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FRIDAY, june 12, 2015 • VOL. 18, NO. 11 • FREE

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District 5 commission seat election is June 16

See coverage on page 11A

Round Two

Burrell Ellis on trial again
by Andrew Cauthen
Andrew@dekalbchamp.com
“Debt, desperation and deceit.
That is what the evidence will show
this case is about.”
That’s how Assistant District
Attorney Lawanda Hodges began
her opening arguments June 9 in

the retrial of suspended DeKalb
County CEO Burrell Ellis.
Ellis is on trial in the courtroom
of Superior Court Judge Courtney Johnson. He is accused of
strong-arming vendors to donate
to his re-election campaign in
2012.
In October 2014, Ellis’ first

trial ended in a hung jury after six
weeks; the jury deliberated for 11
days.
In the first trial, Ellis faced four
counts of criminal attempt to commit theft by extortion; three counts
of theft by taking; two counts of
criminal attempt to commit false

See Ellis on page 15A

Suspended DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis is facing
a jury for the second time on corruption charges.
Photo by Andrew Cauthen
Photos by Travis Hudgons

Decatur underpass comes to life
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com

was ugly.
Norris sent a handwritten letter
to the mayor in April 2014 when
he arches of the Commerce Street she was in the second grade at WinBridge have gotten an artistic
noma Park Elementary and received
facelift.
a reply approximately six months
Muralists Evan Hynes and Spen- later.
cer King were commissioned by
She said, “It’s been a full year
city of Decatur officials to paint the now since I wrote the letter and now
panels of the bridge after 7- year-old it’s exciting that there is a full unTahlia Newton-Norris wrote a letderpass being painted.”
ter to Decatur mayor Jim Baskett
Assistant City Manager David
about the unattractive appearance
Junger was tasked by the mayor to
of the underpass.
find artists who could design and
The walls of the bridge were fre- paint the space.
quently tagged with graffiti and grey
Junger said Hynes and King
patches of paint covered the tags.
were perfect because they attended
Norris said she rode home under Decatur High School and had
that bridge every day and thought it worked with the city before on a

T

Visionary third-grader Tahlia Newton-Norris poses with Decatur High School alumni Evan
Hynes and Spencer King underneath the newly designed Commerce Street Bridge. Photo by
Ashley Oglesby

See Art on page 15A

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local

Page 2A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Volunteer Katherine Holt, right, looks on as residents of Columbia
Place Apartments in Decatur select donated food. Photos by Andrew
Cauthen

Emma Burrus runs Columbia Place Ministry, Paulette McKinney passes out food to residents of the complex.
a nonprofit that provides food once-a-week
to residents of Columbia Place Apartments in
Decatur.

South DeKalb ministry serves meals for 25 years
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
For 25 years, Emma Burrus, a member of
Peace Lutheran Church in Decatur, has been
serving meals at an apartment complex near her
church.
“This is my church community and we are a
part of the community,” said Burrus, a resident of
Conyers, about volunteering in the community.
Each Tuesday, Burrus and others serve meals
to 30 to 35 people in Columbia Place Apartments, located at 1776 South Columbia Place.

The ministry also provides complete meals on
Christmas and Thanksgiving.
Burrus’ Columbia Place Ministry has an
apartment in the 47-unit complex with “just a
small kitchen, a sitting area and dining area and
bedroom,” she said.
“Every Tuesday at 4 [p.m.], people come in
and I serve a meal,” Burrus said. A team of volunteers comes in to help serve the food which is
prepared by Burrus. “They come in and we chat.”
Columbia Place Ministry receives donations
of bread and pastries from Publix and Panera
Bread. Some fresh produce comes from a com-

munity garden at Peace Lutheran Church.
The ministry started when Burrus “piggybacked on someone else,” she said.
“We just started to go down [there] because
we had one person who was a member of the
church,” Burrus said. “So they would go down
and minister to him.”
The volunteers decided to help other people.
“We just started opening it up,” Burrus said.
At first, the residents “didn’t know each other.
They were afraid to come out and speak. But we

See Ministry on page 16A

Because money does
not grow on trees.

That’s why I installed a programmable thermostat
and got a $100 rebate.
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some great cash rewards. For more information on tips and other rebates, visit georgiapower.com/save.
Georgia Power customers may be eligible to receive a rebate of 50% of the installed cost up to $100 for upgrading from a standard to a programmable thermostat. Certain preconditions
and requirements must be met in order to qualify for this rebate. Rebate available through December 2014. Application and receipt/invoice must be submitted within 60 days of purchase
or installation. ©2014. Georgia Power Company. All rights reserved.

local

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Community garden,
church collaborate
to feed thousands
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Community gardens are
used by some people as an
option to access food outside of grocery shopping.
Community gardens are
also used for giving back
to those in need. In its five
years of existence, Henderson Park Community Garden has had a partnership
with Friends of St. Martin de
Porres food ministry at Holy
Cross Catholic Church in
Tucker.
Founded in 2010, Henderson Park Community
Garden is one of the first
100 percent organic gardens in DeKalb County.
The garden consists of 55
plots, including four that
are specifically for growing
vegetables and herbs for the

food ministry.
“Friends of St. Martin
de Porres’ food ministry at
Holy Cross Catholic Church
is the closest food pantry to
the garden, and the only one
in Tucker,” said Cara Schroeder, community liaison
director for Henderson Park
Community Garden.
The mission of the
garden is to “strengthen
community, enable the cultivation and consumption
of wholesome, homegrown
food, provide an environment for hands-on education in organic gardening,
foster an intergenerational
gardening experience and
enhance the beauty of
neighborhood greenspace.”
Schroeder said it is recommended that a community garden share its surplus
vegetables and fruits with

Page 3A

Henderson Park Community Garden Club celebrated its fifth anniversary in April. Photo provided

those in the community. The
garden partnered with the
food ministry because of its
proximity and the needs in
the community.
“The Henderson Park
Community Garden is all
about sharing our surplus
and sharing other opportunities to expand into growing fruits and vegetables
and sharing information,”
she said. “In the end, it was
just one of those things that
evolved because they are the

closest food pantry. We have
12 volunteers who look over
those [four] plots. We have
two volunteers who pick up
fruits and vegetables from
the garden and deliver them
to St. Martin de Porres on
Tuesdays.”
Sam Taylor, who volunteers with Friends of St.
Martin de Porres, said the
garden has donated more
than 3,300 pounds of food
in the past four years.
Since 1982, Friends of

St. Martin de Porres food
ministry has operated a
food pantry that feeds the
homeless and provides
nutritious food items to
school children in need. It
provides food for more than
3,500 people “in crisis” each
month, according to the
church’s website.
“In 2014, we provided
food to about 7,500 families,” Taylor said.
The garden also has

See Garden on page 9A

TENTATIVE BUDGET FOR
DEKALB COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION
JULY 1, 2015 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2016
General
(K-12)
Anticipated Funds Available
Local Taxes
Other Local Sources
State Funding
Federal Funding
Other
Total Revenue Anticipated

$427,865,868
11,416,925
435,564,835

$874,847,628

Total Funds Available

Budgeted Expenditures
Instruction
Pupil Services
Instructional Staff Services
General Administration
School Administration
Transportation
Maintenance & Operations
School Nutrition
Capital Outlay
Support Services
Other Support Services
Debt Service
Agency
Transfers to Other Funds
Total Expenditures
Ending Fund Balance 6/30/2016

Total Funds Allocated

Debt
Service
$0

$101,783,690
$3,294,072

$80,870,650

($7,800,922)

$955,718,278

$97,276,840

$582,209,159
38,045,492
13,321,077
13,296,735
56,628,344
51,819,011
84,225,035

$67,471,034
2,989,293
16,079,030
3,716,487
95,074
858,164
75,900

5,816,237
23,495,039
1,409,099
1,490,512
220,000
2,514,250

6,028,913
780,472
2,923,751

$874,489,990

$101,797,940

$81,228,288

$955,718,278

Capital
Outlay
$105,373,471

$13,221,431
18,883,958
69,678,301

**

Transfers from Other Funds
Beginning Fund Balance 7/1/2015 *

Special
Revenue

Sch. Nutrition
& Athletics

Trust
& Agency

$9,327,307

16,735,000

$542,566,646
24,692,356
498,197,545
77,678,301
16,735,000

$16,789,000

$1,159,869,848

$54,000
43,748,752
8000000

$0

$105,373,471

$1,332,000

$61,076,059
$1,000,000

$5,626,072

$64,075

$288,507,568

$2,311,398

$3,237,951

$367,190,720

$1,396,075

$393,881,039

$64,387,457

$20,026,951

$1,532,686,640

$31,500

$649,711,693
41,034,785
29,400,107
17,715,222
56,723,418
52,677,175
84,304,935
57,788,234
93,990,219
25,894,835
4,332,850
2,822,512
16,950,000
5,626,072

$702,000

$81,195,327

4,000
57,788,234
949,743
1,599,324

20,000

$1,332,000
16,730,000
779,822

($4,521,100)

$97,276,840

Total

1,332,000

1,000,000

$1,332,000

$82,527,327

$62,043,301

$16,781,500

$1,138,972,058

$64,075

$311,353,712

$2,344,156

$3,245,451

$393,714,582

$1,396,075

$393,881,039

$64,387,457

$20,026,951

$1,532,686,640

* NOTE: Beginning fund balances are estimates based on the March 2015 Financial Reports
** NOTE: Includes Transfer in from After School Programs

Adoption of the Approved Budget for Fiscal Year 2015-16 is scheduled for the official meeting of the DeKalb Board of Education at 7:00 P.M. on June 17, 2015, in the Board Room at 1701 Mountain
Industrial Blvd., Stone Mountain, Georgia 30083.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

opinion

Page 4A

Be SMART about guns
On May 19 in DeKalb
County a 9-year-old boy accidentally shot himself in
the finger.
At approximately 1 a.m.
that day in a house on Rollingwood Drive, the boy’s
mother was asleep in the
living room when the child
climbed onto a step stool to
get a shoe box from a closet
shelf in the mother’s bedroom. A .9mm handgun was
in the shoe box.
“While handling that
firearm it discharged, striking him in the finger,” Capt.
S.R. Fore, DeKalb County
Police’s public information
officer, told a reporter.
That was one of six unintentional child shootings
in Georgia recently cited
by the Georgia chapter of
Moms Demand Action for

Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com

Managing Editor
@AndrewChampNews

Gun Sense in America, part
of Everytown for Gun Safety.
The group has launched a
“Be SMART” Campaign to
reduce child shootings.
“Our thoughts and
prayers are with the family
of this young child who was
injured this week in DeKalb
n County. Sadly, these trag-

edies happen all too often,”
said Dr. Viviana Goldenberg, a volunteer leader
with the Georgia chapter of
Moms Demand Action.
On April 29 in Augusta a
15-year-old boy was playing
with a gun when he unintentionally shot his 1-yearold brother in the head,
killing him. The teenager
was charged with involuntary manslaughter, reckless
conduct, and possession of a
handgun by a minor.
In January in Baconton,
after a day of hunting, the
adults in a hunting party
told a 13-year-old boy to put
up the guns. While doing so,
he accidentally discharged
one, killing himself, according to Moms Demand Action.
According to research by

Everytown for Gun Safety,
there have been at least 97
unintentional child shootings in America in 2015 so
far, an average of one every
36 hours.
Moms Demand Action
encourages everyone to be
SMART:
• Secure all guns in homes
and vehicles;
• Model responsible behavior around guns;
• Ask about the presence of
unsecured guns in other
homes;
• Recognize the risks of teen
suicide;
• Tell peers to Be SMART.
I am not a gun owner—
except a few Airsoft models,
but I am not against the
legal and responsible ownership of firearms. (I do have a
problem with semiautomat-

ic, military weapons in the
hands of civilians—I don’t
see a legitimate purpose
for that). I believe that the
chances are extremely slim
of me having a legitimate
need for a gun while having
quick and easy access to it.
But if I owned a gun I
would be SMART. A gun in
shoe box is not SMART. The
gun was not lying on the
kitchen table, but the 9-yearold child knew where it was
and could get to it without
much trouble. And in this
instance he only hurt his finger. That just as easily could
have been his or someone
else’s life.
If you must own a gun be
SMART, because the life you
save may be yours or your
child’s.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

opinion

Page 5A

One Man’s Opinion

The latest tempest
Summer’s onset often has
me strolling down memory
lane, and repeating visits
(at least in my head), to our
favored family vacation spot,
Georgia’s Jekyll Island.
The Georgia Press Association recently returned
to its tradition of annually
gathering there for conventions, which has also helps
guarantee my return to these
family fun roots.
Once the playground of
America’s old money and
industrial elite, the historic
village on the Jekyll River
side of the island, with its
majestic Jekyll Island Club
and unique accommodations, remains in demand
year-round. 
Business on the beach
side had been losing out to
newer competition nearby
as well as up and down the
east coast and Gulf, as well
as dominated by many properties showing their age and
lack of amenities. But new
hotels as well as significant
renovations and improvements to older properties
have both visitation numbers and tourism dollars on
the rise.
Meanwhile over the past
decade, almost with the
consistency of swallows returning to Capistrano, there
is a new island tempest,
and whirlwind of protest or
complaint wrought by local
island retirees and residents,

Bill Crane
bill.csicrane@gmail.com

Columnist

most who have relocated
to Georgia and Jekyll from
elsewhere, and many who
seem to view the public state
park as their own private island community or retreat.
Last year the locals were
up in arms about the potential thinning of the white tail
deer herd whose population
is not native and which has
become both a safety and
sanitation nuisance on the
island. Deer and other nonnative species were originally imported to the island
as hunting stock for the
aforementioned millionaires
back in the day.
This year’s cry to arms
from the Birkenstock and
blue-rinse set on Jekyll regard the heinous crimes
of causeway mowing and
transport of beach deck
chairs to the island beach in
front of the new Westin Hotel and Conference Center.

