnt feel that it was reasonable for us to

have to travel out of state for the freedom to


marry.
In Hamilton County, where Cincinnati is
located, the marriage license bureau said
other courthouse staffers have been crosstrained and forms are available online to
help speed the process. Court officials in
Cuyahoga County, where Cleveland is located, say theyre prepared to process triple the
usual number of applications.
Probate Court Judge Jan Michael Long, of
Pickaway County, near Columbus, said he
and other probate judges met to discuss
potential rulings and their impacts. There
are a lot of procedural issues involving the
need for gender-neutral wording and who
gets legal notifications, he said, and it could
be complicated depending on when the court
ruling becomes effective and how its worded.
In Ingham County, Michigan, Clerk Barb
Byrum said she might not wait for a new
marriage license form from the state, and
could simply white-out bride and groom
on the application when she gets the legal
green light.
She has collected dozens of email addresses from local same-sex couples to notify
them of the Supreme Court decision when
she knows it. She was among four clerks
who issued licenses on a Saturday during a
24-hour period in 2014 when gay marriage
in Michigan was legal between court orders.
The Tennessee Equality Project has been
asking people to let them know in advance
if they plan to get married on Day One. Its
website includes instructions on obtaining
licenses and finding officiants.
Bleu Copas, who lives just outside of
Knoxville, said he wants to get married
right away if the ban is lifted.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Monday June 22, 2015

Reopening church doors after shooting sends a message


By Phillip Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLESTON, S.C. Emanuel African


Methodist Episcopal Church opened its
tall, wooden doors to the world Sunday,
embracing strangers who walked in from
the street or tuned in from home for the
first worship service since a white gunman
was accused of killing nine black church
members.
It was that same hospitality that allowed
the suspected gunman to be welcomed into
a Bible study for about an hour before he
allegedly stood up, made racially offensive
remarks and opened fire in the church
known as Mother Emanuel because it is
one of the oldest black congregations in
the South.
I was so pleased when authorities told us
you can go back into Mother Emanuel to
worship, said the Rev. Norvel Goff, a presiding elder of the 7th District AME Church
in South Carolina, before adding a note of
defiance to a service sprinkled with themes
of love, recovery and healing.
Some folks might need some more time
in order to walk in. But for those of us who
are here this morning ... because the doors
of Mother Emanuel are open on this
Sunday, it sends a message to every demon
in hell and on earth.
The churchs air conditioning did little to
fight the heat of extra bodies in the sanctuary. There was fervent singing and shouting, so much so that many congregants
waved small fans in front of their faces.
Despite the heaviness in the air, many
stood some holding small children to
shout their praises or raise their hands
toward the churchs vaulted ceiling. For
added security, police officers stood watch
over worshippers.
Some congregation members stood to
applaud when Goff thanked law enforcement for their response to the shooting.
Goff was appointed to lead the historic

Charleston church after Emanuels senior


pastor, the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, was
fatally shot during the massacre. A black
sheet was draped over Pinckneys usual
chair, which sat empty. At least one parishioner kneeled down in front of it and
prayed.
Pinckney was also a state senator and
married father of two children. Goff
acknowledged Fathers Day and said: The
only way evil can triumph is for good folks
to sit down and do nothing.
As Emanuels congregation belted out a
gospel hymn, church bells rang throughout
the Holy City nicknamed because of
the numerous churches here. Later Sunday,
people were expected to gather on the
Arthur Ravenel Bridge to join hands in solidarity.
The bridge is named after a former state
lawmaker and vocal Confederate flag supporter. The slayings have renewed calls for
the flag to be removed from the South
Carolina Statehouse grounds, in part
because photographs of Roof in a purportREUTERS
ed manifesto showed him holding People hold hands as they pray while they take part in the morning service at Emanuel African
Confederate flags. The 2,500-word mani- Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C.
festo also contained hate-filled writings.
Less than 2 miles from the church, someone vandalized a Confederate monument,
spray-painting Black Lives Matter on
the statue. City workers used a tarp to cover
up the graffiti, police said.
Photos on local news websites from
before the tarp was put up showed the graffiti in bright red paint, along with the message This is the problem. (hash)
RACIST.
Around the country, pastors asked people
to pray for Charleston. In Atlantas 1st
Iconium Baptist Church, a predominantly
black church with a tradition of speaking
out for social justice, the Rev. Timothy
McDonald told his congregation Sunday
that he had met Pinckney last April during
a visit to Columbia, South Carolina, with a
group of ministers.

NATION/WORLD

Monday June 22, 2015

Heading to Europe, Pentagon


chief to boost military support
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON Heading to
Europe, Defense Secretary Ash Carter
is carrying a strong message of U.S.
military support for American allies
and Baltic nations to help calm growing concerns about Russian aggression.
A key theme at all his stops will be
how the United States, NATO and other
partners can best deal with the Kremlin
in the wake of Moscows annexation
of Ukraines Crimea region and its military backing of separatists battling
Ukraines government on the eastern
border.
Officials said Carter, who left
Washington on Sunday, plans to
encourage allied ministers to better
work together in countering threats
facing Europe. His talks are sure to
draw the ire of Russian President
Vladimir Putin as his government
chafes under economic penalties
imposed for its actions in Ukraine.
At a NATO meeting, defense ministers will discuss plans to involve the
alliance more officially in the fight
against Islamic State militants in Iraq.
According to U. S. officials, NATO
leaders will consider providing min-

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

Defense Secretary Ash Carter arrives to testify before a House Armed Services
Committee hearing on U.S. Policy and Strategy in the Middle East.
istry-level advice and other training
assistance in Iraq, with a possible
decision approving the plan expected
around July.
Carter also intends to talk with counterparts about a U.S. proposal to send
to Eastern Europe enough tanks,
Humvees and other military equipment
to outfit one brigade. The equipment
would be used for exercises and other

training programs. The idea of placing


it in Eastern Europe has been in discussion for months; Carter has yet to give
his final approval.
Generally, a brigade has roughly
3,500 troops.
Officials have not said where the
equipment would go, but there are indications that Poland, which borders
Russia, might be one location.

U.S. developing Plan B for deporting convicted plane bomber


By Eric Tucker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON The federal government has been exploring a Plan B


to deport a man who placed a bomb on
a Hawaii-bound airplane in 1982 and
who has remained in immigration custody since being released from prison
two years ago.
Mohammed Rashed pleaded guilty in
2002 to his role in the bombing of Pan
Am 830, which killed a Japanese
teenager and injured more than a dozen
others. Under the terms of his plea

agreement, the U.S. government said


it would work to deport the Jordanianborn Palestinian to the country of his
choice after he finished serving his
sentence on murder and conspiracy
charges.
But efforts to deport Rashed have
stalled amid diplomatic complications
since his March 2013 release from
prison.
He remai n s at an i mmi g rat i o n
detention facility in Batavia, New
York, and his lawyer has complained
t o a j udg e t h at t h e g o v ern men t
appears to have failed to satisfy its

end of the plea deal.


At a court hearing last month in
Washington, Justice Department
lawyer Christopher Dempsey said the
government was developing a Plan
B strategy to remove Rashed from the
country. The details of that plan were
not publicly disclosed in court, and
lawyers involved in the case have
declined to discuss it.
The government wants him out of
here, and would love it if we could
effect his removal, Dempsey said,
according to a hearing transcript
obtained by the Associated Press.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the nation


Manhunt for escaped killers
shifts after possible sighting
FRIENDSHIP, N.Y. Investigators tracking two murder convicts who escaped from a northern New York prison scoured a
rural area near the Pennsylvania border Sunday, saying an
unconfirmed but credible report of a sighting had shifted the
search across the state.
About 300 law enforcement officers searched the neighboring towns of Amity and Friendship, where two men who resembled the convicts were spotted Saturday near a railroad line that
runs along a county road.
While state police called the sighting unconfirmed, the
intense hunt that had focused for two weeks around a prison near
the Canadian border was quickly expanded to a rural, mountainous area 350 miles away, dotted with sheds, trailers, summer
homes and other potential hideouts.
We will search under every rock, behind every tree and structure until we are confident that that area is secure, State Police
Maj. Michael J. Cerretto said at a news conference Sunday.
Concentrating in the area along County Route 20 and
Interstate 86, officers walked railroad tracks, checked car trunks
and deployed search dogs as a helicopter flew back and forth
overhead. At one point, state police outfitted in camouflage
could be seen heading into some woods.

New Orleans police arrest


suspect in killing of officer
NEW ORLEANS After an intense 24-hour manhunt, New
Orleans police Sunday arrested a man believed to have shot and
killed a police officer while wearing handcuffs as he was being
transported to jail. But questions remain about where the gun he
used to kill Officer Daryle Holloway, 45, came from and how he
hid from a law enforcement search that included canine, SWAT
and helicopter teams.
Travis Boys, 33, was still wearing his broken handcuffs
when a rookie officer and his trainer spotted him trying to
board a city bus Sunday morning, said Police Superintendent
Michael Harrison.
To my understanding, he got on the bus after spotting the
officers. And the officers saw that and then he got off the bus
and then was apprehended, Harrison told reporters, while
standing in front of a memorial to the citys fallen police officers.

Texas abortion law teed


up for Supreme Court review
WASHINGTON Abortion is back before the Supreme
Court, and the justices could signal by the end of June whether
they are likely to take up the biggest case on the hot-button
subject in nearly a quarter-century.
If the court steps in, the hearing and the eventual ruling would
come amid the 2016 presidential campaign.
The court is considering an emergency appeal from abortion
providers in Texas, who want the justices to block two provisions of a state law that already has forced the closure of roughly half the licensed abortion clinics in the state. Ten of the
remaining 19 clinics will have to shut their doors by July 1,
without an order from the Supreme Court.
The Texas law is among a wave of state measures in recent
years that have placed restrictions on when in a pregnancy
abortions may be performed, imposed limits on abortions
using drugs instead of surgery and increased standards for clinics and the doctors who work in them.

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OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

School board that has lost its way


By Judith Puccini

t is an election year. Voters


beware. Two seats on the San
Mateo Union High School
District Board of Trustees will be on
the ballot. What was once a board
dutifully focused on the welfare of
youth and made scal decisions that
promoted equity for all students, has
digressed to having a number of
trustees with their own agendas at the
expense of taxpayer dollars. The
exception to this perspective are
trustees Linda Lees Dwyer and Bob
Grifn who admirably understand why
they are elected, who they represent,
and are holding rm in dissenting
with the other three trustees.
Years ago, voters approved a bond
Measure M, a portion of which was
designed to improve the facilities at
the Crestmoor site in San Bruno
which currently houses the districts
alternative education program,
Peninsula High School (which has
functioned successfully for more than
20 years) and more recently, classrooms for special needs students.
Later, voters also approved Measure O
to complete the districtwide modernization.
Against the logical, well thoughtout and cost-effective recommendation to the board from the district

administration to redo the Crestmoor


site for Peninsula High School, to
include a new facility for the special
needs students, and to house the districts charter Design Tech School,
trustees Hanley, Friedman and Rogers
want instead to purchase and lease
buildings in Burlingame.
The mayor of San Bruno has
addressed the board and stated that San
Bruno values the joint agreements
with the district for use of the elds at
the Crestmoor site and values
Peninsula High School as an asset in
the community.
Further, these three board members
envision a new district ofce in a
sprawling new complex in
Burlingame rather than listening to
the recommendation of the district
leadership that the district ofce
should be rebuilt in its existing footprint at a major cost savings as
opposed to purchasing or leasing new
property.
Again, against the administrations
recommendations, these board members decided to spend $750,000 a year
to lease a building in Burlingame to
house the Design Tech Charter High
School rather than put those funds
into improvements at the Crestmoor
site where Design Tech High School
could easily have been accommodated
without buying or leasing.
The district administration would

Guest
perspective
also like to build a new facility to
house the maintenance and transportation operations, possibly on the
San Mateo High School campus. Each
of the district administrations recommendations, including this facility,
would t within the scope of the
remaining bond money.
Voters of the district should attend
the June 25, 2015, board meeting and
let this board know how they feel
about equity for students and scal
accountability. In the ve years of
delays, $50 million has been lost due
to increased construction costs; costs
will continue to rise and the time will
come when there wont be options.
Judith Puccini is the former PTA president of John Muir Elementary School
in San Bruno, the former PTO president
of Capuchino High School, a former
Juv enile Justice commissioner for 12
y ears and a member of the Measure M
bond committee. She has liv ed in San
Bruno for 54 y ears.

Letters to the editor


Regarding the Beresford
Hillsdale Neighborhood
Association meeting
Editor,
Regarding Sue Lemperts column (in
the June 15 edition of the Daily
Journal) and Lisa Taners response (in
the June 19 edition of the Daily
Journal), Id like to add some context
to the Beresford Hillsdale
Neighborhood Association meeting on
Feb. 17, 2015.
I was unable to participate in the discussion with speaker Mimi Steele
because I was attending a City Council
meeting, but came as soon as the council meeting ended (I was honored to
speak at the next months BHNA meeting to present the citys perspective).
On Feb. 17, I did verbally challenge
Ms. Steele during her presentation.
Three other members of the audience
also confronted her.
We did not challenge her because of
her party afliation. We responded to a
specic comment made by Ms. Steele.
In justifying her no growth position
for San Mateo, Ms. Steele stated,
What is the end result of all this
smart growth and stack and pack
housing? You end up with different people living here. People different than
you and me. People with different cul-

Jerry Lee, Publisher


Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

tures and beliefs. After confronting


Ms. Steele about her prejudiced comments, some of her supporters called
me a Communist. That type of redbaiting harkens back to the days of
McCarthyism, and I confronted that
bullying head on. I respect peoples
party afliations. I respect healthy
debate on the scope of development in
our city. But statements of intolerance
and prejudice are never welcome in San
Mateo.I will continue to speak out
against intolerance whenever and wherever it occurs.

David Lim
San Mateo
The letter writer is a member of the
San Mateo City Council.

Caltrain bike capacity


Editor,
Being able to bring a bike onboard
Caltrain from Palo Alto to San
Francisco makes my commute much
easier and much more exible. I dont
have to worry about driving and parking at a train station, and I dont have
to worry about coordinating my schedule with a bus, or walking for a long
time while in the city.
I know I am not alone in wanting to

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Ricci Lam, Production Assistant


Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

bring a bike aboard Caltrain. Caltrains


own passenger analysis reveals that
bike boardings increased 147 percent
from 2008 to 2014, while walk-on
boardings increased only 35 percent.
I am dismayed that Caltrain is considering holding bike capacity at on
the electried trains. This does not
seem wise, given the growing popularity of bringing bikes on board. I hope
Caltrain reconsiders its bike capacity
recommendations and increases bike
capacity on electried trains.

Jane Huang
Palo Alto

Toll lanes
Editor,
Forget toll lanes; limit construction
(Ofcials studying toll lanes in the
June 18 edition of the Daily Journal).
When will cities governments open
their shuttered eyes to the fact that in
no way can this little strip of land
between an ocean and a bay support
life in all its aspects for a limitless
number of inhabitants?

