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June 25, 2015 - Focus on Stoughton - The Courier Hub - 7

Focus On

Stoughton

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June 25, 2015

Focus on Stoughton

Courier Hub

From the mayor’s desk

Many good things happening
in Stoughton this year
We have all enjoyed watching the new Cultural Heritage
Center, LIVSREISE, grow
and open during Syttende Mai
2015. We look forward to all
that it will bring to Stoughton
residents, Stoughton business
and visitors alike.
AJ Arnett, Norse View
Holdings LLC has brought
the majority of residential
development to Stoughton
in 2015 by building 9 single
family homes and planning
28 more at the corner of Cty.
Hwy. B
and N.
Page St.
Stoughton Hospital continues to
work on
parking lot
reconfiguOlson
ration and
additions
while beginning an addition
and remodel of the ambulance garage and emergency/
urgent care rooms.
Skaalen Home Retirement
Services is remodeling all 3
residential wings on the east
side of their building.
Viking Brew Pub, owned
by Vik and Lori Malling
became Stoughton’s first
brew pub when it opened in
August 2014.
Milestone Senior Living is
constructing a 40 unit senior
living complex at 2220 Lincoln Avenue.
Spanrie Properties is building a 7-unit multiplex residential building at 2301 Lincoln Avenue.
Jordan Tilleson and Nicole
Hines continue to seek the
right location for Stoughton’s
first Doggie Daycare, potentially at the former Stoughton
Lumber location.
The historic Turner &
Atkinson Tobacco Warehouse at 515 E. Main St.
has become a new home to
Lageret, a wedding and celebration venue.
Purple Ocean LLC continues to work to remodel and
convert the old Pack ‘R Place,
located at 208 W. Main St.
into a take-out restaurant.
Main Street Kitchen moves
into a more central Main St.
location at 120 E. Main St..
Fahrenheit 364, opened at
364 E. Main St. across from
the Stoughton Opera House,
providing refreshments to

Opera House patrons.
Level Up converted the old
church on Hoel Avenue into
their new fitness center.
Meloniece Gaskin has
opened a new Group Daycare
at 1425 E. Main St.
The city has begun to work
with NAFA, a current business located in our industrial
park to help them grow and
expand, right here in Stoughton utilizing the new property
north of our current business
park.
Zalk Josephs Fabricators
LLC completed a 14,753 sq.
ft. addition to their facility at
400 Industrial Circle.
The Stoughton FUDA,
Future Urban Development Area, study concluded
in April 2015. The City of
Stoughton, Stoughton Area
School District, surrounding
townships worked with the
Capital Regional Planning
Commission to discuss and
plan what the future of our
area may look like.
Stoughton High School
is receiving a new entry and
facelift over the summer
months.
The American Legion and
Veterans of Foreign War
have begun fundraising for
the new Veterans Memorial Park, located just outside
the city limits in the town of
Pleasant Springs.
The City of Stoughton and
Stoughton Redevelopment
Authority continue to pursue
the purchase of the former
Milfab site and redevelopment of the river front redevelopment area.
The City of Stoughton
continues to work with Forward Development Group on
the Kettle Park West project,
Phase 1 contains a new 34.1
acre commercial center at the
corners of Hwy 51 and 138.
This development will bring
a Wal-Mart supercenter, a
new Kwik Trip, a McFarland
Bank branch as well as many
other retail opportunities to
Stoughton. Phase 2 and 3 of
this development may bring
additional business opportunities, mixed use and residential development.
As Stoughton’s Mayor, I
continue to work to fulfill our
goal of providing by retaining
and bringing new jobs, goods
and services for all in our
community.