I’m not kidding.
Jekyll and nearby St.
Simons and Sea Island are
connected to the mainland
by a series of bridges and
long causeways constructed
across marshland along the
Georgia coast. High and fast
growing weeds and grasses
can easily grow several feet
tall, right up to the road
shoulder. 
The causeways are not lit,
but both during daylight and
after dark, the tall grass substantially reduces visibility,
particularly as it relates to a
darting deer, or slow moving sea turtle, both known to
often traverse the marsh as
well as the causeways.
In the case of transporting the beach chairs, a local
businessman, using a single
all-terrain vehicle, daily
traverses roughly a third of
mile of beach to deliver, set
up and at evening return
and pack up, rental chairs
and umbrellas. This same
path is already in use by the
Jekyll Island Authority (JIA),
Sea Turtle Center and Georgia State Patrol. The rental
chairs may only be on the
beach from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30
p.m., and must remain at
least 50 feet at all times from
sea turtle nesting areas. 
Protests led by the ever
vocal David and Mindy
Egan, Jekyll’s self-appointed
protectors, propose that the
Westin or the JIA construct

a permanent storage shed on
the beach or nearby at the
soon to be constructed Jekyll
Island Suites, and the equipment then rolled across sand
by hand truck. 
I suspect that a majority
of these southern transplants
have never attempted rolling
a loaded hand truck across a
sandy beach. 
Costs of building, maintaining and securing a
year round structure are
year-round, significant and
not helpful to beach ecosystems. And other than
the late October Georgia/
Florida game weekend, the
majority of Jekyll tourism
remains seasonal.
Jekyll is a unique, beautiful and historic place which
all Georgians and others
should experience at least
once. The seven-mile barrier
isle is not part of a land conservation easement or trust,
nor is it a nature preserve; it
is a public park, intended for
tourism and visitation. State
and federal law significantly
limit any potential development ranging from height
limitations to beach frontage to the amount of natural
green space on the island
which can be in any way
“disturbed” by man.
So if summer gifts you a
stroll along the Jekyll shores
or riverside, or a convention/conference brings you
there, please do me a favor,

take a load off, and rent a
beach chair for the day, and
while you are lounging, perhaps sign a petition, because
even in 2015, it appears that
the pen is often still mightier
than the sword—unless of
course you are cutting grass
along the causeway, then go
with a strong blade.
Bill Crane also serves as a
political analyst and commentator for Channel 2’s Action
News, WSB-AM News/Talk
750 and now 95.5 FM, as well
as a columnist for The Champion, Champion Free Press
and Georgia Trend. Crane is
a DeKalb native and business
owner, living in Scottdale. You
can reach him or comment
on a column at bill.csicrane@
gmail.com. 

F ree P ress
Let Us Know What You Think!
THE CHAMPION FREE PRESS encourages opinions from its readers. Please
write to us and express your views. Letters
should be brief, typewritten and contain
the writer’s name, address and telephone
number for verification. All letters will be
considered for publication.
Send Letters To Editor, The Champion Free Press, P.
O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 30031-1347; Send email
to Andrew@dekalbchamp.com • FAX To: (404)
370-3903 Phone: (404) 373-7779 . Deadline for news
releases and advertising: Thursday, one week prior
to publication date.
EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions written by columnists and contributing editors do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editor or publishers. The
Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any
advertisement at any time. The Publisher is not
responsible for unsolicited manuscripts.

Publisher:
John Hewitt
Chief Financial Officer:
Dr. Earl D. Glenn
Managing Editor:
Andrew Cauthen
Production Manager:
Kemesha Hunt
Photographer:
Travis Hudgons
Staff Reporters:
Carla Parker, Ashley Oglesby
The Champion Free Press is published
each Friday by ACE III Communications,
Inc., • 114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur,
GA. 30030 • Phone (404) 373-7779.

www.championnewspaper.com
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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Statement from the
publisher
We sincerely appreciate the
discussion surrounding this and any
issue of interest to DeKalb County.
The Champion was founded in 1991
expressly to provide a forum for
discourse for all community residents
on all sides of an issue. We have no
desire to make the news only to
report news and opinions to effect
a more educated citizenry that will
ultimately move our community
forward. We are happy to present
ideas for discussion; however,
we make every effort to avoid
printing information submitted to
us that is known to be false and/or
assumptions penned as fact.

local

Page 6A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Tiffany McNary
Tiffany McNary, a
Brookhaven resident and
clinical assistant professor at
Georgia State University, has
served as a volunteer board
member at Odyssey Family
Counseling for two years.
“I work very hard at nurturing these life components
and am dedicated to giving
deeply to each one,” she said,
adding that her background,
which includes a master’s
degree in expressive arts
therapy and counseling and
a doctorate in counselor
education, makes her especially qualified to volunteer
with Odyssey.
“The skills I have developed from my graduate
training, coupled with my

14 years of clinical experience, allow me to bring a
mental health perspective
and expertise to the Odyssey
board. Advocating for mental health services for children and families that have
been impacted by trauma
has been a core passion of
mine, and one I’ve dedicated

my entire professional career
toward. More specifically, I
have expertise in working
with children who have been
exposed to or are victims of
trauma, through incorporating the expressive arts and
play into my counseling sessions.”
McNary said Odyssey’s
mission is directly aligned
with her values. “Odyssey
provides mental health services for the most in need
children in Atlanta, and
children as young as 3 years
old. My years of clinical experience working with traumatized children has shown
me that if a child’s life can be
touched and connected to,
the unhealthy trajectory his/

her life is on can be changed
to a better, healthier one. I
believe in the work that Odyssey does and I believe that
Odyssey’s services are critical to the lives of so many
children and families.”
During her two years on
the Odyssey board, McNary
has served on its development committee helping to
raise funds for the agency.
Last year, she served as vice
chairwoman of Odyssey’s
40th anniversary committee,
which organized a fundraiser designed to increase
community awareness of the
organization in addition to
bringing in revenue for the
nonprofit.
“I take my role as a

board member very seriously. I understand that
the decisions we make as a
board directly impact how
Odyssey functions on many
levels. It is deeply rewarding
to watch these decisions impact the lives of the clients
Odyssey serves.
McNary serves on the
boards of three other metro
Atlanta nonprofits—all dedicated to enriching the lives
of children—in addition to
volunteering at each of her
children’s schools and her
church. The most rewarding part of volunteering, she
said, is “helping to facilitate
healthy change in the lives of
others.”

If you would like to nominate someone to be considered as a future Champion of the Week, please contact Andrew Cauthen
at andrew@dekalbchamp.com or at (404) 373-7779, ext. 117.

Men working together
to stop violence
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
When it comes to addressing the issue of
domestic violence, women are often the ones
to speak out against it.
However, there is a group of men in
DeKalb County who have spoken out for
years against domestic violence and worked
to educate other men on ending male
violence against women. For more than 30
years, Men Stopping Violence (MSV) has
worked to engage men into building safer
communities for females.
MSV is a not-for-profit organization that
provides organizations, communities and
individuals with the knowledge and tools required to “mobilize men to prevent violence
against women and girls,” according to its
website.
“We look to the violence against women’s
movement to keep the reality of the problem
and the vision of the solution before us,” the
website states. “We believe that all forms of
oppression are interconnected. Social justice
work in the areas of race, class, gender, age
and sexual orientation are all critical to ending violence against women.”
The organization was established in
1982, but it originated in 1981 when Atlanta
therapists Dick Bathrick and Gus Kaufman
began Atlanta’s first program for batterers.
Kathleen Carlin, who was then executive director of the Cobb County YWCA Women’s
Resource Center, hired them to teach classes.
The classes grew and MSV was established. Since then the organization has educated more than 60,000 men about how to
change abusive behavior.
“That is our primary role—to educate
the community about the issue of violence
against women,” said Ulester Douglas, ex-

ecutive director of MSV.
MSV has programs such as “Because
We Have Daughters,” “Tactics and Choices
for Stopping Domestic Violence,” “Community Restoration Program” and more. MSV
has trained more than 1 million people in
churches, community groups, corporations,
universities, hospitals, civic organizations,
and national associations of district attorneys, social workers, and battered women’s
advocates.
MSV has held classes at churches,
schools and carious community locations in
DeKalb.
“We are very involved in DeKalb County,” Douglas said. “DeKalb County government has been extremely supportive of the
work we do. We also do a class for men who
were arrested for simple battery and we have
classes for men who were sent by DeKalb
court for aggravated assault. We do a lot of
community education.”
Eighty-five percent of participants report
an increased knowledge of appropriate responses to someone they know who is abusing his partner and an increased willingness
to intervene, according to the organization.
Douglas said the organization has plans to be
more involved in the community.
“We have a three-year strategic plan and
it does include having more of a presence
in the community, certainly DeKalb, to really be out there and engage the community
even more than we are already are doing,”
he said. “This problem of violence and all its
many forms is not going to be solved by just
working with men and young men who are
violent. It has to be a community solution
because the community has got to take responsibility for its role in the problem. It has
to be a community accountability approach.”

Dads and daughters participate in a bridge activity.

Men Stopping Violence (MSV) created the “Because We Have Daughters” initiative in 2005 to give men an opportunity to begin providing
those safety skills.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

local

AroundDeKalb

Avondale Estates
Men’s club to hold meeting

WSB-TV meteorologist Brian Monahan will
be the speaker at the Avondale Estates Men’s Club
meeting June 24 at 11:30 a.m. The meeting will
be held at American Legion Post 66, located at 30
Covington Highway. All men are invited to join the
club for the meeting and lunch ($10 cash) prepared
by the chef at the American Legion. For more information, call Bob Boyd at (404) 501-9118.

City to host wine stroll
Avondale Estates will host its second annual
Tudor Square Wine Stroll June 26, from 5:30 to 9
p.m. Attendees can sample more than two dozen
wines and hors d’oeuvres at several local establishments. The event starts at Tudor Square, 119 Center Street. Tickets for the event can be purchased at
www.eventbrite.com.

Brookhaven
Town Brookhaven hosting movie event
Movies on the Town is back for a third year on
the green space at Town Brookhaven. A free movie
will be screened every Thursday until July 30 (no
movie week of July 4) at dusk. Music and announcements begin approximately two hours prior.
Attendees can bring blankets, and grab dinner at
one of the restaurants to eat on the green. Coolers,
outside food and drinks, pets or chairs are prohibited. For more information www.townbrookhaven.
net.

Decatur
Organization to host job fair
The Reading and Writing Advisory will host
a job fair June 12 in Decatur. The organization is
looking for a new education wellness coach. The
job fair will take place at 3929 Flat Shoals Parkway,
Suite F, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, visit www.eventbrite.com.

Monologue City celebrates its third annual
monologue competition
Monologue City’s 3rd Annual “Monologue
Competition” will take place July 16 at 7 p.m. at
the Porter Sanford III Performing Arts and Community Center, 3181 Rainbow Dr., Decatur. This
competition, which is open to both children and
adults, allows actors to showcase their talent and
receive feedback from top industry professionals.
Tryouts for the competition will be held June 18, at
7 p.m.
For more details about the registration process,
updates, or to purchase tickets to the event, visit
m.facebook.com/monologuecity.  

Annual car show to be held

The fifth annual What Would Jesus Drive car
show will be held Saturday, June 13, from 1 to 5
p.m., at The Covenant Church, 1700 Corey Blvd.,
Decatur.
There will be trophies, giveaways, raffles, kids’
recreation area, live DJ, food and more.
All years, makes, models, and motor vehicles
are welcome. Car show entry is only $10.
Awards categories are: best of show, best
muscle car, Julian ‘Q-Ball’ Scott” best classic car,
best import, best exotic, best daily driver, best
truck, best off-road, best motorcycle, most unique
car, most attended car club, most decals, bishop’s
choice, kid’s choice, ladies choice, best interior, best
engine bay, best audio system, best exhaust tune
and the ugly duckling.

