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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

Measurement Guideline for
Upstream Oil and Gas
Operations
Oil and Gas Commission
June 1st, 2013

June 1st, 2013

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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................................... 9
INTENT ................................................................................................................................................................... 9
WHAT’S NEW IN THIS EDITION............................................................................................................................... 9
DOCUMENT ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES................................................................................................................ 10
CONTENT ADDITIONS ......................................................................................................................................... 11
CONTENT OMISSIONS ......................................................................................................................................... 13
DEFINITIONS ........................................................................................................................................................ 14
1.

CHAPTER 1 STANDARDS OF ACCURACY ...................................................................................................... 15

1.1.

INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................................... 15

1.2.

APPLICABILITY AND USE OF UNCERTAINTIES ................................................................................................. 15

1.3.

MAXIMUM UNCERTAINTY OF MONTHLY VOLUME ........................................................................................ 15

1.4.

SINGLE POINT MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY .............................................................................................. 16

1.5.

CONFIDENCE LEVEL ................................................................................................................................. 16

1.6.

DETERMINATION OF UNCERTAINTIES .......................................................................................................... 16
1.6.1.

1.7.

Sample Calculation ..............................................................................................................................17

EXPLANATION OF STANDARDS OF ACCURACY ............................................................................................... 17
1.7.1.
1.7.2.
1.7.3.

Oil Systems ...........................................................................................................................................17
Gas Systems .........................................................................................................................................25
Injection/Disposal Systems ..................................................................................................................37

1.8.

STANDARDS OF ACCURACY – SUMMARY ..................................................................................................... 40

1.9.

MEASUREMENT SCHEMATICS ................................................................................................................... 41
1.9.1.
1.9.2.
1.9.3.

2.

Measurement Schematics Requirements.............................................................................................43
Implementation ...................................................................................................................................45
Schematic Availability ..........................................................................................................................45

CHAPTER 2 METER MAINTENANCE ............................................................................................................. 46

2.1.

DEFINITIONS.......................................................................................................................................... 46

2.2.

APPLICABILITY ........................................................................................................................................ 47

2.3.

FREQUENCY........................................................................................................................................... 48
2.3.1.

Frequency Exceptions...........................................................................................................................48

2.4.

ACCURACY OF INSTRUMENTS USED TO CONDUCT MAINTENANCE .................................................................... 49

2.5.

GAS METERS ......................................................................................................................................... 50
2.5.1. General Maintenance Requirements ...................................................................................................50
2.5.2. Gas Meter Maintenance Frequency .....................................................................................................51
2.5.3. Gas Meter Internal Inspection / Functionality Test ..............................................................................52
2.5.4. Gas Meter, Meter Element, and End Device Exceptions for Calibration/Verification Frequency and
Internal Inspections ............................................................................................................................................53

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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

2.5.5.
2.6.

OIL METERS .......................................................................................................................................... 57
2.6.1.
2.6.2.

2.7.

Orifice Meters ......................................................................................................................................55

Live Oil Meters .....................................................................................................................................57
Dead Oil Meters ...................................................................................................................................64

CONDENSATE METERS............................................................................................................................. 67
2.7.1.
2.7.2.
2.7.3.
2.7.4.

Proving Requirements ..........................................................................................................................67
Condensate at Equilibrium Conditions .................................................................................................67
Condensate at Flow-Line Conditions ....................................................................................................67
Condensate Meter Exceptions .............................................................................................................69

2.8.

OTHER LIQUID HYDROCARBON METERS...................................................................................................... 72

2.9.

WATER METERS..................................................................................................................................... 72
2.9.1.

Water Meters Exception ......................................................................................................................73

2.10. PRODUCT ANALYZERS.............................................................................................................................. 74
2.11. AUTOMATIC TANK GAUGES ...................................................................................................................... 74
2.11.1.
2.11.2.

Inventory Measurement ..................................................................................................................74
Delivery Point Measurement ...........................................................................................................75

2.12. USING TANK GAUGING FOR OIL / CONDENSATE MEASUREMENT ..................................................................... 75
2.12.1.
2.12.2.

Inventory Measurement ..................................................................................................................75
Delivery Point Measurement ...........................................................................................................75

2.13. WEIGH SCALES ...................................................................................................................................... 76
2.13.1.
3.
3.1.

CHAPTER 3 PRORATION FACTORS, ALLOCATION FACTORS AND METERING DIFFERENCE............................ 78
DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................................................................... 78
3.1.1.
3.1.2.
3.1.3.
3.1.4.
3.1.5.

3.2.

Target Factors ......................................................................................................................................80
Target Factor Exception .......................................................................................................................81
Acceptable Proration Factors and Allocation Factor Ranges ...............................................................81
Proration Factors .................................................................................................................................81
Allocation Factors ................................................................................................................................82

METERING DIFFERENCE ........................................................................................................................... 82
3.2.1.
3.2.2.

4.

Weigh Scale Exceptions ...................................................................................................................77

Description ...........................................................................................................................................82
Target Metering Difference .................................................................................................................84

CHAPTER 4 GAS MEASUREMENT ................................................................................................................ 85

4.1.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ........................................................................................................................ 85

4.2.

GAS MEASUREMENT AND ACCOUNTING REQUIREMENTS FOR VARIOUS BATTERY / FACILITY TYPES ........................ 85
4.2.1.
4.2.2.
4.2.3.
4.2.4.

4.3.

Oil Facilities (Batteries) ........................................................................................................................85
Gas Facilities ........................................................................................................................................86
Gas Gathering System ..........................................................................................................................88
Gas Processing Plant ............................................................................................................................88

BASE REQUIREMENTS FOR GAS MEASUREMENT ........................................................................................... 89

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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

4.3.1.
4.3.2.
4.3.3.
4.3.4.
Charts
4.3.5.
4.3.6.
4.3.7.
4.4.
5.

Design and Installation of Measurement Devices ................................................................................89
Fuel Gas ...............................................................................................................................................96
Gas Lift Systems for Both Oil and Gas Wells ........................................................................................97
Operations: Base Requirements for Creating Acceptable Gas Charts and Properly Reading Gas
99
Gas in Solution (GIS) with Oil Volumes under Pressure ......................................................................103
Volumetric Calculations .....................................................................................................................109
Production Data Verification and Audit Trail .....................................................................................111

REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................ 128
CHAPTER 5 SITE-SPECIFIC DEVIATION FROM BASE REQUIREMENTS.......................................................... 130

5.1.

SPECIALIZED TERMINOLOGY DEFINED ....................................................................................................... 130

5.2.

SITE-SPECIFIC EXCEPTIONS ..................................................................................................................... 130
5.2.1.
5.2.2.
5.2.3.

5.3.

Initial Qualifying Criteria ....................................................................................................................130
Documentation Requirement .............................................................................................................131
Site-Specific Approval Applications ....................................................................................................131

CHART CYCLES EXTENDED BEYOND THE REQUIRED TIME PERIO ..................................................................... 132
5.3.1.
5.3.2.
5.3.3.

Exceptions ..........................................................................................................................................132
Applications .......................................................................................................................................134
Considerations for Site-Specific Approval ..........................................................................................134

5.4.

GAS PRORATION WITHOUT INDIVIDUAL WELL MEASUREMENT – UNITIZATION ................................................. 134

5.5.

MEASUREMENT BY DIFFERENCE .............................................................................................................. 135
5.5.1.
5.5.2.
5.5.3.
5.5.4.
5.5.5.
5.5.6.
5.5.7.
5.5.8.

6.

Gas Measurement by Difference .......................................................................................................135
Oil Measurement by Difference .........................................................................................................138
Exceptions ..........................................................................................................................................140
Applications .......................................................................................................................................147
Considerations for Site-Specific Approval ..........................................................................................147
Surface Commingling of Multiple Gas Zones/Wells ...........................................................................148
Applications .......................................................................................................................................151
Considerations for Site-Specific Approval ..........................................................................................152

CHAPTER 6 DETERMINATION OF PRODUCTION AT GAS WELLS ................................................................. 154

6.1.

INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................... 154

6.2.

SPECIALIZED TERMINOLOGY DEFINED ....................................................................................................... 154

6.3.

BATTERIES / FACILITIES .......................................................................................................................... 156
6.3.1.

6.4.

Group Measurement ..........................................................................................................................157

GAS WELL TYPES.................................................................................................................................. 159
6.4.1.
6.4.2.
6.4.3.

Unitization Well .................................................................................................................................160
Measured Gas Well ............................................................................................................................160
Effluent Gas Well ...............................................................................................................................160

6.5.

LOAD/FRAC FLUID ................................................................................................................................ 161

6.6.

DECIMAL PLACE HOLDERS FOR VOLUMETRIC CALCULATIONS IN A GAS PRORATION BATTERY / FACILITY ................ 162

6.7.

EFFLUENT WELL TESTING ....................................................................................................................... 162

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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

6.7.1.
6.7.2.
6.7.3.
6.7.4.
6.7.5.
6.7.6.
6.7.7.

Frequency...........................................................................................................................................162
Procedure ...........................................................................................................................................163
Decision Tree ......................................................................................................................................165
Well Testing Evaluation .....................................................................................................................168
Revocation of Well Testing Exemption ..............................................................................................169
Well Testing Exemption Audit Trail ....................................................................................................169
Regulatory Audit ................................................................................................................................171

6.8.

PRODUCTION VOLUME ACCOUNTING ....................................................................................................... 172

6.9.

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS ...................................................................................................................... 172
6.9.1.
6.9.2.
6.9.3.
6.9.4.

7.

General Requirements .......................................................................................................................172
Measured Gas Well ............................................................................................................................173
Effluent Gas Well ...............................................................................................................................173
Sampling and Analysis Exception .......................................................................................................174

CHAPTER 7 CROSS BORDER MEASUREMENT............................................................................................. 175

7.1.

INTRODUCTION TO CROSS BORDER MEASUREMENT VOLUMES ...................................................................... 175

7.2.

PURPOSE ............................................................................................................................................ 175

7.3.

QUALIFICATION CRITERIA - CROSS BORDER MEASUREMENT VOLUMES FACILITY ............................................... 175

7.4.

CROSS BORDER FACILITY PRINCIPLE ......................................................................................................... 180

7.5.

APPLICATION ....................................................................................................................................... 180

7.6.

NEW CONSTRUCTION OR MODIFICATIONS AT A CROSS BORDER FACILITY IN THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.. 180

7.7.

LEGACY CONSTRUCTION INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA......................................... 181

7.8. NEW CONSTRUCTION, MODIFICATIONS, OR LEGACY CONSTRUCTION AT A CROSS BORDER FACILITY OUTSIDE THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA .......................................................................................................................................... 181
7.9.

INTER-PROVINCIAL PIPELINES ................................................................................................................. 182

7.10. SITE INSPECTIONS ................................................................................................................................. 182
7.11. MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE ...................................................................................................................... 182
7.12. GENERAL DESIGN OF CROSS BORDER MEASUREMENT ................................................................................. 183
7.12.1.
7.12.2.
7.12.3.
7.12.4.
7.12.5.
7.12.6.
7.12.7.
7.12.8.

Phase Separation ..........................................................................................................................183
Design of Measurement by Difference ..........................................................................................185
Design of Natural Gas Measurement ............................................................................................187
Design of Fuel Gas Measurement .................................................................................................187
Design of Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement ................................................................................191
Design of Natural Gas Measurement ............................................................................................192
Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement - Design ..................................................................................199
Oil Measurement - Design .............................................................................................................203

7.13. OPERATIONS – NATURAL GAS MEASUREMENT, LIQUID HYDROCARBON MEASUREMENT, OIL MEASUREMENT ...... 203
7.13.1.
7.13.2.
7.13.3.
7.13.4.
7.13.5.
7.13.6.

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Calibration/Verification Test Equipment .......................................................................................203
Natural Gas Measurement - Operations .......................................................................................204
Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement – Operation............................................................................208
Oil Measurement – Operation ......................................................................................................211
Natural Gas, Liquid Hydrocarbon, and Oil Measurement – Operation – Reporting .....................212
Natural Gas Measurement – Frequencies – Operation .................................................................214

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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

7.13.7.
7.13.8.
7.13.9.

Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement – Frequencies – Operation .....................................................222
Oil Measurement Frequencies – Operations .................................................................................229
Electronic Flow Measurement for Hydrocarbon Systems .............................................................230

APPENDIX 1 – GLOSSERY .................................................................................................................................... 233
APPENDIX 2 – GAS EQUIVALENT FACTOR DETERMINATION ............................................................................... 242
APPENDIX 3 – DETERMINING FUEL GAS ESTIMATES........................................................................................... 246
APPENDIX 4 – EFFLUENT WELL TESTING DECISION TREE ACCOUNTING SAMPLE CALCULATIONS ....................... 249
APPENDIX 5 – SCHEMATIC EXAMPLE ................................................................................................................. 313
APPENDIX 6 – OGC DOCUMENTS REPLACED BY THIS MANUAL .......................................................................... 314

List of Tables
Table 1.8-1 Measurement Uncertainty - Oil Systems ................................................................................. 40
Table 1.8-2 Measurement Uncertainty - Gas Systems ............................................................................... 41
Table 1.8-3 Measurement Uncertainty - Injection Systems ....................................................................... 41
Table 2.5-1 Gas Meter Maintenance Frequency ........................................................................................ 51
Table 2.6-1 Live Oil Group Meter Proving Requirements ........................................................................... 57
Table 2.6-2 Live Oil Test Meter Proving Requirements .............................................................................. 58
Table 2.6-3 Dead Oil Group Meter Proving Requirements ......................................................................... 64
Table 2.6-4 Dead Oil Test Meter Proving Requirements ............................................................................ 64
Table 2.7-1 Proving Requirements for Condensate at Equilibrium Conditions .......................................... 67
Table 2.7-2 Proving Requirements for Delivery Point / Custody Transfer Condensate ............................. 67
Table 2.7-3 Proving Requirements for Non Delivery Point / Non Custody Transfer Condensate .............. 67
Table 3.1-1 Proration Gas Battery / Facility ................................................................................................ 82
Table 3.1-2 Custom Treating Plant / Facility ............................................................................................... 82
Table 3.1-3 Clean Oil Terminal (Third Party operated, where applicable) ................................................. 82
Table 4.3-1 Orifice Meter Design Requirement .......................................................................................... 90
Table 4.3-2 Gas Meter Temperature Reading Frequencies ........................................................................ 96
Table 4.3-3 Well Fuel Gas Measurement Requirements ............................................................................ 96
Table 4.3-4 Facility Fuel Gas Measurement Requirements ........................................................................ 97
Table 4.3-5 Required EFM Reports ........................................................................................................... 125
Table 5.5-1 Prorated Gas Flow Rates and Ratios ...................................................................................... 137
Table 5.5-2 Prorated Gas Flow Rates and Ratios ...................................................................................... 138
Table 5.5-3 Oil Measurement by Difference Requirements ..................................................................... 140
Table 5.5-4 Prorated Gas Flow Rates and Ratios ...................................................................................... 141
Table 5.5-5 Condensate Requirements When Delivering to a Proration Oil Battery / Facility................. 142
Table 5.5-6 Condensate Reporting when Delivering into Oil Battery / Facility ........................................ 148
Table 6.6-1 Decimal Place Holders............................................................................................................ 162
Table 7.13-1 Cut-Off Points for the Three Stages ..................................................................................... 215
Table 7.13-2 Stage 1 Orifice Metering ...................................................................................................... 217
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................. 219 Table 7.........................................................................13-12 Stage 1 Turbine Metering .........................13-15 Stage 2 Coriolis Metering ........ 222 Table 7........ 22 Figure 1......................7-10 Plant Inlet or Total Battery...............................................Delivery Point Measurement ......Delivery Point Measurement ......................................................... Including Single-Well Batteries / Facilities ...................Delivery Point Measurement ................Delivery Point Measurement .........................................13-8 Stage 3 Orifice Metering .................... 2013 7 .......................... 227 Table 7............ 26 Figure 1........................... 29 Figure 1.................................................................7-11 Fuel Gas..................................................................................................13-1 Example Liquid Analysis ..... 223 Table 7....................... 33 Figure 1.........................................................................13-6 Stage 2 Turbine Metering ............................................................................7-1 Total Battery / Facility Oil (Delivery Point Measurement) ............................. 225 Table 7.................... 218 Table 7............................................................................... Facility or Group Condensate (Recombined) ...............................................................................................Delivery Point Measurement .................. Facility or Group Condensate (Recombined) ............................13-4 Stage 1 Ultrasonic Metering ........................ 242 List of Figures Figure 1...13-17 Stage 3 Coriolis Metering ..................13-23 Volume Correction Using Pressure and Temperature Correction Factors (CPL and CTL) ......7-13 Acid Gas ..........Delivery Point Measurement ....................7-6 Water Well (Proration Battery / Facility) ....13-5 Stage 2 Orifice Metering ........................... 226 Table 7.......................... 227 Table 7................. 221 Table 7......Oil Measurement ........ 23 Figure 1..............7-9 Plant Inlet or Total Battery......Delivery Point Measurement ...... 220 Table 7........................................ 228 Table 7............................. 219 Table 7...........................................................7-16 Well Gas (Effluent Proration Battery / Facility) ..................................................................................Delivery Point Measurement .....................................................7-14 Dilution Gas.......................................... 226 Table 7............................................................ 33 Figure 1.......................13-13 Stage 1 Coriolis Metering ..........................................7-5 Oil Well (Proration Battery / Facility) .................................Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Table 7...............................13-14 Stage 2 Turbine Metering ...................................... 228 Table 7......................................................................13-19 Stage 4 Coriolis Metering ...................................................................................... 231 Table 7....................................................Delivery Point Measurement ........7-12 Flare / Vent Gas .13-11 Four Cut-Off Point Stages ...........13-22 Density Correction to 15oC............................................................ 21 Figure 1.................................................13-7 Stage 2 Ultrasonic Metering ................................................................... 28 Figure 1....7-2 Total Battery / Facility Gas .............................7-8 Hydrocarbon Liquid Deliveries.................................13-3 Stage 1 Turbine Metering ..... 225 Table 7.............................13-9 Stage 3 Turbine Metering .....13-16 Stage 3 Turbine Metering .. 221 Table 7......................... 20 Figure 1................7-4 Oil Well (Proration Battery / Facility) ............7-7 Gas Deliveries (Sales Gas) .... 217 Table 7............................13-10 Stage 3 Ultrasonic Metering .....................................................................................................13-21 Coriolis Metering ................ 31 Figure 1...................................... 25 Figure 1................................... 18 Figure 1............................................7-15 Gas Well (Well-Site Separation)........ 232 Table 7......7-3 Total Battery / Facility Water..............................13-18 Stage 4 Turbine Metering ....................Delivery Point Measurement ..................... 24 Figure 1............................................................................................................................... 229 Table 7...................13-20 Turbine Metering ....... 32 Figure 1.....Oil Measurement ................................................................ 34 June 1st...................... 30 Figure 1........ 230 Table 7...............

...............7-2 Well Testing Decision Tree... 38 Figure 1.......................................................................7-1 Typical Effluent Well Measurement Configuration with Well Test Unit ........................................................... 37 Figure 1........... 151 Figure 6........... 2013 8 ....5-9 Test Method 1............................................................................................................................... 139 Figure 5................ 166 Figure 6............................................................. 136 Figure 5......................5-4 Measured Oil Facility Gas Delivering into a Gas Proration Battery / Facility ............................................................................................... 88 Figure 4....................................................................7-18 Total Battery / Facility Water ....2-1 Injection / Disposal Systems ...........5-7 Volumetric Criteria for Measured Gas Tie-In to a Proration Battery / Facility .. 135 Figure 5.....5-5 Measured Oil and/or Oil-Water Emulsion from a Battery / Facility Delivering into an Oil Proration Battery / Facility by Truck .......... 168 Figure 7.................................... 186 June 1st............................................................................................ 136 Figure 5.................7-17 Well Condensate (Recombined) ...............................................................................2-2 Metering Difference .................... or Receiving from a Gas Plant .........5-8 Oil System Example.. 39 Figure 1.............................................................................................1-2 Allocation Factor .......... 159 Figure 6..............................................................................................7-3 Well Test Evaluation Example..................................................................................................................................Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 1...............................................................................................3-1 Cross Border Case 1 ...............................5-2 Measured Gas Source(s) Delivering into an Effluent (Wet) Measurement Gas Proration Battery / Facility ...........7-19 Well Water ................................................7-22 Total Water ..................................................................7-23 Well Water .....................................................7-21 Well Gas ........................................................................... 141 Figure 5............................ 79 Figure 3....................................................................... 176 Figure 7...........2-2 Oil Battery Delivering to........................................................................................ 83 Figure 3..5-6 Measured Oil and/or Oil-Water Emulsion (and gas if applicable) under Pressure from a Battery / Facility Delivering into an Oil Proration Battery / Facility by Pipeline ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 164 Figure 6.2-1 Calibration vs.......................................... 137 Figure 5........................... 84 Figure 4....... Verification Decision Tree ................................. 150 Figure 5..................................................................5-10 Test Method 2.........................1-1 Proration Factor ..........................5-1 Measured Gas Source(s) Delivering into a Gas Proration – Unitization Battery / Facility..................3-1 Typical Group Measurement Design .......12-1 Commingled Non-British Columbia and British Columbia Production ....... 36 Figure 1.......................................................5-3 Measured Gas Source(s) Delivering into an Oil Proration Battery / Facility ........................ 48 Figure 3............................................................................. 146 Figure 5..................... 89 Figure 5........ 39 Figure 2................................7-20 Total Gas .... 80 Figure 3................................................................... 37 Figure 1................................... 35 Figure 1....... 139 Figure 5...............................................................2-1 Typical Gas Plant Measurement and Reporting Points ..........................