Beverly Kalinin
San Mateo
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Worth waiting for


A

t long last a safe passage over Highway 101 and


Hillsdale Boulevard for pedestrians and cyclists
is in the works. The city of San Mateo has
received funds for the first step, an environmental
review, and that is underway.
The proposed bridge will start at the Hillsdale
Boulevard/Franklin Parkway intersection, wrap around
the southern half of the 101/Hillsdale interchange, and
end at Hillsdale Boulevard and Norfolk Street. Additional
connections are also proposed from Hillsdale Court from
the west side and from La Selva Street from the east side.
From Norfolk Street, its a short ride to the Bay Trail and
a connection to Foster
City.
The structure is approximately 1,100 feet and the
city is hoping for an ideal
width of 14 feet to accommodate ample space for
bikes and walkers. The
most exciting news is that
the city is planning a
design competition for the
bridge. It wont be an eyesore but a unique and signature design to reflect the
character of the community, according to Aaron
Lam, engineer with the
citys Department of Public Works.
The project is currently funded through the environmental phase through a Measure A $875,000 grant from
the San Mateo County Transportation Authority. The
city has submitted applications for the design ($2.7 million) and construction ($30 million.) The major challenge is receiving the necessary funding to complete the
overpass, but the community and Caltrans seem to be on
board.
***
This is a project close to my heart. When I served on
the San Mateo County bicycle pedestrian committee, it
was important to complete funding for the
Belmont/101/Ralston Avenue overpass. It took way too
long to accomplish but at last it was completed several
years ago. The next priority was to start the ball rolling
on a similar safe overcrossing on Hillsdale Boulevard.
As a cyclist, I dont dare cross Highway 101 from east
Hillsdale Boulevard during the week at its current configuration. On the weekends, it seemed a bit safer if one is
careful to wait for a lull in the traffic as cars enter the
freeway from Norfolk Street/Hillsdale Boulevard. There
is a narrow walkway to ride on and then you must navigate another freeway crossing before safely arriving on
the other side. The other option, the 19th Avenue crossing which cyclists share with cars, is much more challenging.
Now there is talk of building an overpass for bikes and
pedestrians in San Carlos. All of this is good news. Safe
routes encourage people to bike to work and children to
bike to school. It encourages recreational use at a time
when the country is fighting obesity. And best of all it
provides another mode of transport for employees as
development increases along these corridors. Sure people will still use their cars. But more and more will be
turning to two wheels as the best way to get around.
***
Presidential politics are of major interest if you are a
political junky like yours truly. But this year, along with
the interest, is a bit of a disappointment. Many of the
candidates on both sides are qualified and with exceptional experience. But I dont feel that same passion
which I felt four and eight years ago. While President
Obama is still struggling in his last few years to accomplish his agenda, I bet history will treat him much more
kindly than present pundits. In fact many who are badmouthing him today may miss him tomorrow.
I was very impressed with how Rand Paul answered
instead of ducked questions. And I agreed with him on his
views about our involvement in the Middle East. But his
stand on and use of the Patriot Act to get notoriety and
campaign funds disgusted me. Whats not to like about
Marco Rubio when you look at him and hear him speak.
Its just that most of his policies are so awful. The union
busting Scott Walker is just scary and I find nothing
appealing about him. Folks forget he started out as a
bureaucrat. I liked Jeb Bush, despite the party label, until
he started bragging that Florida had more guns on his
watch than Texas. As for Hillary, I know I should be
excited that she could become the first woman president.
But its more important that, if elected, she will be a
great president, not just a good enough one.
Sue Lempert is the former may or of San Mateo. Her column
runs ev ery Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdaily journal.com.

10

BUSINESS

Monday June 22, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Chip credit cards


put a squeeze on
small businesses
By Joyce M. Rosenberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK New credit and


debit cards with computer chips
are putting the squeeze on small
businesses.
The cards being rolled out by
banks and credit card companies
are aimed at reducing fraud from
counterfeit cards. As chip cards are
phased in, magnetic stripe cards,
which are easier for thieves to
copy, will be phased out.
Businesses of all sizes face an Oct.
1 deadline to get new card readers
and software that can handle
chips. Most estimates of transition costs for small companies
vary from the low hundreds to tens
of thousands of dollars due to the
wide range of equipment used.
If businesses dont meet the
deadline set by companies including MasterCard, Visa and
American Express, they can be
held liable for transactions made
with phony chip cards.
The switch to new chips in credit and debit cards poses a threat for
small companies because they
cant get the volume discounts on
the new equipment that big retail-

ers get. And they dont have inhouse tech experts to install the
new systems.
This is one of the biggest
nightmares merchants are going
to face, says Michael Kleinman,
owner of Mason Eyewear, a store
in
Brickell,
Florida,
and
Centurion Payment Services, a
company that processes credit and
debit card payments.

TIP OF THE ICEBERG


The card readers shoppers see are
just one part of a payment processing system. Theyre connected to software in a merchants
computer system that receives the
transaction information and sends
it to a payment processor. The
processor then posts a charge or
debit to the cardholders account
and a credit to the merchants
account.
The simplest card readers used in
stores and other small businesses
are likely to cost at least $100.
The machines will also read magnetic stripes and some also handle
what are known as contactless
payments made with services like
Apple Pay or Google Wallet. Most
software prices start at several

The switch to new chips in credit and debit cards poses a threat for small companies because they cant get the
volume discounts on the new equipment that big retailers get.
hundred dollars, but can run into
the thousands for more complex
systems. Many companies have
computer systems that do more
than handle payments they also
manage inventory and customer
and
vendor
information.
Businesses like restaurants and
those with multiple locations are
likely to have the most complex
systems and the highest expenses.
Dickie Brennan & Co. , which
o p erat es fo ur New Orl ean s
restaurants, expects to pay more
than $25, 000 to replace card
readers and software, says Derek
Nettles, the companys information technology director. The
company wont raise its prices
to pay for the switch; instead,
its delaying an upgrade of its

security camera system.


Were not happy about the additional expense, Nettles says.

ITS NOT PLUG AND PLAY


Changing card readers and software isnt something many small
business owners, even tech-savvy
ones, will be able to do on their
own. Theyll need to hire technology consultants who can charge as
much as $100 an hour or more to
install the system and ensure it
works.
Even with Kleinmans expertise
in payment processing as owner
of Centurion Payment Services, it
took him five hours to install two
card readers and software. And he
was on the phone getting technical support from his vendor while
he did it. Although the new system

works, there are glitches that keep


him tinkering. For example,
sometimes the system has trouble
accepting certain cards.
Most people are definitely
going to need to hire somebody to
do it, Kleinman says.
It may make sense for companies with combined payment,
inventory and other systems to
separate the payment part to make
them less vulnerable to hackers,
says Scott Shedd, a technology
consultant with WGM Associates
in Scottsdale, Arizona.
But that will add more costs,
says Avivah Litan, an analyst with
Gartner Research.
If you want to use this opportunity to secure your systems, it
could cost you thousands, she
says.

European leaders working hard to keep Greece in eurozone


By Demetris Nellas and Raf Casert
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRUSSELS Greek Prime Minister Alexis


Tsipras headed to Brussels late Sunday for a
crucial emergency eurozone summit aimed at
reaching a deal between Athens and its international creditors that would allow the debtravaged country to avoid a default and a
potentially disastrous exit from the euro.
Tsipras departure for Mondays summit of
the 19 eurozone leaders capped a day of
intense contacts between many of the major

players, including German Chancellor


Angela Merkel, French President Francois
Hollande and European Commission
President Jean-Claude Juncker, all bent on
keeping Greece within the currency club and
avoiding financial chaos.
Greece is facing a June 30 deadline to make
a 1.6 billion euro ($1.8 billion) loan repayment to the International Monetary Fund,
which, at present, it would be unable to make.
And even bigger payments to the European
Central Bank in July. So far, both Greece and
the creditors have appeared locked in a who-

blinks-first contest that has left them unable


to bridge the gaps and secure a deal.
On Sunday, Tsipras presented to Juncker,
Hollande and Merkel Greeces proposal for a
mutually beneficial agreement, which will
provide a permanent solution and not just
postpone tackling the problem, his press
office said in a statement.
However, technical negotiators from the
creditors were still waiting in Brussels for a
detailed outline of the Greek proposals late
Sunday to assess whether they really constitute a breakthrough, a European Union official said.
The institutions are waiting, the official
said, more than eight hours after the Greek
government announced they had presented
the proposal to creditors. The condition for
this meeting to be productive is to have the
proposal.
The official asked to remain anonymous
because of the sensitivity of the negotiations.

Over the past weeks, the international creditors have often complained that Greek initiatives have been too slow to come and far
too vague.
In Milan, Hollande told reporters that
everything must be done to keep Greece in
the Eurozone because if the Greeks leave the
eurozone it wont be positive for the Greeks
or Europeans.
We need stability especially since much
of Europe is beginning to rebound economically, he said. For this reason we must reach
an accord.
Tsipras met with his senior ministers all
day in Athens and left for Brussels Sunday
evening.
Ahead of the eurozone summit Monday,
Tsipras will hold a one-on-one meeting with
EU President Donald Tusk and will then join a
meeting, convened by Tusk, with Juncker,
IMF managing director Christine Lagarde and
European Central Bank President Mario
Draghi, Tsipras press office said.

Foster City-based investment advisor


Bai l ard Inc. , in conjunction with CT
Real ty o f Al i s o Vi ejo , California, has
acquired the three-building, Cl as s A Pal m
Terrace ofce complex in Lake Forest,
California. Bailard and CT Realty acquired

Business on the move


the 155,795-square-foot property, located
at 25521, 25531 and 25541 Commercentre
Drive, for $30 million from LaSalle
Investment Management.

REMATCH IN OMAHA: VANDY AND VIRGINIA SET FOR REMATCH IN COLLEGE WORLD SERIES FINALS >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 15, Ward in


fine form in return to ring
Monday June 22, 2015

Spieth wins stunner at U.S. Open


By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

UNIVERSITY PLACE, Wash. Another


major for Jordan Spieth. Another stunning
loss for Dustin Johnson.
Chambers Bay delivered heart-stopping
drama Sunday in the U.S. Open when Spieth
birdied his final hole to become only the
sixth player to win the Masters and the U.S.
Open in the same year. The real surprise was
not that he won, but how he won.
Johnson had a 12-foot eagle putt for the
victory. Two putts would force an 18-hole

playoff Monday. Less than a minute later,


Spieth was shocked to be the youngest U.S.
Open champion since 1923.
Johnsons eagle putt ran by the cup and
stopped just over 3 feet away. With his
future father-in-law Wayne Gretzky watching, Johnsons short birdie putt rolled by
the left edge.
Lost in Johnsons blunder was the clutch
play of the Masters champion. Having lost
control of the tournament with a double
bogey on the 17th hole, Spieth drilled his tee
shot and hit a 3-wood that caught the back
bank and rolled below the cup. His eagle putt

was wide left, giving him a 1-under 69.


He walked off the green at 5-under 275 and
worried about golfs biggest hitter playing
the par-5 behind.
Spieth becomes the first player since
Bobby Jones to make birdie on the 72nd hole
to win the U.S. Open by one shot, all because
of Johnsons three-putt. The 21-year-old
Texan heads to St. Andrews next month in
pursuit of golfs holy grail the Grand Slam.
Tiger Woods in 2002 was the last player to
get the first two legs of the slam. In 1960,

See GOLF, Page 15

KYLE TERADA/USA TODAY SPORTS

Jordan Spieth is all smiles after rallying to win


Sunday at Chambers Bay.

U.S. poised for


big showdown
with Colombia
By Anne M. Peterson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

San Mateo shortstop Nolan Dempsey, right, throws to third baseman Chris Davis, left, who tags out Renos Austin May in Sundays championship
game of the Second Annual Peninsula Classic at Seacloud Park. Reno went on to a dramatic 6-5 win.

S.M. Sox suffer first loss


By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The San Mateo White Sox opened the summer on quite a run.
San Mateos Palomino League team won 11
straight to start the season. Its first loss of
the year, however, was sa tough one to digest
as the White Sox fell 6-5 to the Reno
Muckdogs in Sundays championship game
of the Second Annual Peninsula Classic.
The White Sox rallied back from a five-run
deficit to tie it in the bottom of the sixth. But
Reno answered right back to score the gamewinning run in its final at-bat as Cole
Hummel shot a two-out RBI single to left
against reliever Chad Franquez.

We were right there in every one of those


last innings, White Sox manager Lenny
Souza said. Its not fun to come out on the
losing end, but were 11-1. Thats not too
many chinks in the armor.
Each team played with a sever handicap in
Sundays tourney finale. For Reno, it was the
third game of the day. But, while Reno used
composite BBCOR bats, San Mateo insisted
on using exclusively wood bats. And the balance paid off in the form of a dramatic finish.
We have good team chemistry, White Sox
outfielder Daniel Wray said. Even though we
were down five, we still came back. Weve
got a lot of fight.
Wray had a big day, going 3 for 3 with four
RBIs, including the clutch hit in the bottom

of the sixth to tie it at 5-5. The wiry strong


Wray came up with the bases loaded and two
outs and laced a two-run single to left, plating
Ryan Kammuller and Isaiah Fitzhugh.
I wasnt trying to swing for a home run,
Wray said. I was trying to hit it hard.
But on an auspicious day for the Reno
Muckdogs, they would not be denied. In the
13-year existence of the Muckdogs travel
team, they had never played three games in
one day, according to manager Ken Camel.
And even more auspiciously, one of the most
prolific Muckdogs alumni, professional
pitcher Cody Anderson, made his major league
debut Sunday with the Cleveland Indians.

See PALOMINO, Page 12

EDMONTON, Alberta Never mind the


infamous punch and the trash talk: The U.S.
womens team says the only motivation it
needs for defeating Colombia is the opportunity to move on at the Womens World Cup.
When the teams met nearly three years ago
in the London Olympics,
Colombia striker Lady
Andrade sucker-punched
U.S. star Abby Wambach
in the eye, drawing a twomatch suspension.
Then in advance of
Mondays game against the
United States in the round
of 16 at the World Cup,
Abby
Andrade made provocative
Wambach
statements about the
Americans to a reporter.
U. S.
striker Alex
Morgan wasnt taking
the bait.
Yes, weve seen what
Lady said, Morgan said.
Weve always respected
them. We want to let our
actions speak on the field.
At a pregame news conLady
ference on Sunday, midAndrade
fielder Megan Rapinoe
said: For us, we dont need any extra motivation. This is the knockout round. Its do
or die. Were ready.
Coach Jill Ellis said she understands
Andrades posturing, but it has no impact on
the United States approach to the match.
She should say shes going to win. Every
athlete here is an elite athlete. At that level,
you should have self-belief in what you can
do, Ellis said. Does it derail us? Do we focus
on it? No. I just want to win the game.
Colombia midfielder Yoreli Rincon said
her teams defensiveness about the United
States stemmed from things the players had

See SOCCER, Page 16

Phelps wins 200 individual medley at Santa Clara


By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA Olympic gold medalist


Michael Phelps knows training in Colorado
Springs is good for his swimming career.
That doesnt mean he has to like it.
Its painful, Phelps said. Its mentally
challenging more than anything. I know,
deep down inside, I do benefit from going.
Phelps took charge of the mens 200 individual medley and raced to his second win of
the Arena Pro Series on Sunday night.

Its just good to push my body as hard as


I can, he said. It helps prepare me. This
has been a great confidence booster for me.
I look at this and feel like Im doing something right.
Phelps next focus is the national championships, where he expects to swim the 100
fly, 100 individual medley and 200 individual
medley, though he hasnt confirmed anything.
I didnt know what events I would swim
here until I got here, Phelps said. I dont
know that I will be able to do all the events
I want at nationals.