Civil War symposium scheduled
DeKalb History Center will present a Civil War
symposium on July 11 with a series of events and
presentations lasting from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.
The focus of the day’s activities will be on people and events in and around Atlanta and DeKalb
County during the war. Events include a walking
tour, lectures, panel discussion, lunch, a play and
an optional bus tour. History Center programming
and preservation coordinator, Jenny Goldemund
said “This is a can’t miss event for those interested
in the history of the Civil War in our area.”
The schedule for the day begins at 9 a.m. with
a Civil War walking tour of downtown Decatur
followed at 10 a.m. by a presentation by Gordon
Jones of the Atlanta History Center entitled The
Battles In and Around Atlanta. At 11 a.m. Robert
A. Pratt of the University of Georgia will present
The Fate of the Freedmen. The 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.
segments are both free and sponsored by Georgia
Humanities Council.
Lunch and a panel discussion with Pratt, Jones
and Will Bryant from The Battle of Atlanta Commemorative Organization (B’ATL) will begin at
noon. Lunch will be provided by Fox Brothers BarB-Q and will be followed at 1 p.m. with a production of Shadows of the Past, a play about the Civil
War in DeKalb County.
From 2 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. there will be a
guided bus tour of the front lines of the war in
DeKalb County by B’ATL. There is a $15 charge for
the bus tour; advance reservations are required.
 Advance paid reservations include all events
except the bus tour. The advanced reservation price
is $35 per person for members of DeKalb History
Center and $40 for non-members. The bus tour is
an additional $15 per person. Walk up tickets are
$60 per person and do not include the bus tour.
For additional information or to register by
phone call (404) 373-1088, ext. 20.

Lithonia
Monthly arts celebration set
Scribes and Vibes, a monthly celebration of
the arts, will be held Saturday, June 13, from 1 to

Page 7A

4 p.m. at Stonecrest Library, 3123 Klondike Road,
Lithonia.
The event is “a beautiful blend of poetry, music
and fine art through musical performances, open
mic and art exhibits,” states an announcement
about the event. Funding for the event is provided
by the Friends of Stonecrest Library.
For more information, call (404) 482-3828.

Stone Mountain
Village hosting concert series
Tunes by the Tracks will be going on during
June. The free concert series will be held each Friday night in June from 7-9 p.m. in Stone Mountain
Village. Concerts will be held in the municipal
parking lot and will feature a number of wellknown artists. The concerts are free. Beer and wine
will be available for sale. Lawn chairs are encouraged. For more information, visit Tunes by the
Tracks Facebook page.

City to host annual Back to School Bash
Stone Mountain will host its annual Back to
School Bash at the Pavilion in Stone Mountain Village July 25. This event provides free school supplies to approximately 1,000 local children prior to
returning to school for the year. Volunteers from
the Stone Mountain Rotary Club and the Stone
Mountain Women’s Club will assist with distributing the school supplies. Contributions are welcome
and checks should be made payable to the “City of
Stone Mountain” and designated “Back to School
Bash”. The mailing address is 875 Main Street,
Stone Mountain, GA 30083. Contributions received before July 15 will be used to purchase supplies this year.

Residents to receive notice of property tax
increase
The city of Stone Mountain has tentatively adopted a millage rate which will require an increase
in property taxes by 14.83 percent. All concerned
citizens are invited to public hearings on this tax
increase to be held at City Hall, 875 Main Street,
Stone Mountain, on Monday, June 22, at 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m.
Time and place of an additional public hearing
on this tax increase is at City Hall, 875 Main Street,
Stone Mountain, on Tuesday, July 7, at 7 p.m.
The tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 22.00 mills, an increase of 2.842 mills.
Without this tentative tax increase, the millage rate
will be no more than 19.158 mills. The proposed
tax increase for a home with a fair market value of
$50,000 is approximately $56.84 and the proposed
tax increase for non-homestead property with
a fair market value of $75,000 is approximately
$85.26.

local

Page 8A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Dr. Wood W. Lovell, right, medical director of Scottish Rite Hospital, addresses the 1976 groundbreaking
ceremony as Scottish Rite Children’s Hospital moved from Decatur to north Atlanta.

Fundraising efforts in 1913 for the establishment of a children’s hospital
included selling pencils. Pictured below are leather braces used at Scottish Rite in the early years to help young patients walk.

Century-long children’s healthcare
journey started in Decatur
by Kathy Mitchell

wasn’t a smooth one. Fundraisers from pencil sales to
At the beginning of the
concerts to screening of a
20th century, approximately Charlie Chaplin movie to
10 percent of the children
football games to Christmas
born in the United States
tree exhibits would keep
died before their first birth- the hospitals open over the
day, according to the Cenyears.
ters for Disease Control and
“Community support
Prevention. Those who sur- was a key from the very
vived often didn’t receive the beginning,” said Shelton
specialized care they needed Stevens, the senior develto avoid disabling disabiliopment officer/executive
ties and illnesses.
director, Sports Network
Georgia resident Bertie
at Children’s Healthcare of
Wardlaw was inspired to
Atlanta. “We treated every
help improve that situation
child even when the family
in 1913 after orthopedic
had no money. So funds had
surgeon Michael Hoke
to come from foundations,
cured her nephew of a seclubs, companies, individurious bone infection. She
als—the community.
launched a campaign to
“In 1933, the nation was
raise money for a children’s
in the middle of the Great
hospital.
Depression. Money was
The biggest donor
hard to come by and Scotwas the Scottish Rite Matish Rite was in danger of
sons; thus the hospital that
closing its doors. Someone
opened in 1915 was called
had the idea of holding a
Scottish Rite Convalescent
Thanksgiving Day football
Hospital for Crippled Chilgame fundraiser between
dren. Hoke donated his
Georgia Tech freshmen
services as the healthcare
and University of Georgia
facility opened in Decatur in freshmen. They had no idea
two rented cottages with 20
whether people would come.
patient beds.
But it was a great success
From that humble start,
and became a tradition. I
one of the largest children’s
think people came out behealthcare systems in the
cause they didn’t want the
United States—Children’s
hospital to close,” Stevens
Healthcare of Atlanta, which said.
now includes Scottish Rite
In 1928, another nonHospital, Egleston Children’s profit children’s hospital—
Hospital and Hughes Spald- Henrietta Egleston Chiling Children’s Hospital—was dren’s Hospital—opened in
born, but the path to success Atlanta. In 1956, Egleston

became the pediatric teaching affiliate for Emory University Hospital.
“One of the proudest
moments in our history
came in 1998 when Egleston
Children’s Health Care System and Scottish Rite Medical Center came together to
form Children’s Healthcare
of Atlanta—one of the largest pediatric systems in the

country. Each hospital had
its own history and culture,
but that didn’t make either
unwilling to combine their
resources for the benefit of
the children,” Stevens said.
 
The name Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta was
unveiled in 1999, along with
a logo featuring  children to
be known as Hope and Will.
Hughes Spalding Pavil-

 

See Healthcare on page 16A

 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
GEORGIA, DEKALB COUNTY 
   A petition has been filed with the Board of Commissioners of DeKalb County, Georgia, 
for the construction of a sewer infrastructure in Land Lot(s) 375 of the 18th District of 
DeKalb County, Georgia, description of which is as follows: 
Sewer Main shall run along Carnaby Court and Yarmouth Court and impact 
properties located at 1471, 1472, 1475, 1478, 1479, 1487, 1492, 1495, 1502, 
1503, 1511, 1512, 1519, 1520 Carnaby Court, and 5240, 5241 and 5244 
Yarmouth Court.  
   Same to be constructed and the costs assessed against the abutting property. Said 
Petition has been set for hearing before the Board of Commissioners at 9:00 a.m. on 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 in the Auditorium of the DeKalb County Maloof Center, 1300 
Commerce Drive, Decatur, Georgia.  
   All persons, whose interests are affected by the proposed sewer, desiring to be heard, 
are hereby notified to appear in person or by attorney at said time and place and 
present such objection or evidence therein as their interests require. 
 

local

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Page 9A

From food to finances, agency touches lives
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
From newborns to the
elderly, the DeKalb County
Extension Office has a variety of free programs to aid
and inspire.
“The most important
thing that Extension offers is
that we really touch people
in the community,” said
Jessica Hill, director of the
county’s extension office.
The DeKalb County
Extension Office is a part
of the University of Georgia Extension, which is a
partnership with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
UGA Extension’s mission is “to extend lifelong
learning to the people of
Georgia through unbiased,
research-based education
in agriculture, the environment, communities, youth
and families,” according to
its website.
Those interested in
gardening or landscaping
can participate in the extension office’s horticulture
program. “They get to see
demonstrations of our horticulture agents planting and
doing different things,” Hill
said.
The office has a family and consumer finances
program which teaches nutrition, diabetes education,
chronic disease prevention
and finances,” Hill said.

Garden

Continued From Page 3A

perimeter beds that Schroeder said she uses to grow
fruits and vegetables all
year-round for the food pantry.
“That’s one of my little
volunteer happy hats that
I wear because I can harvest my vegetables and take
them to the food pantry,”
she said. “They are a fabulous food pantry. When we
started working with them
five years ago, from my
understanding, they were
serving about 420 families
a week. Now, their numbers
are about 620 a week. There
is a lot of need in this community.”

D5 Election Day

Tuesday
June 16

To accompany a mobile
farmers market recently
launched, the extension office will be “offering educational programming…in the
areas of nutrition, finances,
[and] budgets,” Hill said.
“So we are actually out and
about touching the community.”
The office also has a
4H and youth development
program in which it teaches
“young people citizenship
and they will also be helping
and serving the community
with this mobile market as
well,” Hill said.
More than 270 volunteers participate in the
extension office’s master gardener program in DeKalb
County. These volunteers
maintain different sites
around the county for gardening, Hill said.
“They are a very instrumental part of not only
maintaining those gardening
sites, but they also answer
consumer calls as well,” she
said.
Funded with monies from county, state and
federal governments, the
extension office celebrated
its centennial last year. Although the office has approximately 500 volunteers
divided up among its master

gardener, 4H, family and
consumer sciences programs, it only has a staff of
21 people.
“It’s a small staff, but
we do big work around the
county,” Hill said. “We rely
on our volunteers to help us
promote Extension, advo-

cate for Extension, and to do
educational programming
within the community.”
“Cooperative Extension is very proud to serve
our community and to be
a part of our community,”
Hill said. “We can help communities to become more

healthy, more sustainable
and more environmentally
friendly.”
For more information
about the DeKalb County
Extension Office, call (404)
298-4080 or visit www.caes.
uga.edu/extension/dekalb.

NOTICE OF TAX INCREASE
And 5 Year History of Levy

The Governing Authority of the City of Avondale Estates has tentatively adopted a 2015 millage rate which will
require an increase in the property taxes by 16.53 percent. All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearings
on this tax increase to be held at City Hall, 21 North Avondale Plaza, Avondale Estates, GA 30002 on Tuesday,
June 16, 2015 at 5:30 P.M., Monday, June 22, 2015 at 7:30 P.M., and Wednesday July 1, 2015 at 6:00 P.M.
This tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 10.957 mills, an increase of 1.56 mills. Without this tentative
tax increase, the millage rate will be no more than 9.403 mills. The proposed tax increase for a home with a fair
market value of $200,000.00 is approximately $312. The proposed increase on non-homestead property with a fair
market value of $200,000 is approximately $312. The proposed tax increase for a property with the county basic
homestead exemption is $312.

City
Real & Personal

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

157,295,925

158,471,976

133,021,745

141,146,248

148,072,403

178,050,508

7,917,420

7,854,350

8,014,980

8,451,460

7,456,190

5,564,760

165,213,345

166,326,326

141,036,725

149,597,708

155,528,593

183,615,268

Motor Vehicles
Mobile Homes
Timber - 100%
Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest
Less M&O Exemptions

119,131

102,456

231,089

138,061

268,311

371,490

165,094,214

166,223,870

140,805,636

149,459,647

155,260,282

183,243,778

165,094,214

166,223,870

140,805,636

149,459,647

155,260,282

183,243,778

11.000

10.957

10.957

10.957

10.957

10.957

11.000

10.957

10.957

10.957

10.957

10.957

$1,816,036

$1,821,315

$1,542,807

$1,637,629

$1,701,187

$2,007,802

Net Taxes $ Increase

$5,279

-$278,508

$94,822

$63,558

$306,615

Net Taxes % Increase

0.29%

-15.29%

6.15%

3.88%

18.02%

Net M&O Digest
State Forest Land
Assistance Grant Value
Adjusted Net M&O Digest

Gross M&O Millage
Less Rollbacks
Net M&O Millage

Total City Taxes Levied

NOTICE
The Mayor and Council of the City of Pine Lake does hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be
held at the Pine Lake Club House, 300 Clubhouse Dr., Pine Lake Georgia, 30072 on June 30, 2015 at 7:30 PM and pursuant to
O.C.G.A. Section 48-5-32 does hereby publish the following presentation of the current year's tax digest and levy, along with the
history of the tax digest and levy for the past five years.
The Pubic Hearing will be held immediately prior to the meeting, beginning at 7:00 PM on June 30, 2015 in the Club House,
300 Clubhouse Dr., Pine Lake GA 30072. The public is invited to attend and be heard.