Deviation from these standards and practices will be evaluated on their demonstrated effectiveness. June 1st. and 5) what resultant volumes must be reported to MOF. in accordance with the objectives for measurement set out in this manual. Reg. To facilitate such adoption. The significant changes have been identified below. 4) what data must be kept for audit purposes. the guidance contained in this manual has been written in normative (or mandatory) language. Permit holders may choose to include some or all of this Measurement Guideline into their own internal standards and practices. where.C. accounting.” Adherence to the standards and practices in this manual is considered an effective way for permit holders to work to achieve compliance with the applicable regulatory requirements relating to measurement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Introduction This Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations (referenced as the Measurement Guideline or manual) has been prepared by the British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) to provide guidance regarding a permit holder’s measurement obligations under section 53 of the Drilling and Production Regulation. Intent This manual specifies: 1) what and how volumes must be measured.” mathematical procedures (accounting) and/or estimation may have to be employed to arrive at the desired volume to be “reported. B. What’s New in this Edition This release of the manual includes document organizational changes along with content additions and deletions. the term “measurement” is used to include measurement. All changes applied to this release of the manual have been identified by blue text. While measurement allows the determination of a volume. 282/2010. 2013 9 . accounting and reporting are integral components of measurement in that after a fluid volume is “measured. 2) what. and reporting. This manual is not intended to take the place of the applicable legislation. estimation. In this manual. and how volumes may be estimated. 3) if accounting procedures must be performed on the measured volumes and what these procedures are.

These have all been updated as Word tables within the manual to reduce the manuals file size. 3) Text formatting has been applied throughout the entire manual to ensure that a consistent layout is present for reading ease and navigation throughout the headings and text bodies. For example: Figure 2. 7) “Ministry of Small Business” has been replaced with either “Ministry of Finance” or “MOF” as appropriate 8) Removal of references of “AEUB” and changed to ERCB” where the reference is warranted through the manual. 9) Header pages have been removed and replaced with headings at the beginning of each Chapter to reduce the size of the manual and eliminated wasted printed material. m3 when referencing liquid volumes b. mm or m when referencing length or diameter as appropriate 6) “Basic Sediment and Water” or “BS&W” has been replaced with “Sediment and Water” or “S&W” to stay relevant with industry and the ERCB’s Directive 017. e3m3 when referencing gas volumes c.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Document Organizational Changes The formatting changes that have been applied to this manual’s release include: 1) The use of a consistent alphanumeric numbering methodology. Numerous bulleted lists have been updated with an alphanumeric list so that the end user is able to better reference a specific point when utilizing the manual as a communication medium. Old tables were inserted as a picture or Excel table into the Word document. “103m3” has been replaced by “e3m3” 5) Units of measure have all been replaced to a standard of metric units. 2013 10 . and is the 3rd drawing in this section. 10) Header has been updated with the most current OGC logo. 2) All Tables and Figures have been renumbered to include the section in which it can be found. 4) Consistency has been applied through the manual for units of measure: a. The following default units have been updated where applicable throughout the manual: a.1-3 can be found in Chapter 2. 14) Added “/facility” text to “battery” text where applicable for clarity. Section 1. 11) Tables have been reconstructed as needed to ensure consistency. 15) Removed the multiple references in Chapter 1 referring to Cross Border Measurement to a ‘one-liner’ at the beginning of the Chapter that states the following: “For further June 1st. “per cent” has been replaced by “%” b. 12) All font now utilizes “Times New Roman” 13) Reorganized Chapter 4 to be more intuitive to the reader.

Removed the text indicating.4 was updated to indicate that: “Instruments utilized for maintenance at a Cross Border Measurement facility are to adhere to the requirements outlined in Chapter 7. 12) Updated the previous Table 2.1(1) 4) Added text in Section 1. Text has been indicated in blue where this change has been made. 11) Included verbiage indicating the requirements to maintain associated meter elements if meters other than orifice are utilized in Section 2.7. Various Meters” table to provide more clarity 13) Replace the following in Sections 2. 7) “Meter Maintenance” has been utilized to generically reference verbiage surrounding calibrations. consider determining specific meter factors to be used for each of those wells.2. Content Additions Additions to content from the previous release have been identified by blue text throughout this manual. “Note: The Province of British Columbia is currently examining flaring and a flaring reduction strategy. 5) Addition of Section 1. a well that is representative of the battery’s average well production characteristics must be directed through the test separator for each of the four runs. that the text does not utilize blue font.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations details pertaining to fluid deliveries involving Cross Border Measurement.” as appropriate to provide more clarity around the specific requirement. “Cross Border Measurement.” 16) All uses of the term “shall” have all been replaced with. self-diagnostics.9 “Measurement Schematics” 6) The addition of Chapter 6. Please note that because this entire Chapter is new to the manual. which may impact the above uncertainties” as this document now exists.1(2)(e).(f) and (g) indicated below: e) When proving a test oil meter.2(6) to include verbiage around vent gas in conjunction with the existing flare measurement requirements. If there are wells in the battery with production characteristics that vary significantly from the average. 8) Added exception for bench proving meters in Section 2. proving.” 10) Section 2.” “is to” or “will. 2) Addition of “Delivery Point Calculation” as an example in Section 1.3. verifications. “are to.4(5) indicates that: The measurement uncertainty of the proving or calibrating device must be equal to or better than the uncertainty of the device being proved or calibrated.6. “Cross Border Measurement.6.1 3) Added details around return fuel gas requirements in Section 1. refer to Chapter 7. internal inspections and repairs.1(2) 9) Section 2.5. June 1st. The following list is to provide a summary to identify the changes that have been applied to this manual from the last release in January 2008: 1) Updated the manual’s “Introduction” and merged with the “Purpose” Section.2 “Minimum Frequency of Calibration/Verification. 2013 11 .7.

22) Added “General Requirements” to Section 4.3.e.1.1.5.1.2.3.1(8)(e). 25) Added requirements around gas lift systems in Section 4. Coriolis and Mass Meters installations in Section 4.2.3-1 “Orifice Meter Design Requirement” 21) Added previsions to permit factors to be utilized in volumetric calculations in fuel gas applications in Section 4.11(3) and 7.4. 24) All document retention requirements were changed to 72 months to align with OGGA requirements. as a result of a stage change.2.6.3 27) Added options around revocation of exemptions in Section 5. measurement requirements in Section 4. 19) Added Section 4.1 “Delineation for an Oil Battery Delivering To or Receiving from a Gas Plant on Same Site” 20) Added further clarification to the meter run specifications in Table 4.2 and 5. With the following single bullet point (e) to parallel the ERCB’s Directive 017: e) The wells selected must include those with the widest variation in gas-oil ratios or other producing characteristics.3.3. 16) Included further clarification in Section 4. or deletion(s) to the measurement system require the approval of the OGC. g) Adequate purging time must be allowed for the proving system when testing separate wells. 2013 12 . sound engineering practices. addition(s). 18) Included further details around requirements of plant inlet measurement in Section 4.4. does require notification to be sent to June 1st.3 26) Verbiage was updated along with the addition of atmospheric pressure to Section 4.7.2.13.1 23) Added details of Ultrasonic.2.3.2 28) Chapter 7 was updated to include a requirement to include a note on metering schematics identifying the requirement that modification(s).3. 29) Chapter 7 has been updated to indicate that manufactures specifications for meter installations or applicable API / AGA recommendations are to be followed.3.3. industry IRP manuals) are available.2.1(10) were updated to indicate that changes made to the maintenance dates.1.5.1 17) Included details around fuel gas estimation vs.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations f) Different wells must be used if possible for the four consecutive test runs required. 30) Section 7. 14) Included a requirement that requires proving tags attached to meters to include: “the type of prover or master meter used” 15) Updated all Sections that indicate “utilizing applicable industry-accepted procedures” as an acceptable means to meet a specific OGC requirement must ensure that auditable methods (i.1.

2) Removal of the entire “Enforcement” Section. Eliminated discussions around upcoming manual additions.1 has been removed and replaced with text for clarity.5. If a bypass is installed. 8) Removed the text in Section 2. 4) Updated Section 1. 32) Section 7. 33) Section 7. 5) Updated Section 1. Separators used in Cross Border applications must have HL-ESD’s that are latching and require to be manually reset. etc. June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations the OGC’s Technical Advisor Responsible for Cross Border Measurement Applications. 3) Removal of the entire “Implementation Provisions” Section.5(4) had text added to provide further clarification around liquid meter bypass requirements. A lot of technicians now generate these tags electronically and therefore the “full name” should suffice.1 “Introduction” preamble and shortened.4 around the maintenance frequency required for rotary or other types of positive displacement meters as this is covered off in the updated table 2. rather than the prior 20% and 80% requirement.3 had further clarification added to permit operators to utilize 10D upstream of liquid turbine meters if a flow conditioner is installed.12. 9) Removed the requirement to have the technician conducting maintenance to include their printed name to the tag being attached to meter after a calibration or prove is conducted. 7) Updated Section 2.5. they are to be locked or car sealed in the closed position. in the FDC system.2 “Applicability and Use of Uncertainties” preamble and shortened.1.1(2) had text added to provide further clarification around the type of HL-ESD that is required at a Cross Border Facility. Eliminated discussions around upcoming manual additions. 31) Section 7. Content Omissions Content that has been removed from the January 2008 release of the manual have been identified by the list below: 1) Removal of references to “AEUB” or ERCB” where it is not warranted through the manual. 6) Table 2.7.) providing that an audit trail exists that the S&W percentage has been applied to the gross volume rather than being required to be incorporated into the meter factor.12. 35) Changes were incorporated throughout Chapter 7 to allow the operator to apply a hydrocarbon liquid S&W percentage to be applied at any point (as a function of the meter factor.3.12.2 “Applicability” paragraph and removed the paragraph speaking to the potential deviation from Figure 2. 2013 13 .1-1. 34) Changes were included throughout the manual to permit operators to conduct calibrations at 25% and 75% of a transmitters range should they so choose.

” 19) Removed the following terms from the glossary: “Error (random)”. 18) Text was removed in section 7.2. i.2..1 & 7.2.6 14) Section 7. many critically important definitions are also included within applicable Chapters throughout the manual.7. “Error (spurious)” and “Error (systematic)” as these are not utilized in the manual at any point. 17) The Chapter 7 requirement to have C10+ compositional analysis conducted on oil volumes has been removed. Definitions Many terms used in this directive are defined in the Glossary (Appendix 1). 16) The Chapter 7 requirements for C10+ analysis reports have been removed and replaced with a requirement for a C6+ analysis as a minimum. 15) Chapter 7 sampling location requirements were updated to reference the updated requirements outlined in Section 6.3.e. June 1st.5 was updated to reflect changes in the Cross Border application process.13.6. However.1 outlining the acceptable circumstances where meter maintenance could be negated: “such as aircraft grounding due to inclement weather preventing access or a major catastrophic facility event that prevents staff from attending to calibrations.9.1.1 “General Requirements” have been simplified and updated.3 around Multi-well Group Facilities 13) Removed mention that a “Monthly Report” is required for EFM audit trail purposes in Section 4. operator facility explosion. 2013 14 .2.13.2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 10) Section 4. 11) Removed “oil” from Section 4.1 as gas wells are not classified as gas wells producing oil within the province of BC 12) Added further clarification to Section 4.7.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

1.

Chapter 1 Standards of Accuracy

1.1. Introduction
The OGC has standards of accuracy stated as “maximum uncertainty of monthly volume” and/or “single
point measurement uncertainty.” The uncertainties are to be applied as “plus/minus” (e.g., ±5%).
Measurement at delivery and sales points must meet the highest accuracy standards because volumes
determined at these points have a direct impact on royalty determination. Other measurement points that
play a role in the overall accounting process are subject to less stringent accuracy standards to
accommodate physical limitations and/or economics.
Out-of-province fluid deliveries involve a model of delivery and sales point requirements that are
covered in “Cross Border Measurement” (Chapter 7 of this manual).
The specific standards of accuracy are summarized in Section 1.8 of this Chapter.
1.2. Applicability and Use of Uncertainties
The OGC has adopted the following uncertainty level requirements for equipment and/or procedures
relating to measurement, accounting, and reporting for various aspects of oil and gas production and
processing operations.
Deviations from the minimum requirements for equipment and methods may be considered if it is in
accordance with the following:
1) No royalty, equity, or reservoir engineering concerns are associated with the volumes
being measured and the operator is able to demonstrate that the alternative measurement
equipment and/or procedures will provide measurement accuracy within the applicable
uncertainties.
2) In some cases, as described in Chapter 5, “Site-Specific Deviations from Base
Requirements,” the operator may deviate from the minimum requirements without OGC
approval, provided that specific criteria are met. Operators may also apply for approval
to deviate from the minimum requirements if the specific criteria are not met.
3) If royalty, equity, or engineering concerns are associated with the volumes being
measured, an operator may be allowed, on application, to deviate from the minimum
requirements. The application must demonstrate that the proposed alternative
measurement equipment and/or procedures will either provide measurement accuracy
within the applicable uncertainties or meet specific criteria described in Chapter 5, “SiteSpecific Deviation from Base Requirements.” Applications will also be considered if
measurement accuracy will be marginally outside the uncertainty limits or if the specified
criteria will be marginally exceeded. In such cases, OGC inspectors and auditors will
review the operators’ records for documentation to confirm that approval has been
obtained to deviate from the minimum requirements and for compliance with the
approval conditions.
1.3. Maximum Uncertainty of Monthly Volume
The MOF requires production data to be reported on a calendar month basis. “Maximum Uncertainty of
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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

Monthly Volume” relates to the limits applicable to equipment and/or procedures used to determine the
total monthly volume. Total monthly volumes may result from a single month-long measurement, but
more often result from a combination of individual measurements and/or estimations.
For example, consider a well in an oil proration battery/facility to which a maximum uncertainty of the
monthly volume would apply:
1) First, the well is tested, and the oil test rate is used to estimate the well’s production for
the period until the next test is conducted.
2) The well’s total estimated oil production for the month is combined with the month’s
estimated oil production for the other wells in the battery/facility to arrive at the total
estimated monthly oil production for the battery/facility.
3) The total actual monthly oil production for the battery is determined based on measured
deliveries out of the battery/facility and inventory change.
4) A proration factor is determined by dividing the actual battery/facility production by the
estimated battery/facility production.
5) The proration factor is multiplied by the well’s estimated production to determine the
well’s actual monthly production.
1.4. Single Point Measurement Uncertainty
“Single point measurement uncertainty” relates to the limits applicable to equipment and/or procedures
used to determine a specific volume at a single measurement point. The oil volume determined during a
24-hour well test conducted on a well in a proration battery/facility is an example of a specific volume
determination to which a single point measurement uncertainty limit would apply.
1.5. Confidence Level
The stated uncertainties are not absolute limits. The confidence level, which indicates the probability
that true values will be within the stated range, is 95%. This implies that there is a 95% probability (or
19 chances in 20) that the true value will be within the stated range.
1.6. Determination of Uncertainties
The uncertainties referred to relate to the accuracies associated with measurement devices, device
maintenance, sample gathering and analysis, variable operating conditions, etc. These uncertainties are
for single-phase specific volume determination points of specific fluids (oil, gas, or water) or for
combinations of two or more such points. These uncertainties do not relate to comparisons of two or
more measurement points, such as comparison of inlet volumes to outlet volumes. Such comparisons are
typically expressed as proration factors, allocation factors, or metering differences.
The uncertainties are relevant to equipment at the time of installation. No uncertainty adjustment is
required to account for the effects of multiphase fluids, wear, sludge or scale buildup, etc., as it is
accepted that such conditions would constitute a bias error to be monitored and accounted for through
the use of proration factors, allocation factors, or metering differences.
The methods to be used for determining and combining uncertainties are found in the latest edition of
the American Petroleum Institute (API) Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS),
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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

Chapter 13, “Statistical Aspects of Measuring and Sampling” or in the latest edition of the International
Organization for Standardization ISO Glossary, Standard 5168: Measurement of Fluid Flow—
Estimation of Uncertainty of a Flow-Rate Measurement.
1.6.1. Sample Calculation
Determination of single point measurement uncertainty for well oil (proration battery/facility) using
“root sum square” methodology:
For oil/emulsion measurement,
Oil meter uncertainty = 0.5% (typical manufacturer’s specification)
Meter proving uncertainty = 1.5%
Sediments and water (S&W) determination uncertainty = 0.5%
Combined uncertainty = √ [(0.5)2 + (1.5)2 + (0.5)2] = 1.66% (rounded to 2.0%)
For delivery point gas measurement,
Primary measurement device – gas meter uncertainty = 1.0%
Secondary device – (pulse counter or transducer, etc.) uncertainty = 0.5%
Secondary device calibration uncertainty = 0.5%
Tertiary device – (flow calculation, EFM, etc.) uncertainty = 0.2%
Gas sampling and analysis uncertainty = 1.5%
Combined uncertainty

= √ [(1.0)2 + (0.5)2 + (0.5)2 + (0.2)2 + (1.5)2]
= 1.95% (rounded to 2.0%)

1.7. Explanation of Standards of Accuracy
The following section explains standards of accuracy for oil, gas, and injection/disposal systems.
For further details pertaining to fluid deliveries involving Cross Border Measurement, refer to Chapter
7, “Cross Border Measurement.”
1.7.1. Oil Systems
1) Total Battery/Facility Oil (delivery point measurement), including Single-Well
Batteries/Facilities
For the schematic below:
m = single point measurement uncertainty
M = Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume

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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

Figure 1.7-1 Total Battery / Facility Oil (Delivery Point Measurement)

Single point measurement uncertainty:
Delivery point measures greater than 100m3/d = 0.5%
Delivery point measures less than or equal to 100m3/d = 1%
Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A
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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

The uncertainty of the monthly volume will vary, depending on the number of individual
measurements that are combined to yield the total monthly volume.
The term “delivery point measurement” refers to the point at which the oil production
from a battery/facility is measured. If clean oil is delivered directly into a pipeline system
(Lease Automatic Custody Transfer [LACT] measurement) or trucked to a pipeline
terminal, this point can also be referred to as the “custody transfer point.” The “delivery
point” terminology is from the perspective of the producing battery/facility, but the
receiving facility (pipeline, terminal, custom treating facility, other battery/facility, etc.)
may refer to this point as their “receipt point.” The oil volume determined at the delivery
point is used in all subsequent transactions involving the oil from the battery/facility.
The measurement equipment and/or procedures must be capable of determining the oil
volume within the stated uncertainties if clean oil is being measured.
If the oil volume delivered out of a battery/facility is included in an oil/water emulsion,
the stated uncertainties apply to the total emulsion volume determination only. It is
accepted that potential errors associated with obtaining and analyzing a representative
emulsion sample may prevent the oil volume from being determined within the stated
uncertainties.
For facilities that receive oil volumes from other batteries totaling 100m3/d or less, the
single point measurement uncertainty has been increased to allow for the economical
handling of oil when minimal receipt volumes would not justify the added expense for
improved measurement equipment and/or procedures.
2) Total Battery/Facility Gas
Includes gas that is vented, flared, or used as fuel, including single-well batteries also
referred to as “associated gas,” as it is the gas produced in association with oil production
at oil wells.
For the schematic below:
m = single point measurement uncertainty
M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume

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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

Figure 1.7-2 Total Battery / Facility Gas

Single point measurement uncertainty:
>16.9e3m3/d = 3%
3 3
3 3
>0.5e m /d but ≤16.9e m /d = 3%
3 3
≤0.5e m /d = 10%
Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume:
>16.9e3m3/d = 5%
>0.5e3m3/d but ≤16.9e3m3/d = 10%
≤0.5e3m3/d = 20%
Note that M is dependent on combined deliveries, fuel, flare, and vented gas
measurement.
The maximum uncertainty of total monthly battery/facility gas volumes allows for
reduced emphasis on accuracy as gas production rate declines. For gas rates up to
3 3
0.5e m /d, the gas volumes may be determined by using estimates; therefore, the
maximum uncertainty of monthly volume is set at 20%. If gas rates exceed 0.5e3m3/d,
the gas must be measured; however, a component of the total monthly gas volume may
include estimates for low volumes of fuel, or vented or flare gas that may add to the
monthly uncertainty. At the highest gas production rates, it is expected the use of
estimates will be minimal or at least have a minor impact on the accuracy of the total
monthly gas volume, thereby resulting in the 5% maximum uncertainty of monthly
volume.
The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the measured gas volumes (when
measurement is required) must be capable of meeting a 3% single point measurement
uncertainty. Because of the difficulty associated with measuring very low gas rates, the
equipment and/or procedures used in determining gas-oil ratios or other factors to be used
June 1st, 2013

20

therefore. 3) Total Battery/Facility Water. June 1st. so no basic requirement has been set for single point measurement uncertainty. depending on production rates. therefore. the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume is set at 5%.7-3 Total Battery / Facility Water. Including Single-Well Batteries / Facilities Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume: >50m3/month = 5% ≤50m3/month = 20% Single point measurement uncertainty = N/A Total battery/facility water may be determined by measurement or estimation.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations in estimating gas volumes where rates do not exceed 0. 2013 21 . the water must be separated from the oil and measured. including Single-Well Batteries/Facilities For the schematic below: M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1. If the total battery/facility water production volumes exceed 50m3/month. Total battery/facility water production volumes not exceeding 50m3/month may be determined by estimation.5e3m3/d are expected to be capable of meeting a 10% single point measurement uncertainty. the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume is set at 20%.

Two factors contribute to a reduced certainty that the reported monthly oil production volume will be accurate: lower rate wells are allowed reduced testing frequencies and wells may exhibit erratic production rates between tests. The maximum uncertainty of monthly well oil production volumes for light and medium density oil wells in proration batteries has been developed to allow for reduced emphasis on accuracy as oil production rates decline. Rather than being determined by continuous measurement.7-4 Oil Well (Proration Battery / Facility) Single point measurement uncertainty: All classes = 2% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume: High >30m3/d = 5% Medium >6m3/d but ≤30m3/d = 10% Low >2m3/d but ≤6m3/d = 20% Stripper ≤2m3/d = 40% M is dependent on oil and gas test volumes and the number of days the test is used for estimating production. monthly well oil production volumes are estimated from well tests and corrected by the use of proration factors to result in “actual” volumes. plus correction by a proration factor. The equipment and/or procedures used to determine oil volumes during the well tests must be capable of meeting a 2% single point measurement uncertainty for all classes of June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) Well Oil (Proration Battery/Facility) For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1. 2013 22 .