ConnectStoughton.com

Heritage Center opens in
May amid much fanfare
Bill Livick
Unified Newspaper Group

The May opening of the
Norwegian Heritage Center
– Livsreise (Life’s Journey)
– after more than two years
of planning and a year of
construction, was a significant development for the city
and its business community.
The center has enhanced
Stoughton’s Norwegian
identity and is intended to
draw more visitors to the
community in support of
local businesses.
Bryant Foundation trustees
June Bunting and Jerry Gryttenholm devised the concept of the education center
in 2011 to tell the stories of
actual Norwegian emigrants
who arrived in Wisconsin
between 1825 and 1910.
The pair planned the
15,000-square-foot center
in tribute to the late Janet
Bryant, who died in 2010
and established the Bryant
Foundation to honor her late
husband, Edwin, one of the
founders of the Nelson Muffler Corporation – which later became Nelson Industries
and is now Cummins.
The Heritage Center occupies the corner of West Main
Street and North Page Street
in bold fashion, with steep
gabled roofs and an auburn
exterior. And the large building is even more impressive
inside. A 43-feet-high vaulted ceiling lends a feeling of
spaciousness that’s bolstered
by the bright, airy Exhibition
Hall, where semi-permanent
displays tell individual stories of Norwegian emigrants.
Other attractions include
a genealogy center, a special
exhibits room and a 68-seat
auditorium. “Just enough
room for two busloads of
visitors,” Gryttenholm said.
He and Bunting planned
the center to work closely
with its neighbor, Sons of
Norway Mandt Lodge, and
partner with other Norwegian heritage entities in the
area, including the Naeseth
Library in Madison.
The center’s first visiting
exhibition, Sacred Symbols,
is on loan from the Vesterheim Norwegian-American
Museum in Decorah, Iowa,
and on display in the Special

Photos by Kimberly Wethal

Above: From left, Greta, Mark
and Julie Schmitz look at
exhibits inside the Livsreise
Norwegian Heritage Center during its Grand Opening on May
16.
Right: A bridal crown sits on
display as part of a traveling
showcase that will remain at
Livsreise until March 2016.

Exhibits room. It features
historic artifacts, including
hand-painted trunks, intricately decorated musical
instruments, tools and linens.
From the beginning, Gryttenholm has stressed that the
center will exist “to complement the good things that are
already here” in the city.
“We don’t want to compete with anybody, and
we’re not about making
money,” he said in an interview last year with the Courier Hub. “We want to make
sure that the business community understands that.”
Bunting and Gryttenholm
said the community, as well
as visitors to the city and the
center, have responded “very
positively” to the new facility.
“A week ago we had 250
visitors on a Wednesday, and
that included the sixth-grade
class field trip,” Bunting said
Monday. “They had a marvelous time. Most comments
we’ve received are about

how people are amazed that
a building like this, with that
technology, can be in a small
city like Stoughton.”
Gryttenholm those types
of comments have come
from all over the country.
“One couple that stopped
in was from Connecticut,
and they had a hard time
believing that a community our size could do what
we’ve done,” he said.
“I think people look at it
as being totally about the
Norwegians, but it isn’t. It’s
about our community; it’s a
support for the community
as well as the Norwegian
side of it.”
Gryttenholm said there
have been a few glitches
with the technology, “but

you expect those things
to happen. We’re getting
through that, and the reception has been phenomenal.”
He’s now going through
the city’s approval process
to build a parking lot for
the center across the street,
which would include altering entrances and exits from
the lot.
That has been complicated, he said, because Hwy.
51 is a federal highway,
which means the types of
changes he hopes to build
require city, state and federal
approval.
Gryttenholm said he hopes
construction can begin this
summer, but he’s not sure
when the project will get
underway.

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ConnectStoughton.com

KPW unevenly moves ahead

Unified Newspaper Group

Bill Livick

The Stoughton Chamber
of Commerce started heading
in a new direction this past
year following the departure
of executive director Erica
Dial in April.
Dale Volenberg was
selected to lead the chamber
after Dial announced that her
family would be moving to
Washington state later this
year.
Volenberg is a Stoughton native who grew up on
dairy farm in Utica, went
to Stoughton High School
and spent most of his career
working at Cummins and
Nelson Global. He’s got a
good feel for the community,
he previously told the Hub.
“I just really enjoy working with the community and
the city officials to make
things better for Stoughton,”
Volenberg said.
He sees the importance of
promoting what the city has
to offer as a way to get more
large employers to move to
the city, and he’s planning
on using his 32 years of business expertise to make that
happen.
Volenberg’s big, longterm goal is to bring a large
technology business to the
city. Doing so would bring
more high-paying jobs to the
city’s already solid industrial
economy, he said.

Unified Newspaper Group

Photo by Bill Livick

Sustainable Stoughton member Ingrid West goes over the plan for a new Wal-Mart at Kettle Park
West with a consultant during an open house last year.