CURRENT 2015 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY

INCORPORATED
Real & Personal

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

23,212,367

19,484,475

15,898,584

12,792,852

14,339,521

20,069,921

1,182,020

1,119,240

1,141,400

1,177,580

977,730

699,770

24,394,387

20,603,715

17,039,994

13,970,412

15,317,251

20,769,691

1,069,933

1,059,679

1,103,602

968,437

927,770

952,730

$23,324,454

$19,544,036

$16,036,392

$13,001,975

$14,389,481

$19,816,961

23,324,454

19,544,036

16,036,392

13,001,975

14,389,481

19,816,961

17.100

20.604

24.190

29.824

28.110

21.402

Net M&O Millage

17.100

20.604

24.190

29.824

28.110

21.402

Net Taxes Levied

Motor Vehicles
Mobile Homes
Timber - 100%
Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest
Less M& O Exemptions
Net M & O Digest
State Forest Land Assistance
Grant Value
Adjusted Net M&O Digest
Gross M&O Millage

0

Less Rollbacks

$398,849

$402,685

$387,210

$387,771

$404,488

$424,122

Net Taxes $ Increase/Decrease

$56,416

$3,836

$3,489

$1,014

$16,717

$19,634

Net Taxes % Increase/Decrease

14.00%

0.01%

0.79%

0.02%

4.14%

4.65%

local

Page 10A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Dad teaches kids
to run a business

NOTICE OF
PROPERTY TAX INCREASE
The City of Brookhaven has tentatively
adopted a millage rate for the General Fund
which will require an increase in property
taxes by 15.78 percent over the Rollback
Millage rate. This increase is due solely to the
revaluation of real property tax assessments.
All concerned citizens are invited to the
public hearings on this tax increase to be held
at Brookhaven City Hall at 4362 Peachtree
Road, Brookhaven, GA 30319. The first public
hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. on June 9,
2015.
The second public hearing will be at special
called meeting on June 16, 2015 at 6:00 p.m.
A final public hearing will be held July 7, 2015
at 7:00 p.m. After the final public hearing, the
millage rate will be formally adopted.
The tentative increase will result in a millage
rate of 2.795 mills, a millage rate equivalent
increase of .381 mills. Without this tentative
tax increase, the millage rate will be no
more than 2.414 mills. The proposed tax
increase for a home with a fair market value
of $300,000 is approximately $43 and the
proposed tax increase for non-homestead
property with a fair market value of $200,000
is approximately $31.

by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com

Matt Slappey is deeply
involved in his children’s
lives.
As a Decatur business
growth advisor, Slappey
helps people buy and sell
businesses, and he’s exposed
to many different companies.
Slappey said talking to
current and former clients
many made him realize that
many people do not understand the fundamentals of
business finance.
He said, “It’s really important because as people
talk about the raising of
minimum wage, which
could be a great thing for the
people receiving the money,
there’s also the business side
that impacts the business
owners.”
Ten-year-old Ashley Slappey works the slushy operation at her swim
He added, “I want my
meet.
children to understand that
there are two sides to busiSlappey shared a recent
said his 10-year-old, Ashley
ness transactions and what
scenario with teaching his
asked what she should do
that means as a consumer
children about business at
when her friends come up
and as a business owner.”
the Oak Groove Festival. He and want a snow cone? “Do
Slappey has set out this
summer to share his experSee Business on page 16A
tise with his three young
daughters, ages 10, 13 and
15, by teaching them how
NOTICE
to manage their own snow
cone business.
The City of Brookhaven City Council does hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be
Slappey purchased a
held at the Brookhaven City Hall on on July 7, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. and pursuant to the requirements of O.C.G.A. Section
snow cone machine for
48-5-32 does hereby publish the following presentation of the current year's tax digest and levy, along with the history of the tax
$1,500 and has allowed his
digest and levy for the past five years.
youngsters to set up in their
neighborhood, Oak Groove
Festival and local sporting
CURRENT 2015 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
events.
Brookhaven City
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
He said many business
concepts are not taught
on the elementary school
Real & Personal
2,261,071,691
2,691,060,034
3,160,338,872
and middle school levels.
Motor Vehicles
82,633,320
67,891,300
“If they’re going to make a
Mobile Homes
slushy, they know the cups
Timber - 100%
cost one or two cents, the
straws costs a penny, and the Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest
0
0
0
2,261,071,691
2,773,693,354
3,228,230,172
mix itself may cost 50 cents
per cup; it’s getting them to
Less M& O Exemptions
254,997,596
437,879,638
655,645,230
understand that there are
Net M & O Digest
0
0
0
2,006,074,095
2,335,813,716
2,572,584,942
costs associated with everyState Forest Land
thing they do beyond the
Assistance Grant Value
0
cost of the machine.”
Adjusted Net M&O Digest
0
0
0
2,006,074,095
2,335,813,716
2,572,584,942
In operating the business, Slappey said his chilGross M&O Millage
2.850
2.850
2.795
dren have learned firsthand
Less Rollbacks
0.055
about the cost of materials,
Net M&O Millage
0.000
0.000
0.000
2.850
2.795
2.795
overhead, risk, supply, demand and profit.
Net Taxes Levied
$0
$0
$0
$5,717,311
$6,528,599
$7,190,375
He said the experience
is rewarding to have good,
Net Taxes $ Increase
#REF!
#REF!
#REF!
$811,288.00
$661,776.00
open conversation with his
Net Taxes % Increase
#REF!
#REF!
#REF!
14.19%
10.14%
girls.
 
 

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

local

Page 11A

Election Day is Tuesday, June 16

District 5 residents go to the Polls
A special election June
16 will allow residents of the
5th district of the DeKalb
County Board of Commissioners to choose a representative for a seat that has
been vacant for nearly two
years.
Ten candidates are vying
for the seat, which officially
became vacant May 8 upon
the resignation of Lee May
after nearly two years as interim DeKalb County CEO.
May stopped representing District 5 constituents
as a commissioner in July
2013 when he was appointed
interim DeKalb County
CEO by Gov. Nathan Deal,
following the indictment
and suspension of DeKalb
County CEO Burrell Ellis.
Each candidate was
given a questionnaire by The
Champion with instructions
to limit answers to 50 words.
Responses appear just as
they were received and those
that exceeded that limit were
truncated.

running for commissioner
is because there is a need.
Within recent months,
DeKalb County has a received a black eye as it relates to corruption. I want
to change the mindset of
the people of DeKalb and
the media, by bringing honesty, integrity, great morals,
transparency and….(truncated)
What do you understand the duties of this
office to be? The commissioner position is the most
ambiguous job in government to some. However a
commissioner is the person
that handles the legislative and the administrative
function of the county. And
some of the responsibilities
are as follows, zoning, mileage rates, (taxes) parks and
recreation, public works,
and ordinances. But in….
(truncated)
What expertise do you
have that will help you fulfill the duties of this office?
My qualification varies. I’ve
owned and co-owned several businesses, I worked for
several Fortune 500 companies in management. I am
the deputy director of Project360, a nonprofit organization, director of DRRLL
youth mentoring program, I
am also the senior pastor of
Deliverance Temple TCOGIC Inc., and sit on the….
(truncated)

munity development and
accounting
Occupation: educational
consultant/entrepreneur
What political offices have you held in the
past?  None
Have you ever been convicted of a crime?  Never
Why are you seeking
this office?  I am seeking to
contribute to the progress of
this county. I bring a spirit
of harmony and a critical
thinking ability that will
help all of us to work together to move the entire county
forward. I want to be part of
the solution to restore the
county’s reputation….(truncated)
What do you understand the duties of this
office to be? The duties of
the office of commissioner
include the power and authority to establish policies,
rules and regulations for the
county of DeKalb.
What expertise do you
have that will help you
fulfill the duties of this office? Having a background
in finance, accounting, a
legal background, and other
certificates allow me to fulfill the duties of this office. I
worked for DeKalb County
and understand it from the
inside-out. I know what
works and I know what
needs improvement.

Occupation: president
and CEO of TopTel USA,
Customer Contact Centers
What political offices have you held in the
past?  N/A
Have you ever been convicted of a crime?  No
Why are you seeking
this office?  I am running
for District 5 commissioner
to restore trust, strengthen
our economy and keep families safe. With the help of the
citizens of district 5, we can
clean up DeKalb and build
a better future for the next
generation.
What do you understand the duties of this
office to be? The Board of
Commissioners serves as
the legislative branch of the
DeKalb County government. The main duties of
this office consists of approving the County budget,
which is $1.2 billion across
all funds and approving
land use and zoning (which
controls what development
occurs in our community).
A county….(truncated)
What expertise do you
have that will help you
fulfill the duties of this office? As a business leader in
my community for over 20
years, I understand how to
run complex organizations,
create jobs, work within
financial constraints and
make sound decisions. This
experience will allow to successfully serve the citizens of
district 5.

Gregory Adams

Education: College
graduate degree in business
management at CTU
Occupation: Police officer, senior pastor
What political offices
have you held in the past?
No political office held, but
a candidate in two previous
elections—CEO of DeKalb
County and Commissioner
District 7
Have you ever been
convicted of a crime? No
criminal record
Why are you seeking
this office? My purpose of

Harmel Deanne Codi

Education: Juris doctorate—Birmingham/
Cumberland Law School;
MBA—University of Georgia. Certificates—project
management, economic
development, finance, com-

Jerome Edmondson

Education:  Cleary College, bachelor of science
business management, 1994;
Community College of Air
Force, associates in criminal
justice, 1985; Mississippi
Community College, criminal justice, 1981-1982

Georgia State University
Occupation:  Library
media specialist/writer
What political offices
have you held in the past?  I
have served two terms as the
president of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority Inc., Stone
Mountain/Lithonia Chapter; vice president, of the
same chapter; chairperson,
DeKalb County YWCA;
PTA president, Fairington
Elementary School, DeKalb
County School District
Have you ever been convicted of a crime? No
Why are you seeking
this office? It is critical to
me that we restore a high
level of excellence and accountability in the DeKalb
County government. Too
many of our citizens are
apathetic about issues that
affect our daily lives. I am
concerned that our young
people feel disenfranchised,
and don’t understand why
voting is important. 
What do you understand the duties of this
office to be? The duties are
vast, but some most important ones include determining priorities for capital
improvements, levying taxes
as needed, establishing and
abolishing public roads, and
protecting and preserving
the health, safety, welfare
and morals of the DeKalb
County citizens.
What expertise do
you have that will help
you fulfill the duties of
this office? I am a professional writer and a skilled
researcher. I’m trained to
look for answers to complex
questions. As a single mother, supporting three children through the DeKalb
schools and on to complete
their college degrees, I am
an expert at finding ways to
stretch dollars to meet critical needs.

Vaughn Irons
Gwendolyn “Gwen” R.
Green

Education: BS Ed., Purdue University; MS Ed., Purdue University; educational
leadership certification,

Education: Master of
business administration,
University of Maryland;
graduate level certification,

See District 5 on page 12A

local

Page 12A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

District 5 Continued From Page 11A

Irons

housing and community
development, University of
Maryland; bachelor of arts,
urban policy, Syracuse University; certification in real
estate development, University of Southern California
Ross Minority Program;
special certification: certified aging in place specialist
Occupation: management executive 
What political offices have you held in the
past? None
Have you ever been convicted of a crime? No
Why are you seeking
this office?  I decided to run
because I care about the lack
of progress in our community and our personal lives.
I want to use my resources;
relationships; business experience; economic development skills; and ability to
bring investment to the area;
to improve the quality of life
in South DeKalb.
What do you understand the duties of this
office to be? To protect,
defend and enable the goals
of the United States Constitution for all citizens;
appropriations; authorize
and collect taxes; determine
commission agenda; determine county debt load; authorize inter-governmental
agreements; determine how
land is to be used (zoning);
approve contracts; establish
local laws; set fees and fines;
make/affirm appointments.
What expertise do you
have that will help you
fulfill the duties of this office? Appointed by DeKalb’s
CEO and BOC to serve on
the DeKalb Development
Authority where I still serve.
Currently averaging 1,000
hours annually volunteering in DeKalb. 22 year work
history building communities. Served in leadership
roles with the Georgia
and DeKalb Chambers of
Commerce. My education
uniquely prepared me to
serve.