5) Well Gas (Proration Battery / Facility) Oil well’s “well gas” production is also referred to as “associated gas” because it is the gas produced in association with oil production at oil wells.5e3m3/d but ≤16. Rather than being determined by continuous measurement.5e3m3/d = 10% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume: >16.5e3m3/d = 20% M is dependent on oil and gas test volumes and the number of days the test is used for estimating production.9e3m3/d = 10% ≤0.9e3m/d = 5% >0. The maximum uncertainty of monthly oil well gas volumes has been developed to allow for reduced emphasis on accuracy as gas production rates decline.9e3m3/d = 3% ≤0. Two factors contribute to a reduced certainty that the reported monthly oil production volume will be accurate: lower rate wells are allowed reduced testing frequencies and wells may exhibit erratic production rates between tests. monthly oil well gas production volumes are estimated from well tests and corrected by the use of proration factors to result in “actual” volumes. plus correction by a proration factor.9e3m3/d = 3% >0.5e3m3/d but ≤16. For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1. 2013 23 .7-5 Oil Well (Proration Battery / Facility) Single point measurement uncertainty >16. June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations wells.

thereby resulting in the 5% maximum uncertainty of monthly volume. Because of the difficulty associated with measuring very low gas rates. however.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3 3 For gas rates up to 0.5e m /d. Rather than being determined by continuous measurement. the equipment and/or procedures used in determining gas-oil ratios or other factors to be used 3 3 in estimating gas volumes if rates do not exceed 0. the well test gas volume may be determined by using estimates. which may add to the monthly uncertainty. If gas 3 3 rates exceed 0. 6) Well Water (Proration Battery/Facility) For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1.7-6 Water Well (Proration Battery / Facility) Single point measurement uncertainty = 10% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The uncertainty of the monthly volume will vary. a component of a well’s total test gas volume may include estimates for solution gas dissolved in the test oil volume (gas-in-solution).5e m /d. it is expected that the use of estimates will be minimal or at least have a minor impact on the accuracy of the total monthly gas volume. monthly oil well water June 1st. 2013 24 . the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume is set at 20%. The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the measured test gas volumes (if measurement is required) must be capable of meeting a 3% single point measurement uncertainty. depending on the method used to determine test water rates and the frequency of well tests.5e m /d are expected to be capable of meeting a 10% single point measurement uncertainty. At the highest gas production rates. therefore. the test gas must be measured.

processed sales gas that is delivered out of a gas plant or gas facility into a transmission pipeline. Gas deliveries in this context will typically be clean. Therefore. 2013 25 . The measurement at this point determines the gas volumes on which royalties will be based. Therefore.2. In some cases.7. a stringent expectation is set for the single point measurement uncertainty. and in some cases.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations production volumes are estimated from well tests and corrected by the use of proration factors to result in “actual” volumes.7-7 Gas Deliveries (Sales Gas) Single point measurement uncertainty = 2% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The total monthly volume may result from a single month-long measurement. estimates may be used to determine water rates. The water rates determined during the well tests may be inferred from determining the water content of emulsion samples. this type June 1st. 1. making the uncertainty of the monthly volume equivalent to the single point measurement uncertainty. Gas Systems 1) Gas Deliveries For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty Figure 1. the single point measurement uncertainty is set at 10%.

condensate disposition to an oil facility or for sales Excluded: Return fuel to the original source facility after the gas has been sweetened. gas delivered from one upstream facility to another that is not tied to the same system for FUEL. a. 2) Hydrocarbon Liquid Deliveries For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty Figure 1. etc.7-8 Hydrocarbon Liquid Deliveries Single point measurement uncertainty: Delivery point measures >100m3/d = 0. such as from a gas battery/facility to an oil battery/facility b. ATCO. c. 2013 26 . purchase from downstream facilities – co-ops.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations of gas may be delivered to other plants for further processing or to injection facilities. depending on the number of individual measurements that are combined to yield the total monthly volume. TCPL. sales to downstream – TCPL.5% Delivery point measures ≤100m3/d = 1% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The uncertainty of the monthly volume will vary. ATCO. etc. The term “delivery point measurement” refers to the point at which the hydrocarbon June 1st. thus delivery point measurements are required at the following locations: a. gas plant dispositions b.

battery/facility.” The hydrocarbon liquid volume determined at the delivery point is used in all subsequent transactions involving that liquid.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations liquid production from a battery or facility is measured. and in some cases they may be considered to be oil. etc. other battery/facility. 2013 27 . or plant inlet levels are typically condensate. The point at which clean hydrocarbon liquids are delivered directly into a pipeline system (Lease Automatic Custody Transfer [LACT] measurement) or trucked to a pipeline terminal can also be referred to as the “custody transfer point. For facilities where the hydrocarbon liquid delivery volumes total ≤100m3/d. The volumes determined at this point are the volumes on which royalties are based. Another component of determining the total facility hydrocarbon liquid volume may be the determination of monthly inventory changes. terminal. This does not include uncertainties for basic sediments and water (S&W) determination or temperature correction. Total Battery or Facility Group Gas For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume June 1st. the single point measurement uncertainty has been increased to allow for the economical handling of hydrocarbon liquids when minimal volumes would not justify the added expense for improved measurement equipment and/or procedures. The hydrocarbon liquids delivered out of a gas plant may be pentanes plus. custom treating facility. ethane. The measurement equipment and/or procedures must be capable of determining the hydrocarbon liquid volume within the stated limits. The gross monthly opening and closing inventory volumes must be measured using equipment and/or procedures that would provide no more than the allowed uncertainty stipulated for the hydrocarbon liquid deliveries out of the facility. propane. but the receiving facility (pipeline. 3) Plant Inlet. or a mixture of various (NGL/LPG) components. which may or may not be required in a specific situation. butane.” The “delivery point” terminology is from the perspective of the producing battery or facility.) may refer to this point as its “receipt point. Hydrocarbon liquids delivered out of a gas system at the well.

7-9 Plant Inlet or Total Battery. facility or group gas is typically unprocessed gas that may vary in composition and may contain entrained liquids. Facility or Group Condensate (Recombined) Single point measurement uncertainty = 3% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = 5% Plant inlet gas or total battery. The total reported gas volume could result from combining several measured volumes from various points and may also include the calculated gas equivalent volume of entrained hydrocarbon liquids (typically condensate). 2013 28 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 1. The expectation for the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume is set at 5% to allow for the uncertainties associated with measuring gas under those conditions. The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the measured gas volumes must be capable of meeting a 3% single point measurement uncertainty. June 1st.

Facility or Group Condensate (Recombined) Single point measurement uncertainty = 2% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The condensate volume is included in the total gas volume for reporting purposes and is therefore covered by the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume for the plant inlet. the gas equivalent of the plant inlet June 1st. Total Battery or Facility Group Condensate (recombined) For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty Figure 1.7-10 Plant Inlet or Total Battery. For reporting purposes. Plant inlet condensate is typically separated from the inlet stream and sent through the plant for further processing.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) Plant Inlet. 2013 29 . total battery or facility group gas.

the maximum uncertainty of the monthly volume is set at 20. the maximum uncertainty of the monthly volume is set at 5. In either case. If the annual average fuel gas rates exceed 0. 2013 30 . facility or group condensate is separated and delivered out of the system at that point.5e3m3/d).0% to allow for the uncertainties associated with measuring gas under those conditions.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations condensate is included in the total plant inlet gas volume. June 1st. Therefore. 5) Fuel gas For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1.5e3m3/d or less on a per-site basis. the condensate single point measurement uncertainty is set at 2% for the liquid volume determination.5e3m3/d = 5% ≤0.7-11 Fuel Gas Single point measurement uncertainty: >0. the gas must be measured. facility or group condensate upstream of the plant inlet is separated and measured prior to being recombined with the gas production. Note that if plant inlet or total battery. the gas volume may be determined by using estimates. The maximum uncertainty of monthly fuel gas volumes allows for reduced emphasis on accuracy as gas flow rates decline for all upstream oil and gas facilities. the condensate measurement is subject to the single point measurement uncertainties stipulated for hydrocarbon liquid deliveries (see above). but since the gas being used as fuel may be unprocessed gas and part of the total fuel gas volume may include some estimated volumes (up to 0.5e3m3/d = 3% ≤0. the condensate is converted to a gas equivalent volume and included in the gas production volume. If total battery.5e3m3/d = 20% Note that M is dependent on combined uncertainties of various fuel sources at each reporting facility.5e3m3/d = 10% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume: >0.0%.5e3m3/d on any site. if the annual average fuel gas rate is 0.

is required) must be capable of meeting a 5% single point measurement uncertainty. The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the measured gas volumes (if measurement. Therefore. the equipment and/or procedures used in determining gas-oil ratios or other factors to be used in estimating gas volumes if rates do not exceed 0. Because of the difficulty associated with measuring very low gas rates. 2013 31 . or dilution gas) must be measured. June 1st. 6) Flare / Vent Gas For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1.5e3m3/d (including pilot. flare/vent volumes must be estimated and reported.5e3m3/d are expected to be capable of meeting a 10% single point measurement uncertainty. Flare and vent lines usually operate in a shut-in condition and may be required to accommodate partial or full volumes of gas production during flaring/venting conditions. purge.7-12 Flare / Vent Gas Single point measurement uncertainty = 5% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = 20% Flare and Vent gas may be clean processed gas or it may be unprocessed gas. if flaring or venting is infrequent and no measurement equipment is in place. Continuous or intermittent flare and vent sources at all oil and gas production and processing facilities where annual average total flared and vented volumes per facility exceed 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the measured gas volumes (if measurement is required) must be capable of meeting a 3% single point measurement uncertainty. to allow for the erratic conditions associated with flare/vent measurement. depending on the point in the system from which gas is being discharged. not an estimate. the maximum uncertainty of the monthly volume is set at 20%. In some cases.

7-13 Acid Gas Single point measurement uncertainty = 10% for low pressure acid gas before compression. 8) Dilution Gas For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume June 1st. Therefore. Acid gas usually contains a great deal of water vapour and has other conditions associated with it.0%.0% after compression. the single point measurement uncertainty is set at 10%. 2013 32 . When the acid gas is compressed and then injected into a well. such as very low pressure. and = 3. making the uncertainty of the monthly volume equivalent to the single point measurement uncertainty. which affect measurement accuracy. Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The total monthly volume may result from a single month-long measurement. the single point measurement uncertainty is set at 3.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7) Acid Gas For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1.

it is subject to the same uncertainties as those for fuel gas that must be determined by measurement (as stated above).7-15 Gas Well (Well-Site Separation) June 1st. Since it must be measured. 9) Well Gas (well site separation) For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1. 2013 33 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 1.7-14 Dilution Gas Single point measurement uncertainty = 3% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = 5% Dilution gas is typically “fuel” gas used to provide adequate fuel for incineration or flaring of acid gas.

“Wet” gas wells have continuous effluent measurement.7-16 Well Gas (Effluent Proration Battery / Facility) Single point measurement uncertainty = 3% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = 15% If production components from gas wells are not separated and continuously measured. the maximum uncertainty of monthly well gas volumes allows for reduced emphasis on accuracy as gas production rates decline. The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the separated measured well gas volumes must be capable of meeting a 3% single point measurement uncertainty. the gas wells are subject to a proration accounting system.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Single point measurement uncertainty = 3% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume: >16. Since the separated gas is unprocessed and may still contain entrained liquids at the measurement point and a component of the total reported well gas production may include the calculated gas equivalent volume of the well’s condensate production. 2013 34 . the maximum uncertainty of monthly volumes also allows for the uncertainties associated with measuring gas under those conditions.9e3m3/d = 5% ≤16. 10) Well Gas (effluent proration battery/facility) For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1.9e3m3/d = 10% If production components from gas wells are separated and continuously measured. and the “actual” production is prorated based on the June 1st.

the gas equivalent of the condensate volume is included in the well’s total gas production volume. 11) Well Condensate (recombined) For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty Figure 1. The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the measured well test gas volumes downstream of separation during effluent meter correction factor tests or during the periodic dry gas well tests must be capable of meeting a 3% single point measurement uncertainty. In this case.7-17 Well Condensate (Recombined) Single point measurement uncertainty = 2% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The gas equivalent of the condensate volume is included in the total well gas volume for reporting purposes and is therefore covered by the monthly uncertainty for the well gas. In the case of a gas well subject to effluent measurement. Note that if condensate produced by a gas well is separated at the wellhead and delivered June 1st. If condensate produced by a gas well is separated and measured at the wellhead prior to being recombined with the gas production. which is done during the effluent meter correction factor test.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations measurement of group gas and liquid components following separation at a central location. 2013 35 . the volume of the condensate is mathematically converted to a gas equivalent volume and added to the well gas production volume. is subject to a single point measurement uncertainty of 2%. No requirement has been set for the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume because the gas equivalent of the condensate volume is included in the total well gas volume for reporting purposes. No requirement has been set for the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume because the gas equivalent of the condensate volume is included in the total well gas volume for reporting purposes. The maximum uncertainty of the monthly well gas volume is set at 15% to allow for the inaccuracies associated with these types of measurement systems. the condensate single point measurement uncertainty is set at 2% for the liquid volume determination. The liquid volume determination.

the condensate is reported as a liquid volume. that is. Total battery/facility water in a gas system may be collected at a central location where it can be measured prior to disposal. therefore. In this case. by totaling individual well measurements. the condensate measurement is subject to the single point measurement uncertainties stipulated for hydrocarbon liquid deliveries. Alternatively.7-18 Total Battery / Facility Water Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = 5% Single point measurement uncertainty = N/A Total battery/facility water may be determined by an individual group measurement. The 5% maximum uncertainty of monthly volume allows for some leeway in volume determination. the total battery/facility water may be a summation of individual well estimates or measurements of water collected at well sites and disposed from those sites. 2013 36 . 13) Well Water For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty June 1st. 12) Total Battery/Facility Water For the schematic below: M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1. no basic requirement for measurement uncertainty has been set.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations out of the system at that point.

water production may be determined by using water-gas ratios determined from engineering calculations or semi-annual tests. Injection/Disposal Systems 1) Total Gas For the schematic below: M = Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume Figure 1.7.3. or. 2013 37 .7-19 Well Water Single point measurement uncertainty = 10% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The uncertainty of the monthly volume will vary. depending on whether produced volumes are subject to individual well measurement. or proration. 1. Water production at gas wells may be determined by measurement after separation.7-20 Total Gas Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = 5% Single point measurement uncertainty = N/A The single point measurement uncertainty will vary depending on the source and type of June 1st. if separators are not used.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 1. the single point measurement uncertainty is set at 10%. To allow for the various methods used to determine production volumes. estimation.

making the uncertainty of the monthly volume equivalent to the single point measurement uncertainty. and in some cases. 2) Well Gas For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty Figure 1. 2013 38 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations fluids received. The equipment and/or procedures used to determine the gas volumes injected/disposed into each well must be capable of meeting a 3% single point measurement uncertainty. several sources may make up the total gas volume received by an injection system.7-21 Well Gas Single point measurement uncertainty = 3% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The total monthly volume may result from a single month-long measurement. The gas injected/disposed into each well must be measured and may consist of clean processed gas and/or unprocessed gas that may contain entrained liquids. 3) Total Water For the schematic below: M = maximum uncertainty of monthly volume June 1st. Gas used in injection/disposal systems may be clean processed gas or unprocessed gas that may contain entrained liquids. The expectation for the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume is set at 5% to allow for the uncertainties associated with measuring gas under those conditions.

and/or waste water. June 1st. The water injected/disposed into each well must be measured.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 1. the expectation for the maximum uncertainty of monthly volume is set at 5%. The expectation for the single point measurement uncertainty is set at 5%. To be equivalent to the requirements for total oil and gas battery/facility water. 2013 39 . making the uncertainty of the monthly volume equivalent to the single point measurement uncertainty.7-23 Well Water Single point measurement uncertainty = 5% Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = N/A The total monthly volume may result from a single month-long measurement.7-22 Total Water Maximum uncertainty of monthly volume = 5% Single point measurement uncertainty = N/A Water used in injection/disposal systems may be produced water from oil or gas batteries. fresh water from water source wells. 4) Well Water For the schematic below: m = single point measurement uncertainty Figure 1.

gas systems.9e m /d 3 3 3 3 3 3 >0. flared.5% N/A 1% 5% 3% 10% 3% 20% 10% 5% N/A 20% N/A 5% 2% 10% 2% 20% 2% 40% 2% >16.5e3m3/d but ≤16. and injection systems.5e m /d 6) Well Water June 1st.5e m /d 3) Total Battery/Facility Water >50m3/month 3 ≤50m /month 4) Well Oil (proration battery/facility) 3 High >30m /d 3 3 Medium >6m /d but <30m /d 3 3 Low >2m /d but ≤6 m /d 3 Stripper ≤2m /d 5) Well Gas (proration battery/facility) 3 3 ≤ 0. or used as fuel) 3 3 >16.5e m /d but <16. 2013 40 . Table 1.9e m ≤0.9e3m3/d 10% 3% 20% 10% N/A 10% 1) Total Battery/Facility Oil (Delivery Point Measurement) Delivery point measures >100m3/d 3 Delivery point measures ≤100m /d 2) Total Battery/Facility Gas (Includes produced gas that is vented.Oil Systems Maximum Uncertainty of Monthly Volume Single Point Measurement Uncertainty NA 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 1.9e3m3/d 5% 3% >0.8-1 Measurement Uncertainty .8. Standards of Accuracy – Summary The following summary tables cover oil systems.

8-2 Measurement Uncertainty . accounting. Measurement Schematics This section presents the requirements for measurement schematics used for measurement.Gas Systems Maximum Uncertainty of Monthly Volume N/A Single Point Measurement Uncertainty 2% N/A 0.9.9e3m3/d ≤16.5e m /d 20% 10% 6) Flare and Vent Gas 20% 5% N/A 10% N/A 3% 5% 3% 5% 3% 10% 3% 10) Well Gas (proration battery/facility) 15% 3% 11) Well Condensate (recombined) N/A 2% 12) Total Battery/Facility Water 5% N/A 13) Well Water N/A 10% 1) Gas Deliveries (sales gas) 2) Hydrocarbon Liquid Deliveries Delivery point measures >100m3/d 3 Delivery point measures ≤100m /d 3) Plant Inlet or Total Battery/Facility Group Gas 4) Plant Inlet or Total Battery/Facility Group Condensate (recombined) 5) Fuel Gas >0.9e3m3/d Table 1.Injection Systems 1) Total Gas Maximum Uncertainty of Monthly Volume 5% Single Point Measurement Uncertainty N/A 2) Well Gas N/A 3% 3) Total Water 5% N/A 4) Well Water N/A 5% 1. and reporting of oil and gas facilities.5 % N/A 1% 5% 3% N/A 2% 5% 3% ≤0.5e3m3/d 3 3 7) Acid Gas Before compression After compression 8) Dilution Gas 9) Well Gas (well site separation) >16. June 1st.8-3 Measurement Uncertainty .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Table 1. Measurement schematics are required to ensure measurement. 2013 41 .

and if gas. and maximum flow. meters. A schematic must include the elements identified in Section 1. compressors complete with legal survey location (LSL) e. final destination – battery/facility. producing company c. wet or dry measured d. system ratings and operational values as minimum. gathering systems. and reporting compliance and is a visual tool showing the current physical layout of the facility. direction of flow for all measured fluids June 1st. composition of fluids Piping and instrumentation diagram — A schematic diagram showing piping. and accounting to ensure a common understanding. vessels. equipment. and sample points are typically not shown on gas gathering schematic. Definitions: Process flow diagram — A PFD is a diagram commonly used in chemical and process engineering to indicate the general flow of plant processes and equipment. and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID). names.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations accounting. g.1. engineering. normal.9. major bypass and recirculation lines c. and/or gas plants. process piping b. including: a. Gas Gathering Schematic — A line diagram showing the delineation of facilities and the connectivity of wells to compressors. major equipment symbols. are not considered measurement schematics. batteries. A gas gathering schematic contains: a. 2013 42 . Equipment. process flow diagrams (PFD). and identification numbers d. and pressure h. plant. flow directions e. control loops that affect operation of the system f. interconnection with other systems g. For the purpose of this manual. well location by unique well identifier (UWI) b. temperature. Schematics should be regularly reviewed and used by groups such as operations. well type (oil or gas). facility codes f. and instrumentation connections within process units. etc. Measurement schematic — A diagram used to show the physical layout of facilities that traces the normal flow of production from left to right as it moves from wellhead through to sales.

or readouts) ii. including downhole location if different c. Process equipment that change the state or composition of the fluid(s) within the facility. dehydrators. For larger facilities. etc. Facility name. 2013 43 . Multiple facilities can be on the same page and a typical schematic may be used for wells or facilities with the same measurement configuration.9.9.) d. such as lakes and rivers UWIs and LSLs are to be in a delimited format. A master copy of the measurement schematic must be retained at a central location and previous versions must be stored for a minimum of 72 months. g. including recycle lines and bypasses to measurement equipment. LSL of the surface facility and UWI. see below. General Content Requirements 1) The general requirements of a measurement schematic include the following: a. respectively. How the required information.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 1. including . confirming. weight scale. or reporting purposes.type of measurement (meter. electricity) used for equipment if not measured or estimated as part of total site fuel j. Facility boundaries between each reporting facility with associated facility codes. is shown on a measurement schematic is up to the operator to decide as long as the schematic is clear and comprehensive. Energy source (gas. such as 100/16-06-056-02W5/02 and 16-06-056-02W5. EFM. The measurement schematic can be stored electronically or in hard-copy format. Fresh water sources. testing or proving taps required by the OGC h.1. Permanent flare points k.1. Flow split or diversion points (headers) with LSL if not on a well or facility lease site f. sweetening and refrigeration units. Measurement points and storage tanks or vessels that are used for estimating. Fuel. Identify if oil is tied into a gas system.1. Additional information June 1st. compressors. such as separators. treaters. The schematics must be used by Operations and Production Accounting to ensure that the reported volumes are in compliance with the OGC reporting and licensing requirements. flare. (See Appendix 5 for an example. type of meter(s) if applicable iii. Measurement Schematics Requirements The operator responsible for submitting volumes to the MOF is responsible for creating. an optional gas gathering schematic may be used to show facility delineation. or vent take-off points – default to estimated if meter not shown i. and operator name if different b. e. 1. type of instrumentation (charts. accounting. Flow lines with flow direction that move fluids in and out of the facility(s) and those that connect the essential process equipment within the facility. and revising any measurement schematics. facility licensee name. propane. or gauge) i.

confirmation of no change. If gas drive. Split well production events being reported b. Physical changes. 2013 44 . Some Cross Border facilities may be required to measure fuel for some compressors individually. Pressure safety valves (PSV) are not required measurement points g. and shut-in wells ii. or equipment additions or removal. Include normally closed valves that can change production flow d. etc. require a schematic update. pressure control valves (PCVs). are not required as they can be considered default flow f. Identify if the tank or vessel is tied into a vapour recovery system (VRU) or flare system. such as wells. Originating facility ID or UWI / LSL for truck-in receipt points is not required 3) Storage tanks and vessels indicated on a schematic must include the following: a. such as emergency shutdown valves (ESDs). is set out below. Identify optional non-reporting chemical storage or pop tanks if shown d. reporting event for wells with downhole commingled zones iii. identify them as suspended c. such as plunger lift. The master copy of the measurement schematic must be updated annually to reflect any changes or deletions. pump jack. Documentation of the verification may be stored separately from the schematic but must be available on request. Normally open valves. condensate. and caverns. Identify non-accounting meters if shown h. e. then the HP or KW rating is required unless fuel gas is measured as part of total fuel within a facility.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations required on the schematic. if shown. as well as exceptions. Include fluid type for these tanks. identify if electric or gas drive. For compressors. Identify if the tank or vessel is underground or default to aboveground c. tank and vessel capacity may be shown on separate document and should be available upon request. 2) Well detail indicated on a schematic must include the following: a. waste. vessels. or water. Temporary changes within the same reporting period do not require a schematic update. Identify if artificial lift is utilized. plant product. piping. such as oil. emulsion. default to vented Changes affecting reporting must be documented at the field level when they occur and communicated to the production accountant at a date set by the operator to facilitate accurate reporting before the MOF submission deadline. if no revisions. Suspended wells are optional. All producing wells indicating: i. injection/disposal. There must be verification of the revisions or. b. June 1st. and block valves. water source.

