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Body Scans Visualized

Reference: http://www.bodyscan.human.cornell.edu/sceneba0c.html

N/B Go to this site and get more details with animated video

Virtual Try-on

http://www.bodyscan.human.cornell.edu/scene81bb.html - Go to this link for


animated video

An early version of the virtual try-on concept without body scan data
is offered online by Lands' End, Levi Strauss, H&M, and Sears. However,
these systems are designed for style selection, not sizing. Here's how it
works.

A customer takes her/his own measurements.

The online application lists a predetermined set of measurements.


The customer selects those that are closest to her/his own.

In some cases, information about the general body shape is


entered, such as small waist, large hips, narrow shoulders, or long

torso. Hair style, hair , facial and other characteristics can also be
included.

The online application develops a general image of the customers


body shape and displays it on the screen for confirmation or
modifications.

The customer selects clothing styles from the screen and "tries
them on" the virtual image.

The garment is "dressed" onto the virtual customer and then


preferred clothing styles are selected for purchase.

When body scan data are introduced into this process, the virtual image
will become more realistic and size selection will be possible. The
customers will view their own 3D image (not an idealized model); rotate it
to see front, back, and side views; and select the style and size that fits
best.
A related application of body scanning is size prediction, in which
consumers submit their measurements to a service company which has
access to size specifications for many brands of apparel products. The
service matches consumers with garments by comparing measurements.
Several companies, such as My Virtual Model, offer size prediction, but do
not use body scan data. Intellifit is a body scan company that used 3D
scan data for size selection. The Intellifit scanner uses low-power radio
waves instead of light and can generate a body scan through clothing.
Body scan data will increase the number and accuracy of measurements
used in size prediction. The combination of virtual try-on with size
prediction will not only provide consumers with the brands and sizes that
fit their measurements and proportions best, but will also let them
virtually view garments on their scan and choose the design they like
best. This process combines objective fit information with fit preference -the most realistic way of satisfying customers.

BODY SCAN TECHNOLOGY will help apparel firms improve the fit of their mass-produced clothing by providing
valuable measurement data on consumer populations. Most systems for sizing ready-to-wear garments have been
based on very limited information. Before scan studies were possible, the last traditional anthropometric (bodymeasurement) survey of the civilian population for apparel sizing purposes was conducted in 1941 and was not
accurate for modern body shapes.

Population Studies

BODY SCAN TECHNOLOGY will help apparel firms improve the fit of their mass-produced clothing by providing
valuable measurement data on consumer populations. Most systems for sizing ready-to-wear garments have been
based on very limited information. Before new body scanner technology made anthropometric (body-measurement)
studies affordable, many sizing systems were based on a traditional survey of the civilian population conducted in
1941 that is not accurate for today's body shapes.
In the past, apparel firms have not had anthropometric data, and therefore based many decisions about sizing on
experimentation and subsequent feedback from their customers. This is not a very effective system for gathering
data, as most consumers make decisions about garment fit at home or in the fitting room and do not communicate
their experiences reliably or at all.
Few traditional anthropometric surveys were conducted because of the high labor costs associated with measuring
large numbers of people with traditional tools. Body scanners have changed this. Apparel companies will benefit from
several anthropometric studies that have scanned or are currently scanning representative groups of people from the
population. The goal of these studies is to gain a better understanding of the current human sizes and shapes in order

to develop sizing systems that fit most of the population.

Body scans illustrate significant variation in proportions among three women, each of
whom wears a size 10 pant. (Image: Cornell Body Scan Research Group)

The CAESAR study, an international anthropometric study conducted in the United States, the Netherlands, and Italy,
was funded by the automotive, airline, and apparel industries and its data is being used in the design of many
products. The Textile and Clothing Technology Corporation, [TC] 2, organized a consortium of university and industry
partners to collect 12,000 scans of men and women in 50 locations in the United States to create a database of
civilian anthropometric data for the apparel industry. The data from this study, called SizeUSA, is widely used by
apparel companies to help improve their sizing systems.