Mangham

Mereda Davis Johnson

What political offices have you held in the
past?  None /20-year community advocate
Have you ever been convicted of a crime? No 
Why are you seeking
this office? Serving as 5th
District commissioner is
a natural extension of my
commitment, dedication
and hard work to protect,
develop and improve the
5th District in a manner
beneficial to all of DeKalb.
I cannot be bought or intimidated; I will always put
the interests of the citizens
above my own.
What do you understand the duties of this office to be? Listen to constituents and address concerns
about county services; build
coalitions between government, business and community groups to achieve
goals; initiate and pass laws
that will improve and sustain a high quality of life;
make recommendations for
responsible spending; pass
annual budgets; serve with
honesty and integrity; be accountable.
What expertise do you
have that will help you fulfill the duties of this office?
My professional experience
has a depth that will be valuable to DeKalb, with expertise in law and mediation,
and previous experience
as a legislative aide in the
Georgia House, managing
attorney for Legal Aid, executive director of Pittsburgh
Partnership Community
Development Corporation
in Atlanta, and a financial
analyst with IBM.

Gina Mangham

Kathryn Rice

Education: Bachelor of
art and masters of arts, Tennessee State University; juris
doctor, Thurgood Marshall
School of Law, Texas Southern University  
Occupation: Attorney
What political offices have you held in the
past?  None
Have you ever been convicted of a crime?  No
Why are you seeking
this office? I love and want
to serve the citizens of
DeKalb County. I have lived
my entire adult life in South
DeKalb County. This is
where I have raised my family and built my law practice,
and it is where I want to stay
and help raise my future
grandkids. I….(truncated)
What do you understand the duties of this
office to be? Oversight and
funding for basis governmental services, including,
public safety, roads and
drainage, parks and recreation, zoning and land use,
water and sewer, and other
services.
What expertise do you
have that will help you
fulfill the duties of this office? 
I believe in honest government service, with elected officials working together to confront our challenges
while producing the kind
of economic development
that leads to clean, safe and
sustainable neighborhoods. I
have a history of community
service, working behind the
scenes on a broad range of
issues important to our….
(truncated)

Education:  Bachelor
of business administration finance, University of
Michigan; Juris doctorate,
John Marshall Law School in
Atlanta 
Occupation: Practicing
attorney and mediator 

Education: Ph.D. in public policy specializing in economic development and urban affairs from a joint program at Georgia Tech and
Georgia State University.
Completed requirements for
M.P.A. at Georgia State Uni-

Rice

Saunders

versity. B.A. in government
from Harvard University
Occupation: Consultant
in community and economic development
What political offices
have you held in the past?
None
Have you ever been convicted of a crime? No
Why are you seeking
this office? I am running
for office because I want to
do what I’ve been doing for
years–represent the issues
and concerns of residents
in southern DeKalb. I know
the issues; I am an excellent
organizer; I understand economic development; and I
am honest and ethical.
What do you understand the duties of this office to be? A commissioner’s
primary duty is to create
ordinances that oversee the
financial and geographical
needs of the county. This
includes approving appropriations; levying taxes;
regulating land use; and
maintaining water, sewer,
roads, sanitation and other
services. These services constitute the backbone of what
is needed for successful economic development.
What expertise do you
have that will help you fulfill the duties of this office?
I have a doctorate in public
policy specializing in economic development. I have
extensive community experience in southern DeKalb
(founder of SDIA and
founder of CCCSD for cityhood). I have been a strong
advocate for economic development (chair of SDIA
Economic Development and
supporter of the EMD-CID).

This is my first time running
for public office
Have you ever been convicted of a crime? No
Why are you seeking
this office? I’m running for
District 5 commissioner
because I believe in increasing the quality of life for the
county through balanced
and sustainable growth, increasing public safety, fiscal
responsibility and economic
development.
What do you understand the duties of this office to be? The duties of being commissioner of DeKalb
County include increasing
the quality of life for its citizens through sound policies
and fiscal responsibility.
What expertise do you
have that will help you
fulfill the duties of this office? My 18 years of public
service includes my involvement in the DeKalb Community Council for 12 years.
In addition, I’ve held several
elected roles with the Hidden Hills Civic Association
where I currently serve as
vice president of external affairs. Being co-chair of economic development of the
South DeKalb Improvement
….(truncated)

Kenneth Saunders III

George Turner Jr.

Education: Civil engineering technology, Southern Polytechnic State University
Occupation: Technology
consultant
What political offices
have you held in the past?

Education: B. A. degree,
Georgia State University
Occupation: Retired
from MARTA, last position
was general superintendent
of rail transportation.

See District 5 on page 16A

In

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

WEEK

local

Page 13A

Pictures

The Decatur Youth Baseball Opening Day Parade was held June 6. Starting in McKoy Park, the players from
all the teams rode in the back of trucks down East Lake Drive to Oakhurst Park for a special ceremony and
games. Former Atlanta Hawks player Mike Glenn threw out the first pitch for the opening day ceremony. Photos
by Gregory White

Decatur’s Policy Analyst Demetrius McCoy (center) along with Regional Director of Operations of the Krystal
Company James Smith (left) and Krystal team members recently celebrated the grand reopening of the Decatur restaurant on Lawrenceville Highway with an official ribbon-cutting ceremony on June 6.

Photos brought to you by DCTV
DeKalb County begins one-day-a-week sanitation collection service July 6, 2015
Residential customers will have same-day garbage, recyclable materials and yard trimmings collection
For more info, call or visit:

(404) 294-2900
www.rollingforwardtoone.com

local

Page 14A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Dunwoody reaches agreement
with county on parks bond

Kurt Straudt of Decatur was the featured speaker June 6 for Mountain Shadow Garden Club with a program
on succulents. Photo provided

Mountain Shadow Garden Club:

A garden for all
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

What started as an activity for men has turned into
an organization for all that
gives back.
Established in 1973, the
Mountain Shadow Garden
Club started in Atlanta by
the late Ralph Chewing.
Chewing started the club as
an all men club under The
Gardeners of America/Men’s
Garden Clubs of America.
The organization is a national organization with
more than 2,800 members
in local clubs all around the
United States. The clubs
put emphasis on gardening
education and community
beautification. 
Jim Tucker, who joined
the club in 1997, said Chewing, who lived in Smoke
Rise, later moved the club to
Stone Mountain.
“He gathered other
men to work in the garden,”
Tucker said, adding that the
garden club was active until
the 1990s.
“We needed help rejuvenating the club,” Tucker said.
“A part of the rejuvenation
was taking advantage of the
co-ed portion of The Gardeners of America. We were
missing out on half of the
gardeners.”
In 2001, the Mountain
Shadow Garden Club went
from an all-men’s club to a
co-ed club for those who
enjoy learning about a range
of topics on gardening and

plants. The club’s membership significantly increased.
“It’s a far cry from what
it was,” Tucker said about
the membership. “Once we
changed we got more people
in the club.”
Since then, the club has
become more active in the
community by having more
meetings, participating in
festivals and bringing in
speakers to talk about gardening.
On June 6, Kurt Straudt
was the featured speaker for
Mountain Shadow Garden
Club with a program on
succulents. A succulent is
any plant that has adapted
to dry, arid climates by storing water in its leaves, stems
and/or roots.
In May, the club hosted
a program titled “The Lost
Oaks of Georgia,” providing insight into the Quercus
(oak) species, according to
the club’s Facebook page.
Jim Rodgers, owner and
operator of Nearly Native
Nursery in Fayetteville, discussed the importance of the
plant.
“The club always relies
on free, voluntary speakers,”
Tucker said.
The club meets at
Eastminster Presbyterian
Church in Stone Mountain.
Tucker said the club also
started a scholarship fund
and each year awards a $500
scholarship to a deserving
student attending Gwinnett
Technical College.
Erika Marion of Lil-

burn, who is studying environmental horticulture, was
this year’s recipient.
Tucker said although the
changes to the club brought
in more people—some who
are young—most of the
members are seniors who
are retired.
“More older people are
interested in gardening.
That was true back then,
and it’s still true,” Tucker
said. “But, we brought [the
club] back alive.”

After agreeing in principle to accept approximately
$4 million of proceeds from
general obligation bonds issued by DeKalb County as
part of a lawsuit settlement
resolution, the city of Dunwoody and DeKalb County,
through separate majority
votes of each body, agreed to
approve the execution of an
intergovernmental agreement
for grants to implement the
terms of the settlement.
Under the terms of the
agreement, DeKalb County
agreed to pay Dunwoody approximately $4 million provided the city agrees to spend
the funds on specific park
improvements for the greater
benefit of all DeKalb County
residents.
The terms of the agreement require the city to allocate the proceeds of the Series
2001 and 2006 Bonds for
specified capital projects.
The specified funds allocated to projects under
the agreement include $3.2
million explicitly for the construction and development of
a new 5-acre park in Georgetown, $500,000 to update the
2011 Parks, Recreation and
Open Space Master Plan for
parks and greenspace projects
and $300,000 to be used for
construction of a great lawn
at Brook Run Park.
“We believe this agreement will not only fund the
construction of a new 5-acre
park but also greatly enhance future park space and

amenities,” said Dunwoody
Mayor Mike Davis. “Our goal
throughout negotiations with
the county was to acquire
bond money which our residents paid through previous
tax outlays. We view this as
a fair and reasonable settlement to this ongoing lawsuit
and one which will provide
residents and visitors to our
parks with tangible future
benefits.”
In 2010, the city of Dunwoody filed suit against
DeKalb County alleging
Georgia Code required the
county to remit proceeds
from the general obligation
bonds issued by the county
in 2006 to the city of Dunwoody. Over the next several
years the city and the county
engaged in negotiations, as
well as mediation sessions to
reach a settlement agreement.
Following mediation and
arbitration both parties approved the intergovernmental
agreement to implement the
terms of the settlement in
their respective meetings held
May 26.
“Previously approved
budget funds allocated for
the projects now financed by
the agreement grants are now
freed up to address the top
priorities in Brook Run Park
as defined by the citizens
within the community-developed 2011 Parks, Recreation
and Open Space Master Plan,”
Davis said.

June is National
Elder Abuse Awareness Month
,.

Please Join Us for Our 4th Annual
Safety in Numbers Bingo Event
:;
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2015
10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
open to the public

(free lunch begins at 12:00 p.m.)
Manuel Maloof Auditorium
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, Georgia
Limited Seating

and RSVP Required

RSVP BY JUNE 17, 2015 TO:
COMMUNITY PROSECUTOR HANNAH CHUNG
404.371.2820 hychung@dekalbcountyga.gov
in partnership with aarp, wellcare, and
the elder & disability law firm of victoria l. collier, pc

Sherry Boston
DEKALB COUNTY SOLICITOR-GENERAL

www.dekalbsolicitorgeneral.org
404.371.2201

MAKING DEKALB SAFER FOR ALL

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

local

Page 15A

Art Continued From Page 1A
mural behind Valero on
West Howard Avenue.
While attending Decatur
High School, Hynes and
King both completed senior projects that involving
street art. Hynes said during that time, they made
contacts within the city to
contact for future projects.
Contacted in January
by Junger, the pair brainstormed ideas for the area
and addressed city council
before deciding on the final
art, which is now known as
the “Underwater pass.”
The mural is composed
of silhouettes and divided
into four panels.
“We wanted to show that
change in imagination and
how your views change as
time progresses,” said King.
The first panel features a
young girl reaching upward

with a school of fish whirling around her.
In the second panel the
girl meets a boy and they
stand side by side in front
of animated dolphin and
octopus.
In the third panel the
girl and boy are a bit older
and are on a date. They are
still accompanied by a dolphin, and an octopus but
the features of the animals
are more realistic than animated.
In the final panel, Hynes
said the couple is married
with a child of their own.
He said the entire mural
is meant to be cyclical and
diverse.
“We like the idea of silhouettes because they can
be anybody. It’s diverse and
that’s very Decatur,” King
said.

Artists Evan Hynes and Spencer King draft their designs before applying the final paint. Photos by Travis Hudgons

Ellis Continued From Page 1A
statements and writings; three
counts of coercion of other employees to give anything of value for
political purposes; and a count each
of conspiracy in restraint of free and
open competition, and of conspiracy
to defraud a political subdivision.
Before his retrial began this
month, four charges were dropped:
two counts of theft and two of coercion.
Hodges said that the evidence
will show that, using the help of
then-chief procurement officer Kelvin Walton, Ellis used vendor lists
to raise money for his campaign.
“The defendant uses power to
punish vendors who refuse to give,”
Hodges said.
When Ellis called JoAnn Wise of
Cyber Inc., an information technology services company, “He began
the conversation by saying, ‘I see
your company has done a lot of
work for DeKalb County over the
years. Can I count on you for a contribution?’” Hodges told the jury.
During the conversation, Ellis
“became aggressive and insistent,”
Hodges said, when Wise did not
agree to donate to his campaign.
Ellis allegedly called Wise a few
more times. Wise did not return the
calls because she thought they were
“harassing” and of a personal nature, Hodges said.
“You will learn that the defendant
berated her” during another phone
call, Hodges said. “He scolded her
like she was a child.”
Ellis threatened to call her employer and say she was the reason
why the company would not be

doing work with DeKalb County,
Hodges said.
In 2012, while the alleged strongarming of vendors was occurring,
a special purpose grand jury was
exploring allegations of corruption
and bid-rigging, especially in the

When he agreed to turn state’s
witness, the DA’s Office “put a wire
on him” because “he was a documented liar,” Hodges said.
Those recorded conversations of
Ellis are the foundation of much of
the case against the suspended CEO.