The company that performs the product and residue gas allocations up to the allocation point(s) d. 2013 45 . a window of 12 months from March 1st 2013 has been granted to have operators update their existing schematics to the standards indicated above b. Any reactivated facility must have an up-to-date schematic within three months of reactivation or after the implementation period.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 1. Schematic Availability Schematics must be provided by the operator of record to the following external parties upon request: a.9. MOF or cross-border regulatory bodies e. Facility licensee of the subject facility b.9. As schematics have been a requirement of DPR. 1. Implementation a. No grandfathering for active facilities c. whichever is later.3. The company that performs the reporting for the facility c. The operator (physical or reporting) of receipt/disposition points — all reporting measurement points for the facility only June 1st. OGC.2.

Live oil is commonly measured at the wellhead or battery/facility. Definitions For the purposes of this manual. meter wear). A measuring standard refers to a calibration or proving device with a known value that is traceable to national reference standards maintained by the National Research Council in Ottawa. Ontario. or temperaturesensing element. Dead Oil contains mainly pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons and is in a stabilized (degassed) form at atmospheric conditions. a differential. Dead oil may be at the wellhead or battery/facility.e.g. Chapter 2 Meter Maintenance 2. The K Factor is typically determined by the meter manufacturer and does not take into June 1st..Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2. Flowmeter primary device is a device mounted internally or externally to the fluid conduit. Master meter refers to a meter of known accuracy that is connected in series with another meter for the purpose of checking the accuracy of the second meter and providing a meter factor.1. or electronic transmitters). Maintenance is any process of conducting a calibration. meter slippage. In the case of an EFM system. Note: The primary device may consist of one or more components necessary to produce the primary device signal. Group Oil is grouped and measured at a facility to which test oil is produced. Group oil represents the total volume of oil. This device produces a signal with a defined relationship to the fluid flow in accordance with known physical laws relating the interaction of the fluid to the presence of the primary device. Flowmeter secondary device is a device that responds to the signal from the primary device and converts it to a display or to an output signal that can be translated relative to flow rate or quantity. the following definitions will be used: Calibration refers to procedures or operations that establish the accuracy of the values indicated by a measuring device as compared to the values indicated by a measuring standard by making changes or adjustments to the measuring device. a chart recorder or EFM system). static. it is not in a stabilized form. unless at a single well battery/facility where group oil and test oil are one in the same. A meter factor is a dimensionless number used to correct indicated meter volumes to adjusted volumes if the two volumes differ because of operational conditions (e. chart recorder pen. proving. Functionality Test refers to procedures or operations performed to metering equipment where conventional means cannot be used to verify the equipment. Live Oil contains mainly pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons and may also contain lighter hydrocarbons. End device refers to the device or equipment that records the various values used to calculate a volume (i. 2013 46 . It is not to be confused with the “K Factor.” which is the factor used to convert the number of pulses generated by a meter whose operation is based on electronic pulse technology into units of volume. verification. Meter element refers to any device associated with the meter (e. diagnostic.g. the end device may also perform the calculations necessary to arrive at the measured and corrected gas volume. gas entrained in liquids.. internal inspection or repair to a meter to ensure it is operating in the correct manner to meet the expected uncertainty requirements.

A prover run refers to the operation of a prover or master meter in which a representative volume is sampled and measured. The meter factor is subsequently applied to indicated meter volumes to determine the adjusted volume. The requirements identified here are considered minimums. 2013 47 . treater. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout. an orifice plate. Prover refers to a device used to collect and determine the volume of a sample of fluid that has passed through a meter. and a licensee may choose to apply more stringent requirements. Applicability The maintenance (i.2. (Care should be taken in such cases not to apply the meter factor again. the meter factor should be indicated on the tag or label as being 1. June 1st. or vortex shedder bar). Test oil is usually measured as live oil. In such cases.0000). verification. The decision tree below clarifies when a calibration or verification may be utilized. or test tank. 2. Verification refers to procedures or operations that establish the accuracy of the values indicated by a measuring device as compared to the values indicated by a measuring standard without making any changes or adjustments to the measuring device. etc. These requirements are not applicable to measurement devices used only for a licensee’s internal accounting purposes. Proving refers to the procedures or operations whereby a prover volume is compared to an indicated meter volume (both corrected to applicable pressure and temperature conditions). the meter factor may be incorporated into the software such that the indicated meter volume is already corrected to read the adjusted volume. and that sample volume is compared to the volume indicated by a meter through which the same sample has passed to determine a meter factor. Test Oil is measured at a test separator. For this reason it is recommended that operators tag meters not utilized for accounting purposes as such. diagnostics.) requirements stipulated here are applicable to measurement devices used in British Columbia to meet Section 53 of the DPR. Test oil is an estimate of a well’s production based on the test-to-test method. venturi.e.g.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations consideration all of the specific operational conditions the meter may be subjected to.. proving. calibration. A primary measurement element refers to the part of the meter that provides an indication of flow (e. Provers typically use volumetric or gravimetric means to determine the quantity of the sample. The prover volume divided by the indicated meter volume yields a meter factor.

2013 48 .3. Bimonthly means at least once every two calendar months. maintenance frequencies have the following meanings: a. g. etc. Semi-annually means at least once every second calendar quarter e. July to September. Frequency Exceptions 1) If the use or operation of a measurement device requiring monthly or quarterly maintenance is suspended for a significant period (at least seven consecutive days). the scheduled maintenance may be delayed by the number of days the device was not in use. Annually means at least once every fourth calendar quarter f. For the purposes of this manual. the operator June 1st.3. April to June. the more frequently maintenance should be conducted.1. due to wear. changes in ambient conditions. Verification Decision Tree 2. Documentation of the amount of time the device was not in service must be kept and made available to the OGC on request. If this exception is being applied. c.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 2. Quarterly means at least once per calendar quarter d. Biennially means at least once every eighth calendar quarter (once every two years). Monthly means at least once per calendar month b.2-1 Calibration vs. Triennially means at least once every twelve calendar quarters (once every three years). Generally. Frequency The accuracy of measurement devices may deviate over time. Calendar quarters are January to March. and October to December 2. changes in operating conditions. the more important the accuracy of a measurement device.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

must attach a tag to the meter indicating that this exception is in effect and the next
scheduled maintenance date. This exception is not applicable to measurement devices
subject to maintenance frequencies that are semi-annual or longer.
2) If a liquid meter is removed from service for bench proving but is put “on the shelf” and
not returned to service for a considerable period of time, the countdown to the next
required bench proving does not start until the meter is returned to service. The licensee
must attach a tag to the meter indicating the installation date, but leaving the original
proving tag intact.
3) The OGC may request that maintenance of a meter be done at any time or may extend the
due date for scheduled maintenance, depending on the specific circumstances at a
measurement point.
2.4. Accuracy of Instruments Used to Conduct Maintenance
Instruments utilized for maintenance at a Cross Border Measurement facility are to adhere to the
requirements outlined in Chapter 7, “Cross Border Measurement.” Instruments used in non-Cross
Border applications to conduct maintenance of measurement devices must be tested for accuracy prior
to first being used, immediately following any repairs or alterations being conducted on them (and
before use), and periodically, in accordance with the following:
1) Portable provers must be calibrated (water drawn) bi-annually using measurement
standards.
2) Stationary provers must be calibrated (water drawn) every four years using measurement
standards.
3) Calibration instruments, such as manometers, thermometers, pressure gauges, deadweight
testers, electronic testers, etc., must be tested for accuracy bi-annually against
measurement standards.
4) Master meters must be proved quarterly using a calibrated (water drawn) prover. The
fluid used to prove the master meter must have properties (density, viscosity) similar to
the fluids measured by the meters it will be used to prove. The master meter must be
proved at flow rates that are comparable to the conditions it will be used for.
5) The measurement uncertainty of the proving or calibrating device must be equal to or
better than the uncertainty of the device being proved or calibrated.
The procedures to be followed for these accuracy tests must be designed to provide consistent and
repeatable results and must take into consideration the actual operational conditions the device will
encounter. To that end, the procedures must be in accordance with the following, as available and
applicable (presented in order of OGC preference from first to last):
1) Procedures specified by Measurement Canada, an agency of Industry Canada.
2) Procedures described in the API Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards.
3) The device manufacturer’s recommended procedures.
4) Other applicable industry-accepted procedures that utilize auditable methods (i.e. sound
June 1st, 2013

49

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

engineering practices, industry IRP manuals, etc.).
If none of the foregoing exists, the OGC will consider applications for and may grant approval of
appropriate procedures.
Records of the foregoing accuracy tests must be kept for at least 72 months following the expiry of the
applicable test and provided to the OGC on request.
2.5. Gas Meters
For gas meter maintenance requirements at a Cross Border Measurement Facility, please refer to
Chapter 7, “Cross Border Measurement.”
2.5.1. General Maintenance Requirements
The term “gas meter” is broadly used to describe all of the equipment or devices that are collectively
used to arrive at an indication of a gas volume. Typically, various values (e.g., differential pressure,
static pressure, temperature) must be determined and used to calculate a gas volume. Depending on the
specific gas meter, each of those values may be determined by individual devices or equipment.
Typically, maintenance of gas meter equipment requires the various meter elements to be subjected to
various actual pressures, temperatures, and other values that are concurrently subjected to the calibration
equipment. If the end device does not indicate the same value as the calibration equipment, adjustments
must be made to the meter element and/or end device.
Some meter equipment technologies may require alternative equipment and procedures for regular
maintenance. This is acceptable provided the equipment and procedures are capable of confirming that
the meter elements are functioning properly and are sensing and transmitting accurate data to the end
device. This may be referred to as a Functionality Test.
Orifice meters are commonly used to measure gas volumes. Gas orifice meters themselves (the meter
run and orifice plate-holding device) do not require maintenance. However, the associated meter
elements and the end devices to which they are connected must be calibrated / verified, as described in
Section 2.5.5 Orifice Meters (below).
If devices other than orifice meters are used to measure gas, the associated meter elements and the end
devices to which they are connected must be maintained at the same frequency as orifice meters. The
required procedures must be designed to provide consistent and repeatable results and must take into
consideration the actual operational conditions the device will encounter. To that end, the procedures
must be in accordance with the following, as available and applicable (presented in order of OGC
preference from first to last):
1) Procedures specified by Measurement Canada.
2) Procedures described in the API Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards.
3) The device manufacturer’s recommended procedures.
4) Other applicable industry-accepted procedures that utilize auditable methods (i.e. sound
engineering practices, industry IRP manuals).
If none of the foregoing exists, the OGC will consider applications for and may grant approval of
appropriate procedures.
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Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

2.5.2. Gas Meter Maintenance Frequency
All meters utilized for accounting purposes must have their respective maintenance conducted within
the first calendar month after being installed or put into service. Should operations have a need to
service or repair a meter, that meter must have the required maintenance conducted for that metering
technology conducted by the end of the calendar month.
The frequency of the associated meter element calibrations is to be the same as an orifice meter. For
example, should an operator have a turbine meter installed for a fuel gas application, the primary
measurement element (the turbine body) must be proved once every seven years, however, the related
pressure and temperature elements must be calibrated annually.
Table 2.5-1 Gas Meter Maintenance Frequency

Metering Technology

Orifice

Ultrasonic (primary
device)

Positive displacement,
turbine or other rotary
meters used in a fuel
gas application
(primary device)

June 1st, 2013

Maintenance
Frequency

Maintenance Method

Semi-Annual

Calibration

Annual

Calibration

Once Every Seven
Years

Calibration – see Note
below

Annual

Self-Diagnostics

Delivery Point (see
definition in “Orifice
above)

Semi-Annual

Proving – see Note
below

Non Delivery Point –
including fuel
applications (see
definition in “Orifice
above)

Once every seven years

Proving – see Note
below

Service
Delivery Point
(Includes sales meters,
facility to facility
meters, facility to plant
meters, gas processing
plant to gas processing
plant, which are used
for reporting purposes)
Gas processing plant
and facility meters used
for reporting purposes
but are non-delivery
point meters (These
include gas meters
located at the well head
along with gas meters
located at both oil and
gas facilities)
Delivery Point (see
definition in “Orifice
above)
Non Delivery Point (see
definition in “Orifice
above)

51

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

Service

Maintenance
Frequency

Maintenance Method

Delivery Point (see
definition in “Orifice
above)

Semi-Annual

Proving or SelfDiagnostics if Equipped
– see Note below

Non Delivery Point –
including fuel
applications (see
definition in “Orifice
above)

Annual

Proving or SelfDiagnostics if Equipped
– see Note below

All Meters

Cross Border

Refer to Chapter 7
“Cross Border
Measurement”

As per manufacture
requirements

Semi-annual

Any meter not covered
by above

Delivery Point (see
definition in “Orifice
above)
Non delivery point (see
definition in “Orifice
above)

As per manufacture
requirements

Annual

As per manufacture
requirements

Metering Technology

Coriolis

Upon the request of the
OGC with reasonable
As per manufacture
Any gas meter
All
doubt as to the
requirements
measuring capability of
the meter.
Note: that the maintenance of these meters may be done with the meter in service, or the meter may be
removed from service and proved/calibrated in a shop at a pressure that is within the normal operating
condition for that meter location unless it can be shown that calibrating/proving at a lower pressure
conditions will not change the uncertainty of the meter, such as in the case of a rotary meter.
2.5.3. Gas Meter Internal Inspection / Functionality Test
A key contributor to meter accuracy is the condition of the internal components of the gas meter.
Examples of internal components include orifice plates, vortex shedder bars, and turbine rotors. The
internal components must be removed from service, inspected, replaced or repaired if found to be
damaged, and then placed back in service, in accordance with the following:
1) The required frequency for inspection of internal gas meter primary measurement
element components is the same frequency as the maintenance frequency.
2) Whenever possible, the inspection should be done at the same time as the maintenance
conducted of the meter elements and end device; however, to accommodate operational
constraints, the inspection may be conducted at any time, provided the frequency
requirement is met.
3) Inspections must be done in accordance with procedures specified by the American
Petroleum Institute (API), the American Gas Association (AGA), or other relevant
standards organizations, or the device manufacturer’s recommended procedures, or other
applicable industry-accepted procedures that utilize auditable methods (i.e. sound
engineering practices, industry IRP manuals), whichever are most applicable and
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52

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

appropriate.
4) A tag or label must be attached to the meter or end device that identifies the meter serial
number, the date of the internal inspection, and any other relevant details.
5) A detailed record of the inspection, documenting the condition of the internal
components as found and any repairs or changes made to the internal components must
be kept for at least one year and provided to the OGC on request.
2.5.4. Gas Meter, Meter Element, and End Device Exceptions for Calibration/Verification
Frequency and Internal Inspections
1) If the “As Found” calibration/verification check of a gas meter, meter element, and end
device confirms that the accuracy of all readings or outputs are within ±0.25% of full
scale (with the exception of ±1°C for the temperature element), no adjustment of the
instrumentation is required.
a. An “As Found” calibration/verification check is to encompass a confirmation of the
upstream meter run diameter and orifice plate diameter recordings on a chart or in an
EFM system.
2) If an EFM device has been found not to require adjustment for three consecutive
maintenance cycles , as indicated in Item 1 above, the minimum time between routine
maintenance may be doubled (as per Table 2.5.2-1). A tag must be attached to the meter,
indicating that this exception is being applied and the date of the next scheduled
calibration.
3) The records of the maintenance that qualify the meter for this exception must be kept and
made available to the OGC on request.
A meter that is on a reduced maintenance frequency is to revert back to the minimum
required frequencies if:
a. An electronic gas meter fails the check that placed it at a reduced frequency.
b. Under a reduced maintenance frequency, an electronic gas meter fails a check that
placed it at a reduced frequency.
4) If redundant gas meters are installed for a measurement point or redundant meter
elements and/or end devices are installed on a single gas meter, the minimum time
between routine maintenance of the meter elements and end devices may be doubled,
provided that daily volumes from each end device are compared at least monthly and
found to be within 0.25% of each other. If the daily volumes are not found to be within
0.25% of each other, immediate maintenance of both sets of equipment is required. A tag
must be attached to the meter, indicating that this exception is being applied and the date
of the next scheduled maintenance. The records of the monthly comparisons and any
maintenance that are done must be kept for at least one year and made available to the
OGC on request.
5) If the internal components of gas meters have been inspected and found to be clean and
undamaged for three consecutive inspections, the minimum time between inspections
may be doubled. When the internal components are found to be dirty or damaged on any
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53

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

subsequent inspection, the frequency for inspections will revert back to the original
requirement.
6) If the inspection of internal components of a gas meter requires the meter to be removed
from service and there is no meter bypass installed, it is acceptable to defer a scheduled
internal component inspection until the next time the gas meter run is shut down (except
at a Cross Border facility), provided that any one of the following conditions exists:
a. Shutting down and depressurizing the gas meter run to remove and inspect the
internal components would be very disruptive to operations.
b. Inspection would require excessive flaring/venting.
c. Performing the inspection would create a safety concern, and internal component
inspections have historically proven to be satisfactory.
d. The meter run is installed in a flow stream where the risk of internal component
damage is low (e.g., sales gas, fuel gas).
e. The measurement system at the facility provides sufficient assurance, through
volumetric and/or statistical analysis, that internal component damage will be
detected in a timely manner.
An inspection cannot be delayed if the meter is not measuring properly.
7) In the case of an orifice meter, if the orifice plate is mounted in a quick-change/dual
chamber orifice meter assembly, and, during an inspection of the orifice plate, the fitting
is found to be leaking between the chambers such that the meter run must be shut down
and depressurized to safely remove the orifice plate, it is acceptable to defer a scheduled
orifice plate inspection until the next time the gas meter run is shut down (except at a
Cross Border facility), provided that:
f.

Shutting down and de-pressuring the gas meter run to remove the orifice plate would
be very disruptive to operations.

g. The inspection would require excessive flaring/venting.
h. Performing the inspection would create a safety concern, and
i. The next time the gas meter run is shut down, the orifice meter assembly is
scheduled for repairs to eliminate the cause of the leak and scheduled for future
orifice plate inspections.
ii. Orifice plate inspections have historically proven to be satisfactory.
i.

The meter run is installed in a flow stream where the risk of orifice plate damage is
low (e.g., sales gas, fuel gas, etc.).

j.

The measurement system at the facility provides sufficient assurance, through
volumetric and/or statistical analysis, that orifice plate damage will be detected in a
timely manner.