First he has to survive a three-week training regimen at the Olympic Training


Center.
Youre locked in this compound for three
weeks, he said. I can complain about
going but I know its what I need.
Olympic champion Missy Franklin, in her
first long course event of the season, finished third in the 200 backstroke, an event
in which she holds the world record, and
sixth in the 100 freestyle on the final day.
I have a lot of mixed feelings, Franklin
said. I havent raced for a long time but I

felt strong and powerful. The speed just was


not there. It was important to figure out
what works in the water.
Hungarys Katinka Hosszu won the
womens 200 individual medley and the 200
backstroke, her fourth and fifth victories of
the weekend.
Russian Yulia Efimova won the womens
50 breast, edging Trojan Swim Club teammate Jessica Hardy by a half-second.
Efimova will be competing at the world

See SWIM, Page 14

12

SPORTS

Monday June 22, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Nats Max Scherzer celebrates his no-hitter


By David Elfin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRAD MILLS/USA TODAY SPORTS

Max Scherzer said he didnt get much sleep


Saturday night after throwing a no-hitter.

WASHINGTON A day later, Max Scherzer


couldnt stop smiling.
Im doing great, the Nationals right-hander said the morning after he threw a no-hitter
and came within a strike of a perfect game
before hitting Pittsburghs Jose Tabata in
Washingtons 6-0 victory.
I didnt get much sleep, but thats for a
good reason, just on a high from the game.
Scherzer came within one strike of throwing the 22nd perfect game in major league
history since 1900.
In his past two starts, Scherzer has retired
54 of 57 batters with a combined 26 strikeouts. He is 8-5 with a 1.76 ERA for the season.
Scherzers parents were on hand at
Nationals Park on Saturday to see his accomplishment. Brad and Jan Scherzer decided to
visit this weekend from Missouri instead of
next month.

It was great to be able to share last night


with them as well, Scherzer said. Thats
what my dad wanted (for Fathers Day). He
doesnt want a tie. I gave him a no-hitter, so
hes pretty happy.
Scherzer said he received about 120 texts
after his brilliant performance, but the ones
that meant the most were from opposing
players.
Its a sign of respect, said Scherzer, with
the ball he threw for the final out resting
behind him in his locker.
I really do appreciate the support.
Clint Hurdle had offered Scherzer his lineup
cards. But instead, the pitcher signed them for
the Pirates manager, who plans to auction
them off for charity.
Nationals center fielder Denard Span was
still marveling at Scherzer. Span faced
Scherzer when they were both in the
American League. He said that in 2012, his
Minnesota Twins preferred facing Tigers ace
Justin Verlander instead of Scherzer.

DefendingchampionVanderbilt to PALOMINO
meet Virginia in CWS finals again
Continued from page 11

By Eric Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OMAHA, Neb. Many preseason prognosticators believed Vanderbilt and Virginia


had what it took to reach the College World
Series finals again.
That
the
defending
champion
Commodores (50-19) returned is testament
to their dominant pitching and the steady
effort of a veteran group that got every
opponents best shot.
That the Cavaliers (42-23) ended up here is
nothing short of a surprise given all the obstacles they had to overcome along the way.
The best-of-three finals start Monday

night at TD Ameritrade Park


Were proud of what weve done and certainly glad to be here, Vandy coach Tim
Corbin said Sunday.
Virginia knew its young players would
have to develop rapidly for it to make a title
run. Injuries to veterans complicated matters. Outfielder Joe McCarthy had back surgery in January, utility man John LaPrises
season ended after four games because of a
hip injury, and ace Nathan Kirby strained a
back muscle in mid-April.
The Cavaliers were just 18-18 in March
and April, finished 15-15 in Atlantic Coast
Conference play and didnt qualify for the

See CWS, Page 14

So, it was fitting Reno came out top. But,


of course, it didnt come easy. Last years
matchup in the Peninsula Classic was the
same deal. The two teams battled into extra
innings before San Mateo won 1-0 in the
ninth. The White Sox ultimately took the
2014 championship.
Every time we play Lennys squad, its a
good game, Camel said.
The Muckdogs evened the score by claiming the 2015 title though. And their offense
showed no fatigue in its third game of the day,
banging out nine hits with a lot of loud contact.
Reno got to White Sox starting pitcher
Aldo Severson for two runs in the second
inning. Severson issued back-to-back twoout walks, then both runners moved up on a
wild pitch to set the stage for Kyle Messers
two-run single.
In the fourth, the Muckdogs added to their
lead with a three-run rally. Reno loaded the
bases to start the frame by virtue of two singles and a walk. Then Hummel socked an RBI
single to deep right-center. Severson had a
chance to escape when Renos Patrick
Burrows had a blooper glance off the glove of
a diving Kammuller at second. The ball trickled into the outfield, allowing two runs to
score to give the Muckdogs a 5-0 lead.
After San Mateo generated just one hit
through the first four innings an infield
single by Wray the bats erupted for seven

He was like a sleeper, Span said. You


overlooked him because of Verlander. Every
time he would pitch against us, he would
throw seven innings and (allow only) two
runs.
But Span said that Scherzer is even better
three years later.
I havent seen anything like that, not that
dominating, said Span, who has seen four
major league no-hitters during his eight seasons.
He very well could have had two (straight)
no-hitters. Hes nasty. Hes perfected his
craft. He knows what he wants to do. Hes our
horse. Ive never seen any other pitcher work
(as hard) as he does.
Hes working with a purpose. Thats why
hes so confident. Thats why when he strikes
out guys, he has his little, I call it old
Western, walk with his elbows up in the air.
He just has that bulldog mentality. Its hilarious when he gets in the zone and starts circling the mound.
hits over the final three frames.
The White Sox got on the board in the fifth,
opening the inning with four straight singles. Chandler Vieira, Spencer Walling and
Davis loaded the bases with a trio of singles
and Wray cashed in with a two-run knock.
But, after Brennan Carey drew a one-out
walk to reload the bases, Reno reliever Sam
Gamboa escaped further peril by inducing a
double-play grounder to end the inning.
In the sixth, San Mateo tied it up. Dan
Molinari led off the frame with a four-pitch
walk. Kammuller got hit by a pitch. Then
Fitzhugh singled home Molinari. Vieira followed with a pearl of a sacrifice bunt, causing
Reno to walk Walling to load the bases with
one out.
Davis tried to leave Earth on a high fastball, but popped out to third base for the second out of the inning. But Wray picked his
team up with his third hit of the game to tie it.
Reno left-handed started Hunter Pierce took
a no-decision, but pitched brilliantly through
4 1/3 innings of work, setting down 12 of the
first 14 batters he faced. Gamboa earned the
win in relief. Jake Haley notched the save
after entering amid a seventh-inning jam.
San Mateo had two on with one out in the
bottom of the seventh, but Haley entered the
game to face just one batter, coaxing a double-play grounder to end it.
The White Sox topped Reno earlier in the
day to advance to the championship game.
San Mateo won the first clash between the
long-distance rivals behind a six-inning
effort by right-hander Kevin Hahn to earn the
victory.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Giants, Lincecum drilled by Dodgers


By Joe Resnick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES The Los Angeles


Dodgers hammered Tim Lincecum early and
Yusmeiro Petit often on the way to one of
their best offensive displays of the season.
Yasmani Grandal homered twice, Adrian
Gonzalez and Justin Turner also went deep,
and the Dodgers knocked Lincecum out of
the game in the second inning en route to a
10-2 victory over the San Francisco Giants
on Sunday night. It was the earliest exit ever
for two-time Cy Young Award winner in 260
regular-season starts in the big leagues.
I dont think theres really a game plan
with Lincecum. I mean, hes been doing it
for a long time, Grandal said. This was
just one of those days where he had a bad
day, and we just happened to go off on him.
All four homers came against Petit during
a span of 15 batters after the right-hander
relieved Lincecum, and raised the Dodgers
NL-leading total to 91. In Petits 19 previous appearances this season, he had allowed
five home runs in 38 innings.
He doesnt throw it that hard to get it by
you, and today he was just leaving balls up,
Grandal said. He made some mistakes and
we capitalized on them. Ive faced Petit a lot
in the past couple of years, and hes pretty
good. He has that kind of invincible ball
that he throws on the bottom of the zone
and you think its a ball, but it just keeps
getting called a strike.
Lincecum (7-4) retired only four of the 12
batters he faced, including Anderson on a
sacrifice bunt. The four-time All-Star righthander surrendered five runs on seven hits
and was done after 53 pitches.
My fastball location wasnt there,
Lincecum said. They battled me through
some at-bats, and I wasnt finishing them
off with my secondary pitches. Im not finishing hitters off the way I used to, and Im
giving them more chances than need be. I
was leaving curve balls up in the zone and
getting behind in counts.

CLEVELAND Roberto Perez slid home


with the winning run on David Murphys
bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the ninth inning,
and the Cleveland Indians defeated the Tampa
Bay Rays 1-0 on Sunday.
Rays starter Alex Colome retired his first
16 batters, but Cody Anderson kept the
game scoreless in his major league debut for
the Indians.
Murphy hit a 3-1 pitch from reliever Kevin
Jepsen (1-5) to center field. Kevin Kiermaier
made a strong throw home on one bounce, but
catcher Curt Casali couldnt come up with the
ball as Perez slid across the plate for
Clevelands first walk-off win of the season.
Perez led off the ninth with a single. Jason
Kipnis singled to right, extending his hitting streak to 16 games, and Perez advanced
to third.
Perez held at third on Francisco Lindors line
drive to left that was caught by Joey Butler.
Michael Brantley was intentionally walked
before Murphy delivered.

Dodgers 10, Giants 2


Giants
ab
Pagan cf 3
Brodwy p 0
Arias ph-3b 1
Panik 2b
3
Duffy 3b
4
Lopez p 0
Posey 1b 2
McGhe 1b 2
Crwfrd ss 3
Maxwll rf 4
Belt lf
3
Susac c
3
Linccm p 0
Y.Petit p 2
Blanco cf 1
Totals 31

r
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
2

h
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
8

bi
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

Dodgers
Puig rf
Pedrsn cf
JuTrnr 3b

ab
4
4
3
Cllspo ph-3b 1
AGnzlz 1b 4
VnSlyk 1b 1
HKndrc 2b 4
Hrndz ph-2b 1
Guerrr lf
5
Grandl c
5
Rollins ss
4
BAndrs p 1
Coulom p 1
West p
0
Totals

r
2
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
0

h
2
1
2
0
3
0
1
1
0
3
3
0
0
0

bi
2
1
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0

38 10 16 9

San Francisco 001 000 010 2 8 1


Los Angeles 141 220 00x 10 16 0
EBelt (2). DPLos Angeles 2. LOBSan Francisco
5, Los Angeles 9. 2BArias (1), McGehee (5), Maxwell
(5), Susac (4), Pederson (11), K.Hernandez (6), Rollins
(10). HRJu.Turner (9), A.Gonzalez (12), Grandal 2
(10). SB.Anderson 2.
San Francisco
Lincecum L,7-4
Y.Petit
Broadway
Lopez
Los Angeles
B.Anderson W,3-4
Coulombe
West

JAYNE KAMIN-ONCEA/USA TODAY SPORTS

Adrian Gonzalez launches one of the Dodgers four home runs Sunday against the Giants.
I just wasnt doing a good job of executing
my pitches out there, he added. I was actually doing a really poor job. Just about every
hit I gave up, the ball was up in the zone. I
could have pitched a lot better than I did, but
Ill try my best not to let it linger at all.
Matt Cain and Jake Peavy are working
their way back from injuries, which will
leave manager Bruce Bochy with a difficult
decision who might have to go to the
bullpen? That was where Lincecum ended up
in last season when he was struggling.
You just go about your business, and
whoever makes the decision for that to happen, its up to them, Lincecum said. You
cant control that, so youve just got to
worry about what you can control and
thats what you do when you get out there.
Grandal made it 6-1 in the third, leading off
with a drive into the right field pavilion.
Gonzalez and Grandal hit solo shots in the

Tribe wins in Andersons debut


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

13

Monday June 22, 2015

Cody Allen (1-2) pitched


the ninth for the win.
Colome allowed one hit
in seven innings. His bid
for a perfect game was broken up by Michael Bourns
infield single with one out
in the sixth.
Bourn hit a hard
Cody Anderson grounder behind first
base. The ball skipped
off the glove of Jake Elmore, who was playing a couple of steps off the bag, and rolled
to his right. Second baseman Logan
Forsythe picked it up, but his throw to
Colome covering the bag was late.
Anderson held the Rays to six hits in 7 2/3
innings. Called up from Triple-A Columbus
before the game, he struck out four and
walked one.
Kiermaier doubled with one out in the eighth
and went to third on a groundout. Cleveland
manager Terry Francona pulled Anderson, who
was given a standing ovation by the crowd of
20,847 as he walked to the dugout.

fourth, and Turner made it 10-1 in the fifth with


a two-run drive to center field. Grandal increased
his home run total to 10 with his fourth career
multihomer game and second this season.
Brett Anderson (3-4) yielded a run and five
hits in six innings, after going 0-3 with a
3.38 ERA over his previous seven starts.
The Dodgers third victory in 12 meetings
with the Giants this season kept them in
first place in the NL West by 1 1/2 games
over the defending World Series champions.
The Dodgers took the lead in the first when
Turner drew a two-out walk, advanced to third
on a single by Gonzalez and scored on
Lincecums wild pitch to Howie Kendrick.
It looked like Timmy was going to have
an easy first inning with a couple of quick
outs, Bochy said. But that two-out walk
made it turn into a stressful inning, and it
might have played a part in the second one.

As 3, Angels 2
Angels
ab r h bi
Giavtll 2b 4 1 0 0
Calhon rf 3 0 1 0
Trout cf
4 0 2 0
Pujols dh 3 1 1 2
Freese 3b 4 0 1 0
Fthstn pr-3b 0 0 0 0
Aybar ss
4 0 1 0
C.Perez c 4 0 1 0
DnRrts lf 3 0 0 0
Joyce ph 1 0 0 0
AMarte pr 0 0 0 0
ENavrr 1b 4 0 1 0
Totals 34 2 8 2
Angels
As

As
ab r h bi
Burns cf
4 0 1 1
Semien ss 4 0 0 0
Vogt c
3 1 1 0
Zobrist 2b 4 1 1 0
Reddck rf 4 0 1 0
Lawrie 3b 4 0 2 1
I.Davis 1b 3 0 1 1
Canha dh 3 0 0 0
Fuld lf
2 1 1 0

Totals

31 3 8

000 000 020 2 8 0


001 002 00x 3 8 1

EI.Davis (3). DPOakland 2. LOBAngels 8, Oakland 6. 2BLawrie (15), Fuld (9). HRPujols (21).
CSLawrie (1).
Angels
Richards L,7-5
Gott
J.Smith
Athletics
Kazmir W,4-4
Clippard S,12

IP
6
1
1
IP
7.1
1.2

H
8
0
0
H
6
2

R
3
0
0
R
1
1

ER
3
0
0
ER
1
1

BB
2
0
0
BB
3
0

SO
3
0
0
SO
6
3

UmpiresHome, Chris Segal; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Jim Joyce; Third, Greg Gibson.
T2:58. A29,137 (35,067).