‘We’re going to ask you to return
a verdict—one that speaks the
truth…and that is finding the
defendant guilty of every count
on that indictment.’
-Lawanda Hodges
watershed department, Hodges said.
When Walton testified before the
special purpose grand jury, he denied any wrongdoing or knowledge
of improprieties, Hodges said. But
investigators in the District Attorney’s Office “learned that he’s a liar.”
Walton was approached by officials from the DA’s Office who told
him, “You have two options. You can
be a witness or you can find yourself
on an indictment,” Hodges said.

“We’re going to ask you to return a verdict—one that speaks the
truth…and that is finding the defendant guilty of every count on that
indictment,” Hodges told the jury.
In his opening arguments, Ellis
defense attorney Craig Gillen said
Ellis did not personally benefit from
the campaign contributions.
“Not one thin dime. Not one thin
dime went into Burrell Ellis’ pocket
that wasn’t supposed to be there,”

Gillen said. “Not a single dime, will
the evidence show, went into this
man’s pocket that wasn’t supposed to
be there.
“There will not be any evidence
of any kickbacks,” Gillen said.
There was “no personal benefit
to him whatsoever,” Gillen said. “He
did not line his pockets. He called
folks and asked them for campaign
contributions and there is not a
single thing wrong with that.”
Recordings expected to be played
in court will show that there were
no threats to vendors who did not
contribute to Ellis’ campaign, Gillen
said.
Those recordings were made
when Walton was wearing a wire
from the District Attorney’s Office,
Gillen said.
“Burrell did not know he was
being recorded,” Gillen said. “He
thought he was talking to…a good
worker for the county.”
Instead he was a “grand jury perjurer,” Gillen said.
“He took an oath to tell the truth,
the whole truth and nothing but the
truth, then he lied and then he lied
and then he lied,” Gillen said. “He
lied again and he lied again and he
lied again.
“He then agrees to wear a wire,”
Gillen said.
“I will ask you to return a verdict
that speaks the truth…not guilty on
every count,” Gillen said.
The jury began hearing testimony
from witnesses on the morning of
June 9.

local

Page 16A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Ministry Continued From Page 2A

District 5 Continued From Page 12A
What political offices
have you held in the past?
I am president of District
5 Community Council,
president of Homeowners
United, President of Hunters’ Run II Homeowners
Association, I serve on the
board of directors for Arabia
Mountain Heritage Area,
I volunteer in State Senate
district 43. In 2008 I ran a
respectable campaign for
the Georgia House of Representatives, but I have never
been elected to a political
office.
Have you ever been convicted of a crime? No
Why are you seeking
this office? I am a volunteer

servant of the community. I
have always been involved
in community matters.
Since retiring over 12 years
ago, I became thoroughly
involved in community affairs. I like helping others
by solving quality of life issues for in community. Here
is a chance to get involved
….(truncated)
What do you understand the duties of this office to be? The duties of this
office is to set policy in reference to county operation.
That also includes levying
taxes to fund the necessary
services provided by the
county. To approve a budget,
to provide for public safety,

had that community room
so they all came into the
room and started talking,”
Burrus said. “It’s just a nice
way to get people to meet
each other.”
The ministry started
off serving just cookies and
punch, Burrus said. Then
she thought, “I’m a foodie.
We need more than that.
Let’s do soup and sandwiches. That’s basically what we
did. And then it evolved.
“For them it’s a full meal
because everyone doesn’t

sanitation, water and sewage
treatment as well as local infrastructure and utilities.
What expertise do you
have that will help you
fulfill the duties of this office? I have experience in
developing procedures of
operation, I have experience
in developing and managing
a large budget. I have experience managing projects
and reviewing contracts for
compliance, and chairing
committees to hash out details of scheduled projects.
I have experience leading
various taskforces to solve
problems of transit operation ….(truncated)

have access to shopping or
someone to come in and
cook,” Burrus said. “They
just don’t have the means
to do it. In the summer, we
have a lot of pasta salads
and garden salads and sandwiches. In the winter, I do
heavy, hearty soups—something that will stick to their
ribs.”
Burrus said, “Some
do come to church, but it
doesn’t matter, as long as we
take the church to them.”

Healthcare Continued From Page 16A
ion, which opened in 1952
to serve children in the
Black community, is now
part of the Children’s system. Among its initial major donors was Gone With
the Wind author Margaret
Mitchell.
Noteworthy milestones
during Children’s 100-year
history include:
• Early in its history, Children’s became one of the
first hospitals to directly
involve parents in their
child’s care, beginning
with a policy of allowing
parents to spend the night
at the hospital.
• In 1933, M. Hines Roberts, M.D., Egleston’s first
medical director, helped
establish the American
Board of Pediatrics to advance the science, study
and practice of pediatrics.
• In 1939, Scottish Rite
Medical Director Dr. Hi-

ram Kite achieved international recognition for
his non-surgical treatment
of patients with clubfoot.
• In 1958, Asa G. Yancey
Sr., M.D., the first Black
physician on staff, developed the first accredited
surgical training program
for Black physicians in
Georgia. Yancey, the first
medical director of the
Hughes Spalding Pavilion,
was Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr’s physician.
• In 1983 Egleston joined
the Children’s Miracle Network, which raises funds
nationally for 170 pediatric
hospitals.
• The hospital’s first liver
transplant was performed
in 1987. Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Liver
Transplant Program has
become one of the largest
pediatric liver transplant
programs in the country.

Business Continued From Page 10A
I give it away?,” she asked.
“I had to explain that
you have to take money out
of your pocket and give it to
them because you have to
pay for the slushy. If you’re
giving it to them, you might
as well give them a dollar.
We settled on half price,
which is sort of a break even
type scenario,” Slappey said.
Ashley said she likes the
business because she gets to
eat slushies, and it’s also fun
to operate the machine.
“I want to be a businesswoman when I grow up so
this is really good for me to
learn about business,” she
said.

Slappey said he chose
to have his girls run a snow
cone business because it was
a relatively low-cost and no
risk investment. He plans to
continue to help them operate the business until they’re
no longer interested.
“I just want them to understand broadly how businesses work. If they have to
pay for some piece of equipment to produce some item,
they need to understand that
when they sell whatever it is
that they’re producing, they
have to be able to pay for
that equipment and pay for
the cost of items to build it,”
Slappey said.

Since 1987, Children’s
has performed more than
1,000 pediatric transplants.
• In 1989, the U.S. government named Egleston the
home base of the nation’s
first pediatric disaster
medical assistance team.

Notice of Public Hearing for
Clarkston Millage Rate
Notice is hereby given that prior to setting the tax
millage rate for 2014, the Clarkston Mayor and
Council will hold a Public Hearing at City Hall,
3921 Church Street, Clarkston Georgia, on
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at 7:00pm on the
proposed millage rate. The City Council is
proposing to adopt a millage rate for 2015 that
exceed the rollback rate by 53.80 percent. All
concerned citizens are invited to attend.

Today, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta cares
for more than half a million patients each year and
its three metro Atlanta
hospitals specialize in caring just for children and
teens.“Children are not just
small adults,” Stevens said.
“They require special equipment, special knowledge
and special skills. We’re
proud that Children’s has
been able to provide that for
100 years.”

NOTICE
The Stone Mountain City Council does hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be held at the
City Hall, 875 Main Street, Stone Mountain, GA on Tuesday, July 7, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. and pursuant to the requirements of
O.C.G.A. Section 48-5-32 does hereby publish the following presentation of the current year's tax digest and levy, along with the
history of the tax digest and levy for the past five years.

CURRENT 2015 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
COUNTY WIDE
Real & Personal
Motor Vehicles

2010

2011

2012

2013

97,052,662

68,582,587

67,583,220

56,816,226

67,083,820

79,826,349

5,667,510

5,558,380

5,831,000

5,971,380

4,758,250

3,187,670

600

600

4,000

Mobile Homes

2014

2015

Timber - 100%
Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest
Less M& O Exemptions

0

0

0

0

0

0

102,720,172

74,140,967

73,414,220

62,788,206

71,842,670

83,018,019

2,060,566

1,578,133

1,813,313

1,652,449

2,074,380

2,289,744

Net M & O Digest
State Forest Land Assistance
Grant Value

100,659,606

72,562,834

71,600,907

61,135,757

69,768,290

80,728,275

0

0

0

0

0

0

Adjusted Net M&O Digest

100,659,606

72,562,834

71,600,907

61,135,757

69,768,290

80,728,275

10.000

14.300

18.800

28.030

22.000

22.000

10.000

14.300

18.800

28.030

22.000

22.000

$1,006,596

$1,037,649

$1,346,097

$1,713,635

$1,534,902

$1,776,022

-$68,842

$31,052

$308,449

$367,538

-$178,733

$241,120

-6.40%

3.08%

29.73%

27.30%

-10.43%

15.71%

Gross M&O Millage
Less Rollbacks
Net M&O Millage
Total City Taxes Levied
Net Taxes $ Increase
Net Taxes % Increase

local

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Doraville hires
a new city clerk
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
Doraville officials have
added a new face to its
growing staff.
Sherry D. Henderson
was hired on May 28 as a
city clerk for Doraville.
Henderson formerly
worked as a city clerk and
elections superintendent
in Riverdale and has more
than 15 years of experience
in automating government
processes, spearheading an
open records tracking system solution and providing
assistance in the development and management of
municipal operating budgets.
“I have a high reverence for the office of the city
clerk, and it’s even more rewarding when you get to do
what you love with a great
group of people,” Henderson
said.
Under the administrative direction of Doraville
city manager Shawn Gillen,
Henderson will be responsible for directing, managing, supervising and coordinating the activities and
operations of the city clerk’s
office including preparation
and recording of the activities and decisions of the city
council, codification and
maintenance of official records.
She said a few of her
goals are to “lead initiatives
to automate government
processes–such as open records and records management.”
She said, “I believe in
and encourage a transparent
government. The records
belong to the people, I’m
simply a good steward over
them. I’m interested in developing and implementing
strategies for citizen engagement and community initiatives. I want everyone to be
excited about Doraville and
its’ next chapter in history.”
Henderson is currently
working to get her municipal clerk certification
at Carl Vinson Institute of
Government at the Univer-

commitment to public service led me Doraville. I am
deeply honored and humbled to serve as Doraville’s
city clerk.”
Henderson is a member
of numerous professional
groups including Georgia
Municipal Association, National League of Cities and
the International Institute of
Municipal Clerks.

Page 17A

Notice of Public Hearing for Clarkston
Millage Rate
Notice is hereby given that prior to setting the
tax millage rate for 2015, the Clarkston Mayor and
Council will hold a Public Hearing at City Hall,
3921 Church Street, Clarkston Georgia, on
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at 7:00pm on the proposed
millage rate. The City Council is proposing to
adopt a millage rate for 2015 that exceed the
rollback rate by 53.80 percent. All concerned
citizens are invited to attend.

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX INCREASE 
Henderson

sity of Georgia. She also has
experience in directing improvements to the election
process, implementation of
council agenda management
systems, and managed an
initiative to automate many
government processes with
the introduction of digital
systems.
“My professional goal
is to be part of a government organization actively
working together to achieve
goals for the greater good of
its citizens and businesses
–mayor and council, city
manager and staff working
with citizens to enhance the
quality of life for all,” said
Henderson.
She added, “We all have
a responsibility to Doraville’s
stakeholders. My sincere

 
   The Governing Authority of the City of Clarkston has tentatively 
adopted a millage rate which will require an increase in property 
taxes by 53.80 percent.   
 
   All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearing on this tax 
increase to be held at City Hall on June 30, 2015 at 7:00pm. 
 
   Additional Public Hearings will be held at City Hall on July 7, 2015 at 
10:30 am and on July 7, 2015 at 7:00pm.   
   This tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 21.15 mills, an 
increase of 7.381 mills over the rollback rate.  Without this tentative 
tax increase, the millage rate will be no more than 13.719 mills.   
   The proposed tax increase for a home with a fair market value of 
$65,000 is approximately $191.90.  The proposed increase on a non‐
homestead property with a fair market value of $185,000 is 
approximately $546.19. 
 

CITY OF CLARKSTON
CURRENT PROPOSED 2014 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
City Tax

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Real & Personal

87,540,369

72,710,992

64,816,123

58,592,799

64,881,851

107,610,419

Motor Vehicles

5,223,890

5,088,980

5,462,080

6,244,650

5,266,300

3,300,880

Mobile Homes

0

0

0

0

0

0

Timber - 100%

0

0

0

0

0

0

Heavy Duty Equipment

0

0

0

0

0

0

Gross Digest

92,764,259

77,799,972

70,278,203

64,837,449

70,148,151

110,911,299

Less M & O Exemptions

1,629,182

1,595,543

1,618,667

1,683,228

1,798,483

1,945,711

Net M & O Digest

91,135,077

76,204,429

68,659,536

63,154,221

68,349,668

108,965,588

Gross M & O Millage

11.313

11.313

14.000

17.950

17.950

21.100

Less Rollbacks

0.000

2.687

3.950

0.000

3.200

0.000

Net M & O Millage

11.313

14.000

17.950

17.950

21.150

21.100

$1,031,011

$1,066,862

$1,232,439

$1,133,618

$1,445,595

$2,299,174

#REF!
#REF!