In November, the Common Council approved a
second version of the development agreement, which
calls on the city to provide
about $5 million in tax
increment financing assistance and the developer to
sell four of seven lots in the
35-acre commercial center
phase of the development by
June 30. The developer was
also obligated to provide
the city with two letters of
credit, in the amount of $5.3
million.
Earlier this month, the
council granted the developer, Forward Development

Group, a 60-day extension
because FDG has not been
able to sell the lots required
or provide the necessary letters of credit.
The company’s lender,
McFarland State Bank, had
reportedly asked FDG and
the city to bring Wal-Mart
into a separate agreement
with the city that guarantees
the company will build a
153,000-square-foot Supercenter and open the store by
Dec. 31, 2017, at a value of
at least $12 million for tax
purposes.
The Supercenter is
planned to be the anchor of

the commercial center.
In return for Wal-Mart’s
guarantees, the city must
promise to complete public
infrastructure improvements
should the developer default
on the project, or allow WalMart to complete the offsite improvements using the
city’s borrowed money.
The new deadline for selling the lots and providing
the letters of credit is Aug.
31 of this year.
Mayor Donna Olson and
six members of the Common Council have backed

Turn to KPW/Page 13

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In order to
do that, he
plans to market the positive aspects
of the city
– the school
system, the
Volenberg
downtown
and Stoughton Hospital – to prospective
companies like Exact Sciences of Middleton or Epic in
Verona. Adding that type of
industry would be a catalyst
for small businesses, home
sales and school district
enrollment, but the challenge
will be to make connections
with decision makers who
work in those industries.
While adding to the city’s
industrial economy could be
a long-term boost, Volenberg
has a few short-term goals to
help grow the city.
He highlighted the education system as a bright spot
for the community, and said
he hopes to work with the
district to make sure people
outside the community are
aware of all the good things
the school system is doing.
He also wants to continue
to meet with local businesses
and merchants to work on a
“road map” of what will help
them succeed. Volenberg
also wants to expand some
community events to make
them even more appealing
and profitable.

Mark Ignatowski

The Kettle Park West
development on the city’s
west side induced three
referendum questions and
needed two deadline extensions but managed to move
ahead in fits and starts in the
past year.
The proposed development has been the subject of
intense passions from both
advocates and opponents. A
group opposed to the project
– and especially using the
city’s financial assistance to
make it happen – conducted
a petition drive this winter
and managed to place two
advisory referendum questions on the April ballot. A
majority of voters opposed
building the project and
an even stronger majority
– more than 60 percent of
voters – objected to the city
using tax increment financing to help fund infrastructure improvements leading
to the development.
The voting results prompted one KPW backer to
announce in April that he
would not approve a third
version of the development
agreement, but Ald. Eric
Hohol has since softened
his position and recently
approved a 60-day extension
of project deadlines.

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June 25, 2015

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Helping hands move to Main
Pantry, Joining
Forces for Families
will share building
Samantha Christian
Unified Newspaper Group

Stoughton’s Personal
Essentials Pantry and Joining
Forces for Families nonprofits will soon share the same
downtown building at 343 E.
Main St. to increase their visibility and accessibility for
the people they serve.
PEP, which provides free
personal and household
hygiene products to those in
need from 1-5 p.m. on the
first and third Thursdays of
the month, already moved
into the space in June. The
pantry originally shared
the basement and meeting
space with Ezra Church,
just a few blocks down at
129 E. Main St.
JFF, which collaborates
with county agencies and
communities and focuses
on prevention to care for
families and create safer
places to live, will tentatively set up in the new
office space in August.
Some services will continue to be held at the Dane
County Department of
Human Services building at
125 Veterans Road.
Sharon Mason-Boersma,
who is co-president of the
PEP board and retired in
June as a social worker
with Stoughton/Cambridge/Deerfield JFF, was

Photo by Kimberly Wethal

Mark Adams, a Cummins volunteer, stocks the Personal Essentials
Pantry.