IP
1.1
3.2
2
1
IP
6
2
1

H
7
8
0
1
H
5
2
1

R
5
5
0
0
R
1
1
0

ER
5
5
0
0
ER
1
1
0

BB
1
1
1
0
BB
2
1
0

SO
2
1
1
1
SO
1
2
2

WPLincecum.
UmpiresHome, Clint Fagan; First, Jeff Nelson; Second,
Laz Diaz; Third, Chris Guccione.
T3:06. A53,509 (56,000).

Kazmir shuts
down Angels
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND Athletics closer Tyler


Clippard nearly paid a hefty price after lobbying manager Bob Melvin to work the
ninth inning for a second straight day.
Having given up a two-run home run to
slugger Albert Pujols in the eighth that
trimmed Oaklands lead
to one run, Clippard convinced the skipper to
extend his workload then
held his breath when
Johnny Giavotella hit a
deep fly out to the fence
in left field with the
tying run on base.
Clippard was only
Scott Kazmir scheduled to pitch the
eighth after getting the final four outs of
Saturdays 4-1 win.
Melvin changed his mind when Clippard
came off the mound following Pujols home
run and asked to go back out for the ninth.
Scott Kazmir (4-4) gave up one run in 7
1/3 innings before Clippard took over.
The As won the final two games of the
series between the two teams after losing
five of six to their division rivals.
As third baseman Brett Lawrie, who made
a catch while falling into the Oakland
bullpen on Friday night, turned in another
nifty defensive play when he stumbled over
the mound in foul territory to catch Carlos
Perezs pop fly.
Sam Fuld doubled with one out in the As
third and scored on Billy Burns single.
Burns extended his hitting streak to 12
games, matching his career high.
Lawrie and Ike Davis added RBI singles in
the sixth to put the As up 3-0.

14

Monday June 22, 2015

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SWIM

CWS

Continued from page 11

Continued from page 11

championships in Kazan, Russia, later this


summer.
Saturday, Phelps won the 200 butterfly and
met his expectations. He last won a 200 fly
race at the 2012 Olympic trials and declared
he would not return to the event when he came
out of retirement last year.
I was happy to give a good effort, Phelps
said. In my whole career, I never trained
more than a 100 fly. Im doing things in
workouts for the fly that I havent done
before. Its good to have my confidence
back.
Phelps swam his first 200 fly, since earning a silver medal in London, last month in
Charlotte, finishing seventh in 2:00.77.
Still the world record holder in the event,
Phelps seems determined to recapture the
glory of the event that vaulted him into
prominence at the 2000 Olympics.
He won on Saturday in 1:57.62, six seconds slower than his record time in Rome in
2009 but three seconds faster than last
month. It was the time he targeted to continue working out for the event.
I swam in aggressively and its kind of
weird to say but hard work does pay off,
Phelps said. From here I go to Colorado
Springs for three weeks of training to get into
even better shape and get ready for nationals.
Phelps North Baltimore teammate Chase
Kalisz, who won in Charlotte, finished second in 1:58.06.
I finally won a race and I wanted to go 1:57
so I am very pleased with the race, Phelps
said. I was trying to come home and saw
Chases splashes and wanted to do everything
I could not to let him beat me.
Phelps, who turns 30 at the end of the
month, already owns 18 Olympic gold
medals and 22 overall as the most decorated
Olympic swimmer. He has set a record 39
world records, 29 in individual races, and still
owns seven.
Three-time Olympic gold medalist Nathan

10-team league tournament until the last


week of the regular season. They were given
a No. 3 regional seed and had to go to the
West Coast for the start of the NCAA
Tournament.
Senior Kenny Towns said his sense of
accomplishment is greater than in 2014.
What weve been through this year, the
ups and downs of the season, its a little bit more
satisfying, he said, just
because where weve come
from and how weve been
able to have the success
late in the postseason.
Vanderbilt swept three
games in bracket play
and is 8-0 in the national
Carson Fulmer tournament.
The
Commodores
dropped 6 of 8 in April,
but since losing a series
to Florida on May 9 they
havent lost back-toback games.
Bryan Reynolds and
Rhett Wiseman have led the
Commodores offensively
Connor Jones through the postseason,
and a pitching staff featuring first-round draft picks Carson Fulmer and
Walker Buehler has a 1.33 ERA in the CWS and
an opponent batting average of .163.
Fulmer (13-2, 1.95 ERA), who will start
against Virginias Connor Jones (7-2, 3.05
ERA) in Game 1, said the experience last
year has helped during the current run.
I think the biggest thing for anyone who
comes here is to be comfortable, Fulmer
said. With the people in the stands and the
pressure thats on the line, if you want to call
it that, some people arent used to it. Just
staying comfortable and knowing that youre
working with eight other guys, its big.

ANDREW SCHEINER
/DAILY JOURNAL

A b ov e: Michael
Phelps wins the 200meter
butterfly
Saturday at the
Arena Pro Series in
Santa Clara. He went
on to win the 200 individual
medley
Sunday night.
Left: Chase Kalisz
takes second place in
the 200 fly Saturday
after winning the
event earlier this year
in Charlotte, North
Carolina.
Adrian won the 50 free in 21.97.
There were a lot of fast swimmers in that
field, Adrian said. I got something out of it.
There are still things to work on but I am
overall happy with it.

Ryan Murphy had a special motivation for


winning the 100 back.
Its my mothers birthday today, he said.
It was good motivation for me to win it for
her.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Ward triumphs in long-awaited return

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND As soon as Andre


Ward found his stride following
his lengthy layoff, the fight
quickly came to an end.
Ward made a triumphant return to
the ring and delighted his home
crowd when he stopped Englands
Paul Smith in the ninth round
Saturday night in a nontitle fight.
It took some time to get the
ring rust off, Ward said. I started
with the jab. I wanted to come out
big bang and get a first round KO
but I have a great coach and he told
me to take my time and the knockout will come.
Ward (28-0, 15 knockouts) was
fighting for the first time in 19
months because of a protracted
legal dispute with his former promoter, the late Dan Goosen.
He dominated from the start
against the former British champion Smith (35-6), winning every
round on all three judges scorecards. Smiths corner threw in the
white towel to stop the fight in
the ninth round with Smiths face
covered with blood.
I know theres another level I
can be at where Im not thinking
about anything, Ward said.
Theres another level of sharpness and being crisp that I have.
... I felt like I did good tonight but
I know I have better.
Smith spent most of the fight in
defensive mode, trying to block
Wards many punches instead of
throwing many of his own. Smith
did stagger Ward with a big right
hand in the seventh, but Ward
responded with a flurry and Smith
was cut late in the round.

I know what he was trying to


do, Ward said. He was trying to
lure me in then hit me with the big
right hand. He hit me with a couple of good shots but he didnt
hurt me.
Ward landed more big punches in
the eighth as blood started dripping down the left side of Smiths
face. The round ended with a stare
down between the two fighters to
the delight of the partisan crowd
of 9,016.
Another cut opened in the ninth
as Smiths face was covered with
blood before the fight was called
at 1:46 of the round on a technical
knockout after trainer Joe
Gallagher threw in the towel.
Smith was taking unnecessary
punishment, Gallagher said.
Andre kept cutting open that cut
over his eye. Blood was pooling
over his eye. It was a war we didnt
want to continue.
Smith said he thought he broke
his nose on Wards final combination before the fight was stopped.
The towel couldnt have come
soon enough, Smith said.
Ward had not fought since winning a lopsided unanimous decision against Edwin Rodriguez to
defend his WBA super middleweight title in November
2013. The absence from the ring
stemmed from the dispute with
Goosen, who died in September
2014.
The fight was just Wards second
since beating Carl Froch in
December 2011 in the Super Six
super middleweight tournament
final. Ward also dealt with a shoulder injury that forced him to the
sideline before the dispute with
Goosen.

Sound, pumped his fist and yelled,


YEAH!
That gave him a three-shot lead
because Grace hit his tee shot onto
the railroad tracks out-of-bounds
and made double bogey.
And then his lead was gone.
Spieth hit into the fescue-covered
mounds right of the 17th and made
double bogey.
Louis Oosthuizen made one last
birdie his sixth over the last
seven holes for a 67 to post at 4under 276. Johnson, who had a two-

shot lead at the turn until missing so


many putts on the back nine, was
forgotten until he stuffed his tee shot
on the par-3 17th to 4 feet for birdie.
Spieth, a wire-to-wire winner at
Augusta National, showed he can be
clutch with his 3-wood into the
18th. And then came Johnson in
the final group, blasting his tee
shot so far that he only needed a 5iron, and he put that to 12 feet.
Make it and win. Two putts and he
still gets a playoff.
He made par.

Jason Day, who collapsed on


Friday with vertigo only to rally
for a share of the 54-hole lead, fell
back with missed putt and was
never in the hunt on the back
nine. He closed with a 74 to finish
five shots behind.
Grace never recovered from that
double bogey on No. 16 and shot
71 to tie for fourth with Adam Scott
(64) and Cameron Smith (68).
Spieth is the youngest player to
win two majors since Gene
Sarazen in 1922.

By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANDREW COULDRIDGE LIVEPIC/REUTERS

Andre Ward, right, celebrates the victory in his return to the ring after Paul
Smith's team threw in the towel Saturday at Oracle Arena.

GOLF
Continued from page 11
Arnold Palmer went to St. Andrews
for a chance at three in a row.
For all the criticism of the unique
course at Chambers Bay, this was
the theater at its finest.
But there will be lingering questions about the condition of the

greens, so bumpy that they were


referred to as broccoli and Billy
Horschel said he lost respect for the
USGA. This championship ended
with a short miss, the target of
complaints all week.
The final hour was so wild that
four players could have won over
the last two holes.
Tied for the lead with Branden
Grace of South Africa, Spieth
looked like he wrapped this up
with a 25-foot birdie putt on the
16th hole. He turned toward Puget

15
Murray wins
Queens title
Monday June 22, 2015

LONDON Andy Murray


claimed his 34th career title on
Sunday with a 6-3, 6-4 victory
over unseeded South African Kevin
Anderson in the final of the grasscourt Queens Club tournament.
Top-seeded Murray, who was
contesting his
50th
career
final, also won
the event in
2009, 2011 and
2013. He joins
John McEnroe,
Boris Becker,
Andy Roddick
Lleyton
Andy Murray and
Hewitt as a fourtime winner of the event.
It was Murrays third title of the
year, following victories in
Munich and Madrid.
Earlier Sunday, the third-ranked
Murray completed a 6-3, 7-6 (4)
semifinal win over Serbias Viktor
Troicki after rain stopped play
Saturday.
Anderson was playing his 10th
career final and his first on grass.
A win would have given him his
200th career victory.
Murray did not face a break point
throughout
the match
but
Anderson, who had dropped serve
just once during the week, was broken once in each set. The first
break came when Murray led 2-1,
with Anderson netting a smash,
and Murray moved ahead 3-2 in the
second set with a drop shot.
Although Anderson had struck
96 aces during the week, he failed
to produce the same firepower in
the final, and his game lacked any
other weapons to trouble Murray.

16

SPORTS

Monday June 22, 2015

AL GLANCE

East Division

East Division
W
Tampa Bay 40
New York
38
Baltimore
36
Toronto
37
Boston
31
Central Division
W
Kansas City 39
Minnesota 37
Detroit
35
Cleveland
32
Chicago
30
West Division
W
Houston
41
Texas
37
Angels
35
Seattle
32
As
31

WOMENS WORLD CUP

NL GLANCE

L
31
31
33
34
40

Pct
.563
.551
.522
.521
.437

GB

1
3
3
9

L
27
32
34
36
38

Pct
.591
.536
.507
.471
.441

GB

3 1/2
5 1/2
8
10

L
30
33
35
38
41

Pct
.577
.529
.500
.457
.431

GB

3 1/2
5 1/2
8 1/2
10 1/2

Saturdays Games
Baltimore 5, Toronto 3
Chicago Cubs 4, Minnesota 1, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 3, Texas 2
Oakland 4, Angels 1
Kansas City 7, Boston 4
Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 1
N.Y. Yankees 14, Detroit 3
Seattle 6, Houston 3
Sundays Games
Detroit 12, N.Y. Yankees 4
Baltimore 13, Toronto 9
Cleveland 1, Tampa Bay 0
Boston 13, Kansas City 2
Chicago Cubs 8, Minnesota 0
Chicago White Sox 3, Texas 2, 11 innings
Oakland 3, Angels 2
Houston 6, Seattle 2
Mondays Games
Phili (Correia 0-1) at NYY (Pineda 8-3), 4:05 p.m.
Tigers (K.Ryan 1-1) at Tribe (Bauer 6-3), 4:10 p.m.
Jays (Hutchison 6-1) at Rays (Andriese 2-1), 4:10 p.m.
ChiSox (Danks 3-7) at Twins (Milone 3-1), 5:10 p.m.
Astros (Oberholtzer2-1)at Angels(Santiago4-4),7:05p.m.
K.C. (Blanton 1-0) at Ms (Hernandez 10-3), 7:10 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Philadelphia at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Houston at Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.

W
Washington 37
New York
36
Atlanta
35
Miami
30
Philadelphia 24
Central Division
W
St. Louis
45
Pittsburgh 39
Chicago
37
Cincinnati 32
Milwaukee 25
West Division
W
Los Angeles 39
Giants
38
Arizona
34
San Diego 34
Colorado
30

L
33
35
35
41
47

Pct
.529
.507
.500
.423
.338

GB

1 1/2
2
7 1/2
13 1/2

L
24
30
30
36
46

Pct
.652
.565
.552
.471
.352

GB

6
7
12 1/2
21

L
31
33
35
38
39

Pct
.557
.535
.493
.472
.435

GB

1 1/2
4 1/2
6
8 1/2

Saturdays Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Minnesota 1, 10 innings
Washington 6, Pittsburgh 0
Colorado 5, Milwaukee 1
St. Louis 10, Philadelphia 1
Miami 5, Cincinnati 0
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 4
San Francisco 6, L.A. Dodgers 2
San Diego 8, Arizona 1
Sundays Games
Cincinnati 5, Miami 2
Washington 9, Pittsburgh 2
Philadelphia 9, St. Louis 2
Chicago Cubs 8, Minnesota 0
Colorado 10, Milwaukee 4
Arizona 7, San Diego 2
Atlanta 1, N.Y. Mets 0
L.A. Dodgers 10, San Francisco 2
Mondays Games
Phili (Correia 0-1) at NYY (Pineda 8-3), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. (Kershaw 5-4) at Cubs (Wada 1-1), 5:05 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Atlanta at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 5:40 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

SECOND ROUND
Saturday, June 20
At Ottawa, Ontario
Germany 4, Sweden 1
At Edmonton, Alberta
China 1, Cameroon 0
Sunday, June 21
At Moncton, New Brunswick
Brazil 0, Australia 1
At Montreal
France 3, South Korea 0
At Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada vs. Switzerland, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, June 22
At Ottawa, Ontario
Norway vs. England, 5 p.m.
At Edmonton, Alberta
United States vs. Colombia, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 23
At Vancouver, British Columbia
Japan vs. Netherlands, 10 p.m.
QUARTERFINALS
Friday, June 26
At Montreal
Germany-Sweden winner vs. France-South Korea
winner, 4 p.m.
At Ottawa, Ontario
China-Cameroon winner vs. United States-Colombia winner, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, June 27
At Edmonton, Alberta
Brazil-Australia winner vs. Japan-Netherlands winner, 4 p.m.
At Vancouver, British Columbia
Norway-England winner vs. Canada-Switzerland
winner, 7:30 p.m.
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday, June 30
At Montreal
Ottawa winner vs. Montreal winner, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, July 1
At Edmonton, Alberta
Edmonton winner vs. Vancouver winner, 7 p.m.
THIRD PLACE
Saturday, July 4
At Edmonton, Alberta
Semifinal losers, 4 p.m.
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday, July 5
At Vancouver, British Columbia
Semifinal winners, 7 p.m.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Belangers goal lifts Canada


VANCOUVER, British Columbia
Josee Belangers big left foot
propelled Canada right into the
Womens World Cup quarterfinal
on home soil, with her goal in the
52nd minute lifting the tournament hosts past Switzerland 1-0 in
a knockout-round match Sunday.