$35,851
3.48%

$165,577
15.52%

-$98,820
-8.02%

$311,977
27.52%

$853,578
59.05%

Total County Taxes Levied
Net Taxes $ Increase
Net Taxes % Increase

District 5 Election Day•Tuesday, June 16

Education

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Page 18A

Decatur man recognized as honor graduate
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
The University of Georgia (UGA) recognized 15
first honor graduates during
its spring Commencement
ceremonies May 8 at Sanford
Stadium, including Joseph
Sharp from Decatur.
The honor graduates were recognized for
maintaining a 4.0 cumulative grade point average
throughout their undergraduate studies, as well as
in all college-level transfer
work attempted prior to or
following enrollment at the
university.
UGA President Jere W.
Morehead said, “We commend these graduates for
their high standards of personal excellence and for their
outstanding achievements as
students of the University of
Georgia.”
“We wish them well as
they pursue their varied interests,” he said.
Sharp received his bachelor’s degree in biology-psychology from the Franklin
College of Arts and Sciences.
“It was an honor to sit in
the front row at graduation
and be recognized in front of
my class. It was much more
rewarding to see my parents
stand up in Sanford Stadium
and be recognized by the
15,000 plus students, family
and friends in the stadium,”
Sharp said.
He added, “I worked
hard to maintain grades

Sharp

but it is important to recognize that grades are not
everything. Every student
in Stanford Stadium excels
at something and deserves
recognition. Whether it

was devoting themselves to
community involvement,
triple majoring, diving into
extra-curricular activities,
or working two-jobs to pay
their way through school, I
have always been motivated
by my peers.”
Sharp was born in Columbia, Mo., but moved to
Decatur a day after his first
birthday.
While attending Lakeside High School, Sharp also
took dual enrollment classes
at Georgia Perimeter College
and became eligible for the
HOPE scholarship.
He said he’s “tried to
adopt the long-term view

See Graduate on page 19A

Joseph Sharp at the Crossroads community health center in South
Africa.

DEKALB COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION

DEKALB COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION

FINAL BUDGET ADOPTION
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2016

2nd PUBLIC
MILLAGE RATE HEARING

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

TIME

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

LOCATION

7:00 p.m.

TIME

J. David Williamson Board Room
Administrative & Instructional Complex
1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd.
Stone Mountain, GA 30083

LOCATION

11:30 a.m.

Citizens interested in reviewing a detailed copy of the program
based budget may do so by visiting the DeKalb County School
District website at www.dekalb.k12.ga.us.

J. David Williamson Board Room
Administrative & Instructional Complex
1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd.
Stone Mountain, GA 30083

Citizens interested in reviewing a detailed copy of the program
based budget may do so by visiting the DeKalb County School
District website at www.dekalb.k12.ga.us.
FOR INFORMATION, CALL THE OFFICE OF THE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AT 678-676-0133.

FOR INFORMATION, CALL THE OFFICE OF THE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AT 678-676-0069.

NOTICE
The Board of Education of the City of Decatur does hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be held at the
Board Room of the Central Office at 125 Electric Avenue, Decatur, Georgia on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 at 6:30 PM
and pursuant to the requirements of O.C.G.A. 48-5-32, does hereby publish the following presentation of the current year's tax digest
and levy, along with the history of the tax digest and levy for the past five years.

CURRENT 2015 TAX DIGEST AND FIVE YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
Fiscal Year
Assessment Ratio
REAL PROPERTY
PERSONAL PROPERTY
PUBLIC UTILITIES
MOTOR VEHICLE
GROSS DIGEST
LESS M&O EXEMPTIONS
NET M&O DIGEST
GROSS M&O MILLAGE
LESS ROLLBACKS
NET M&O MILLAGE
NET TAXES LEVIED
NET TAXES $ INCREASE
NET TAXES % INCREASE

2010

2011
50%

1,157,883,900
20,069,600
11,673,700
46,119,000
1,235,746,200
63,620,529
1,172,125,671
19.90
0.00
19.90
$23,325,301
($201,631)
-0.86%

2012
50%

1,149,844,600
21,146,700
18,933,750
46,119,000
1,236,044,050
65,428,635
1,170,615,415
20.90
0.00
20.90
$24,465,862
$1,140,561
4.89%

2013
50%

1,168,366,733
22,174,136
14,297,200
49,311,000
1,254,149,069
65,244,138
1,188,904,931
20.90
0.00
20.90
$24,848,113
$382,251
1.56%

PROPOSED
2015

2014
50%

1,168,516,565
23,211,680
14,639,953
52,979,900
1,259,348,098
66,558,918
1,192,789,180
20.90
0.00
20.90
$24,929,294
$81,181
0.33%

50%
1,326,224,078
22,086,973
15,152,714
47,331,663
1,410,795,427
65,278,363
1,345,517,064
20.50
0.00
20.50
$27,583,100
$2,653,806
10.65%

50%
1,593,248,082
23,091,526
15,236,377
35,521,588
1,667,097,573
64,916,277
1,602,181,296
19.50
0.00
19.50
$31,242,535
$3,659,435
13.27%

Education

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Page 19A

Graduate Continued From Page 18A
that hard work now will
pay off down the road. The
thought of attending medical
school and having the opportunity to have a positive
impact on the lives of other
people has been my biggest
motivator,” he said.
In 2013 Sharp spent 12
weeks in South Africa shad-

owing in township clinics
and working on a research
project aimed at increasing
adherence to antiretroviral
therapy (ART) for people
living with HIV.
Sharp is currently in
South Africa to conduct a research project aimed to assist
people infected with HIV.

“The burden of HIV on
the people of South Africa
is hard to fully describe. In
some of the communities in
which I have worked, one
in three people are infected
with HIV,” Sharp said.
He said, “While my
impact on the long-term
outcome of the project will

Power
IN
THE

The Mayor and City Council of the City of Lithonia has tentatively
adopted a millage rate which will require an increase in property taxes
by 2.98%.

Weight
Loss
Clinic

All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearing on this tax
increase to be held at City Hall, 6920 Main Street on Tuesday, June
23, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. A third public hearing will be
held at City Hall, 6920 Main Street on Monday, July 6, 2015 at 6:30
p.m.

Every 2nd & 4th
Saturday
10am-2pm

Only

$95

South Africa are to earn an
MD/MPH from Emory University School of Medicine
and Rollins School of Public
Health.
His long-term goal is
to work in academic global
health as a medical epidemiologist.

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX INCREASE

PEWS

5026 Snapfinger Woods
Drive, Suite 110
Decatur, GA

be minimal, my vision is to
provide access to ART for all
people living with HIV in a
way that is unobtrusive to
their daily lives and encourages long-term retention and
adherence to support a long,
full and happy life.”
Sharp said his immediate
plans after returning from

Call today

888-856-9004
*Blood work
*Lipotonix (fat burner injection)
*Appetite suppressant
*Meal planning

This tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 17.000, an
increase of 0.492 mills. Without this tentative tax increase, the millage
rate will be no more than 16.508 mills.

Can lose up to 10 pounds per month or more!

This proposed tax increase for a home with a fair market value of
$36,000 is approximately $24.00. The proposed increase on nonhomestead property with a fair market value of $70,000 is
approximately $48.00.

Examination done by Nurse Practitioner!

NOTICE
The Mayor and Lithonia City Council do hereby announce that the millage rate will be set at a meeting to be
 
held at the Lithonia City Hall, 6920 Main Street, Lithonia 30058 on Monday, July 6, 2015 at 7:00 PM and pursuant to the requirements of O.C.G.A. Section
48-5-32 do hereby publish the following presentation of the current year's tax digest and levy, along with the history of the tax
digest and levy for the past five years.  

 

CURRENT 2014 TAX DIGEST AND 5 YEAR HISTORY OF LEVY
 
COUNTY WIDE

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Real & Personal

$

26,674,180

$

20,765,829

$

19,375,805

$

17,690,700

$

20,095,784

$

22,214,312

Motor Vehicles

$

1,582,040

$

1,615,590

$

1,690,000

$

1,853,380

$

1,554,440

$

981,640

Mobile Homes

$

176,149

$

176,149

$

117,094

$

117,094

$

93,990

$

93,990

23,289,942

Timber - 100%
Heavy Duty Equipment
Gross Digest

$

28,432,369

$

22,557,568

$

21,182,899

$

19,661,174

$

21,744,214

$

Less M& O Exemptions

$

565,746

$

545,059

$

562,008

$

552,462

$

526,915

$

536,850

Net M & O Digest
State Forest Land Assistance
Grant Value

$

27,866,623

$

22,012,509

$

20,620,891

$

19,108,712

$

21,217,299

$

22,753,092

$

-

Adjusted Net M&O Digest

$

27,866,623

$

22,012,509

$

20,620,891

$

19,108,712

$

21,217,299

$

22,753,092

Gross M&O Millage

13.178

15.205

16.552

17.869

13.178

15.205

16.552

17.869

$367,226

$334,700

$341,317

Net Taxes $ Increase

-$7,920

-$32,526

$6,617

Net Taxes % Increase

-2.11%

-8.86%

1.98%

17.869

17.000

Less Rollbacks
Net M&O Millage
Total County Taxes Levied

17.869

$341,454 $

379,132

$137 $

37,678

0.04%

9.94%

17.000
$386,803
$

7,671
1.98%

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

TheChampion

local

Page 20A
For Prices, Deadlines and Information

Visit www.championclassifieds.com

Classifieds

Rates: $30.00 for up to 40 words, each additional word $0.60.
All ads are prepaid! All Major credit cards accepted!

Ads Due By Friday - Noon
for next publication date.

The Champion is not responsible for any damages resulting from advertisements. All sales final.

AUCTIONS
ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in over 100 newspapers
for only $350. Your 25-word classified ad will reach
more than1 million readers. Call Jennifer Labon at the
Georgia Newspaper Service, 770-454-6776.

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DISCLAIMER: We do not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate, or intend to discriminate, on any illegal basis. Nor do we knowingly accept employment advertisements that are not
bona-fide job offers. All real estate advertisements are subject to the fair housing act and we do not accept advertising that is in violation of the law. The law prohibits discrimination based on color,
religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Trainer Angus Garay has been training
dogs since he was 18 years old.

business

Page 21A

Kennel Manager Ashley Wells, left, and front desk employee Lona
White say playing with the dogs is a favorite part of their jobs.

According to officials at The Ark, its kennels are state-of-the-art. Photos
by Kathy Mitchell

The Ark brings flood of animal care services
by Kathy Mitchell
After 10 successful years
in Chattanooga, Tenn., the
most recent two marked by
recognition in The Chattanooga Free Press’s “Best
of the Best” competition,
The Ark Pet Spa & Hotel
has opened its first Georgia
location.
The pet facility opened
April 25 in Doraville, offering boarding, daycare, training and grooming for dogs,
cats and other small pets at
its first facility outside Chattanooga.
“What makes us stand
out from other businesses
of our type is our free-play
philosophy. Dogs that are
left with us won’t be cooped
up in a kennel all day. We
let them run and play with
staff and with other dogs of
similar size and temperament. We believe this makes
them better dogs. They are
healthier, happier and more
social with humans and with
other dogs,” said Adam
Harbin, marketing director
for The Ark.
Dogs initially go through
an assessment period, Harbin explained, to establish
that they are friendly with
people and other pets. They
then are allowed to join
free play, running, jumping
and romping under watchful eyes of professionally
trained staff members.
Trainer Angus Garay
works with dogs that need
help before living comfortably with humans or other
animals. “I’ve been training
dogs since I was 18,” said
Garay, who recently moved

to Georgia from Los Angeles. “When I saw this place
I was struck by what a nice
facility it is. It’s clean and
well designed. There’s an
air of permanence. I felt like
it’s here to stay.”
“All of us love animals,”
said employee Lona White.
“Everybody on staff really
enjoys playing with the
dogs and the other animals.”
Most of the staff do volunteer work with rescue dogs
in addition to their jobs, she
said.
Kennel Manager Ashley
Wells, who was assistant
manager at one of the Tennessee locations, said she is
impressed with The Ark’s
business model. “Everything we do is geared toward making the animals
happy and making the customers happy.”
The entire facility can
be viewed on pet cams that
allow customers who are
given a user identification
number and a password to
see what their pets are doing
at any time—24 hours a day.
“Even if the customer is on
vacation in England he can
log on and watch his pet,”
White said.
While dogs are a specialty, a wide range of pets
are welcome, Harbin said.
“We’ve had chickens, pot
belly pigs and, of course,
cats. The cats have a room
with cat trees for climbing.
We have an African grey
parrot that’s been [at one of
the Chattanooga locations]
for six months,” he continued. The facility is equipped
to accept reptiles, monkeys
and a variety of other ani-

mals.
“If we don’t know how
to care for a particular
animal, we’ll learn,” Harbin said. “We are, after all,
The Ark.” Animals can be
boarded for a day, a week or
months, he said.
White said the Peachtree
Industrial Boulevard location was chosen because
there were few pet care facilities in the area. “We’re
near the Doraville/Dunwoody line and there are
lots of people with pets in
the area. Also, we’re near
I-285 and I-85 so we’re
easy to get to. People tell

us they’re glad we’re here
because before they were
taking their dogs a long way
to board them or have them
groomed.”
The Doraville facility
has a 6,000-square-foot
building with what it calls
“state-of-the-art” kennels
for dogs of all sizes as well
as housing for cats and
other animals. “The dog
area opens into the outdoor
play area, which features
pet turf—not grass,” Harbin
said. “The advantage of pet
turf is it’s cleaner and safer
than a natural surface. It’s
antimicrobial and it’s easier

to keep germs to a minimum. Also, if there’s been
a hard rain, the area doesn’t
get muddy so the dogs stay
cleaner. Their owners appreciate that.”
There is a small retail
area that offers pet-related
items from odor-removing
candles to pet food. “All of
our food is high-end and
grain-free,” White noted.
A second building on the
property is approximately
4,000 square feet and is being built out to allow The
Ark to expand.