a proponent of moving the
JFF office to a more central
location in Stoughton.
“The move was actually
to enable people to know
where our services are and
to become more visible and
accessible for people we
serve,” she said. “(Getting)
the site downtown is basically what JFF is all about.
It’s wanting to serve people
where they’re at.”
She explained that there
are more than a dozen community social workers at
various sites in the county
that provide grassroots social

work to help families in
need, especially to help them
get services and resources.
Sharing the space with
PEP just seemed to fit.
“I’m excited about that
location because it’s also
right next door to the local
city government and it also
collaborates with PEP,” she
said. “It’s a great connection for both nonprofits.”
The pantry is now located on the same floor as its
gathering space, rather than
in the basement, which
gives PEP more flexibility. Since PEP’s volunteers

need Internet access for their
computers to track inventory, they are temporarily borrowing Wi-Fi from neighboring business Koffee Kup.
“One of the main things
is that it’s on same floor,
we don’t have to go up and
down (the stairs),” PEP copresident Pat Brestar said.
“(Things) are going great;
we’re all moved in.”
David Marshall, who
works with JFF as a human
resources program specialist, said JFF’s lease of the
building is pending county board approval, even
though the landlord gave
JFF the keys in June.
But Marshall and Brestar
agreed that everything is
coming together for both
nonprofits. Even though
Mason-Boersma will no
longer be residing in the
JFF office, Marshall is
glad she will still be nearby
when helping out with PEP.
“We look forward to having her around,” he said.
Joe Sullivan, with Oregon/Belleville JFF, will be
filling in for Mason-Boersma’s position until Lacey
Arimond starts full-time
in August. Arimond has
been working with juvenile
justice for the county and
speaks Spanish.
For more information
about PEP, visit
pepstoughton.org. For
more information,
about JFF, contact Joe
Sullivan at 835-4188 or
visit danecountyhuman
services.org.

June 25, 2015

Courier Hub

11

Stoughton Area School District

Recent education changes
prompt new visioning session
Scott De Laruelle
Unified Newspaper Group

Nearly four years ago,
the Stoughton Area School
District held a three-day
“visioning” session attended by more than 100 people from a variety of walks
of life to help guide the
district through the next
decade.
That process will continue this upcoming school
year, when district officials plan to hold a similar
but smaller event to gather
more input from a variety
of community members on
the future direction of the
district. The main reason,
Stoughton Area School
District superintendent
Tim Onsager wrote in an
email to the Hub, is “a lot
of changes” in public education since then.
“We want to revisit
our Strategic Plan so that
it reflects our changing
times and incorporates
community input as far as
what direction we should
take,” he said.
While a date has not yet
been set for the session,
which is likely to be held
on a single day, Onsager said he anticipates it
will take place during the
upcoming 2015-16 school
year, with input expected
from “many of those”
who helped develop the
district’s current strategic

On the web
For more information about the
Stoughton Area School District and
the visioning session scheduled for
the 2015-16 school year, visit:

stoughton.k12.wi.us
plan. That plan, eventually passed by the school
board in January 2013,
was shaped in large part
by the 2011 visioning sessions, held at Stoughton
High School and attended
by a variety of community
members, including business owners, seniors, educators, parents and district
officials.
Through numerous
meetings of large and
small groups that concentrated on both the past and
possible future of the district, several main themes
emerged: developing more
connections with the community, diversifying its
funding sources and producing graduates with
critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Those
themes were then included
into Strategic Plan, which
according to the district
is designed to “help guide
Stoughton schools through
more rigorous state standards, standardized testing, a declining enrollment
trend and an uncertain
financial outlook.”

The Livsreise Story
Following 3.5 years of planning and construction, Livsreise, Stoughton’s Norwegian Heritage Center, officially opened
to the public on May 16, 2015.
Livsreise features a permanent exhibit area focusing on the Norwegian immigration to America from around 1825
to 1910. There is also an exhibit area that currently features some of Vesterheim Norwegian American Museum’s
traveling display; a genealogy center that is directly linked to the Norwegian American Genealogical Center and
Naeseth Library in Madison; an interactive map of Norway tracing immigration routes; various vignettes telling the
immigration story and a small, handicapped accessible, auditorium that will seat 68 people.
Livsreise is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm.
Admission is free to the public and all are welcome!