World Cup
Australia knocks out Brazil
MONCTON, New Brunswick
Substitute Kyah Simon scored in
the 80th minute to lift Australia to
its first Womens World Cup
knockout win, a 1-0 upset of
Brazil and star Marta on a rainy
Sunday afternoon.
Australia moves on to face the
winner of Tuesdays match
between Japan and Netherlands.

Belanger controlled a pass from


Christine Sinclair and struck it
left-footed to finish into the lower
corner of the net past diving Swiss
goalkeeper Gaelle Thalmann.

France downs South Korea

Canada advances to face sixthranked England or No. 11 Norway


in the quarterfinals next Saturday
back here at BC Place.

MONTREAL Marie Laure Delie


scored two goals to help France
beat South Korea 3-0 on Sunday
and advance to the quarterfinals.

SOCCER

Colombia is making its second


World Cup appearance; it finished
in 14th in 2011 in Germany. But
Colombia had never won a match
in the sports premier tournament
until the upset over France.
The United States has won both
its previous meetings with
Colombia, including a 3-0 victory
at the 2012 Olympics.

Continued from page 11


heard following that match at the
London Games.
I believe that theyve not been
able to forget this (the punch),
Rincon said thought a translator.
We have.
The second-ranked Americans
finished on top of the so-called
Group of Death and drew No. 28
Colombia in the round of 16. A victory over Las Cafeteras would move
the U.S. to the quarterfinals against
No. 16 China, which defeated
Cameroon 1-0 on Saturday.
The United States is seeking its
third World Cup title, but first
since 1999.
Colombia was the third-place finisher in Group F behind France and
England. But Las Cafeteras already
pulled off one of the tournaments
biggest upsets with a 2-0 groupstage victory over No. 3 France.

Wambachs last?
Wambach has said this is likely
her final World Cup. At 35, she told
The Associated Press in April that
she might put off retirement until
the 2016 Olympics, but would not
decide until after Canada.
She talked Sunday about enjoying the moment.
This being my last World Cup, I
do want to stop and smell the roses
at certain moments and I think that
was the last group-stage game Ill
ever play, she said. For me,
thats what makes these tournaments so awesome, is that every
continual game, stakes get higher,
the pressure gets steeper.

DATEBOOK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

17

Universals Jurassic World took in $102 million in North American theaters, according to studio estimates Sunday, making it
only the second release to break $100 million in its second week.

Jurassic holds box office,


but Inside Out shows bite
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK In a box-office bout


of Tyrannosaurus-sized proportions,
Jurassic World kept the No. 1 spot
with one of the biggest second weeks
ever, while Pixars Inside Out nearly matched it with a $91 million debut
well above expectations.
Universals Jurassic World took
in $102 million in North American
theaters, according to studio estimates Sunday, making it only the second release to break $100 million in
its second week. The enormous
holdover for Jurassic World, which
last week set an opening weekend
record with $208.8 million, has been
bested by only 2012s The
Avengers, which made $103.1 million in second week.
The unexpected sensation of the
Colin Trevorrow-directed, Steven

Top 10 movies
1.Jurassic World,$102 million ($160.5
million international).
2.Inside Out,$91 million ($41 million
international).
3.Spy, $10.5 million.
4.San Andreas, $8.2 million.
5.Dope, $6 million.
6.Insidious Chapter 3, $4.1 million.
7.Pitch Perfect 2, $3.3 million.
8.Mad Max: Fury Road, $2.8 million.
9. Avengers: Age of Ultron, $2.7
million.
10.Tomorrowland, $2 million.
Spielberg-produced fourth entry in
the franchise had turned Disneys
$175 million 3-D Inside Out into an
underdog expected to merely nip at
the heels of Jurassic World. But the
emotional Inside Out, about the
voices in the head of an 11-year-old

girl, blew past its own forecasts to set


records, too.
Inside Out was the first Pixar
release not to open in first place, following an unparalleled two-decade
streak of 14 straight no. 1s. But its
the largest opening for a wholly
original movie (one not based on
source material or a sequel), unseating Avatar in that distinction.
Directed by Pete Docter (Up) and
co-directed by Ronaldo del Carmen,
Inside Out had been expected to
open in the range of previous Pixar
non-sequels like Wall-E ($63. 8
million opening) and Brave ($66.3
million).
But Inside Out was propelled by
gushing reviews from critics, a flashy
premiere at the Cannes Film Festival
and an appetite for a movie from
Pixar. The animation studio hadnt
had a release in two years after delaying The Good Dinosaur last year.

ve fielded this question (or one very similar)


many times: Ive been thinking about adopting a
dog who will get along with cats, since I have
one at home. When I visit your adoption center in person to see the dogs, can someone tell me which dogs
are cat-compatible? The short answer is maybe. We
share everything we know about our animals with
potential adopters. Some dogs come to us as ownersurrenders and we have the chance to ask their owners
about key issues like housetraining, overall health,
likes and dislikes, fears, compatibility with cats and
small children. When dogs arrive as strays, we dont
have this ability. We can pass along breed generalizations (e.g. the herding breed will probably knock
down your toddler!) and specific observations weve
made since the dog came into our care. We can test for
some things rather easily. For example, we can learn
in a few minutes whether a dog walks well on leash or
is comfortable being handled by a stranger. But, as
you might imagine, testing for cat compatibility isnt
easy in a shelter environment. While this kind of
test might make great viewing for a live cam, we do
our best not to have the fur fly in our center. That said,
if someone visits and falls for a particular dog, we can
get a sense of cat compatibility by exposing that dog
to cats. By exposing, we mean a quick, controlled
walk (on leash) by one of our cat condos. This wont
tell us everything we need to know, but it will tell us
something. And, if the potential adopter is interested
in a young dog who may never have met a cat, we
believe we can, in many cases, give them tools to
arrange for a smooth getting to know you process at
home. This includes understanding the difference
between normal and problematic signs.
Scott ov ersees PHS/SPCAs Customer Serv ice, Behav ior
and Training, Education, Outreach, Field Serv ices,
Humane Inv estigation, Volunteer, and Media/PR program
areas and staff.

18

LOCAL

Monday June 22, 2015

TAX
Continued from page 1
growth in coming years.
Officials had previously discussed pursuing a bond which would tax residents $19
per every $100,000 of assessed home value,
but polling data showed targeting such an
amount may garner only roughly 56 percent
support from voters, which would jeopardize the chances the bond might pass.
School districts need 55 percent support
from voters to pass bond measures, and the
local jurisdiction would substantially
increase its odds of success by reducing the
rate of tax asked from voters, according to
polling data.
Support for a $14 dollar tax of every
$100,000 of assessed home value would
likely jump by about 9 percent, to roughly
63 percent of potential voters in the coming November election, pushing the bond
well passed the necessary threshold, according to Godbes report.
Further convoluting the issue for the district is the city of San Mateos interest in

PROJECT
Continued from page 1
This is just going to be tremendously
exciting for us, Slichta said.
The project is roughly one block away
from The Trousdale, a 132-bed facility
developed by the Peninsula Health Care
District, which recently broke ground and
will also serve Alzheimers disease and
memory loss patients.
Slichta said he believes the proximity of
the two facilities, combined with the presence of the medical center nearby, will aid in
developing an environment which will best
serve patients.
I believe that having a competitor down
the street will only make us better, he said.

potentially asking residents to support a


sales tax increase during the next election,
which when presented during polling interviews, decreased the willingness of some
voters to support a bond measure for
schools.
There is some sensitivity surrounding
the number of revenue measures on the ballot, Godbe wrote in his report.
Despite the variety of hurdles the district
must clear in pursuit of the bond, officials
remained optimistic regarding the results of
the poll.
This was very heartening to see the numbers were so high, said Trustee Colleen
Sullivan.
Pursuing a $148 million bond which
would be used to update and add new classrooms, replace aging portable facilities,
build equivalent gyms and multipurpose
rooms that could house classrooms and
acquire, repair or construct classrooms,
sites or facilities would gather 63 percent
support from voters in a fall election, during which time the city of San Mateo pursues its own half-cent sales tax, according
to polling data.
Support for a bond with the same definition, but not competing against another
Burlingame
Councilman
Michael
Brownrigg said city officials are looking
forward to the facility opening its doors,
and officially closing the book on the period of uncertainty whether the project would
ever to be able to get off the ground.
Were very excited about it, he said.
Were excited for the patients sake, excited for Sunrises sake and excited for the
city.
Brownrigg was mayor when the project
stalled, and recalled interactions with residents who at the time were concerned with
the eyesore the site had become when construction stopped.
He credited the company for its commitment to seeing the project through, and said
both parties can look forward to working
together toward serving an aging population.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
revenue measure on the same ballot, causes
support to jump by about 5 percent, according to the polling data.
As you consider this, what also happens
on the ballot is consequential, said Godbe.
Godbe, who has extensive experience in
coordinating polling efforts for tax measures throughout the Bay Area, said indications for the current San Mateo-Foster City
Elementary School District bond are more
optimistic than they were during the previous bond effort, which failed in 2013.
We would recommend you would continue moving forward with this process, he
said.
The board will now begin considering
whether to pursue a tax measure that will aid
officials in accommodating the constant
stream of students flowing into the district,
as roughly 250 more students are projected
to enroll next year, which could grow to as
many as 600 students by 2019. There are
currently about 11,800 students currently
We as a city pushed real hard on the owners of Sunrise to get their financial act
together and they did and Im glad they did,
he said.
The projects location near other care
facilities is ideal as well, said Brownrigg.
We lean into the notion that is a cutting
edge area for senior health, he said. This
is a very exciting vision.
Mayor Terry Nagel echoed those sentiments, and said the project would go toward
serving a generation of local residents who
may soon require care for memory loss.
We really need to look to the future to
serve an aging population, she said.
Slichta said he appreciated the willingness of city officials to stay committed to
getting the project built, even through the
years when the future of the facility was in
question.

enrolled in the district.


Should the board approve putting a bond
on the fall ballot by the August deadline,
despite the optimistic polling results,
Godbe encouraged the district to engage in
an enthusiastic campaign to rally and maintain support for the tax, which could
enhance the chances of overcoming any
hurdles associated with getting the revenue
measure approved.
This is not a slam dunk by any stretch of
the imagination, he said.
In other business, a variety of local elected officials, including state. Sen Jerry Hill,
D-San Mateo, county Superintendent Anne
Campbell, Foster City Mayor Art Kiesel,
San Mateo Councilman Rick Bonilla spoke
at the meeting to honor district
Superintendent Cynthia Simms, who is
retiring at the end of the month.
Simms is leaving her post at the top of
the district after four years, and will be
replaced by Joan Rosas, who worked previously at the county Office of Education. The
first day of work for Rosas will be July 1.

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Slichta said he can recall when only a
shell of the project had been built, and now
has trouble believing how far the facility
has progressed in a relatively short amount
of time.
But as the residence is on the precipice of
being able to open its doors, Slichta said
the company and community are aligned in
their anticipation of serving patients.
Its the start of a new chapter, and were
really glad it can begin in Burlingame, he
said.
The Sunrise Senior Living, 1818
Trousdale Drive, will celebrate a ribbon cutting Thursday, June 25. The event begins at
5:30 p.m.

austin@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Advertisement

Exhibitor space and sponsorships available!


Call 650-344-5200

Can Marriage Exist Between

Science And Religion?


By Paul Larson

July 18, 10am - 4pm


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MILLBRAE

Some
say
that
science and religion
dont mix. Some
say that science is
the ultimate search
for God. Some say
religion supersedes
science, some say both have equal stature
and others say both are hogwash. Everyone
has their own personal assessment of the
correlation between science and religion.
The aspiration of religion along with the
aspiration of science is to explain the
universe and answer questions about life, in
addition to satisfying human psychological
needs when dealing with the realities of
death. Religion is based on faith, science is
based on observation, and both are based on
human curiosity and the need to find
answers. Whether a person is repetitively
reading religious scripture, or fascinated by
repeatable scientific experimentations, both
are searching for methods that answer
questions about the universe around us.
It can be debated that early humans
turned to religion as a way to alleviate their
fears and gain reassurance with the concept
of life after death. This helped to give them
a sense of order in a confusing world that
often seemed mysterious.
Eventually
scientific realization evolved along side
religion and the process of trial and error
established itself as a way to solve some of
these mysteries. Firethe wheelfarming.
The more humans observed the world they
lived in, the more they leaned how the
natural world worked and how they could
manipulate it to their advantage. Over the
centuries religious power came at odds with
scientific discovery, which led to a period of

scientific stagnation: The Dark Ages.


Later at the dawn of The Renaissance
science was again embraced leading to great
advances in art, architecture, medicine,
astronomy and other natural sciences. Over
the ages science and religion have been
evolving together on a roller coaster ride of
acceptance, denial and equilibrium.
We now appear to be at a crossroads
where religion is not only viewing science
with an evaluative broadmindedness, but is
exploring hand in hand with scientific
processes.
One prime example is the
Vaticans
Pontifical
Academy
of
Sciences. Quoting John Paul II: ...today
eminent scientists are members a visible
sign of the profound harmony that can
exist between the truths of science and the
truths of faith.... Gregor Mendel, the father
of Genetics, was an Augustinian Friar.
Georges Lemaitre, who developed much of
the Big Bang Theory, was a Belgian priest.
Recently, Pope Francis, who has a Masters
Degree in Chemistry, insisted that there is
no reason to believe that science and God
are incompatible.
With all this in mind, every human being
is unique as a fingerprint, and every human
brain has its own unique consciousness.
Whether you analyze with your religious cap
or your science cap, matrimony between the
two could be found by looking inward. So,
close your eyes, examine your deep
thoughts, and you may detect a rational
enlightenment finely attuned to both.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make preplanning arrangements please feel free to
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in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:

www.chapelofthehighlands.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

19

TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL

Author Jane Smiley read excerpts from her new book, Some
Luck,at the Belmont Public Library on June 14.The first in a trilogy,
it tells the story of an Iowa family over a 100 year period. Smiley
received a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1992 for her best-selling
book A Thousand Acres. Here, Ms. Smiley, left, completes
autographing several books for a very pleased Jean Mueller.

eth and Caro l y n


Fri eberts haus er,
of Redwood City,
gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia
Hospital
in
Redwood City June 4,
2015.
***
Mural i Vi s wanathan
and Is hani Baruah, of
Menlo Park, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City June 6, 2015.
***
Jas o n Barry and Darmendra Si ng h de Barry , of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City June 7, 2015.
***
B e n j ami n Lauf f e r an d Ni c o l e Mo n t e, of San
Francisco, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City June 7, 2015.
***
Kri s ten and Amy Efl and, of Redwood City, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City June 8,
2015.
***
Al fredo and Brenda Ro s i l l o , of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
June 8, 2015.
***
Nabi l Nas s ery and Kri s ti na Sto l l Nas s ery , of
Hayward, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City June 11, 2015.
***
Do ug l as Mi taro to nda and Rachel Rei chenbach,
of Burlingame, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City June 11, 2015.
***
Mi chael and Jacl y n Mari nel l o , of San Mateo, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
June 13, 2015.
***
Jo s e Marti nez and Dai ra Rami rez, of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City June 13, 2015.
***
Dav i d and Meredi th No e, of Menlo Park, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City June 15,
2015.
Have
some
good
news?
goodnews@smdailyjournal.com.