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX INCREASE 
The DeKalb County Board of Commissioners has tentatively adopted a millage rate which 
will require an increase in property taxes by 40.00 percent. 
All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearings on this tax increase to be held at the 
Manuel Maloof Auditorium, 1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, GA 30030 on June 23, 2015 at 
10:00 am and 6:00 pm. 
Times and places of additional public hearings on this tax increase are at the DeKalb County 
Manuel J. Maloof Center Auditorium, 1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, GA 30030 on July 14, 
2015 at 10:00 am. 
This tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 11.683 mills, an increase of 3.338 mills.  
Without this tentative tax increase, the millage rate will be no more than 8.345 mills.  The 
proposed tax increase for a home with a fair market value of $175,000 is approximately 
$111.36 and the proposed tax increase for non‐homestead property with a fair market value 
of $250,000 is approximately $273.72. 
This increase is due to a temporary shift in millages done in FY 2014 to keep the total tax rate 
constant or smaller.   DeKalb County has seven basic tax levies.  Only two are used in this 
required calculation.  In 2014, these two rates combined went down from 11.51 to 9.02 while 
other rates were increased temporarily.  In 2015, the two rates combined went back up to 
11.28 which still are below the 2014 rate.  This upward shift requires an advertisement of an 
increase.   When all seven levies are added together the typical resident will see a decrease 
from 21.21 to 20.81 mills in 2015. 

InclusIveness

DeKalb Chamber of Commerce • Two Decatur Town Center, 125 Clairemont Ave., Suite, Decatur, GA 30030 • 404.378.8000 • www.dekalbchamber.org

local

Page 22A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

The Champion receives top press award for eighth time
For the seventh consecutive year, and the eighth
time since 2007, The Champion Newspaper has received
the top award in its division
in the Georgia Press Association.
The Champion Newspaper won the 2015 first-place
general excellence award
in the association’s Better
Newspaper Contest on June
5 at the Westin Jekyll Island
Hotel during the group’s
129th annual convention.
The Champion also won the
award in 2007 and 20092014.
“The Champion does
an outstanding job serving several DeKalb County
communities with a relentlessly local focus, including
news about politics, government, events/activities, civic
organizations, churches,
businesses, social issues and
controversies, construction
projects, schools/education,
features/human interest,
economy, crime sports and
more,” a judge said about
The Champion’s local news
coverage, which won first
place.
The newspaper’s front
page, designed by production manager Kemesha
Hunt, also won first place,
with a judge citing its “great

use of photos,” “uncluttered
design” and “consistency of
style from issue to issue.”
“I appreciated how The
Champion makes the most
of what it can do,” a judge
stated about the newspaper’s lifestyle coverage. “I
could easily surmise the
focus of the publication—to
teach readers something
about their community.”
The Champion won first
place for its lifestyle coverage. Gale Horton Gay is the
lifestyle editor. Gay also won
first place for feature writing.
Managing editor Andrew Cauthen won first
place for education coverage. A judge cited Cauthen’s
“excellent use of photos and
editorial content in education writing.”
Photojournalist Travis
Hudgons won first place in
the sports feature photo category for a “touching photo”
of the jersey of a Miller
Grove basketball player who
died.
Hudgons also won first
and second place in the
photo essay category.
Cartoonist Fitzroy
James won first place in the
weekly paper division for an
editorial cartoon about the
DeKalb County School Dis-

DEKALB COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION
3rd PUBLIC
MILLAGE RATE HEARING

trict’s superintendent search.
James also won second place
in the category.
Nigel Roberts won first
place in the religion coverage category.
“The articles by this
author are solid and this
newspaper should be thankful to have these articles for
its readers,” a judge stated
about Roberts.
Other awards won by
The Champion are:
 

TIME
6:15 p.m.

LOCATION
J. David Williamson Board Room
Administrative & Instructional Complex
1701 Mountain Industrial Blvd.
Stone Mountain, GA 30083

Citizens interested in reviewing a detailed copy of the program
based budget may do so by visiting the DeKalb County School
District website at www.dekalb.k12.ga.us.
FOR INFORMATION, CALL THE OFFICE OF THE
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AT 678-676-0133.

• Editorial page, third place;
• Editorial writing, Andrew
Cauthen, second and third
place;
• Hard news writing, Andrew Cauthen, second
place;
• Investigative reporting,
Andrew Cauthen, Travis Hudgons and Donna
Turner, third place.
• Headline writing, John
Hewitt, second place, and
Andrew Cauthen, third
place.

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX INCREASE 
   The Board of Education of the City of Decatur has tentatively adopted a 
millage rate of 19.50 mills which will require an increase in property taxes 
by 7.73% for fiscal year 2015‐2016.   This is a decrease from the 2014‐2015 
millage rate of 20.50 mills.   
   All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearing on this tax 
increase to be held at the Board Room of the Central Office, 125 Electric 
Avenue, Decatur, Georgia on Thursday, June 18, 2015 at 9:00 a.m.   
   Times and places of additional public hearings on this tax increase are at 
the Board Room of the Central Office, 125 Electric Avenue, Decatur, 
Georgia on Thursday, June 18, 2015 at 6:00 p.m. and Tuesday, July 14, 
2015 at 6:00 p.m.  This tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 
19.50 mills, an increase of 1.4 mills over the rollback millage.  Without this 
tentative tax increase, the millage rate will be no more than 18.10 mills.  
The proposed tax increase for a home with a fair market value of $400,000 
is approximately $280.  
 

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

• Newspaper website, maintained by Donna Turner,
second place;
• Information graphics, Travis Hudgons, third place;
• Website photo, Travis
Hudgons, second place;
• Business coverage, Kathy
Mitchell, second and third
place;
• News photo, Travis Hudgons, second place;
• Sports writing, Carla
Parker, second and third
place;

Notice of Property Tax Increase

The City of Stone Mountain has tentatively adopted a millage rate
which will require an increase in property taxes by 14.83% percent.
All concerned citizens are invited to public hearings on this tax
increase to be held at City Hall, 875 Main Street, Stone Mountain, GA
30083 on Monday, June 22, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Time and place of an additional public hearing on this tax increase is
at City Hall, 875 Main Street, Stone Mountain, GA 30083 on
Tuesday, July 7, 2015 at
7:00 p.m.
The tentative increase will result in a millage rate of 22.00 mils, an
increase of 2.842 mils. Without this tentative tax increase, the
millage rate will be no more than 19.158 mils. The proposed tax
increase for a home with a fair market value of $50,000 is
approximately $56.84 and the proposed tax increase for nonhomestead property with a fair market value of $75,000 is
approximately $85.26.

The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Sports

Page 23A

Emory again places in Directors’ Cup standings
The Emory University Department of Athletics finished eighth in
the 2014-15 Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup Division III standings, as
announced by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA).
The eighth-place finish represents the 14th time in the past 15
years that Emory has recorded a

top-10 showing—2000-01 (fourth),
2001-02 (fifth), 2002-03 (second),
2003-04 (second), 2004-05 (eighth),
2005-06 (fourth), 2006-07 (ninth),
2007-08 (seventh), 2008-09 (sixth),
2009-10 (18th), 2010-11 (seventh),
2011-12 (sixth), 2012-13 (second)
and 2013-14 (sixth). Emory registered a final total of 807 points, the
fifth-highest mark for the depart-

ment since the inception of the Cup
in 1995-96.
Emory scored Directors’ Cup
points in 13 sports in 2014-15 and
captured a national championship
in women’s swimming and diving
while claiming runner-up berths
in volleyball and women’s tennis.
Other teams to come away with top10 finishes in the Directors’ Cup in-

cluded men’s swimming and diving
(fourth), men’s tennis (fifth), baseball (fifth), men’s basketball (ninth)
and softball (ninth).
Emory athletics also claimed
nine University Athletic Association championships during this past
school year–volleyball, men’s bas-

See Emory on page 24A

Complete the mission.
Earn your degree online.
visit gpc.edu/militaryoutreach

Shatryce Hill
GPC Student
Marine Corps Veteran

A BETTER WAY FORWARD

local

Page 24A The Champion Free Press, Friday, June 12, 2015

Emory

DeKalb suspends its P-card program

ketball, women’s swimming
and diving, men’s swimming and diving, men’s tennis, women’s tennis, men’s
outdoor track and field,
softball, and baseball.
Williams College
(Miss.) finished in the No.
1 spot with 1,053 points,
its 18th Directors’ Cup title
in 20 years. Johns Hopkins was runner-up with
1,016.75 points. A total of
322 schools accumulated
points in the final Division
III standings.
The Directors’ Cup
is a program that honors
institutions maintaining
a broad-based program,
achieving success in many
sports, both men’s and
women’s. Began in 1993-94
for Division I by NACDA
and USA Today, it was
expanded in 1995-96 to
include Division II, III and
the NAIA and, in 2011-12,
expanded to the Junior/
Community Colleges.
Points are awarded based
on each institution’s finish in up to 18 sports–nine
women’s and nine men’s.

Following the preliminary finding of special investigators, interim
DeKalb County CEO Lee May announced June 8 that the county’s
purchasing card (P-card) program
is suspended for most users.
County P-cardholders will be
able to use their P-cards “with narrow exceptions in extreme circumstances of public safety and public
works emergencies,” a county news
release stated.
“Just twelve weeks ago, I announced my intention to return
DeKalb County to the people;
implement real reform; and bring
about more transparency, ethics
and integrity–to the public’s trust,”
May stated. “Progress is being made
every day but major challenges remain in our commitment to root
out any abuse, corruption or malfeasance. This is the primary reason
why we hired special investigators.”
According to a news release,
the special investigators’ summary
“outlines examples of dubious expenses charged to the county with
no apparent direct benefit to county
government and/or with no justification or explanation given.” Such
expenses included improper use of
tax exempt status; purchases of unauthorized items, as outlined in the
current policy; and splitting pur-

Continued From Page 22A

chases to circumvent the county’s
$1,000 per transaction limit.
The P-card use suspension is
effective by close of business on Friday, June 12, with the following exceptions for departments that have
critical emergency operations that
would be detrimentally affected:
•P 
ayment for county motor vehicle
repairs and maintenance
•P 
ayment for materials or supplies
needed in the event of an emergency
•P 
ayment for expenses associated
with a court case
•P 
ayment for repairs, maintenance,
and service agreements for county
owned equipment, buildings and
infrastructure (provided no contract is required to be signed) 
“Let me emphasize that the vast
majority of employees of DeKalb
County are hard-working, honest
men and women who do their jobs
everyday with honor and dignity.  I
appreciate them,” May said. “I want
those few who have not played by
the rules to know that I am serious about restoring the public’s
confidence, and we will continue to
carry out reform and restore trust
in our government.”
The DeKalb P-card policy will
be updated to reflect these changes,
according to the news release.

Pet of the Week

Lucinda
(ID# 24209854)
is a very sweet
and loving 3
year old pittie
girl. She would
rather be by
your side than
anywhere
else. Along
with her cute
face comes
a love for all treats, gentle hugs
and unconditional love. You will fall
in love! Come meet Lucinda today
at the DeKalb shelter and take
advantage of our "Beat the Heat"
promotion. Throughout June all pets
over six months and dogs weighing
at least 25 lbs. may be adopted for
FREE! They will be spayed/neutered,
vaccinated and microchipped
at no additional charge. If you
would like more information about
Lucinda please email adoption@
dekalbanimalservices.com or call
(404) 294-2165. All potential adopters
will be screened to ensure Lucinda
goes to a good home.