8) Internal metering diagnostics may be used to determine if the structural integrity of the
primary measurement element is within acceptable operating parameters and checked at
the same required intervals as an internal inspection. Then internal inspection is not
June 1st, 2013

54

and one warmer temperature are recommended). and full span. 9) Single phase in-line proving of the gas meter may be used to determine if the primary measurement element/meter element is within acceptable operating parameters and proved at the same required intervals as an internal inspection. A zero check of the differential under normal operating pressure must be done before and after the calibration. the temperature element must be calibrated at three points (operating temperature.5. this must be clearly indicated on a tag or label attached to the meter (or end device). “shutdown” means any scheduled discontinuation of flow through the meter that is of sufficient duration to allow the operations needed to remove and inspect the internal component. If a thermometer is in place and used to determine flowing gas temperature. Evidence in the battery or facility logs that the internal component inspection has been scheduled for the next shutdown must be available for inspection by the OGC. the operator must be able to demonstrate to the OGC. e. that the situation meets the conditions identified. b. The differential pressure element must be calibrated at zero. c. The operator must maintain documentation on the diagnostic capability of the measurement system and make it available to the OGC on request. the accuracy of that device must be verified at the same frequency and in the same manner as a thermometer left in place.5. Pen arc. the operator should consider conducting those inspections prior to the conclusion of this unscheduled shutdown. 2013 If a thermometer or other temperature measuring device is not left in place (transported by an operator and used to determine flowing gas temperatures at multiple sites). An inspection cannot be delayed if the meter is not measuring properly. and spacing must be inspected and adjusted. if necessary. The static pressure element must be calibrated at zero. full span. For the purposes of these exceptions. the thermometer must be checked at two points and replaced if found not to read accurately within ±1°C (operating temperature and one other temperature are recommended). on request. and nine ascending/ descending points throughout its range. 2. 50% of full span. f. June 1st. 55 . one colder temperature. If a temperature element is in place.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations required until an alarm or error is generated by the device or as recommended by the manufacturer. and the record of that verification must be readily available for inspection by the OGC. If these exceptions are being used. Then internal inspection is not required until the uncertainty limits are exceeded. If the primary measurement element inspections are deferred in accordance with any of the foregoing exceptions. Orifice Meters 1) The procedure for orifice meter chart recorder (end device) calibration/verification must be in accordance with the following: a. An initial baseline diagnostic profile must be performed and documented during the commissioning process. pressure stops. linkage. d. If an unscheduled shutdown occurs that will allow sufficient time to conduct internal component inspection operations.

Subsequent to the meter calibration. ii. c. For digital meter elements. the calibrated/verified at zero. The site location. The meter serial number. f. d) If a temperature element is in place. iv. and b. and full span (ascending). If a thermometer is in place and used to determine flowing gas temperature. as well as 80% and 20% (or 75% and 25%) of full span (descending). 2013 56 . 2) The procedure for calibration/verification of an orifice meter electronic flow measurement (EFM) system must be in accordance with the following: a. The full name of the person performing the maintenance. The meter serial number. For analog meter elements. the accuracy of that device must be verified at the same frequency and in the same manner as a thermometer left in place. For digital and analog meter elements. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. If a thermometer or other temperature measuring device is not left in place (transported by an operator and used to determine flowing gas temperatures at multiple sites). The date of the maintenance. the differential pressure element must be calibrated/verified at zero. the static pressure element must be calibrated/verified at zero.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations g. 50% of full span. e. v. This tag or label must identify: i. If the detailed report is left with the meter. the thermometer must be checked at two points and replaced if found not to read accurately within ±1°C (operating temperature and one other temperature are recommended). a tag or label must be attached to the meter (or end device) and must identify: i. a tag or label must be attached to the meter (or end device). A zero check of the differential under normal operating pressure must be done before and after the calibration/verification. differential pressure element must be of calibrated/verified full span. Subsequent to the meter calibration/verification. June 1st. d. and the record of that verification must be readily available for inspection by the OGC. 50% calibrated/verified full span. g. 50%of full span. A detailed report indicating the tests conducted on the meter during the calibration/verification and the conditions “As Found” and “As Left” must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC. iii. and full span. The meter element calibration/verification ranges. the temperature element must be calibrated/verified at two points (operating temperature and one colder temperature or one warmer temperature are recommended) and calibrated or replaced if found not to indicate accurately within ±1°C. h.

However. the reading of the calibration must be verified at the receipt location of such data to ensure accurate data transmission.6. v. 2. Oil Meters Oil production and disposition volumes must always be reported as liquid volumes at 15°C and either equilibrium pressure (equilibrium pressure is assumed to be atmospheric pressure at the point of production or disposition) or 101.1. SCADA. the proving procedures must allow for the volume reduction that will occur when the gas in solution with the “live” oil is allowed to evolve on pressure reduction. iii. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. 2) No consideration for gas in solution is required when proving meters used to measure “dead” oil. there are two basic ways in which oil is measured. h. The meter element calibration/verification ranges. If the detailed report is left with the meter. The date of the maintenance.6-1 Live Oil Group Meter Proving Requirements Group Oil Custody Transfer – Pipeline with meter Delivery Point – Pipeline with meter Delivery Point – Truck with meter Proving Frequency Temperature Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Temperature Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Pressure Monthly Continuous Continuous Continuous Continuous Monthly Continuous Continuous N/A N/A Monthly Continuous Continuous N/A N/A Single Point or Continuous N/A N/A N/A N/A Delivery Point – Receipt – Tank Gauging OGC Site Specific Delivery Point – Pipeline Batch – Tank Gauging OGC Site Specific June 1st. requiring distinctly different proving procedures: 1) If oil production is measured prior to being reduced to atmospheric pressure. A detailed report indicating the tests conducted on the meter during the calibration/verification and the conditions “as found” and “as left” must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC. Live Oil Meters Table 2. The site location. or other means of communication.6.325kPa absolute pressure. The full name of the person performing the maintenance. iv. If data from the instrumentation are sent to another location(s) for flow calculations via DCS. i. RTU. 2013 Single Point or Continuous Single Point or Continuous Single Point or Continuous 57 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations ii. 2.

To account for the shrinkage that will occur at the metering point due to the gas held in solution with live oil. Meters used to measure live oil are subject to the following proving requirements: 1) Requirements for Group Oil Meter a. Live oil meters are typically those used to measure volumes of oil or oil/water emulsion produced through test separators. the live temperature and/or pressure correction values must be continuously applied to the raw volume data. The resultant meter factor must be applied back to the volumes measured after the repair or change. 2013 58 . The resultant meter factor must be applied to all volumes produced prior to the determination of the meter factor from the prove.Meter Annual Well Test – Tank Gauging Annual Temperature Measurement Frequency Single or Continuous Single or Continuous Volumetric Compensation Temperature Single or Continuous Single or Continuous Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Pressure N/A N/A N/A N/A NOTES: 1) Where temperatures and/or pressures are required to be continuously measured. A new group oil meter must be initially proved within the first calendar month of operation. An acceptable initial proving must consist of three consecutive runs (one of which June 1st. b. 2) The temperature measuring element must be installed in the flow stream and be representative of the stream temperature. c. The surface temperature of the piping will not be allowed as a satisfactory temperature measurement nor will the installation of the temperature measuring element be installed where there is normally no flow. the proving equipment and procedures may determine the amount of shrinkage either by physically degassing the prover oil volumes or by calculating the shrinkage based on an analysis of a sample of the live oil. The group oil meter must be proved by the end of the calendar month following any repairs being conducted on the meter or any changes to the meter installation. Calculation of shrinkage volumes is most often used to mitigate safety and environmental concerns if the live oil volumes are measured at high pressures or if the live oil contains hydrogen sulphide (H2S).6-2 Live Oil Test Meter Proving Requirements Test Oil Proving Frequency Well Test .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Temperature Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Temperature See Cross Border Chapter 7 Proving Frequency Group Oil Cross Border Delivery Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Pressure Table 2. but also includes meters used to measure well or group oil or oil/water emulsions that are delivered to other batteries or facilities by pipeline prior to the pressure being reduced to atmospheric pressure.

A new test oil meter at a well or a battery/facility must be proved within the first three months of operation. the meter must be replaced. a well that is representative of the battery’s average well production characteristics must be directed through the test separator for each of the four runs. (Proving procedures using more than four runs will be allowed. f. Each group oil meter must be proved at least every month. One proving run is sufficient if the new meter factor is within 0. Following the initial proving: i. iii. b. the meter must be proved in the same manner as the initial proving run.) e. c. provided that the operator can demonstrate that the alternative procedures provide a meter factor that is of equal or better accuracy. b. If a consistent meter factor is unattainable. 2013 59 .5% of the previous meter factor. (Proving procedures using more than four runs will be allowed. 2) Requirements for Test Oil Meter a. The test oil meter must be proved immediately (by the end of the calendar month) following any repairs on the meter or any changes to the meter installation (note that the resultant meter factor must be applied back to the volumes measured after the repair or change). June 1st. When proving a test oil meter. each providing a meter factor that is within ±1. A meter used to measure test oil or oil/water emulsion volumes must be proved annually thereafter.5% of the previous mean factor. The design and operation of the meter installation must ensure that the conditions of fluid flow through the meter are within the manufacturer’s recommended operating range.5%of the mean of the four factors. The resultant meter factor will be the average of the four applicable meter factors.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations may be the “as found” run). each providing a meter factor that is within ±0. The resultant meter factor will be the average of the three applicable meter factors. If there are wells in the battery with production characteristics that vary significantly from the average. provided that the operator can demonstrate that the alternative procedures provide a meter factor that is of equal or better accuracy).25%of the mean of the three factors. consider determining specific meter factors to be used for each of those wells. The meter must be proved in-line under normal operating conditions. If the new meter factor is not within 0. d. d. ii. An acceptable proving must consist of four consecutive runs (one of which may be the “as found” run). e. 3) Requirements for Group and Test Oil Meters a. A meter used to measure group oil or oil/water emulsion volumes to or at a battery or facility must be proved monthly thereafter.

depending on the initial fluid pressure and the fluid characteristics.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations c. while non-tank-type volumetric provers such as ball provers. (Tank-type volumetric or gravimetric provers will require the taps to be downstream of the throttling/dump valve. iv. If a master meter is used for proving. Whenever operating conditions at the meter experience a change that could significantly affect the shrinkage factor. iii. a new shrinkage factor must be June 1st. v. The size of the prover taps and operation of the prover must not restrict or alter the normal flow through the meter. such that the proving device will not interfere with the normal interaction of the meter and the throttling/dump valve. f. after application of any required correction factors. If the proving procedure involves using a shrinkage factor (rather than degassing) to adjust the prover volume to atmospheric conditions. A shrinkage factor representative of the fluid passing through the meter must be determined and used to adjust the meter volumes to atmospheric conditions. 2013 60 . The prover taps must be located downstream of the throttling/dump valve. after application of any required correction factors. then: i. pipe provers. The resultant volume determined by the prover. Each proving run must consist of a representative volume of oil or oil/water emulsion that is directed through the meter and into the prover and then the liquid volume is reduced in pressure to atmospheric pressure. The meter must be installed upstream of either a throttling control valve with snapacting on/off control or a snap-acting dump valve. The prover must be a tank-type volumetric or gravimetric prover. The amount of time required to degas the prover volume and arrive at a stable atmospheric pressure in the prover will vary. iv. The resultant volume determined by the prover or master meter. such that the proving device will not interfere with the normal interaction of the meter and the throttling/dump valve. or master meters will require the taps to be upstream of the valve. The location of the prover taps depends on the type of proving device to be used to prove the meter. The shrinkage factor must be based on analysis of a sample of the metered fluid taken at normal operating conditions prior to and within one month of the proving. it must have an uncertainty rating equal to or better than the meter it is being used to prove. iii. g. If the proving procedure will include degassing the prover to physically reduce the pressure of the oil to atmospheric pressure. is divided by the metered volume to determine the meter factor. Each proving run must consist of a representative volume of oil or oil/water emulsion being directed through the meter and into the prover or through the master meter. ii. is divided by the metered volume to determine the meter factor. then: i. The shrinkage factor may either be incorporated into the meter factor or be applied to metered volumes after they are adjusted by the meter factor. e. d.) ii. A uniform flow rate must be maintained through the meter.

the tag attached to the meter must indicate that a shrinkage factor was used instead of degassing the prover and whether the shrinkage factor was incorporated into the meter factor or will be applied separately. it may be possible to program the meter factor into the software to allow the meter to indicate corrected volumes. it is acceptable to assume that the temperature observed at the time of proving is reasonably representative of the temperature experienced at the meter until the next proving. In the case of a Group Oil . The date of the proving. The site location. h. If a meter is proved after a period of regular operation.Live Oil delivery point or custody transfer meter. When this option is used. 2013 61 . In the case of a test oil meter. the meter factor must include a correction factor to adjust the metered volume to 15°C (unless the meter is temperature compensated). The average meter factor. Although the actual fluid temperature may vary with ambient temperature. Consideration should also be given to proving the meter at the new operating conditions to determine if the meter factor has been affected. iii.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations determined based on analysis of a sample of the metered fluid taken at the new operating conditions. The meter serial number. the meter factor must not include a correction factor for pressure. i. ii. a tag or label must be attached to the meter and must identify: i. The metered volume must be corrected to 15°C. The meter must be continuously pressure compensated in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute (API) – Chapter 11. Whether the volume readout is meter-factor corrected or if the volume readout is meter-factor uncorrected. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout. the meter factor must not include a correction factor for temperature. v. The type of prover or master meter used. The metered volume must be corrected to 101. This requirement does not apply to meter technologies that do not require correction for temperature. i. iv. vi. Subsequent to the meter proving. The meter must be continuously temperature compensated in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute (API) – Chapter 11. iii. This requirement does not apply to meter technologies that do not require correction for temperature. If the meter is connected to a manual readout. it is necessary to apply the meter factor to the observed meter readings to get the corrected volumes.325kPa. an “As Found” proving run must be performed prior to conducting any repairs on the meter or replacing the meter. In the case of a Group Oil . June 1st.Live Oil custody transfer measurement meter. ii. This requirement does not apply to meter technologies that do not require correction for pressure. vi.

ii. degas the first run only. The name of the person performing the prove. a copy of the sample analysis must be attached to the proving report. in accordance with the following: i. June 1st. which can be applied to subsequent runs conducted without degassing. A detailed report indicating the type of prover or master meter used. If the degassing procedure is being used. In situations where individual well production rates are so low that proving a test oil meter in accordance with the requirements listed above would require excessive time. If the meter is used to measure test volumes of conventional oil/emulsion. iii. Any meter used to measure test volumes of oil (density greater than 920kg/m3) may be proved in a meter shop. If the detailed report is left with the meter. and corrective action must be taken where required: a) The flow rate through the meter must be observed in order to verify that it is within the manufacturer’s recommended operating ranges. and then use the data to calculate a shrinkage factor. the average rate of flow of oil of all the wells that are tested through the meter must be less than or equal to 2m3/d and no well may exceed 4m3/d of oil production. it is acceptable to modify the proving procedures. and the calculations conducted during the proving must be either left with the meter or readily available for inspection by the OGC. Produce several wells through the test separator at one time to increase the volume available for the proving runs. iv. Note: The detailed proving report must clearly indicate if any of the foregoing modifications were used to prove the meter. in order of OGC preference. j. Complete. 4) Group and Test Oil Meter Exceptions – Live Oil a. may be used to reduce proving time: i. iv. the run details. individual proving runs requiring more than one hour are considered excessive. If the gas held in solution with the fluid produced through the meter is of sufficient volume to significantly affect the fluid volume indicated by the meter. The meter installation must be inspected as follows. b. Conduct only three proving runs. b) The dump valve must not be leaking (no flow registered between dumps). consideration should be given to determining an appropriate shrinkage factor to correct for the effect of the solution gas and provide that factor to the meter calibration shop so it may be built into the meter factor. Use the highest rate well for all proving runs. 2013 62 . iii. The following modifications. ii. A live oil meter may be removed from service and proved in a meter shop. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations vii. If the proving involved the use of a shrinkage factor instead of degassing.

5%of the mean of the four factors. the run details. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. c) The fact the proving was done in a shop. The resultant meter factor will be the average of the four applicable meter factors. June 1st. it is necessary to apply the meter factor to the observed meter readings to get the corrected volumes. e) An acceptable proving must consist of four consecutive runs (one of which may be the “as found” run). e) The type of prover or master meter used. b) The date of the proving.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations v. f) The name of the person performing the calibration. d) The average meter factor. as follows: a) Water is typically used as the proving fluid. a tag or label must be attached to the meter and must identify: a) The meter serial number. an “As Found” proving run must be performed prior to conducting any repairs on the meter or replacing the meter. but varsol or some other light hydrocarbon fluid may be used for the proving. If the detailed report is left with the meter. c) If a master meter is used for proving. and the calculations conducted during the proving must be either left with the meter or readily available for inspection by the OGC. each providing a meter factor that is within ±0. h) A detailed report indicating the type of prover or master meter used. b) Corrections for the temperature and pressure of the proving fluid must be made. The shop proving may be conducted with a volumetric or gravimetric prover or with a master meter. Subsequent to the meter proving. it must have an uncertainty rating equal to or better than the meter it is being used to prove. it may be possible to program the meter factor into the software to allow the meter to indicate corrected volumes. g) Whether the volume readout is meter-factor corrected or if the volume readout is meter-factor uncorrected. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout. If the meter is connected to a manual readout. d) If a meter is proved after a period of regular operation. where applicable. 2013 63 . vi.

2013 64 . A new meter must initially be proved within the first calendar month of operation. Dead oil meters are typically those used for delivery point (custody transfer point) measurement of clean oil that has been degassed to atmospheric pressure. June 1st.6-4 Dead Oil Test Meter Proving Requirements Test Oil Proving Frequency Well Test . the live temperature and/or pressure correction values must be continuously applied to the raw volume data. These meters may be found measuring oil being pumped from a battery/facility into a pipeline or measuring oil being pumped from a truck into a pipeline terminal. battery.6-3 Dead Oil Group Meter Proving Requirements Group Oil Custody Transfer – Pipeline with meter Delivery Point – Pipeline with meter Delivery Point – Truck with meter Delivery Point – Receipt – Tank Gauging Delivery Point – Pipeline Batch – Tank Gauging Cross Border Delivery Proving Frequency Temperature Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Temperature Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Pressure Monthly Continuous Continuous Continuous Continuous Monthly Continuous Continuous N/A N/A Monthly Continuous Continuous N/A N/A Single Point or Continuous N/A N/A N/A N/A Single Point or Continuous OGC Site Single Point Specific or Continuous See Cross Border Chapter 7 OGC Site Specific Single Point or Continuous Table 2. or other facility.2. The resultant meter factor must be applied to all volumes produced prior to the determination of the meter factor from the prove. The surface temperature of the piping will not be allowed as a satisfactory temperature measurement nor will the installation of the temperature measuring element be installed where there is normally no flow. Dead Oil Meters Table 2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2.Meter Well Test – Tank Gauging Annual Annual Temperature Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Temperature Treat as Live Oil – Test Oil Treat as Live Oil – Test Oil Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Pressure NOTE: 1) Where temperatures and/or pressures are required to be continuously measured. Meters used to measure dead oil are subject to the following proving requirements: 1) Requirements for Group Oil Meter a. 2) The temperature measuring element must be installed in the flow stream and be representative of the stream temperature.6.

A meter used to measure group oil or oil/water emulsion volumes to or at a battery or facility must be proved monthly thereafter. One proving run is sufficient if the new meter factor is within 0.5% of the previous mean factor. The meter serial number. but other provers such as ball provers. is divided by the metered volume to determine the meter factor. The size of the prover taps and operation of the prover must not restrict or alter the normal flow through the meter. The design and operation of the meter installation must ensure that the conditions of fluid flow through the meter are within the manufacturer’s recommended operating range. The volume measured by the prover or by the master meter. The type of prover or master meter used. If a master meter is used for proving. An acceptable initial proving (the first proving of a new or repaired meter) must consist of three consecutive runs. each meter must be calibrated at least every month. iv. pipe provers or master meters may be connected either upstream or downstream of the meter). g. The prover taps must be located so that the connection and operation of the proving device will not interfere with the normal operation of the meter (tank-type volumetric or gravimetric provers must be connected downstream of the meter. If a consistent meter factor is unattainable. ii. l. m. h. after application of any required correction factors. The resultant meter factor will be the average of the three applicable meter factors (proving procedures using more than three runs will be allowed if the operator can demonstrate that the alternative procedures provide a meter factor that is of equal or better accuracy).Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations b. 2013 65 . the meter must be calibrated in the same manner as the initial proving run. The meter must be proved in-line under normal operating conditions. i. Each proving run must consist of a representative volume of oil being directed through the meter and the prover or master meter. Subsequent to the meter proving. the meter must be replaced. c. iii. d. f. each providing a meter factor that is within ±0. If the new meter factor is not within 0.25% of the mean of the three factors. it must have an uncertainty rating equal to or better than the meter it is being used to prove. a tag or label must be attached to the meter and must identify: i. Proving may be done with any suitable volumetric or gravimetric prover or a master meter. Following the initial proving. June 1st. ii. The date of the proving. The average meter factor.5% of the previous meter factor. k. i. e. j.

Whether the volume readout is meter factor corrected or whether the volume readout is meter factor uncorrected. This requirement does not apply to meter technologies that do not require correction for pressure. If the meter is connected to a manual readout.Dead Oil custody transfer measurement meter. The tag attached to the meter must clearly indicate that the meter measures ≤100m3/d and that the meter is on a quarterly proving frequency. the run details. the meter proving frequency may be extended to quarterly. p. The name of the person performing the prove.5% of the previous factor for three consecutive months. 2013 66 . The required proving frequency will revert back to monthly whenever the meter factor determined during a proving is found not to be within 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations v. Chapter 11. If the detailed report is left with the meter. The meter must be continuously pressure compensated in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute (API) Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS).325kPa.5% of the previous factor. The tag attached to the meter must clearly indicate that the meter has been found to have consistent meter factors and is on a quarterly proving frequency. The metered volume must be corrected to 15°C. If the meter factor has been found to be within 0. June 1st. it may be possible to program the meter factor into the software to allow the meter to indicate corrected volumes. and the calculations conducted during the proving must be either left with the meter or readily available for inspection by the OGC. In the case of a Group Oil . o. Chapter 11. the meter factor must not include a correction factor for pressure. If the volume of fluid measured by a dead oil meter does not exceed 100m3/d.2. vi. 2. b. Dead Oil Meter Exceptions 1) Group Oil Meter Exceptions – Dead Oil Meter a. In the case of a Group Oil . the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. The required proving frequency will revert back to monthly if the meter begins measuring volumes greater than 100m3/d. This requirement does not apply to meter technologies that do not require correction for temperature.1. the meter factor must not include a correction factor for temperature. The metered volume must be corrected to 101. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout.Dead Oil delivery point or custody transfer meter. it is necessary to apply the meter factor to the observed meter readings to get the corrected volumes. the meter proving frequency may be extended to quarterly.6. n. A detailed report indicating the type of prover or master meter used. The meter must be continuously temperature compensated in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute (API) Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS).