Contact

us

at

KENNETH SEIBERT

Members of the EL CAMINO REELERS demonstrate their fun at the Third Annual San Mateo County Pride Celebration on
June 13 in San Mateo Central Park. The group, which meets on Wednesdays in Palo Alto, is a modern Western Square Dance
club, formed by lesbians and gay men in order to meet people, have fun and learn to square dance. For information email
information@reelers.org or visit www.reelers.org.

TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL

The San Mateo Adult School held its annual High School and
GED Graduation at the College of San Mateo on June 17. From
left, Maria Del Carmen Velasquez, Carmen Rivera and Darlyng
Lopez celebrate receiving their high school diplomas. Rivera
was a recipient of the Burlingame Bodies of an Ancient and
Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry Scholarship and Lopez
was awarded a Lynda Mathe Memorial Scholarship.

ALEXANDER KALLIS/DAILY JOURNAL

Students from Eastside College Preparatory School in East


Palo Alto met with Author David McCullough on June 16 at
the Fox Theatre in Redwood City just before McCullough
spoke about his newest book,The Wright Brothers.The event
was hosted by Peninsula Arts and Letters in partnership with
Keplers Books of Menlo Park. Pictured are, from left, Darius
Riley, Nohely Peraza, David McCullough and Julitza Manriquez.

Store Closing
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The 2015 San Mateo County Leadership Program held its


graduation on June 16 in the San Mateo City Council
Chambers, recognizing 30 participants from the communities
of San Mateo, Foster City, Burlingame and Hillsborough. The
Leadership Program identifies and nurtures existing and
potential community leaders, increasing their knowledge of
the community and community issues while enhancing their
individual effectiveness through exposure to leadership
characteristics. Among those participating in the ceremony
were Shirley Ferer, left, and 2015 Program Director Susan
Barnes.

20

DATEBOOK

Monday June 22, 2015

BILL
Continued from page 1
visions dont apply to used car dealers
or rental companies. Extending this
type of law to used car dealers grew stagnant in Congress so Gordon, D-Menlo
Park, said he sought for California to
set an example.
Assembly Bill 287 would have
required used car dealers and rental companies to, at minimum, disclose
whether a recall has been issued before
passing a vehicle on to a consumer. But
his proposal concerned consumer advocacy groups that felt the new law would
impede existing implied protections
under which victims of defective cars
have been able to file personal injury
lawsuits.
With the recent Takata air bag recall
impacting millions of vehicles and
officials questioning if there are enough
replacement parts available, Gordon
said he now seeks to work with opposing groups to find a more comprehensive solution to getting unsafe cars off
the road.
There were some pretty dramatic
shifts in the recall landscape. In May,
under the revised Takata air bag recall,
17 million cars were recalled in one day.
Were now at a point where nearly 25
percent of all cars in America are under a
recall, Gordon said. It seems to me, if
I truly want to protect consumers, and
thats my goal, then I needed a pause to
take some time to figure out in this new
landscape, what do we need to do if we
cant get cars fixed quickly? Its one
thing if you notify people and the car
can get repaired, but what if there arent
enough parts? So by delaying the
vote until next year, it gives me several
months to really try to work with the
manufacturers, the dealers, the consumer groups, to see if we can draft
something that provides even greater
protection.

NURSERY
Continued from page 1
Thanks for the warmth. Seriously,
when people come in and [say] its so
sad to see you go, thank you for that.
Because it shows you care. And were
trying to put a good spin on it
theyve earned their retirement and I
feel like Ive earned by semi-retirement, he said.
Ray Tyler said his passion for greenery and design will be well nurtured as
he plans to continue his landscape
architect business while having more
time to spend with his own family.
I enjoy being one on one with people and being creative in their gardens, Ray Tyler said. Its just so fun
to see someone come in wanting a spe-

Gordons bill passed 76-0 on the


Assembly floor but it will now wait in
the
Senates
Transportation
Committee. The bill would require dealers who are affiliated with a particular
make to fix recalls before selling a used
car while others must at least notify a
buyer or renter. For example, if a Ford
dealer is selling a used Mustang with a
recall, it must have it fixed prior to
sale.
Rosemary Shahan, president of
Consumers for Auto Reliability and
Safety, breathed a sigh of relief to hear
Gordons bill could be tabled as her
organization lobbied against it.
Shahan argues the bill would have
given dealers and rental companies
carte blanche to put defective cars on
the road so long as they disclose recalls
to consumers. Currently, many victims
of accidents stemming from recalled
vehicles are able to sue by claiming a
seller or renter was negligent. However,
if AB 287 were in effect, it could override consumers implied protections,
Shahan said.
Yet according to Gordons office and
the current language of the proposed
bill, AB 287 would not place consumers in a less advantageous legal
position or affect their legal rights,
claims or remedies otherwise available
under law.
Shahan said civil litigation attorneys
disagree and she ultimately fears the
bill wouldnt result in more recalled
vehicles being fixed. Plus, although an
individual may consent to driving a
faulty car, it impacts the general public.
Even if someone knows what
theyre getting into, a lot of these
defects potentially affect other people
too like passengers or others on the
road. For example, with the [General
Motors] ignition switch, you could
lose power steering and a lot of those
cars changed lanes abruptly, Shahan
said. As just a matter of public policy,
we want to get those cars fixed for
everybodys safety.
Gordon sympathized with his oppo-

nents and ultimately, believes there


needs to be significant changes with
how recalls are noticed, processed and
fixed.
The pushback from the consumer
groups was they felt my bill didnt go
far enough, they felt simple notification wasnt enough. At the end of the
day, I agree with them, we want these
cars repaired and safe on the road,
Gordon said.
But with last year marking an all-time
high with 64 million recalls issued,
Gordon said he needs everyone on board
with improving consumer protection
and automotive safety.
One thing for sure is that I need the
manufacturers to step up and work with
me to figure out how do we get these
cars repaired and how do we speed up
that process. It may be that we also
have to think of recalls in certain categories, currently theres only one standard and its a federal standard for [Stop
Sale, Stop Drive]. But very few cars fall
into that category, Gordon said.
Gordon and Shahan agreed the Stop
Sale, Stop Drive notice is rare; even
GMs notoriously faulty ignition
switches didnt fall under that category.
Shahan said while her organization is
always open to discussions, she doesnt
see it supporting any legislation that
doesnt require recalled vehicles be
fixed before being sold or rented.
Ultimately, a nationwide law is ideal,
she added.
Gordon agreed a federal standard is
preferable, but believes his legislation
in California could help progress
broader standards that support consumer protection.
One of the other things that the consumer groups said to me was that we
need federal standards and we really
ought to have the federal government
pass a law, Gordon said. Well I happen to also agree with that statement.
But theyve not been able to move any
legislation on this issue through
Congress and Im not convinced its
worth the public safety to wait.

cific thing then take that and exceed it


then get them up and passionate and
loving it as well. Keeping it fun. Quite
often Ill wake up in the middle of the
night and go oh yeah! I could have
done this and that and the other. I try
to put my heart and soul into each one
as I go.
Educating customers is an inherent
part of the business, particularly as the
Tyler family has a wealth of institutional knowledge having now experienced three periods of drought.
During the 1990s drought, Bob Tyler
said he was able to reduce the nurserys
consumption from 200 units of water
down to 4 units by spraying a polymer
sealant to retain moisture on his stock.
You pick up little tricks along the
way, now in our third round of going
through this, Ray Tyler said, adding
residents dont need to abandon their
plants, but pull it back just enough to

keep things alive. Going from pristine mode to self-sustain mode, thats
how I label it for some of my customers.
Reminiscing about former days, Bob
Tyler noted how there used to be dozens
of nurseries around the Bay Area. But as
time passed and land was sold, eventually there were fewer and fewer competitors. Like a quaint Japanese garden
in the middle of a neighborhood shopping center, the multi-level nursery is
offering numerous sales and the Tyler
family encourages people to come visit
and say goodbye.
The customers, theyve become
friends, Mary Tyler said. All these
years, we feel like theyre part of the
family.
Visit the carlmontnursery.com for
more information about the Ty ler family and the Carlmont Nursery.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
MONDAY, JUNE 22
Crafts with the A Team. 2 p.m. Oak
Room, San Mateo Public Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Join us for
Crafts with the A Team and make
mosaic CD picture frames. Sign up is
required. For kids going into fifththrough eight-grade. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
DJ Workshop. 4 p.m. Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Teen Program: learn
how to drop some beats with real
DJs! For more information email
John Piche at piche@plsinfo.org.
Introduction to Prostate Health.
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. New Leaf
Community Market, 150 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. Join us for an
introductory class with health practitioner Samantha Corsiglia, founder
of EarthDancer Wellness, for a talk
about prostate health and preventative approaches including exercise, lifestyle and eating, healthy
function, stress and self care. Free.
For more information email
patti@bondmarcom.com or go to
www.newleafhalfmoonbay.eventbri
te.com.
TUESDAY, JUNE 23
Veronik a
Gold
Integral
Counseling and Psychotherapy
presents EMDR No-Fee Study
Group. 9 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Veronika
Gold Integral Counseling and
Psychotherapy, 530 Oak Grove Ave.,
Unit 104, Menlo Park. Free. For more
information
go
to
http://www.veronikagold.com or
call 422-2418.
Puppet Art Theater Co. First showing at 5 p.m., second showing at 7
p.m. Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose
Road,
Burlingame.
Performing Tommys Train Trouble.
For more information email John
Piche at piche@plsinfo.org.
The Mark and Dre Show. 6:30 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Experience the
comedy, stunts, juggling and music
of The Mark and Dre Show. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Millbrae Library Musical Open
House. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Burlingame.
Music by The Sun Kings, the premier
Beatles tribute band. Activities for
children and light refreshments.
Free. For more information call 6977607.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24
Computer Coach. 10:30 a.m. to
noon. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Drop into this relaxed and welcoming tutoring session with all your
technical questions for one on one
help. Free. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Meet new
business connections. Join the
SMPA for lunch and networking.
Free admission, but lunch is $17. For
more information call 430-6500.
Music in the Park. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Stafford Park, Redwood City.
Jane Austen Moviefest: Pride and
Prejudice. 6:30 p.m. Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Raffle prizes must be
present to win. Free. For more information email piche@plsinfo.org.
Lifetree Cafe: How to Spot a Liar.
6:30 p.m. Bethany Lutheran Church,
1095 Cloud Ave., Menlo Park. An
hour-long conversation exploring
practical ways to tell if someone is
telling the truth. Complimentary
refreshments. For more information
visit facebook.com/LTCMenloPark
or call 854-5897.
Needles and Hooks Knitting and
Crocheting Club. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For
more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
THURSDAY, JUNE 25
Health screening for seniors 60
and older. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. East Palo
Alto Senior Center, East Palo Alto.
12-hour fast required: water and
medicines only but delay diabetes
medicines until after screening
when ready to eat. Health screenings include complete cholesterol
profile, blood pressure, blood glucose, BMI and consultation with a
nurse or dietician. To register call
696-3660.
Passion to Profit Business
Conference. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sobrato
Center for Nonprofits, 350 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City.
Register
online
at
www.phase2careers.org.
Lifetree Cafe: How to Spot a Liar.
9:15 a.m. Bethany Lutheran Church,
1095 Cloud Ave., Menlo Park. An
hour-long conversation exploring
practical ways to tell if someone is
telling the truth. Complimentary

refreshments. For more information


visit facebook.com/LTCMenloPark or
call 854-5897.
Public Open House Day Tour. 9:30
a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to
12:30
p.m.
The
Shoreway
Environmental
Center,
333
Shoreway Road, San Carlos. The tours
include visiting the Transfer Station,
outdoor education area, rainwater
harvest tank and solar panel display,
a state-of-art Materials Recovery
Facility (MRF), the Environmental
Education Center and more. Free. For
more information or to reserve a
spot on the tour call 802-3506.
San Mateo Asian Seniors Club
(Age 50 and up). 10:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Martin Luther King Center, 725
Monte Diablo Ave., San Mateo.
Activities include lectures. exercise
classes, bingo, mahjong, craft classes,
casino trips, special event lunches,
etc. $20 annual membership. For
more information call 349-8534.
Memoir Writing Classes. 1 p.m.
Deborahs Palm, Palo Alto. $50 for
four classes, $15 drop-in fee. Taught
by Phyllis Butler. For more information call 326-0723.
Make a
Rice Bowl
with
Peopleologie. 2 p.m. Oak Room, San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Learn all about rice
and make a rice bowl with
Peopleologie. Sign up required.
Ages 6 and up. Free. For more information call 522-7838.
Film Screening and Panel on
College Costs. 5 p.m. 1700 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Parents,
students, teachers and counselors
are
encouraged
to
attend.
Reception/priority seating/silent
auction begins at 5 p.m. ($12).
General seating begins at 5:45 p.m.
Free general admission. For more
information go to www.marblearch.us/events or email hello@campanile.us.
San Mateo Central Park Music
Series. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Central Park,
San Mateo. Come to listen to music,
eat, drink and have fun. Band: Native
Elements.
Mission Hospice and Home Care
Film Series. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
1670 S. Amphlett Blvd., Ste. 300 San
Mateo. A 26 minute film: Facing
Death ... with Open Eyes, an exploration of beliefs, fears and desires
about death. The film will be followed by a discussion. For more
information email sbarber@missionhospice.org.
Pride and Prejudice Book
Discussion. 7 p.m. Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Whether you have just
read the book for the first time or
you read it years ago, come to these
discussion of one of the most
beloved romances of all time. Free.
For more information email
piche@plsinfo.org.
Movies on the Square: Fast and
Furious 6. 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City.
FRIDAY, JUNE 26
Health screening for seniors 60
and older. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, San Bruno. 12hour fast required: water and medicines only but delay diabetes medicines until after screening when
ready to eat. Health screenings
include complete cholesterol profile,
blood pressure, blood glucose, BMI
and consultation with a nurse or
dietician. To register call 696-3660.
Blood Drive and Bone Marrow
Registry in honor of Bella Hung. 2
p.m. to 7 p.m. Surf Spot, 4627
Highway 1, Pacifica. Each donor will
receive a free San Francisco Giants Tshirt. To register go to www.bloodheroes.com, select Donate and enter
sponsor code BELLA. For more
information call (415) 793-9261.
Music on the Square: Mustache
Harbor. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free.
Reel Great Films Billy Elliot. 7
p.m. to 10 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. The
film is set in the fictional mining
town of Everington Village during a
miners strike, and centers on the
character of 11-year-old Billy Elliot,
his love of dance and his hopes of
becoming a professional ballet
dancer. Free. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
SATURDAY, JUNE 27
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast.
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. $8 per person, $5
for each child under 10. There will be
an omelet bar, pancakes, bacon,
French toast, juice, coffee and tea.
Bring your family and support our
veterans.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT

Monday June 22, 2015

21

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

ACROSS
1 Utmost degree
4 Immense
8 Rain slicker
11 Europe-Asia range
13 1939 Lugosi role
14 Snort of disgust
15 Writer Morrison
16 Trivial matter
18 Aussie city
20 Close
21 Pipe tting
22 Colorful carp
24 Dingbat
27 Malfunction
30 Unlucky time
31 Experience
32 Zigs opposite
34 Taro dish
35 Helm position
36 Fire the pottery
37 Pack animals
39 Sheiks bevy
40 Herd animal
41 Dye container

GET FUZZY

42
45
49
53
54
55
56
57
58
59

Horn sound
Father of Horus
Stay-at-home mom
Flake
Cries of surprise
Heavy-metal band
Web locale
Muddy track
Lively party
Scientic principle

DOWN
1 Bolt holders
2 Besieged city of old
3 Poker holding
4 Upholstery choice
5 Way back when
6 Family member
7 Numerical prex
8 Think over
9 Water, in Baja
10 Moonstruck star
12 White sale buys
17 Fit of pique
19 Famous cathedral town

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
31
33
35
36
38
39
41
42
43
44
46
47
48
50
51
52

Swiss artist
Olive yield
Touch of frost
Goddess statue
Diamond or Armstrong
The Bee
Ivan or Nicholas
Ocean sh
Blemish
Precious stone
I love (Lat.)
Hand-dyes with wax
Circus routines
Owns
Guarantee
Explorer Heyerdahl
Waikikis island
Give the boot to
Churn up
Modicum
Falsify data
Marvy!
Nippers co.
TV spots

6-22-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS

MONDAY, JUNE 22, 2015


CANCER (June 21-July 22) Reduce, recycle and
relax. If you deal with clutter, you will nd it easier to
move forward. Help your community by donating things
you are no longer using to someone in need.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Take advantage of any
chance you get to join a cultural, music, theater or
arts group. You will feel inspired, leading to new
friendships and alliances.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Review your plans for
the future. Make any changes necessary to get you
closer to your goals. Learn new skills, practice positive
thinking and move forward with optimism.