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Livsreise
608-873-7567
277 West Main Street
Stoughton, WI 53589
www.livsreise.org

12

June 25, 2015

Courier Hub

Focus on Stoughton

ConnectStoughton.com

Library renovations set to begin
Scott De Laruelle
Unified Newspaper Group

Photos by Bill Livick

Singer-songwriter Whitney Mann performs with her band at the Catfish River Music Festival last year.

Photo by Scott De Laruelle

Arts and entertainment
scene keeps growing

Construction is slated to begin in August on the second-floor
renovation project at the Stoughton Public Library.

that has yet to be worked
out with contractors, and
that on some days, the
library’s back door will be
used as a public entrance.
MacDonald said during
construction, a “majority” of adult books will be
listed on library computers
as unavailable, as they will
need to be stored either in
the basement of off-site for
several weeks.
He said people can call
the library or check the
catalog to see what books
are available, and when the
changes begin in July, the
library’s website (stoughtonpubliclibrary.org) and
Facebook page will provide
updates and information.

Bill Livick
Unified Newspaper Group

The city’s arts scene continued to expand in the past
year, with new business
openings and music events,
and the official designation
of an arts and entertainment
district downtown.
Last October, the Common Council approved the
Stoughton Arts Council’s
proposal to establish the
district. The Arts Council
has been busy fundraising
to purchase and install new
signs marking the district.
The organization also hopes
to raise money to eventually be able to commission
public art installations and
launch a marketing campaign.
While the Arts Council
works toward those goals,
organizers of a music series
and a music festival have
been achieving their objectives.
The Gazebo Musikk
series began last year
thanks to the work of organizers Tricia Suess and
Stoughton Parks and Recreation director Tom Lynch.
Held at Gazebo Rotary
Park, the series hosts live
performances that are free
to the public.
In its inaugural year, the
series included six concerts staged from 6-7:30
p.m. This year’s second
season began May 28 and

The Catfish River Music Festival welcomes families and kids of all ages.

runs through Aug. 27, with
a total of 13 concerts in an
array of styles, from blues
and classic rock to folk and
alternative country, honky
tonk, bluegrass, western
swing and jazz.
In addition to the weekly
concerts, a music festival
is also slated for the park.
The Catfish River Music
Festival, organized chiefly
by Opera House director
Bill Brehm, returns July
3-5 with a total of 17 concerts – also all free to the
public. Coinciding with the
Stoughton Junior Fair, the
festival drew large numbers
of people downtown last
year and promises to do it
again this July.
“We’re taking all the
best stuff from last year
and making some changes
and improvements,” Brehm
said.
The festival will be

held entirely outside this
year instead of headlining
shows taking place in the
Opera House – although the
indoor facility will remain a
backup in case of rain.
The Opera House itself
continued to thrive in the
past year, with more than
70 ticketed performances,
including national stars
such as Rosanne Cash,
Henry Rollins, Marty Stuart
and The Carolina Chocolate
Drops.
Its popularity is a big
part of why several businesses have opened within
its vicinity in the past year:
the Viking Brewpub, the
new Fahrenheit 364 bar,
AmundArt Hus and Wendigo restaurant.
Earlier this year, Wendigo began bringing live
music to its small stage on
Friday and Saturday nights,
beginning around 9 p.m.

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To comply with the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the
library’s single front doors
will be replaced with double doors, and exterior
outdoor lighting will be
added, along with a security camera system. The
first-floor restrooms and
circulation area will also
be enlarged.
Plans are to start moving
items from the second floor
in July, a process MacDonald said would likely
take the entire month. He
said there probably will be
some days when the library
will have different hours
to “accommodate certain
construction tasks,” though

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With its stately brick edifice and collegiate-looking
archway and columns, the
Stoughton Public Library is
never going to be mistaken
for a clubhouse.
Still, the goal is to make
patrons of all ages feel
comfortable, and that – as
well as enhancing their
safety – is why the next few
months will include a bit
of controlled chaos at the
library as its second floor is
remodeled.
The idea behind the
$660,000 renovation – of
which the city paid $410,00,
with the library picking up
the rest in donations and
grants – is to “provide a
safer and more welcoming
place,” said library director
Richard MacDonald earlier
this year.
He told the Hub that bids
for new signage, shelving
and furniture were accepted
by the library board June 18
and will be on order soon,
as the contractor would like
to begin work Aug. 3, with
a goal to finish in October.
As part of the project,
the second floor area will
receive new “library grade”
shelving, an increase in
square footage and display
space, improved lighting
and furniture, more electrical outlets and new carpeting. Meeting rooms will
be moved and enlarged,
the service desk will be
slimmed down and a new
teen area will be created.