1. 2.7.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2. Condensate at Flow-Line Conditions When a meter that requires proving is used to measure condensate at flow-line conditions are subject to the following proving requirements: 1) A new meter must be proved within the first calendar month of operation.e.325kPa. the volume must be determined and reported as a liquid volume at 15°C and equilibrium pressure (equilibrium pressure is assumed to be either atmospheric pressure at the point of production or disposition or the actual equilibrium pressure).7-1 Proving Requirements for Condensate at Equilibrium Conditions Equilibrium Conditions Condensate Volumes Cross Border Delivery Proving Frequency Monthly Temperature Volumetric Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Measurement Compensation Frequency Temperature Frequency Pressure Treat as Dead Oil – Group Oil See Cross Border Measurement “Chapter 7” Table 2.7-3 Proving Requirements for Non Delivery Point / Non Custody Transfer Condensate Flow Line Conditions -Non Delivery Point -Non Custody Transfer (i.7.Meter Cross Border Delivery Proving Frequency Temperature Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Temperature Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Frequency Pressure Annual Treat as Live Oil – Test Oil See Cross Border Measurement “Chapter 7” Condensate is subject to two differing sets of measurement/accounting/reporting rules. 2. Condensate at Equilibrium Conditions Meters that measure condensate that is stored and delivered as a liquid at atmospheric pressure or equilibrium pressure are typically delivery point meters and are therefore subject to the same proving requirements and exceptions applicable to meters used for dead oil measurement.3. Condensate Meters 2. the volume is determined at flow-line pressure and temperature and corrected to 15°C and 101.Meter Cross Border Delivery Proving Frequency Monthly Temperature Volumetric Pressure Volumetric Measurement Compensation Measurement Compensation Frequency Temperature Frequency Pressure Treat as Dead Oil – Group Oil See Cross Border Measurement “Chapter 7” Table 2. 2013 67 .325kPa absolute and 15°C) as well as in liquid (m3). Proving Requirements Table 2. If condensate volumes are measured and delivered at atmospheric pressure or equilibrium pressure. but the volume may be reported as a gas equivalent volume at standard conditions (101.2. If condensate volumes are measured and delivered at flow-line conditions. The resultant meter factor must be applied to all volumes produced prior to the determination of the meter factor from the prove. Wellhead) Well Test . June 1st.7-2 Proving Requirements for Delivery Point / Custody Transfer Condensate Flow Line Conditions -Delivery Point -Custody Transfer Well Test .7.7.

it must have an uncertainty rating equal to or better than the meter it is being used to prove. 3) The meter must be proved immediately (by the end of the calendar month) following any repairs being conducted on the meter or any changes to the meter installation. after application of any required correction factors. 6) The design and operation of the meter installation must ensure that the flow through the meter is within the manufacturer’s recommended operating range. is divided by the metered volume to determine the meter factor. The volume measured by the prover or by the master meter. and the pressure in the prover must be regulated such that reduction of the condensate volume due to flashing is minimized. the prover taps must be located downstream of the dump valve. the meters are to follow the frequency as stipulated in Chapter 7. 2013 68 . b. If a ball or piston-type volumetric prover or a master meter is used. 10) Each proving run must consist of a representative volume of condensate being directed through the meter and the prover or master meter. The meter must be installed upstream of either a throttling control valve with snap-acting on/off control or a snap-acting dump valve for separator designs.” 5) The meter must be proved in-line under flow-line conditions at normal operating conditions. “Cross Border Measurement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2) The meter must be proved annually thereafter (noting the requirement for delivery point meters as applicable). so that the prover or master meter will be subjected to the same flow and pressure conditions as the condensate meter being proved. 11) If a meter is proved after a period of regular operation. The resultant meter factor must be applied to all volumes produced prior to the determination of the meter factor from the prove. The dump valve must be allowed to control the flow of condensate into the prover through its normal operation. 7) The size of the prover taps and operation of the prover must not restrict or alter the normal flow through the meter. If a tank-type volumetric or gravimetric prover is used. 9) If a master meter is used for proving. 4) Condensate meters used for delivery point measurement are subject to the same proving frequency and proving frequency exceptions applicable to meters used for dead oil measurement. 12) An acceptable proving must consist of four consecutive runs (one of which may be the June 1st. the prover taps must be located upstream of the dump valve. 8) The location of the prover taps must be such that the connection of the proving device will not interfere with the normal interaction of the meter and the dump valve: a. For condensate meters at flow-line conditions designated as Cross Border meters. Flow into the prover is not to be controlled by manual manipulation of the prover inlet valve. an “As Found” proving run must be performed prior to conducting any repairs on the meter or replacing the meter.

The average meter factor. or the rate of flow through the meter must be ≤3m3/d with the gas equivalent volume of the daily condensate volume being ≤3% of the daily gas volume related to the condensate production. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. b. b. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout. and the calculations conducted during the proving must be either left with the meter or readily available for inspection by the OGC. 15) A detailed record of the internal components inspection documenting any repairs or changes made to the internal components must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC. a tag or label must be attached to the meter and must identify: a. If the detailed report is left with the meter. The name of the person performing the prove. d. it may be possible to program the meter factor into the software to allow the meter to indicate corrected volumes. If the meter is connected to a manual readout. but consideration should be given to proving the meter in-line if significant condensate production is observed during the test. each providing a meter factor that is within ±2% of the mean of the four factors. 14) A detailed report indicating the type of prover or master meter used. c. If the meter is used to measure condensate production on a continuous or noncontinuous basis. it is necessary to apply the meter factor to the observed meter readings to get the corrected volumes. in accordance with the following: a. The type of prover or master meter used. there is no volume limitation. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. The meter serial number. provided that the operator can demonstrate that the alternative procedures provide a meter factor of equal or better accuracy. f. Condensate Meter Exceptions 1) A meter used to measure condensate at flow-line conditions may be removed from service and proved in a meter shop. c.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations “As Found” run). If the detailed report is left with the meter. 2.7. e. The resultant meter factor will be the average of the four applicable meter factors. 2013 69 .4. and corrective action must be taken where required: June 1st. the run details. Whether the volume readout is meter factor corrected or whether the volume readout is meter factor uncorrected. 13) Subsequent to the meter proving. The meter installation must be inspected as follows. Proving procedures using more than four runs will be allowed. The date of the proving. the rate of flow through the meter must be ≤2m3/d. If the meter is used on a portable test unit.

v. iii. The resultant meter factor is the average of the four applicable meter factors. d. If a meter is proved after a period of regular operation. 2) A detailed report indicating the type of prover or master meter used. Water is typically used as the proving fluid. it must have an uncertainty rating equal to or better than the meter it is being used to prove. Subsequent to the meter proving. If the detailed report is left with the meter. f) Whether the volume readout is meter factor corrected or whether the volume readout is meter factor uncorrected. The flow rate through the meter must be observed to verify that it is within the manufacturer’s recommended operating ranges. a tag or label must be attached to the meter and must identify: a) The meter serial number. If a master meter is used for proving. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout.5% of the mean of the four factors. Corrections for the temperature and pressure of the proving fluid must be made. it is necessary to apply the meter factor to the observed meter readings to get the corrected volumes. An acceptable proving must consist of four consecutive runs (one of which may be the “As Found” run). The shop proving may be conducted with a volumetric or gravimetric prover. or with a master meter. vi. the run details. 3) A detailed record of the internal components inspection documenting the condition of the internal components “As Found” and any repairs or changes made to the internal components must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for June 1st. ii. c) The name of the person performing the calibration. ii. d) The average meter factor. iv. it may be possible to program the meter factor into the software to allow the meter to indicate corrected volumes. and the calculations conducted during the proving must be either left with the meter or readily available for inspection by the OGC. where applicable. b) The date of the proving. 2013 70 . an “As Found” proving run must be performed prior to conducting any repairs on the meter or replacing the meter. If the meter is connected to a manual readout.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations i. The dump valve must not be leaking (no flow registered between dumps). each providing a meter factor within ±0. but varsol or some other light hydrocarbon fluid may be used for the proving. e) The type of prover or master meter used. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. as follows: i.

the primary device does not require proving. the device manufacturer. f. V-cone meter).g. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. b. Flow through the meter must be continuous and maintained within the rates specified by the meter manufacturer as providing accurate measurement. provided that the following conditions are met: a. The date of the maintenance. c. inspected. 4) If a meter used to measure condensate at flow-line conditions is a type that uses no internal moving parts (e. The internal components of the primary meter device must be removed from service annually. other applicable industry-accepted procedures. orifice plate size). orifice meter. e. whichever are most appropriate and applicable.. A tag or label must be attached to the meter (or end device) and must identify: i. Whenever possible. in accordance with procedures specified by API in the Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards. Inspection date. other relevant standards organizations. iv. provided the frequency requirement is met. h. vortex meter. and then placed back in service.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations inspection by the OGC. g. If the detailed report is left with the meter. v. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met..g. The name of the person performing the maintenance. Other relevant details (e. ii. If the detailed report is left with the meter. the AGA. A detailed record of the internal components inspection documenting the condition of the internal components “As Found” and any repairs or changes made to the internal components must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC. d. the inspection of internal components should be done at the same time as the meter end device maintenance. the foregoing June 1st. using procedures specified by the American Petroleum Institute (API) in the Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards. or other applicable industry-accepted procedures. The design and operation of the entire meter system must be in accordance with the meter manufacturer’s specifications. whichever are most applicable and appropriate. If the detailed report is left with the meter. replaced or repaired if found to be damaged. iii. A detailed report indicating the tests conducted on the meter during the calibration and the conditions “As Found” and “As Left” must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC. 2013 71 . but to accommodate operational constraints the inspection may be conducted at any time. or the device manufacturer’s recommended procedures. The meter secondary and tertiary devices must be calibrated at the frequencies specified above for meters used to measure condensate at flow-line conditions. the AGA. The primary device serial number.

the meter must be proved: 1) Within the first three months of operation. such as propane. or a master meter. each providing a meter factor within ±1. c. or the meter may be removed from service and proved in a meter shop. 6) An acceptable proving must consist of four consecutive runs (one of which may be the “As Found” run). must be used to adjust volumes to 15°C. Correction factors. 5) If a meter is proved after a period of regular operation. 2013 72 . pentanes plus. etc. e. using water as the test fluid. a gravimetric prover. are subject to the same proving requirements and exceptions as are meters used for measurement of condensate at equilibrium conditions or measurement of dead oil (see above). 4) The proving may be conducted in line at field operating conditions. 3) Immediately (by the end of the calendar month) following any repairs being conducted on or replacement of the meter. butane. a tag or label must be attached to the meter and must identify: a.. The name of the person performing the maintenance.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. liquid natural gas/natural gas liquid/liquid petroleum gas (LNG/NGL/LPG). Other Liquid Hydrocarbon Meters Meters used to measure other liquid hydrocarbons. b. The fact the proving was done in a shop. 2. The meter factor may be assumed to be 1. an “As Found” proving run must be performed prior to conducting any repairs on the meter or replacing the meter. The proving may be conducted using a volumetric prover. or disposal or injection or disposal of other water-based fluids. d. Proving procedures using more than four runs will be allowed if the operator can demonstrate that the alternative procedures provide a meter factor of equal or better accuracy. Where a master meter is used for proving. The date of the proving.9. The resultant meter factor must be applied back to the volumes measured since the date of repair/change. The meter serial number. injection. 2. The resultant meter factor is the average of the four applicable meter factors. 2) Annually thereafter. Water Meters If a meter is used to measure water production.5%of the mean of the four factors.0000 until the first proving is conducted. it must have an uncertainty rating equal to or better than the meter it is being used to prove. 7) Subsequent to the meter proving. as appropriate. The average meter factor.8. June 1st.

but to accommodate operational constraints the inspection may be conducted at any time. whichever are most appropriate and applicable. Water Meters Exception If a meter used to measure water or other water-based fluids is a type that uses no internal moving parts (e. 10) A detailed record of the internal components inspection documenting any repairs or changes made to the internal components must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. 6) A tag or label must be attached to the meter (or end device) and must identify: a. in accordance with procedures specified by the American Petroleum Institute in the Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards. V-cone meter).. it may be possible to program the meter factor into the software to allow the meter to indicate corrected volumes.g.e. orifice meter. If the detailed report is left with the meter. 8) Whether the volume readout is meter factor corrected or whether the volume readout is meter factor uncorrected. The primary device serial number. whichever are most applicable and appropriate. the device manufacturer.). 2) The design and operation of the entire meter system must be in accordance with the meter manufacturer’s specifications. or other applicable industry-accepted procedures that utilize auditable methods (i. b. the AGA. it is necessary to apply the meter factor to the observed meter readings to get the corrected volumes. the device manufacturer’s recommended procedures other relevant standards organizations. 3) The internal components of the primary meter device must be removed from service annually. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. provided the frequency requirement is met. inspected. 4) Whenever possible.9. the AGA. June 1st. sound engineering practices. replaced or repaired if found to be damaged. If the meter is connected to a manual readout.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations f. vortex meter. and then placed back in service. 2. The date of the maintenance. If the detailed report is left with the meter. and the calculations conducted during the proving must be either left with the meter or readily available for inspection by the OGC. the inspection of internal components should be done at the same time as the meter end device calibration. The type of prover or master meter used. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout. 5) The meter end devices must be calibrated at the frequencies specified above for Water Meters.1. or other applicable industry-accepted procedures. 2013 73 . 9) A detailed report indicating the type of prover or master meter used. the primary device does not require proving provided the following conditions are met: 1) Flow through the meter must be continuous and maintained within the rates specified by the meter manufacturer as providing accurate measurement. using procedures specified by the API in the Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards. industry IRP manuals. the run details. etc.

the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. it must be calibrated annually using procedures recommended by the manufacturer. June 1st. 2) The date of the calibration or prove.11. 2. If the detailed report is left with the meter. d. If none of the foregoing exists. e. A detailed report indicating the tests conducted on the meter during the calibration and the conditions “As Found” and “As Left” must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations c.). A detailed record of the internal components inspection documenting the condition of the internal components “As Found” and any repairs or changes made to the internal components must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC. Product Analyzers If a product analyzer (water cut analyzer) is used to determine water production.. the OGC will consider other appropriate procedures. If the detailed report is left with the meter. as available and applicable (presented in order of OGC preference from first to last): 1) The device manufacturer’s recommended procedures. A detailed report indicating the calibration procedure used and the calibration details must be either left with the analyzer or readily available for inspection by the OGC. Inspection date. sound engineering practices. 2013 74 . orifice plate size). etc. If the detailed report is left with the analyzer or readily available. 3) Other applicable industry-accepted procedures that utilize auditable methods (i. Other relevant details (e. f. a tag or label must be attached to the product analyzer and must identify: 1) The primary device serial number. g. Following the calibration.e.11. 3) The name of the person performing the calibration or proving. they must be calibrated on site within the first month of operation and annually thereafter. industry IRP manuals. 2. Automatic Tank Gauges 2. The calibration procedures must be in accordance with the following. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. The name of the person performing the maintenance.1.10. 2) Procedures described in the American Petroleum Institute Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards. Inventory Measurement If automatic tank gauge devices are used to indicate fluid levels in tanks for monthly inventory measurement. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met.g.

12. at batteries/facilities. they must be calibrated on site within the first month of operation and monthly thereafter.11. generic gauge tables applicable to the tank size/type being used. or batch deliveries into a pipeline). It is acceptable to use gauge tables provided by the tank manufacturer. This is referred to as the tank calibration or tank strapping. 2013 75 . and results in the creation of a tank gauge table. Delivery Point Measurement Exception Where the accuracy of an automatic tank gauge is found to be within 0.1. 2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations A record of the calibration and the procedure used must be made available to the OGC on request. A record of the calibration and the procedure used must be made available to the OGC on request. Inventory Measurement If tank gauging is used only for monthly inventory measurement.1. The records of the calibrations that qualify the device for this exception must be kept and made available to the OGC on request. 3) Other applicable industry-accepted procedures that utilize auditable methods (i. specific tank calibration procedures are not required. such as truck volume receipts at batteries/facilities or batch deliveries into a pipeline. the volume in the tank relative to its height at any given point must be determined. The calibration procedures must be in accordance with the following.12.e.2. 2. In either case.11. sound engineering practices. If none of the foregoing exists. The record of calibration must clearly indicate that the device has been found to demonstrate consistent accuracy and is on a quarterly calibration frequency. or.12.5% of full scale for three consecutive months. Using Tank Gauging for Oil / Condensate Measurement Tank gauging refers to determining levels in a tank and using those levels to calculate a volume increase or decrease in the tank. which June 1st. if those are unavailable. Delivery Point Measurement If automatic tank gauge devices are used to indicate fluid levels in tanks for delivery point measurement of oil or oil/water emulsion. 2.). 2) Procedures described in the American Petroleum Institute (API) Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards. the calibration frequency may be extended to quarterly. 2.2.5% of full scale. The level may be determined by using an automatic tank gauge device or by manually determining the level with a gauge tape. etc. Delivery Point Measurement If tank gauging is used for delivery point measurement of oil or oil/water emulsion or condensate (in the case of truck volume receipts. the specific tanks being used must be calibrated on site within the first month of operation and any time the tank is damaged or altered. as available and applicable (presented in order of OGC preference from first to last): 1) The device manufacturer’s recommended procedures. The calibration must result in the creation of a gauge table for each tank. The calibration frequency will revert back to monthly whenever the accuracy is found not to be within 0. the OGC will consider applications for and may grant approval of appropriate procedures. 2. industry IRP manuals.2.

as a minimum.13. alternatively. and made available to the OGC on request. Weigh Scales Weigh scales used to measure oil/water emulsion and clean oil receipts. 2. The service company must then send a written report to Measurement Canada documenting the adjustment and/or repairs. 2) Immediately (by the end of the calendar month) following any incident in which the scale may have been damaged. 7) Remove the truck: Determine if the scale returns to zero with no weight on the scale. 6) Remove the test load and note the weight of the truck alone: Determine if the scale reading correctly indicates the removal of the test load (acceptable error is ±0. retained for at least one year. and other facilities must be approved and inspected prior to use. This record June 1st. A detailed record of the accuracy tests and any calibration activities must be kept in close proximity to the weigh scale. typical of the loads routinely handled by the scale: Note the total weight of the test load and truck. pipeline terminals. 4) The complete set of procedures set out by Measurement Canada for determining weigh scale accuracy must be used following any damage or modifications and at least annually. If as a result of the foregoing tests the weigh scale is found to not be accurate. 5) Add a loaded truck. A record of the calibration must be made available to the OGC on request. 3) Remove the 10kg standard weight: Determine if the scale returns to zero. using the following abbreviated procedure: 1) Zero check: Determine if the scale reads zero with no weight on the scale.2% of the test load). 4) Add a test load consisting of 10 000kg of standard weights or.2% of the test load). Calibration procedures must be in accordance with applicable methods stipulated in the API Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards. custom treating plants. it must be calibrated and retested until found to be accurate and then sealed by a heavy-duty scale service company. durable object(s) of known weight (minimum 5000kg): Determine if the scale reads the correct weight of the test load (acceptable error is ±0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations must then be used in conjunction with tank gauge readings to determine volumes. 2013 76 . Natural Gas Liquids (NGLs) or condensate at batteries. in accordance with Measurement Canada requirements. Weigh scales must be tested for accuracy in accordance with the following schedule: 1) Monthly. The monthly accuracy tests may be done using the complete set of procedures set out by Measurement Canada or. 2) Add a 10kg standard weight: Determine if the scale reads 10kg. 3) Immediately (by the end of the calendar month) following any changes or modifications being made to the scale.

3) Details of the tests performed and the results noted. 2. The detailed record of the accuracy tests must clearly indicate that the weigh scale measures ≤100m3/d and that the weigh scale is on a quarterly testing frequency. Weigh Scale Exceptions 1) If the volume of fluid measured by a weigh scale does not exceed 100m3/d. serial number. the monthly accuracy test frequency may be extended to quarterly. and capacity of the weigh scale and any associated equipment.1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations must include the following information: 1) Make. The required accuracy test frequency will revert back to monthly whenever a quarterly accuracy test determines that the weigh scale requires calibration adjustments. The required testing frequency will revert back to monthly if the weigh scale begins measuring volumes in excess of 100m3/d. 2) If the weigh scale has been found to not require calibration adjustments for three consecutive months.13. 4) Details regarding any alterations or calibration performed on the weigh scale. 2013 77 . model. 2) Date of the accuracy test. June 1st. the monthly accuracy test frequency may be extended to quarterly.

1-1 below). Chapter 3 Proration Factors. proration factors are used to correct estimated volumes to actual volumes.1. based on well test production data. Instead.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3. June 1st. and each well’s monthly production is initially estimated. Allocation Factors and Metering Difference 3. the wells are periodically tested to determine the production rates of oil. and for each fluid the total actual volume is divided by the total estimated production to yield a “proration factor. 2013 78 . gas. In the case of an oil proration battery/facility (see figure 3. This system is applicable when the production of wells producing to a battery/facility is commingled before separation and measurement. Similar accounting procedures are used for gas batteries/facilities subject to proration. Description Proration is an accounting system or procedure where the total actual monthly battery/facility production is equitably distributed among wells in the battery/facility. and water. The estimated monthly production so determined for each well in the battery/facility is totaled to arrive at the battery’s/facility’s total monthly estimated production. gas. gas. and water produced by individual wells are not continuously measured. In this type of system.” The proration factor is multiplied by each well’s estimated production to yield the well’s actual production. the oil. The rates determined during the well test are used to estimate the well’s production for the time period beginning with the well test and continuing until another test is conducted. and water production volumes for the battery/facility are determined by means of separation. The total actual oil.