KenKen is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. 2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

WEEKENDS PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the


numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Not everyone will be


honest with you. Keep your plans a secret until you
have every detail in place. Exercise caution when
traveling or doing physically challenging activities.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You will stand head and
shoulders above any competition. Your leadership skills
will bring greater recognition and respect. Someone
you encounter along the way will offer helpful advice.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Pay no attention
to critics or complainers. If you know in your heart
that something is right, continue. You have the unique
perspective needed to achieve your goals.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You are ready for
a change, and a new partnership will prove to be
interesting and prosperous. Joining an organization

6-22-15
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

will give you a novel outlook. Love is in the stars.


AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Dont neglect your
health. Minor ailments will escalate if theyre not
dealt with in a timely manner. Gradually increase the
amount of exercise you are getting. Taking shortcuts
will result in injury.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Although you can
charm your friends and neighbors, your family
members will be immune to your charisma. Be
responsible when it comes to household chores if you
want to avoid conict.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Check out job
opportunities. Aim for a position that offers a
challenge, and hone the skills required to reach your
goal. Higher income is in the stars, and personal

success is apparent.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Make plans to have
fun with someone who makes you feel good. Travel to
a local ea market or garage sale. Children will add
some humor and levity to your day.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Deception is apparent.
You can safeguard your reputation if you watch
your back and work diligently to live up to your
responsibilities. Someone will try to discredit you.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

22

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015


110 Employment

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment
AEGIS LIVING is one of the country's
leaders in senior living, specializing in
Assisted Living and Dementia.
We have open positions for: Care Giver,
Host/Server, Maintenance Asst./Driver &
Housekeeper.
Please visit Aegis of San Francisco to fill
out an application at 2280 Gellert Blvd,
South San Francisco, CA, Phone (650)
952-6100.

AUTO MECHANIC
WANTED
Experience needed
Busy San Mateo shop.
(650)342-6342

FREE

CAREGIVER -

Assisted Living positions. 1733 California Dr., Burl. 650-692-0600.

CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

CAREGIVER
TRAINING

Employment Opportunity for


Successful Candidates
Call for Appointment for
Next Infomation Session

650-458-2200
www.homebridgeca.org

110 Employment

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service
Presser
Are you..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good communication skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?

110 Employment
GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Carpet Cleaner
$13 - $15 per hour starting
20 - 40 hours per week
Call (650)773-4117
NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED

HOME CARE AIDES


Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

Please call for an


Appointment: 650-342-6978

DRIVER AND
WAREHOUSE
PERSONS

110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

NOW HIRING

Apply in person
Westborough Royale,
89 Westborough Blvd, South SF

Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.


and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.
Pay dependent on route size.
Apply in person 800 S. Claremont
Street #210 in San Mateo

WW1

$12.,

JOHN GRISHAM H.B. books 3 @ $3


each. Call 650-341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595
TAMI HOAG H.B. books. 6 @ $3 each.
650-341-1861

294 Baby Stuff

296 Appliances
BROTHER SEWING machine XL-5600
Buttonholer, 45 stitch functions.NEW IN
BOX. $80. 650-878-9511
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

210 Lost & Found


FOUND-LARGE SIZED Diamond Ring in
San Carlos Bank Parking Lot on 5/21.
(650)888-2662.
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301

CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One


pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.
MAYTAG STOVE, 4 burner, gas, 30
wide, $300. (650)344-9783

PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like


new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RANGE HOOD - 36 Stainless Steal.
Good Condition. $55. (650) 222-4109.
WHIRLPOOL REAR tub assembly for a
front
loading
washing
machine,
$200/obo. (650)591-2227

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,


clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

WHIRLPOOL shock absorber for front


loading washing machine, $30/obo.
(650)591-2227

LOST - Womans diamond ring. Lost


12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

2 KIDS Bikes for $60. 310-889-4850.


Text Only. Will send pictures upon request.

LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardis market


(Reward) (415)559-7291

Early mornings, six days per week,


Monday through Saturday

BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

295 Art

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,


she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

San Mateo Daily Journal


Newspaper Routes

16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent


condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502

BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012

DRIVERS
WANTED

Books

TRAVEL PORTABLE baby chair, Chicco with hook-on padded sides, hippo
grips. perfect. $35 - 650-878-9511

HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED


$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

Assisted living facility in SSF.


Days Thurs - Monday 10:30AM - 7:00PM.

LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver


necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

STROLLER W/tray, infant carseat, base,


GRACO pastel green, never used, perfect $65 . 650-878-9511

7AM TO 3:45 PM PAY STARTS


FROM $11.00 TO $18.00 DOE
ABLE TO LIFT 50 LBS,
CLASS "C" LICENSE.
MUST BRING CLEAN DMV
PRINTOUT RECORD FOR THE
PAST 5 YEARS AND NO DUI
ON RECORD. (650)409-6280

Ofce Assistant
Receptionist

210 Lost & Found


LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chilis in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061

297 Bicycles

AB CIRCLE machine. $55. 310-8894850. Text Only. Will send pictures upon
request.
BICYCLE DIAMONDBACK Cobra, 6speed, 20-inch, excellent condition, barely ridden. $80 obo (650)345-1347
BRIDGESTONE MOUNTAIN Bike. $95.
27" tires. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

297 Bicycles

298 Collectibles

298 Collectibles

LANDRIDER
AUTO-SHIFT.
Never
Used. Paid $320. Asking $75.(650)4588280

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters


uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858

TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave


Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

298 Collectibles

MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper


Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for


all 3 (650) 692-3260

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple


antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass


Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four


rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta


graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

23

299 Computers
DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

300 Toys
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142
5 RARE purple card Star Wars figures
mint unopened. $75. Steve, 650-5186614.

868 Cowan Road - Burlingame, CA

NOW HIRING!
DRIVERS - CLASS A and B
DRIVER HELPER
COOK - HALAL & ARABIC FOODS and WESTERN
FOOD PREPARER
ASSEMBLY - BEVERAGE & EQUIPMENT
UTILITY WORKER/PORTER

RETENTION BONUS AVAILABLE!


Contact Info: Phone: 650-259-3100 Fax: 650-692-2318
Email: stephane.ako@lsgskychefs.com

300 Toys

300 Toys

300 Toys

PLAY KITCHEN Dora Explorer, talks


Spanish, English sink oven shelves toddler, accessories $60. 650-878-951

PLAY KITCHEN Step 2, accessories,


sink, shelves, oven, fridge, extendable,
perfect , $50. 650-878-9511

STAR WARS Battle Droid figures mint


unopened. 4 for $40. Steve, 650-5186614.

JOB FAIR
COMPANY
LOCATION
POSITION TYPE
JOB FAIR ON

LSG Sky Chefs


BURLINGAME, CA
FULL TIME
THURSDAY JUNE 25, 2015
10:00 am to 4:00 pm

868 Cowan Road - Burlingame, CA

NOW HIRING!

DRIVERS - CLASS A and B


DRIVER HELPER
COOK - HALAL & ARABIC FOODS and WESTERN
FOOD PREPARER
ASSEMBLY - BEVERAGE & EQUIPMENT
UTILITY WORKER/PORTER

RETENTION BONUS AVAILABLE!


Contact Info: Phone: 650-259-3100 Fax: 650-692-2318
Email: stephane.ako@lsgskychefs.com

Now Accepting Applications

Assistant Candy
Maker Trainees

Seasonal
Quality Assurance Inspector

Qualications for Assistant


Candy Maker Trainees
include, but are not limited to:
follow formulas, be able to
work day and night shifts,
read, speak and write English
and regularly lift up to 50 lbs.
Entry level rate of pay is
$14.00/hour.

Qualications for the Seasonal


Quality Assurance Inspector include,
but are not limited to: check the
weight, appearance and overall
quality of our product at various
steps of manufacturing; read, speak
and write English. Must pass a
written math test. Entry level rate of
pay is $13.00/hour.

Applicants must be available for day or night shift and overtime, as required.

Both are Union positions. If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at


(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

24

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015


300 Toys

302 Antiques

302 Antiques

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

COMPLETE 1999 UD1&2 set of 525


baseball cards - mint. $50. Steve, 650518-6614.

1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect


condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,


72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass


front, 18 x 25 x 48 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and


foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70


(650)387-4002

ESPRESSO TABLE 30 square, 40 tall,


$95 (650)375-8021

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper


Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian


Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains


Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

303 Electronics
27 INCH Sony TV (not flat screen) Excellent condition $75.00. 650-347-6875.
36 TELEVISION with stand. Three
glass shelves; wood frame. $50 (650)
571-8103.
4 CAR speaker Pioneer 5/1/4" unused in
box 130wtts.$30.00 all. (650)992-4544

EXECUTIVE DESK 60, cherry wood,


excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151
EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151
FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324
GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital


Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,


white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer


Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

HOME MADE Banquet/Picnic Table 3' X


8' $10. (650)368-0748

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves


42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good


condition $50., (650)878-9542

INTAGE ART-DECO style wood chair,


carved back & legs, tapestry seat, $50.
650-861-0088.

46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great


condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.


$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767

FREE 36" COLOR TV (not a flat


screen). Great condition. Ph. 650 6302329.
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266
PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198
PIONNER PAIRS car speakers ,in box
never used 5/1/4" 130 wtts. $15.
(650)992-4544
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063
RECORD PLAYER - BIC Model #940.
Excellent Condition. $30. Call
(650) 368-7537.
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
SUBWOOFER 12" wide 34" good condition. $40. 650-504-6057

304 Furniture
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414
CABINET, ENTERTAINMENT, Wood.
49W x 40H x 21D.Good Condition.
$75/Offer. (650)591-2393
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465


DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING TABLE - Round 41. Leaf & 3
chairs. $65. (650) 222-4109.
DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. 40 x
35.5 x 17.5 . $65. (207)329-2853.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

ITALIAN TABLE 34 X 34 X 29Hm Beautiful Oak inlaid $90 OBO In RC (650)3630360


LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483

SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood


frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33 x 78
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274

TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at


each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TABLE, WHITE, sturdy wood, tile top,
35" square. $35. (650)861-0088

306 Housewares
BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
FLATWARE - Stanley Roberts stainless
flatware service for 8, plus assorted
pieces. $65 obo (650)591-6842
NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
WROUGHT IRON wine rack, 24 bottle,
black, pristine $29 650-595-3933

307 Jewelry & Clothing


NEW IN box, quarts wristwatch stainless
case/strap $19 650-595-3933

NEW STORE

COSTUME JEWELRY $2

Friditas

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

132 Hazelwood Dr, SSF


(415)828-2997
www.friditas.com

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505


TV STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168

VAN GOGH Vase of White Roses


wood and glass frame. 24 x 30. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow


floral $99. (650)574-4021

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,


round. $75.(650)458-8280

MIRROR, NOT framed41" x 34" $ 15.


(650)366-8168

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with


upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",


curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.


Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184

10 POUND Sledge
(650)368-0748

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x


17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

12 FOOT Heavy Duty Jumper Cables


$25 (650)368-0748

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

14 FT Extension Ladder. Extends to 26


FT. $125. Good Condition. (650)3687537

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.


(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and


coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

308 Tools
Hammer

$2

4 WHEEL movers dolly cost $40 asking


$25 obo 650 591 6842

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle


Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Limerick, e.g.
5 Underground
molten rock
10 Get lost!
14 Far from fair
15 Double-reed
woodwinds
16 Global extremity
17 Rural political bloc
19 Shortly, to
Shakespeare
20 Submitted
21 Opponents
23 Mate for a stag
24 Amin of Uganda
25 Crate-moving
equipment
27 Mountain
climbers return
trip
31 Rain really hard
32 The Trojans of
the NCAA
33 Silly error
36 Other side, in war
39 Bone-breaking
combo, in a
playground
rhyme
43 Martial artsbased workout
44 Stop stalling!
45 Three, in Napoli
46 Circus safety
gear
48 Double-__: traitor
51 Slow-cooked
entre
55 Really annoy
56 The Greatest in
the ring
57 Get lost!
58 Farther below
sea level
62 CBS legal drama
The Good __
64 Retail outlet with
a tech support
area called the
Genius Bar
66 Bad to the bone
67 River in
Dsseldorf, in
Dsseldorf
68 Nebula named
for a crustacean,
which can
precede the
starts of 17-, 25-,
39-, 51- and 64Across
69 Pack of cards
70 Desirable trait
71 Citgo rival

DOWN
1 Wrinkly-faced
dogs
2 Storybook baddie
3 Splashy style
4 Connecticut home
of a 19-acre
maritime museum
5 Breakfast times
6 Blood
classification
letters
7 __ on a tangent
8 Likewise
9 Stand up for
(oneself)
10 Health resort
11 Burger bar array
12 Emotionally
distant
13 Religious belief
18 One of a triangle
trio
22 Sport with clay
targets
26 Carsons
successor
27 Clean with a rag
28 Juanitas this
29 Word before
method or notation
30 Pond hopper
34 Singer Yoko
35 Govt. banking
protector

37 Inconsequential
38 River of Flanders
40 Trucker on a
radio
41 Zither-like
Japanese
instruments
42 Shrill
47 Worlds largest
desert
49 Mine extracts
50 Undetailed
drawing

51 Toyed with, catstyle


52 Martini garnish
53 Last years frosh
54 Drinks
excessively
59 Skin opening
60 Important
chapters in
history
61 Civil War fighters
63 Bugling beast
65 Stretch the truth

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

xwordeditor@aol.com

By Roger Wienberg
2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

06/22/15

06/22/15

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

308 Tools

311 Musical Instruments

335 Garden Equipment

470 Rooms

AIR COMPRESSOR - All trade. 125psi.