Focus on Stoughton

ConnectStoughton.com

Photo by Mark Ignatowski

The AmundArt Hus occupies the stately corner building on W. Main
and Water streets.

June 25, 2015

13

Photo by Scott De Laruelle

Photo by Mark Ignatowski

Renovations continue at 120 E. Main St., where Back to the Bean
will share a coffee bar with Main Street Kitchen.

Courier Hub

Fahrenheit 364 tavern is open for business across from the
Stoughton Opera House.

Fahrenheit 364

AmundArt Hus
(the Bill Amundson Studio)

Back to the Bean
Coffee Roasters

194 W. Main St.
Principal owner or leader: Bill Amundson
Opening/arrival date: Dec. 1, 2014
Number of employees: One (Anita James Amundsonwife)
Charity connections/plans: Contributes work to a variety
of charity concerns for auction, most recently the Stoughton
Tumblers and the Naeseth Library-Norwegian American
Genealogical Center of Madison.
Stoughton connection: I am a Stoughton native, high
school graduation class of 1971. I lived in Colorado for 35
years before returning to Stoughton with my wife Anita to
take care of my elderly father and the household in 2010
(he died a year ago, June 17, 2014). The ArtHus is in the
same building that I had a studio in while attending the
UW-Madison from 1971-1975.
Business focus: I specialize in fine and not so fine art;
big drawings, small drawings, Wal-Mart drawings, yard art,
T-shirts, jewelry and wearable art, prints and more. Many
Norwegian themed items for folks who enjoy the contemporary Scando-American lifestyle. We also host the occasional
event-talks, book signings, performances, etc.
What’s special about your business? We are the only
gallery in town that specializes in humorous and cutting
edge art objects that also caters to Stoughton’s proud
Norwegian heritage.

334 E. Main St. (but moving to 120 E. Main St.)
Principal owner or leader: DJ and Melanie LeClear
Opening/arrival date: We first started in November of
2014 and we will be reopening with a coffee bar later this
summer. Currently we have no coffee shop of our own
(Main Street Kitchen serves our coffee), but when we move
we will have our own coffee bar alongside the Main Street
Kitchen.
Number of employees: Two, for now
Charity connections/plans: Not yet
Stoughton connection: After being in the Navy for six
years I landed here because of a job. We chose Stoughton
specifically because we fell in love with the town and bought
a house on Fourth Street.
Business focus: Single origin (from one farm or collective of farms), high quality, and responsibly sourced coffee.
We strive to make connections with our coffee farmers to
ensure that they are being paid fairly for the high quality
product that they produce.
What’s special about your business? We only use high
quality, responsibly sourced coffee, and we roast it in such
a way that preserves the terroir of the origin and hard work
that the farmers put into the growing and processing. We
are always striving for the highest quality and we know that
there is always room for improvement. We love to educate
our customers about the origins of our coffee to, in another
way, bring them “back to the bean.”

364 E. Main St.
Principal owner or leader: Scott Sowlles
Opening/arrival date: December 19, 2014
Number of employees: 2
Charity connections/plans: Have participated in fundraisers for the Stoughton Hospital Cardiac Unit and The
Stoughton Area Youth Center so far. We also have assisted
the VFW with their Remembrance Poppies program.
Stoughton connection: Having lived in Stoughton since
2001, I have made many friends and acquaintances in town
that have helped and encouraged my business venture. In
addition to the beautiful natural resources Stoughton features, the Opera House, the Livsreise and Stoughton Village
Players all bring visitors to enjoy the diversity that downtown offers.
Business focus: With over 50 beers featured, we have
one of the largest selections of craft beers in town. Our wine
list is comprised of nearly 20 outstanding alternatives from
which to choose. In addition, our 12-year-old Scotch flight
and specialty cocktails also appeal to our most sophisticated
guests.
What’s special about your business? Countless times
we have been told how comfortable Fahrenheit 364 is, even
for the single lady! Our customer service orientation is
second to none. Michelle and I are continually broadening
our expertise in market trends through tastings and other
educational opportunities to bring our customers a most
enjoyable experience.