The allocation factor is determined by dividing the monthly total actual volume for each fluid by the monthly total estimated volume for each fluid.1-2 below). The total estimated volume of each fluid received from each source is multiplied by the allocation factor for that fluid to yield the actual volume received from that source. The name of the factor has been chosen to reflect the differences between batteries that receive fluids from wells through flow lines (where proration factors are used) and facilities that receive fluids from batteries only by truck (where allocation factors are used). in that it is used to correct fluid receipt volumes (considered estimates) to actual volumes based on disposition measurements taken at the outlet of the facility (and also considering inventory change). 2013 79 . The purpose of an allocation factor is similar to a proration factor.1-1 Proration Factor An “allocation factor” is a type of proration factor. such as custom treating plants/facilities and third-party-operated clean oil terminals (see Figure 3. June 1st. It is used at facilities where only fluids received by truck are handled.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 3.

the OGC expects proration factors and allocation factors to be monitored by June 1st. the outlet volumes of the clean oil and water are not determined by the same type of measurement. 3. Measurement accuracy and uncertainty generally relate to random errors. there will be no plus/minus and all of the measurements are assumed to be in error by the same amount and in the same direction.. based on individual well production volumes and gas analyses. For example. the target factors for oil and water in a conventional oil proration battery/facility are different because while the estimated production volumes of oil and water are determined by the same type of measurement. since it is assumed that the factor will correct for a bias error that has occurred.1-2 Allocation Factor The allocation factors discussed in this Chapter are not to be confused with the process whereby products delivered out of a gas plant are “allocated” back to each well in the system.1. It is important to note that target factors for different products may be different because of the products’ being subjected to different levels of uncertainty.1. Where a bias error occurs in a series of measurements. The Standards of Accuracy (Chapter 1) focus on specific measurement points (i. Proration factors and allocation factors are therefore used to equitably correct all measurements for biased errors. any proration factor or allocation factor should be acceptable. 2013 80 . whereas proration and allocation factors relate to a comparison of inlet (or estimated production) to outlet measurement. Target Factors If measurement and accounting procedures meet applicable requirements. as such. and. are not directly comparable to proration and allocation factors. which generally relate to bias errors. When measurement equipment and procedures conform to all applicable standards.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 3. it is assumed that generally the errors that occur in a series of measurements will be either plus or minus and will cancel each other out to some degree. inlet or outlet).e. However.

3. the OGC expects the reported production data to be amended. but need not expend a great deal of effort to conduct an investigation and document the results. The OGC deems the ranges of proration factors and allocation factors indicated below to be acceptable targets. the operator is expected to investigate the cause of the factor being outside the target range and document the results of the investigation and the actions taken to correct the situation. Acceptable Proration Factors and Allocation Factor Ranges This section describes acceptable proration factors for a conventional oil battery/facility and a gas battery/facility (effluent measurement). but the findings are not quantifiable for past months. 2013 Low 0. 3.1. The OGC acknowledges that in some batteries or facilities. 3. If the cause is determined and action is taken to correct the situation for future months. or 2) The majority of the wells in the battery/facility produce ≤2m3/d of oil and no well produces greater than 6m3/d of oil. Allocation factors are noted for a custom treating plant and clean oil terminal. the operator must also document the reason(s) that prohibit further action from being taken.1. but must be available to the OGC on request for audit.2. In this case.10 81 .1.3.95 0. no amendments need to be submitted.05 1. This information does not have to be routinely submitted to the OGC.10 1. If the cause of a factor being outside these ranges is determined and the error can be quantified. Target Factor Exception An exception to the foregoing procedure is allowed for conventional oil proration batteries if based on average rates determined semi-annually: 1) All wells in the battery/facility produce ≤2m3/d of oil.4.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations operators and used as a “warning flag” to identify when the measurement system at a battery or facility is experiencing problems that need investigation. When a factor is found to exceed these limits. thereby bringing the factor back into line.90 0. the operator should still be aware of the proration factors and take corrective action where necessary.90 High 1. In that case. Proration Factors Table 3.1-1 Oil Battery / Facility Type of Fluid Oil Gas Water June 1st. physical limitations and/or the economics applicable to a particular situation may prohibit the resolution of situations where factors are consistently in excess of the targets indicated below.

a “metering difference” is used to balance.1-1 Proration Gas Battery / Facility Type of Fluid Gas Water Low 0. Allocation Factors Table 3.10 1.95 0.1-2 Custom Treating Plant / Facility Type of Fluid Oil Water Low 0.05 1. However.1-3 Clean Oil Terminal (Third Party operated. Metering differences occur because no two measurement devices provide exactly the same volume due to the uncertainties associated with the devices.2.5. It should be noted that metering difference differs from proration and allocation factors in that for batteries or facilities where those factors are used.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Table 3. any difference that occurs between the measured inlet/receipt volumes and the measured outlet/disposition volumes at a facility. June 1st.10 3.95 High 1. on a monthly basis. 2013 82 .90 High 1.10 Condensate (if applicable – volumes are tanked at the battery/facility) 0.05 3. where each well’s volume is measured prior to injection/disposal. Metering Difference 3. Description For OGC and the MOF production reporting purposes. where applicable) Type of Fluid Oil Low 0. a more significant cause of metering differences is that the product measured at the inlet to a facility is usually altered by the process within the facility.1. resulting in a different product or products being measured at the outlet of the facility. A metering difference may be used as follows: 1) Injection/Disposal Systems Receipts into these facilities are typically measured prior to being split up and delivered to individual wells.90 High 1.1. the difference occurs between “estimated” and “actual” volumes.10 Table 3.2.90 0. Metering difference is generally acceptable as an accounting/reporting procedure if a difference results from two or more measurements of the same product.90 1.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 3. June 1st. 4) Gas Gathering Systems – Limited Application in British Columbia Receipts into these facilities are typically measured prior to being subjected to some sort of limited processing. and only in limited. 2013 83 . at a crude oil group battery where each well’s gas production is measured and the combined gas stream is measured again before being sent to a gas gathering system or gas plant. and those products are measured prior to delivery to a sales point. Metering differences would not be appropriate for use in a proration battery. specific situations where there is both inlet and outlet measurement. 5) Gas Plants Receipts into these facilities are typically measured prior to being processed into saleable products. 3) Facilities A metering difference may be used for gas and water volumes where both inlet and outlet measurement are used to account for volume differences across the facility. which may include liquids removal and compression. The resultant product(s) are measured prior to delivery to a sales point or to a gas plant for further processing.2-1 Injection / Disposal Systems 2) Batteries A metering difference may be used for gas and water production only. for example.

The OGC acknowledges that in some batteries or facilities. This information does not have to be routinely submitted to the OGC. Target Metering Difference If measurement and accounting procedures meet applicable requirements. the operator is expected to investigate the cause of the poor metering difference and document the results of the investigation and the actions taken to correct the situation.2-2 Metering Difference 3.2. thereby bringing the metering difference back into line. 2013 84 . If the cause of a poor metering difference is determined and the error can be quantified. physical limitations and/or the economics applicable to a particular situation may prohibit the resolution of situations where the metering difference is consistently in excess of the target indicated.2. no amendments need to be submitted.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 3. metering differences up to ±5% of the total inlet/receipt volume are deemed to be acceptable. The OGC expects the metering difference to be monitored by operators and used as a “warning flag” to identify when the measurement system at a battery or facility is experiencing problems that need investigation. but the findings are not quantifiable for past months. If the cause is determined and action is taken to correct the situation for future months. In such cases. June 1st. When a metering difference is found to exceed 5%. the OGC expects the incorrectly reported production data to be amended. but must be available to the OGC on request for audit purposes. the operator must also document the reason(s) that prohibit further action from being taken.

325kPa (absolute) and 15°C. Gas Measurement and Accounting Requirements for Various Battery / Facility Types 4. 2) All wells in a multi-well facility must be subject to the same type of measurement.1.2. Chapter 4 Gas Measurement Dealing with gas measurement from any source in the upstream and midstream oil and gas industry.4.” under “Measurement by Difference. or other oil facilities may not be connected to an oil proration facility upstream of the oil facility group gas measurement point unless specific criteria are met and/or OGC approval of an application is obtained. 4.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4.2. Monthly gas volumes must be reported in units of e3m3 and rounded to 1 decimal place. For examples. 2) Individual monthly well gas production is estimated based on periodic well tests and June 1st.2. this Chapter presents the base requirements and exceptions used to determine volumes for reporting to MOF. General Requirements 1) All wells in the facility must be classified as oil wells.1. gas facilities. Standard or base conditions for use in calculating and reporting gas volumes are 101. Proration Battery / Facility 1) All well production is commingled prior to the total facility gas being separated from oil or emulsion and measured (or estimated where appropriate) as a single phase. Single-Well Battery / Facility 1) Gas must be separated from oil or oil emulsion and measured (or estimated where appropriate) as a single phase.3.2.2. 4. 4. Oil Facilities (Batteries) 4.1.2. see Chapter 5. 3) Production from gas wells. General Requirements All gas production and injection volumes must be continuously and accurately measured with a measurement device or determined by engineering estimation if exception conditions described are met or site-specific OGC approval has been obtained.1.2. Multi-Well Group Battery / Facility 1) Each well must have its own separation and measurement equipment. A gas measurement system is in compliance if the base requirements throughout this manual are met. 2013 85 . similar to a singlewell facility. “Site-Specific Deviation from Base Requirements.1. 2) All equipment for the wells in the battery/facility must share a common surface location. 4.1. It should be noted that the OGC may stipulate additional requirements for any specific situation.1.” 4.

If there are mixtures of measured and prorated wells (mixed measurement) within the same facility. 2013 86 . 2013 onwards. battery/facility. OGC exception criteria in Chapter 5.2.2. 4. 2) Condensate produced must be reported as a liquid if it is disposed of from the well site without further processing. 4) Oil produced in conjunction with the gas must be reported as oil at stock tank conditions. the overall site fuel gas used must be measured. If it is part of another facility located on the same site.2. June 1st. or individual compressor site.2. “Determination of Production at Gas Wells” 2) All wells in the facility must be classified as gas wells.2. Conversely. are not allowed to tie into a multi-well group battery/facility unless there is a group measurement point before the tie-in. that is designed to consume fuel gas exceeding 0. and the measured well(s) must have their own separate battery/facility code(s) to deliver gas into the proration battery/facility.” under “Measurement by Difference.” must be met or OGC site-specific approval must be obtained . 3) Gas wells may produce condensate.5e3m3/d on a per site basis must have fuel gas measurement installed from March 1st. 5) All wells in a multi-well facility must be connected by pipeline to a common point. such as a well site. 4.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations corrected to the actual monthly volume through the use of a proration factor. Single-Well Battery / Facility 1) Gas must be separated from water and condensate or oil (if applicable) and continuously measured as a single phase.1.2. well(s) with no phase-separated measurement.” under “Measurement by Difference. 3) Condensate that is recombined with the gas production after separation and measurement or trucked from the well site to a gas plant for further processing must be converted to a gas equivalent volume and added to the measured single-phase gas volume for reporting purposes.” are met or OGC sitespecific approval is obtained. “Site-Specific Deviation from Base Requirements. General Requirements 1) Well production volumes are to be determined as per Chapter 6. 6) Gas production from oil wells or facilities or from other gas wells or facilities may not be connected to a gas proration facility upstream of the gas proration facility group measurement point unless OGC exception criteria in Chapter 5.2. including effluent wells. “Site-Specific Deviation from Base Requirements. 4) All wells in a multi-well facility must be subject to the same type of measurement. Gas Facilities 4. 7) Any oil and gas facility. gas plant.

See Chapter 4 of this document.2. 4) The combined (group) production of all wells in the effluent proration facility must have three-phase separation or equivalent and be measured as single-phase components. similar to a singlewell facility. 3) Estimated well water production is determined by multiplying the water-gas ratio (WGR).Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations The gas-in-solution (GIS) with the oil at the point of measurement must be estimated and added to the gas production volume.3. 4.4. 2) Estimated well gas production is the effluent metered volume multiplied by an Effluent Correction Factor (ECF) that is determined from periodic tests conducted at each well in which a test separator is connected downstream of the effluent meter and the volumes measured by the test separator are compared to the volume measured by the effluent meter.2. by the estimated well gas production. Multiple gas facilities can deliver to a common facility. There must not be any proration from any downstream measurement point. but the wells must deliver to a common facility. without separation of phases prior to measurement. The rules for reporting condensate as a gas equivalent or as a liquid are the same as those for singlewell gas facilities (see above). If condensate is trucked out of the group separation and measurement point without further processing to a sales point. Well to Facility and Facility to Facility linkage requirements are summarized in the Facility Application and Operations Manual. June 1st. or there may be a mixture of methods for handling condensate. condensate production must be reported at the wellhead based on the condensate-gas ratio (CGR) from the well test. 2) The wells in the group facility may all be identical with regard to handling of condensate and water. Section 4.5 (below). which is determined from the periodic tests. Multi-Well Group Battery / Facility 1) Each well must have its own separation and measurement equipment.2.2. 3) The volumes measured at each well separator must be used to report the production to the MOF. Hydrocarbon liquids and/or water may be tanked and disposed of by truck and reported as liquid disposition. 2013 87 .3. 4) There is no group measurement point requirement for fluids from the gas group wells. If liquid condensate is trucked to the same gas plant that gas delivers to for further processing. the condensate must be reported as a gas equivalent. 4. and the resulting total actual facility gas volume (including gas equivalent volume [GEV] of condensate) and total actual facility water volume must be prorated back to the wells to determine each well’s actual gas and water production. Recombined hydrocarbon liquids (reported as gas equivalent volume) and water (reported as liquid water) must be sent to the same common facility as the gas. Multi-Well Effluent Proration Battery / Facility 1) The production from each well is subject to total effluent (wet gas) measurement.

2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4.2-1 Typical Gas Plant Measurement and Reporting Points June 1st.2-1 below. there are situations where the raw gas has been stripped of its liquid (not recombined downstream) and measured upstream of the plant site. ethane.3. line heaters. Figure 4. See Figure 4.4. However. and any volumes used internally. 2013 88 . and/or other facilities to another facility (usually a gas plant) is considered to be a gas gathering system. acid gas disposition. but does not include a production facility. Gas Gathering System A facility consisting of pipelines used to move gas production from oil batteries. is required unless otherwise exempted by the OGC. Gas Processing Plant A “gas processing plant” is a plant where hydrogen sulphide. Inlet measurement usually consists of the battery or facility group measurement point. The system may include compressors. flare and vent gas. gas batteries. Outlet measurement usually consists of the gas plant inlet measurement. and other equipment. helium. 4. the gas plant inlet measurement may consist of the upstream facility’s group measurement.2. dehydrators. natural gas liquids. Monthly liquid inventory change must be accounted for and reported to the MOF. or other substances are extracted from gas. such as sales. carbon dioxide. If all streams entering a gas plant on the same gas gathering system are “dry” (the absence of free liquids via dehydration or equivalent process). Inlet separation and continuous measurement are required before commingling with other streams and must be used to report volume to the MOF for the plant receipt from upstream facilities (except for gas group batteries) and for plant balance. lease fuel for other facilities. Measurement of all gas deliveries out of a gas plant.

e. Base Requirements for Gas Measurement 4. Delineation for an Oil Battery / Facility Delivering To or Receiving from a Gas Plant on Same Site Oil battery/facility gas and water sent to a gas plant for further processing or disposition and gas for flaring must be measured and reported as disposition from the oil battery/facility to the gas plant.2-2 Oil Battery Delivering to. total flare.3. 2013 89 .4. and dispositions. Gas plant condensate. This is a royalty trigger point requiring delivery point measurement. or Receiving from a Gas Plant 4. C5+ and/or condensate) without all products being measured and reported. Design and Installation of Measurement Devices The design and installation of measurement devices must be in accordance with the following or as June 1st. and/or NGL sent to an oil battery/facility must be measured and reported as disposition to the oil battery/facility. Oil must not be combined with any other royalty payable product (i. NGL. Figure 4.1.3. The gas plant will report the receipts. C5+.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4.2.1.

3. if the meter is relocated. When a meter such as a gas plant outlet meter is used to check sales/delivery point (royalty trigger point) measurement and is not normally used to report volumes to the MOF. However.3-1 Orifice Meter Design Requirement Meter Run Date of Manufacture Before January 2008 After January 2008 (Except for sales/delivery point meters or Cross Border Measurement Volumes) All sales/delivery point meters manufactured after January 2008 Cross Border Measurement Volumes (Refer to Chapter 7 of this document. February 1991 (AGA3 1991) or April 2000 (AGA3 2000) April 2000 (AGA3 2000) April 2000 (AGA3 2000) b. June 1st. the check meter could be used to report volumes to the MOF. when another gas source ties in to the sales pipeline between the check meter and the sales/delivery point meter (royalty trigger point).1-1 below.3. Part 2) Version Non-AGA meter run not marked with upstream and downstream ID-markings are Grandfathered for the existing volumetric throughput application.”) Applicable AGA3 (API MPMS 14. it does not require AGA3 April 2000 specification.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations approved by Measurement Canada. If an orifice meter is used to measure gas. the AGA3 April 2000 specification is required if the meter is manufactured after January 2008 as shown in the following figures below. 2013 90 . In this case. “Cross Border Measurement. 1) Orifice Meter a. but cannot be used for sales/delivery point or Cross Border measurement. however. Table 4. it must be designed and installed according to the applicable American Gas Association (AGA) Report #3: Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids (AGA 3) listed in Table 4. it must be refurbished to AGA3 (1985) or later specification. AGA3 1991 or earlier meter run with upstream and downstream ID marking may be reused or relocated except to replace a meter where AGA3 2000 specification is required.

Manufacturer’s name ii.Mandatory c. iii.3-2 Orifice Meter AGA3 2000 Specifications . Serial number. 2013 91 . A permanently marked plate with the following information must be attached to each meter run.3-3 Orifice Meter AGA3 2000 Specification . Date of manufacture. etc.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 4. This plate must be maintained in readable condition (not painted over or covered with insulation.) for inspection: i. June 1st.Optional Figure 4.

All other accounting meters installed after March 1st. 5) Any measurement under vacuum conditions must have absolute pressure measurement to accurately measure the static pressure. Meter runs that are manufactured before January 2008 and designed to the AGA3 1991 or earlier specifications complete with the upstream and/or downstream ID markings may be relocated or reused for the application they are designed for. it must be inspected or refurbished to ensure that it meets the minimum of AGA3 1985 specifications.4mm from the orifice plate) of the meter run at 25.. v. These meter runs are grandfathered for the existing volumetric throughput. must utilize the following installation requirements as appropriate: 1) Accounting meters using pressure sensing devices must be equipped with full port valves at the metering tap on the sensing lines. to avoid interfering with normal flow if the marking creates a dent or protrusion on the plate surface.1. See above. If new gas volumes are added to such an existing meter run or if a meter run is to be relocated. The orifice plate must be permanently marked with the plate bore in millimetres to two decimal places (or to three decimal places if indicated in inches).g.4mm upstream of the orifice plate in millimeters to one decimal place (or to three decimal places if indicated in inches). nominal pipe ID can be used for flow calculations. 3) Drip pots are not permitted to be installed on sensing lines for delivery point or sales point measurement points.3-1. regardless of the metering technology.4mm per 300mm from the transmitter to the changer. Table 4.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations iv. “AGA3/1991” or “AGA3/2000. but it must not be used for sales/delivery point (royalty trigger point) measurement. For existing in-service meter runs that are manufactured before January 2008 and are not designed to the AGA3 2000 or earlier specifications at the time of manufacture or not marked with upstream and/or downstream internal diameter(s) [ID(s)]. AGA3 Version/year (for new runs only after January 2008). preferably within 6mm of the outside edge of the plate.” d. General Installation All meters. e. Orifice Meter Design Requirement. 4) Sharing of metering taps by multiple differential pressure devices is not allowed. 2013 are no longer permitted to have drip pots installed to ensure measurement integrity. Average upstream inside diameter (U/S) (25. f.1. June 1st.3. The minimum tubing size must be 12. 4.7mm nominal. 2013 92 . A separate set of valve manifolds must be used for each device. e. This means that sensing lines should not exceed 1m in length and should have a slope of 25. 2) Sensing lines must be self-draining such that they do towards the sensing taps to prevent liquid from being trapped in the line and disrupting measurement accuracy.

it must be designed and installed according to the provisions of the 1985 or later editions of the AGA Report #7: Measurement of Gas by Turbine Meters (AGA7) or the manufacturer’s recommendation. c. 2013 93 .3. 7) Linear Meter a. b. For sales/delivery point measurement.. Secondary measurement equipment on an orifice meter run is to be connected to one non-shared set of orifice flange taps. between one and five pipe diameters downstream of the meter) or the meter manufacturer’s recommendation and the temperature must be determined as per item 16 below. Temperature measurement equipment must be installed according to AGA3 specifications and the temperature must be determined as per item 15 below. Orifice plate sizes are to follow the latest AGA Report No. a. the installation must include instrumentation that allows for continuous pressure.12.3: Rotary Type Gas Displacement Meters or the June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 6) Orifice Meters End devices. which is acceptable not to winterize. The exception is clean dry sales specification gas with minimal moisture. sensing lines. electronic flow measurement) or at a later date (e. 8) Rotary Meter a. such as a turbine. or vortex meter. temperature. Chart recorders must be suitably winterized to prevent sensing lines and other piping from freezing and disrupting measurement. 3. The chart drive for a circular chart recorder used to measure gas well gas production or group oil battery/facility gas production must not be more than 8 days per cycle unless the exception criteria specified in Chapter 5. If the mode of operation causes painting on the chart because of cycling or on/off flows. it must be designed and installed according to the provisions of the 1992 or later edition of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) B109. a 24-hour chart is required for any gas measurement point.. e. and compressibility corrections either on site (e. “Site-Specific Deviation from Base Requirements. The tip of a thermowell is to be located within the center third of the pipe. Temperature measurement equipment is to be installed according to AGA7 (i. c. If a rotary meter is used to measure gas. and other piping must be in good operating condition and suitably winterized to prevent them from freezing and disrupting measurement.” are met or OGC site-specific approval is obtained.4. pressure and temperature charts). A 24-hour chart drive is required for gas measurement associated with single well oil wells and oil well test gas measurement unless the exception criteria specified in Chapter 5. “Site-Specific Deviation from Base Requirements.” are met or OGC site-specific approval is obtained.. Chapter 1. electronic correctors.g. b.e.g. If a linear type meter. General Equations and Uncertainty Guidelines. The tip of the thermowell is to be located within the center third of the pipe diameter. d. ultrasonic. is used to measure gas.