25 gallon. $99. (650)591-8062

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie


Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

GREAT STATES brand push lawn mower, 14" blade, good condition, $20, 650561-9769 San Carlos

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model


SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

KIMBALL PIANO with bench. Artists


console. Walnut finish. Good condition.
$600 obo (650)712-9731
UPARIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40 high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"


dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,


$750. Call (650)572-2337

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.


(650)573-5269

312 Pets & Animals

CRAFTSMAN HEAVY duty 10 inch saw


1 hp, blades/accessories, $90 (650)3455224 before 8:00 p.m.

ADOPTION IS THE ONLY OPTION

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with


variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
HAND EDGER $3. (650)368-0748
HEAVY DUTY,
(650)368-0748

Mattock/Pick

$10.

HEDGE TRIMMER, battery operated


with charger. $90. (650)344-9783
OXYGEN AND acetylene welding tanks,
small size, $95.00. 650-341-0282.
POWER INVERTER - STATPOWER
PROWATT 2500. modified, Sine wave
phase corrected. $245.
650-591-8062
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585

PETS IN NEED
We offer adoptions 7 days a week
noon - 6 PM
871 5th Ave. Redwood City

650.367.1405

www.petsineed.org
Proudly saving lives for 50 years.
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084
PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

315 Wanted to Buy


WE BUY

SKILL SAW 7/1/4" CRAFTMAN profesional unused $ 45. (650)992-4544

Gold, Silver, Platinum


Always True & Honest values

TOYOTA, SMALL hidraulic Jack like


new $20.00 (650)992-4544

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa


1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.
WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

309 Office Equipment


BROTHER P-TOUCH Labeler LCD display organize files, unused (2) for$ 20.00
STAND WITH shelves, 29" high. Can be
used for TV, computer, printer. $10. Pacifica (650)355-0266

310 Misc. For Sale


10 VIDEOTAPES (3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.
BASE BOARD 110v heaters (2). 6'
white, 1500 watts. New. $25 each.
(650)342-7933
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.
PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

316 Clothes
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
XXL HARLEY Davidson Racing Team
Shirt. $90. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

317 Building Materials


20 STEEL construction building spikes
3/4" x 24" $40.00 for all. 650-347-6875
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12 x 5x1
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955

340 Camera & Photo Equip.


CAMERA. MINOLTA 35 mm Maxxum
7000 with accessories and Tamrac Bag.
$75. 650-794-0839. San Bruno

345 Medical Equipment


AUDLT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.
BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149
HOMEDICS SHIATSU Massaging Cushion, still in box. $25. Pacifica (650) 3550266
PATIENT LIFT - People Lift $400.00
(650)364-8960
WHEEL CHAIR $60. Plastic Restroom
Shower Chair $50. (650)364-8960

Garage Sales

ESTATE

SALE
SAT
JUNE
20TH
9AM-3PM

3387 BRITTAN AVE #9


SAN CARLOS 94070
FURNITURE, GARDENTOOTS, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS AND
MORE!!

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity


counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29 x
19 $300 (408)744-1041
FREE, 3 interior solid core paneled doors
with hardware. Reply
tmckay1@sbcglobal.net
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
SCREEN DOOR, (650)678-5133
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $49
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

318 Sports Equipment


BB GUN. $39 (650)678-5133

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage


sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.

GOLF SET for $95. 310-889-4850. Text


Only. Will send pictures upon request.

Reach over 76,500 readers


from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

HJC MOTORCYCLE helmet, black, DOT


certified, size L/XL, $29, 650-595-3933

Call (650)344-5200

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.


$10.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,


Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80


obo 650-364-1270

TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393

MENS BIKE 24. 10-speed Schwinn


CrossFit. Blue. Good Condition. $50.
(650) 871-1778.

TELESCOPE. CSTAR 600 power refractor. Tripod included. Excellent condition.


$50. Call 650-871-1778.

NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260

TRIPOD : Oak and brass construction.


Used in 1930"s Hollywood In RC $90
OBO (650)363-0360

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly


Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

List your Open House


in the Daily Journal.

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @


$10 each set. (650)593-0893

Reach over 76,500


potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the


Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5 high x 1.5 wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine


(650)368-3037

$99

USMC TACTICAL folding knife, stainless


steel, boxed $25 650-595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

321 Hunting/Fishing
HUNTING
CLUB
Membership
$2,600.Camanche Hills Hunting Preserve, Ione CA. Pheasants, Ducks, Chukar and sporting clay range. Excludes
annual dues and bird card. Call 209-3041975.

335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call


(510)784-2598

CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,


bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,


(650)343-4461

335 Garden Equipment

HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296

LAWNMOWER, GAS powered with rear


bag. Almost new. $100 (650)766-4858

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

Call (650)344-5200

380 Real Estate Services


HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.

Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.

440 Apartments
BELMONT-LARGE RENOVATED 1BD
& 2BDs quiet building in prime area. No
smoking, no pets, no housing assistance
phone (650) 591-4046.

25

620 Automobiles
04 AUDI A4 Ultra Sport package, black
on black, 107K miles, $6,800. Call
(650)342-6342
1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929

Dont lose money


on a trade-in or
consignment!

Asphalt/Paving

Construction

NORTHWEST
ASPHALT PAVING

AIM CONSTUCTION

Driveways, Parking Lots


Asphalt/Concrete
Repair Installation
Free Estimates
(650)213-2648
Lic #935122

JOHN PETERSON
*Paving *Grading *Slurry Sealing
*Paving Stovnes *Concrete
*Patching
WE AIM TO PLEASE!

(408) 422-7695
LIC.# 916680

Cabinetry

Sell your vehicle in the


Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
Well run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car


loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

Cleaning

DODGE
99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296
HONDA 93 LX SD, 244K miles, all
power, complete, runs. $1,700 cash only,
(650)481-5296
JAG 1988 XJ6. Looks great. Runs great.
$1900.00. **SOLD**
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
SUMMER FUN car. 98 Mustang. GT
Convertible. Green, Tan, Leather interior,
Excellent Condition. 128,000 Miles.
$3700. (650) 440-4697.

625 Classic Cars


FORD 63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

630 Trucks & SUVs


CADILLAC 07 ESCALADE, black on
black, excellent condition. 1 owner, always garaged, have all service records.
122K miles. 4 new tires, and all the
amenities. Runs and drives great, clean
interior, good leather & carpets, amazing
sound system. $19,995. (650)619-0370
DODGE 01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

Concrete

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484

LEMUS CONSTRUCTION

(650)271-3955

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with


mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

Dryrot & Termite Repair


Decks, Doors/Windows, Siding
Bath Remodels, Painting
General Home Improvements

670 Auto Parts

Lic. #913461

1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many


heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, 92
to 96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted


Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Free Estimates
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
New Construction
Remodeling
Kitchen/Bathrooms
Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596a

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047


Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs


ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Gardening
CALL NOW FOR
SPRING LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Sprinklers and irrigation
Lawn Aeration
Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

J.B GARDENING

Maintenance New Lawns


Clean Ups Sprinklers
Fences Tree Trim
Concrete & Brick Work
Driveway Pavers
Retaining Walls

Gutters

Hauling

O.K.S RAINGUTTER

CHEAP
HAULING!

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,


Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

SPECIALS
AS LOW AS $2.50/sf.

Mention this ad for


Free Delivery
See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119
Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)278-0157

Since 1985
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
All Work Guaranteed

(650) 453-3002
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Service-Apartments/Homes:
one time service/bi-weekly.
References Available.
FREE ESTIMATES
10 years Exp. Honest. Reliable

(650)458-1965

HOUSE CLEANING
SERVICES
Vacancy, Janitorial,
Post Construction Cleaning.
Commercial & Residential
Cleaning

650.918.0354

www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

PENINSULA
CLEANING

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771

Tree Service

Hillside Tree

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming

Pruning

Shaping
Large

Removal
Grinding

Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal


to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635

Fences Tree Trimming


Decks Concrete Work
Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

Window Washing

Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)296-0568

Free Estimates

Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
The Garden Doctor
Landscaping & Demolition
Fences Interlocking Pavers
Clean-Ups Hauling
Retaining Walls
(650)771-2276
Lic# 36267

Lic.#834170

HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small

Roofing

REED
ROOFERS

Lic.# 891766

(650)740-8602

PAYLESS

Serving the entire Bay Area


Residential & Commercial

Kitchen & bath remodeling


Tile work, roofing and more!

Call for Free Estimate

HANDYMAN SERVICE

FREE ESTIMATES
(650)771-2432

SENIOR HANDYMAN

Specializing in any size project

Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retrired Licensed Contractor

650-201-6854

Lic#1211534

FRANS
HOUSE CLEANING

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING

Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA Lic 982576
(415)828-9484

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY


Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Flooring

SHOP
AT HOME

SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Plumbing

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD

Painting

Handy Help

(650)400-5604

Flamingos Flooring

Hauling

The Village
Contractor

Remodels Carpentry
Drywall Tile Painting

Call Joe

(650)701-6072
Lic# 979435

Hauling
AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured


Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal


Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up


www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

License #931457

Painting

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior


Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

LEMUS PAINTING
(650)271-3955

Interior & Exterior


Residential & Commercial
Carpentry & Sheetrock Repairs
Lead safe certified
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461

(650) 591-8291

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Art

portraits by HADI

Beautiful portraits by experienced sketch artist. Pen & ink on


the 18 X 24 sketch paper.
Singles, couples, families.
Makes a wonderful gift. Can create a sketch from any photo.
Starting at $199. (650) 283-6836

Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13

Monday June 22, 2015

Dental Services

Food

Health & Medical

Legal Services

I - SMILE

FATTORIA E MARE
Locally Sourced
Fresh Italian Food.
Join us for
Happy Hour 4-6:30 M-F
1095 Rollins Road
Burlingame
(650) 342-4922

BACK, LEG PAIN OR


NUMBNESS?

DOCUMENTS PLUS

Implant & Orthodontict Center


1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS


Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

Call us for a consultation

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Divorce

Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing

$5 CHARLEY'S

Sporting apparel from your


49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

(650)771-6564

Dental Services
Do you want a White,Brighter
Smile?
Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

1217 Laurel St., San Carlos


(Between Greenwood & Howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

Steelhead Brewing Co.


333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters


365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
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Ross Meyers LDA #2

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650.347.2500
www.divorcecenters.com
We are not a law rm. We can only provide self
help services at your specic direction.

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

Furniture

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

2833 El Camino Real


San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match


your lifestyle

Maui Whitening
650.508.8669

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F

Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City


Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

EYE EXAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

LEGAL

Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS


Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy

KAY'S HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials Waxing Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381 El Camino Real


Millbrae

(650)697-6868

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING


& CAREER COLLEGE

Train to become a Licensed


Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr


10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$48

Belbien Day Spa

Equity based direct lender


Homes Multi-family
Mixed-use Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.


Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.


SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

GRAND
OPENING

Wills & Trusts

L & R WELLNESS
CENTER
Relaxing & healing massage
$50 per hour
$5 off with this ad!
39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1
San Mateo

(650)557-2286
Open 7 days
10am - 9pm

HEALING MASSAGE
10 am to 9 pm
New Masseuses
every two weeks

2305-A Carlos St.


Alongside Highway 1

Moss Beach
(Cash Only)

HEALING TOUCH IN...

ACUHEALTH

Best Asian Body Massage

$35/hr

(with this ad for first time visitors)

Free Parking

(650)692-1989
Music

NEW YORK LIFE

Music Lessons
Sales Repairs Rentals

Eric L. Barrett,

REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!

Travel

Insurance

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF


President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Real Estate Loans

(650)389-2468

1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

27

Bronstein Music

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office


1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 22, 2015

Sciatica and Herniated Discs May Be to


Blame for Pain in Your Back and Neck
LOCAL CLINICS OFFER FREE CONSULTATION TO THOSE SUFFERING FROM BACK AND NECK PAIN

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Whiplash
Neck Pain

They can cause pain and numbness in the back, neck, legs, and feet.
This pain affects everything that you do, from work to play, and
ultimately your quality of life.We are here to tell you that there is
hope.We have the technology and experience to help you nd relief
from sciatica and back pain. At Bay Area Disc Centers, we have
helped thousands of pain sufferers just like you. We offer only the
most advanced non-surgical treatments.

Bulged Disc
Herniated Disc
Sciatica
Pinched /FSWFT
Stenosis

Is Surgery the Answer?


It is true that surgery may be the answer for certain types of back injuries.
When considering your options, ask yourself this question ...If there is a
solution to back pain that doesnt require surgery, is it worth exploring?

Before you consider surgery consider these points


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The Solution: The DRT Method, (Disc Restoration Therapy)


The DRT Method is a 5 Step S.P.I.N.E. approach to healing & restoring
function to bulging and degenerative discs.
Spinal Decompression, Physiotherapy, Inter-Segmental Mobilization, Nutritional
Support, Exercise Rehabilitation.
The DRT Method allows for a much higher success rate by increasing hydration
and restoring health to your discs. This results in a more effective and lasting
solution to your pain. There are no side effects and no recovery time is required.
This gentle and relaxing treatment has proven to be effective... even when drugs,
epidurals, traditional chiropractic, physical therapy and surgery have failed....
Disc Restoration Therapy has shown dramatic results.

Who is a Candidate for Disc Restoration Therapy


Disc Restoration Therapy has been found to relieve the pain associated with disc
degeneration, herniated and bulging disc, facet syndrome and sciatica. It is our
opinion that patients should exhaust all non surgical/non-invasive treatments rst
before considering surgery.

Why Bay Area Disc Centers?


Dr. Thomas Ferrigno, DC and his team have vast experience in treating
patients suffering from moderate to severe disc disease.
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno, DC is Certied by and is also part of the Disc
Centers of America Team who are a national group of doctors that
have gone through extensive training that follow the protocols set up
by The International Medical Advisory Board on Spinal Decompression, and follows the protocols set forward by Dr. Norman Shealy the
Honorary Chairman, former Harvard professor, and probably the most
published doctor in the world on spinal decompression therapy.

Get Your Life Back, Today!


If you suffer from sciatica, severe back or neck pain, you can nd
relief! If you are serious about getting your life back and eliminating
your back and neck pain, my staff and I are serious about helping you
and providing how our technology and experience can help.We are
extending this offer to the rst 30 callers. These spaces ll up quickly,
so call today to reserve your spot.

INCLUDES:
1. Free Consultation with Dr. Thomas Ferrigno
2. Complete Orthopedic and Neurologic Eval.
3. MRI/X-Ray Review
4. Report of Findings

Dr.Thomas Ferrigno, D.C.


Member, DCOA Disc Centers of America
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Campbell:
855-240-3472

Palo Alto:
855-322-3472

San Mateo:
650-231-4754

www.BayAreaBackPain.com
Space Is Limited To The First 30 Callers! Call Today To ScheduleYour Consultation