Photo by Mark Ignatowski

Located in the Fastenal building on the eastern edge of the city, Kick
Unlimited offers a number of martial arts classes.

File photo by Bill Livick

Kicks Unlimited Stoughton
1740 E. Main St.
Principal owner or leader: Jason Huett, Owner
Opening/arrival date: December 2014
Number of employees: 3
Charity connections/plans: We are working with a local
group in Stoughton to help raise funds for a ‘Dreampark’ in
Stoughton this Fall. We are holding an ‘Anti-Bully’ seminar
and donating the proceeds from this event. In addition, we
actively support “Logan’s Heart & Smiles,” which benefits
children with disabilities.
Stoughton connection: A friend of mine had a martial
arts school in Stoughton and had a full plate managing his
school and another business. He was passionate about providing martial arts in the community and really did not want
to see Stoughton lose the martial arts as a service offering. We both shared the same passion and I was fortunate
enough to be in a position with my staff that we could carry
the torch.
Business focus: Martial arts instruction for kids and
adults of all ages.
What’s special about your business? We are extremely
passionate about helping our students improve their selfconfidence, self-esteem, and inner strength via the martial
arts. In addition, much of the curriculum was developed
while I was on tour with the Power Rangers Live Tour and
is highly interactive and fun. Lastly, Kicks Unlimited has
been in business 13 years and has deep roots in all the
communities where we have schools.

Photo by Mark Ignatowski

Wendigo on East Main Street is now offering Sunday brunch in
addition to their dinner menu.

Wendigo
121 E. Main St.
Principal owner or leader: Caitlin and Cale Ryan
Opening/arrival date: Aug. 26, 2014
Number of employees: 16
Charity connections/plans: Wendigo is a Buy Fresh Buy
Local restaurant partner. We work with this local nonprofit
to make a commitment to bring local and sustainable foods
to the Stoughton community.
Stoughton connection: We came to Stoughton to open
Famous Yeti’s Pizza. We loved the community and decided
to start our family here. We enjoy being able to walk from
our house to our restaurants with great places to stop along
the way for books, groceries and ice cream.
Business focus: Wendigo is a casual restaurant and bar
with seasonal entrees and salads, decadent burgers and
sandwiches, and house-infused artisan cocktails. Some
favorites of ours include the Warm Potato & Arugula Salad,
Poutine and the Pho-rench Dip.
What’s special about your business? The menu at the
Wendigo changes seasonally. We have a few core favorites
that are available all year long and a portion of our menu
that changes to highlight what is available locally. Also, we
now offer Sunday brunch.

Stoughton Mayor Donna Olson and Forward Development
Group development manager Dennis Steinkraus visit in 2013 at
the groundbreaking for Nelson Global Products’ new facility in
Business Park North.

KPW: Construction starts
Continued from page 9
the project because they see
it as a key to further economic development in the
city. The developer’s longterm plan involves developing roughly 300 acres of
what had been farmland,
with future phases including
a residential housing project.
Supporters say the city
needs to draw new residents
– and especially young families – to Stoughton in order
to turn around declining
school enrollment numbers.
Construction of infrastructure improvements
along Jackson Street has
already begun, while the
city waits to see if the
developer can meet its
obligations in the next two

months.
Construction bids for the
off-site improvements were
opened in May and came
in about $1 million higher
than the developer had estimated. This caused FDG to
ask the city’s permission to
spend contingency dollars
now, at the front end of the
project, instead of waiting
to use those funds, if necessary, near the end of the
Phase 1 work.
The request was defeated
in a 7-5 vote on June 9, but
Ald. Greg Jenson, a KPW
supporter who cast the
deciding vote, has told the
Courier Hub he will reverse
his vote when the council
reconsiders the matter so
that the project can move
forward.

14 - The Courier Hub - Focus on Stoughton - June 25, 2015

Nine Years &
Still Going Strong!
Thank You Stoughton!

Joe

Jim
Bernie

Greg

Dalton

9

9
9
Grey

Joe Jr.

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Jason

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