b. there must be no pressure restriction between the tap and the meter. such as continuous fuel measurement downstream of a pressure regulating valve.. electronic flow measurement) or at a later date (e. pressure and temperature charts) unless the meter is operating under constant pressure. temperature. June 1st. f. it must be designed and installed according to the provisions of the 1992 or later edition of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) B109. and compressibility corrections either on site or at a later date. This can be mechanical or electronic. The temperature must be determined as per item 16 below. Install temperature measurement equipment according to the meter manufacturer’s recommendation or less than 20 pipe diameters downstream of the meter.2: Diaphragm Type Gas Displacement Meters (over 500 cubic feet/hour capacity).e. to allow for measuring pressure drop across the meter and determining if the meter is over-ranging.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations manufacturer’s recommendation. For sales/delivery point measurement. d. b. e. may utilize seasonal pressure and temperature correction factors for volumetric calculations that are determined from the measurement devices installed in Sections (b) and (d) above. It is acceptable for the tap openings to be present within the meter body. c. electronic correctors. temperature. The installation must include instrumentation that allows for continuous pressure.g. or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) B109. such as a regulator). The tip of the thermowell is to be located within the center third of the pipe diameter. If a diaphragm displacement meter is used to measure gas.. 2013 94 . Equip the meter with a non-reset counter..1: Diaphragm Type Gas Displacement Meters (up to 500 cubic feet/hour capacity). Nozzles and Venturi Tubes Inserted in Circular CrossSection Conduits Running Full (ISO 5167) or the meter manufacturer’s recommendation. If a venturi or flow nozzle type of meter is used to measure gas. Install pressure taps not more than 20 pipe diameters upstream and downstream of the meter. and compressibility corrections either on site (e. it must be installed according to the provisions of the 1991 or later edition of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Standard 5167: Measurement of Fluid Flow by Means of Orifice Plates. The upstream tap must be used for pressure measurement and must be reading the metering pressure (i. such as continuous measurement downstream of a pressure regulating valve. if required. and/or the manufacturer’s recommendation. 9) Diaphragm Meter a. in which case pressure and temperature correction factors at the determined operating temperature can be used for volumetric correction. Fuel gas meters that are operating under constant pressure. 10) Venturi and Flow Nozzle a. with no restrictions between the meter and the temperature probe. the installation must include instrumentation that allows for continuous pressure.g. Other conditions are the same as for the rotary meter above.

14) Other Meters a. Any electronic gas measurement system must be designed and installed according to the requirements as stated in Chapter 4. the density does not change. temperature.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 11) Ultrasonic Meters a. the manufacture can verify that the effect of the density change on the volume will meet the OGC’s uncertainty requirements for that application. Coriolis mass metering systems must be designed and installed according to the manufactures specifications or the provisions of the latest edition of AGA Report No. and wedge meters.3. b. temperature. 15) Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) a. If meters other than those listed above. 11: Measurement of Natural Gas by Coriolis Meter. Chapter 21. the tip of the thermowell is to be located within the center third of the pipe.2. and compressibility corrections (where required) either on site or at a later date. 9: Measurement of Gas by Multipath Ultrasonic Meters (AGA9). they must be installed according to the meter manufacturer’s recommendation. As applicable. or ii. 2013 95 . As applicable.2 of this document. Mass meters are not be utilized for use at gas plant flare stacks unless the criteria above can be met in Section 13(a). All EFM devices must have a continuous temperature reading for flow calculation. such as-cones.2 in this this document. 12) Coriolis Meters a. The installation must include instrumentation that allows for continuous pressure. 13) Mass Meters a. June 1st. and compressibility corrections. the tip of the thermowell is to be located within the center third of the pipe.7.7. b. Ultrasonic metering systems must be designed and installed according to manufactures specifications or the provisions of the 1998 or later editions of AGA Report No. The installation must include instrumentation that allows for continuous pressure. b.1 is considered to have met the audit trail and reporting requirements. Mass meters that depend on gas density to determine the volume may only be used if: i. are used to measure gas. However. or the density can be determined and recorded for flow calculation. External gas sample analysis and density must be used to determine the gas volume at base conditions. the performance evaluation is still required in accordance with Chapter 4. Any EFM designed and installed in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS).3.

Table 4. ≤0. the fuel use has to be separately measured and reported to each individual facility.9e3m3/d Daily Production (proration) volume testing or non-routine or emergency flaring and venting 2) Note that the temperature-measuring element must be installed on the meter run if present or near the meter such that it will be sensing the flowing gas stream temperature.5e3m3/d threshold has been exceeded. A meter equipped with a temperature compensation device is considered to have continuous temperature measurement. It is expected that the operator will meter the whole volume consumed rather than just a specific stream for which the 0. 2013 Meter Comments No N/A Yes N/A 96 . Fuel Gas A fuel gas calculation with regard to a metering requirement will consider the combined usage at a location for a piece or pieces of equipment. That is. The tables blow provide further details regarding when fuel gas estimates are acceptable and when measurement is required.5e3m3/d and Sales/Delivery Point Meter No or Cross Border Delivery Meter *See Appendix 3 for guidance on estimating fuel gas volumes.9e3m3/d Weekly >16. the operator cannot use the surface temperature of the piping or use a thermowell location where there is normally no flow. Table 4.2.3-3 Well Fuel Gas Measurement Requirements Volume Tap Location Estimate * Between Well Production Meter and Sales/Delivery Point Meter Yes or Cross Border Delivery Meter Between Well Production Meter >0.3.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 16) Gas Temperature Reading 1) The flowing gas temperature must be measured and recorded according to the table below.5e3m3/d June 1st.3-2 Gas Meter Temperature Reading Frequencies Minimum Temperature Reading Frequency Criteria Continuous Sales/delivery points (royalty trigger point) and/or EFM devices Daily >16. If there are multiple reporting facilities on the same site. 4.

3-4 Lift Gas from Existing Well .Scenario 1 Option 1: If the lift gas is taken from upstream of the production measurement point.5e3m3/d Upstream of Well Production Meter Yes No Add to Well Production Volume >0. Regular sampling and analysis frequency for the well type applies as indicated in Chapter 6. Figure 4. and sampling and analysis requirements when gas is injected into the wellbore to assist in lifting the liquids to the surface. then there is no reporting requirement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Table 4. reporting.3. Scenario 1 There is no external gas source for the lift gas used. 4.3-4 Facility Fuel Gas Measurement Requirements Volume Tap Location at Well Production Meter Estimate * Meter Comments ≤0. Option 2: If the lift gas is taken from downstream of the production measurement point. the raw gas is being separated and recirculated continuously at the well site with compressor(s). and each one may be subject to different measurement. then measurement of the lift gas is required and the total well gas production will be the difference between the total measured production volume and the measured lift gas volume. 2013 97 . Gas Lift Systems for Both Oil and Gas Wells There are four gas source scenarios.3. June 1st.5e3m3/d Upstream of Well Production Meter No Yes Add to Well Production Volume *See Appendix 3 for guidance on estimating fuel gas volumes.

Scenario 2a 2) For continuously measured wells.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Scenario 2 The lift gas is received back from a downstream gas plant/facility that is classified as “return gas” (no royalty implications). the gas lift volume must be netted off the total measured gas production volume to determine the actual gas production volume for each well. 2013 98 . June 1st. Measurement is required at the facility level for any gas coming back from the gas plant/facility after sweetening / processing.3-5 Lift Gas Using Return Gas from Plant . 1) For proration tested wells. Figure 4. the gas lift volume during the test period must be netted off the total test gas production volume to determine the estimated gas production volume for each well. Part of this return gas could be used for fuel at the well. The lift gas injected into the wellbore must be measured and regular sampling and analysis frequency for the well type applies as indicated in Chapter 6. There are two possibilities under scenario 2 (see below).

The gas sampling and analysis frequency for this type of gas lift well is as indicated in Chapter 6. The well measurement and reporting requirement is the same as scenario 2 above and the gas sampling and analysis frequency for this type of gas lift well is as indicated in Chapter 6. Any gas coming from a non-royalty paid gas source must be measured and reported at the battery/facility level. June 1st.3-6 Lift Gas Using Return Gas from Plant . Operations: Base Requirements for Creating Acceptable Gas Charts and Properly Reading Gas Charts 4. 2) The time and the date of start and finish of the record. The measurement and reporting requirement is the same as scenario 2 with the additional requirement that prior approval must be obtained from the OGC and the MOF to use. 3) On and off chart times are recorded on the chart to the nearest quarter hour. meter location) is properly identified on the chart.4. 4.e..3. 2013 99 . Scenario 4 The lift gas comes from royalty exempted sources.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 4.Scenario 2b Scenario 3 The lift gas comes from external sources with royalty implications.3. Chart Operation Field (chart) operation personnel must ensure: 1) The identification of the gas stream being metered (i.1.4. such as TCPL or ATCO Gas.

6) When there is a painted differential band. 7) It is noted on the charts if the differential pressure. alternating between the top and bottom of the painted area.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) The correct orifice plate size is recorded on the chart. 9) The flowing gas temperature is recorded on the chart in accordance with Temperature Reading Frequency Table for Gas Measurement – Table 4. BLUE June 1st. 8) A copy of the chart calibration report is kept on site or readily available for on-site inspection if it is a manned facility. 6) The time (to the nearest quarter hour) of any orifice plate change is indicated on the chart and the new orifice size is properly indicated relative to the chronology of the chart. or provide estimate of the differential and static pressures. 10) When the pen fails to record because of sensing line freezing. proper chart reading instructions are provided: draw in the estimated traces. There are various ways to read a painted chart: a. 8) Pen tracings are not over-lapping. If the differential pen is in constant up and down motion. 4) Differential pen recordings are at 33% or more within the chart range. 5) The correct upstream meter tube size is identified on the chart. pens out of ink. it is reasonable to read the differential near the top of the band (or vice versa). instructions are provided as to where it should be read. request to read as average flow for the missing period.3-2. 2013 100 . Field (chart) operation personnel should ensure that: 1) A notation is made on the chart with regard to whether or not the meter is set up for atmospheric pressure (for square root charts). 11) Any data or traces that require correction must not be covered over or obscured by any means. 9) Pen trace colours conform to the industry-accepted practice (RED for differential. If the differential pen normally records at the top of the painted band but spikes quickly down and up during separator dump cycles. it is reasonable to read the differential near the centre of the band or in a sine wave motion. or other reasons. b. static pressure. 2) The accuracy of the meter clock speed is checked and the chart reader is instructed accordingly of any deviations. clock stoppage. or temperature range has been changed or if they are different from the values printed on the chart. 7) Pens are not over-ranged or under-ranged. 5) Static pen recordings are at 20% or more within the chart range. 3) The differential pen is zeroed once per chart cycle.

6) The correct coefficient. is recorded.3. and equipment or operating pressure range limitations.4. other than conventional manual methods (planimeters. provided the colour used is documented.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations for static. is as follows. Examples of conditions applicable to orifice chart recorders are as follows: 1) Thick pen traces that will cause excessive error when reading the traces. a request in writing by the OGC inspector or auditor to implement changes to improve measurement accuracy will become enforceable. 3) The integrator is calibrated periodically and after each change of pens. 3) Differential or static pens recording too low on the chart—in some cases. 4. and GREEN or BLACK for temperature).4. but the licensee using any new technology must be able to demonstrate that the following requirements are met: 1) The equipment and/or procedures used to read the chart must not alter or destroy the chart such that it cannot subsequently be read using conventional equipment and/or procedures. An example of such technology is the use of digital scanning technology to scan and store an image of the chart and the use of computer programs to read and interpret the digital image of the chart and the pen traces. June 1st. Chart Reading The chart integrator / planimeter operator must ensure the following: 1) Visible gaps between the integrator / planimeter traces and chart traces are minimized. 4. 4.4.3. large bands of painting suggest that the chart recorder is not able to properly measure the process. The use of alternative technologies to read charts does not require prior approval of the OGC. integrators). This is normally associated with the differential pen. 2013 101 . Alternative Chart Reading Technology The base requirements for alternative methods developed to read orifice meter charts. OGC Site-Specific Requests: If an inspection of a measurement device or of procedures reveals unsatisfactory conditions that significantly reduce measurement accuracy.3. 2) Excessive painting. 4) The correct integrator or square root planimeter constants are noted. however.2. 2) The counter is read correctly. and remedial action is required. high shut-in pressure. Small narrow bands of painting can be dealt with as noted by Item 6 above. any colour may be used.4. using all of the required factors.3. this cannot be avoided because of low flow rate. 5) The correct integrator setback is recorded. however. 2) The accuracy and repeatability of the new equipment and/or procedures must be equal to or better than conventional equipment and/or procedures.

these must be documented and made available for instructing chart analysts. and b. 3) An image of the chart showing how the chart pen traces were read or interpreted must be stored for the applicable required period and in the same manner as in item 1 above. 4) The requirements and recommendations in Section 4. the original chart should be kept for other jurisdictional audits. No alteration or editing of the original scanned image is allowed.) 5) For OGC inspection/audit purposes. the edited or altered image must be stored for the applicable required period and in the same manner as in item 1 above. the back does not need to be scanned provided there is a statement entered in the record to that effect. An additional requirement specific to chart scanning is as follows: a. other jurisdictions might not. it must also be submitted. Any zero adjustment must only reposition the zero line and must maintain the entire span of the pen. If the chart back is blank. the zero line must be adjusted to the correct position if it is obvious on the chart (such as when the zeroing was out when hanging charts but the pen was not adjusted) and/or as documented by the operator. Submit any original paper charts or the scanned original images or make them available for on-line viewing. 2013 102 . (The distance between the actual zero and the pen trace must not be altered.3. There must be a method to confirm that a set of front and back scans belong to the same chart if scanned and stored. Therefore. Note that the software used to open the scanned images should be readily and freely available on the market.3 of this directive must be adhered to.4. b. the repeatability of the scanning technology must be demonstrated by performing three consecutive scans with a rotation of the chart image of about 120° June 1st. Note that although the OGC accepts the above electronic submission for audits. If the edited version is used for accounting purposes. Other situations will require the judgement of the chart analyst and confirmation from the facility operator. Submit all edited images or make them available for on-line viewing. If there are any changes or additions to those requirements and recommendations specific to chart scanning. 6) Upon request. 2) Editing or alterations may only be made to a copy of the original scanned image of the chart.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations The following requirements are specific to the use of digital scanning technology for reading charts: 1) The original chart must be retained for at least 72 months. When a differential pen is not zeroed correctly. At least two separate electronic copies of the scanned images must be retained and one copy must be stored off site at a different physical address/location for the applicable required period. or alternatively the licensee may choose the following procedure for audit trail: a. In case there is any specific/proprietary image reader software required to view the scanned and stored chart images. the licensee must upon request: a. An original scanned image of the chart (both front and back) must be stored so that it cannot be changed.

In that case.5% of the average of the three scans and integrations. 3) A sample of oil taken under pressure containing the gas in solution that will be released when the oil pressure is reduced may be submitted to a laboratory where a compositional analysis can be conducted. since the gas volume measured by the test gas meter will not include the gas that is still in solution with the test oil volume. This estimate may be June 1st. 2013 103 . The total volume of gas released from the oil after it leaves the test separator must be measured. The calculated volumes from each reading must be within ±0. A single gas-in-solution (GIS) factor may be determined and used to estimate the gas volume held in solution with the oil stream for each oil stream where the production sources (producing formation) are the same and test separator operating conditions are similar. An example of such a gas volume is the gas held in solution with oil volumes leaving a test separator at an oil proration battery/facility.0257m3 of gas/m3 of oil/kPa of pressure drop) may be used as the gas-in-solution (GIS) factor for conventional light-to-medium oil production until a more accurate. where the test oil volumes are combined with production from other wells downstream of the test separator. a gas volume must be determined where the gas is dissolved in an oil volume under pressure.5. Additional gas-in-solution (GIS) factors are required for wells in the battery/facility that produce from different formations and where other test separators operate at different pressure and/or temperature conditions. this volume divided by the stock tank volume of oil determined at the test separator provides a gas-in-solution (GIS) factor.5% of the OGC’s known values.3. with all other wells shut in or directed around the equipment. The gas-in-solution (GIS) factor is calculated based on the volume of gas released from the sample and the volume of oil remaining at the end of the analysis procedure. 4) A “rule of thumb” estimate (0. specific gas-in-solution (GIS) factor is determined. Gas in Solution (GIS) with Oil Volumes under Pressure In some cases. and there is no opportunity to measure the gas volume prior to its being commingled with other gas volumes. The gas-in-solution (GIS) factor may be determined by one of the following applicable tests/procedures: 1) A 24-hour test may be conducted such that the production from a well (or group of wells) is directed through the test and group separation/treating equipment. including multiple stage flashing. 4. Operators should also consider determining seasonal gas-in-solution (GIS) factors where ambient temperature differences may significantly affect the factors or when operating conditions change significantly. 2) A sample of oil taken under pressure containing the gas in solution that will be released when the oil pressure is reduced may be submitted to a laboratory where a pressurevolume-temperature (PVT) analysis can be conducted.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations before each scan and integrations of the same chart image. 7) The OGC may check the accuracy of the chart-reading technology and volume calculations by providing charts with known calculated volumes. A computer simulation program may be used to determine the GIS factor based on the compositional analysis. The purpose of estimating the gas in solution is to determine the total gas produced by a well during a production test. the gas volume may be determined by estimation. regardless of its daily volume rate. The volumes determined by the chart reading technology must be within ±0. The analysis must be based on the actual pressure and temperature conditions that the oil sample would be subjected to downstream of the sample point.

but the operator must keep the estimation/testing documentation for OGC audit. 2013 104 . Updated factors may be determined by one of the applicable tests/procedures described below. June 1st.5. Methods for Determining Factors/Rates Used in Estimating Gas Volumes If gas volumes will be estimated using a gas-oil ratio (GOR): 1) A 24-hour test may be conducted such that all the applicable gas and oil volumes produced during the test are measured (including vented gas). 4. without the need for determining a more accurate GIS factor. The gas volume is to be divided by the oil volume to result in the gas-oil-ratio (GOR) factor.5.3. if well oil production rates do not exceed 2m3/d or if all battery/facility gas production is vented or flared. fuel gas. The analysis must be based on the actual pressure and temperature conditions the oil sample would be subjected to downstream of the sample point. and oil/condensate tank vented gas. the volume may be determined by estimation instead of measurement. The gas-oil-ratio (GOR) factor will be calculated based on the volume of gas released from the sample and the volume of oil remaining at the end of the analysis procedure. Qualifying gas volumes may be estimated by using a gas-oil-ratio (GOR) factor if gas volume estimates will vary in conjunction with oil volumes or by using an hourly rate if gas volumes are not dependent on oil volumes. Initial qualification of gas streams where volumes may be estimated can be based on existing historical data or determined by conducting one of the applicable tests/procedures in Section 4. 2) A sample of oil taken under pressure containing the gas in solution that will be released when the oil pressure is reduced may be submitted to a laboratory where a pressurevolume-temperature (PVT) analysis can be conducted. The factors must also be updated immediately following any operational changes that could cause the factors to change. Gas Produced in Association with Conventional Oil Well and Gas Well Production If a gas stream volume associated with a conventional oil well or gas well production does not exceed 0. No specific approval is required. These factors must be updated annually to confirm continuing eligibility for estimation and to update the factors used to estimate gas volumes.3.2. A gas stream that must be measured regardless of daily volume is dilution gas added to an acid gas stream to ensure complete combustion (because of the importance of accurately determining those volumes). 5) Other methods listed in the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) Guide for Estimation of Flaring and Venting Volumes from Upstream Oil and Gas Facilities may be used.5. single-well battery/facility gas. See Appendix 3 for suggested guidance on estimating fuel gas volumes. Examples of the gas streams that may be estimated if the daily volume limitation is not exceeded include battery/facility group gas. 4.5e3m3/d at any given measurement/disposition point. Operators should also consider determining seasonal gas-oil-ratio (GOR) factors if ambient temperature differences may significantly affect the factors.3.3.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations used on a continuous basis.1.

the procedure for determining total gas production is the same as for a three-phase separator. If a single-well battery/facility uses a two-phase separator. If the gas production rate meets the qualifying criteria for estimation and all production from the well produces directly to a tank without using a separator. while the gas-in-solution (GIS) released at the tank is estimated using a gas-oil-ratio (GOR) factor. 6) If applicable.3. below. The oil in the separator is under pressure until it is directed to the storage tank. the gas-in-solution (GIS) within the oil will be released. 4.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3) A sample of oil taken under pressure containing the gas in solution that will be released when the oil pressure is reduced may be submitted to a laboratory where a compositional analysis can be conducted. The gas volume measured during this test may be used to determine the hourly rate that will be used to estimate gas volumes. which is at atmospheric pressure (zero kPa gauge). June 1st. If gas volumes will be estimated using an hourly rate: 5) A meter may be used to measure the gas stream for a minimum of one hour.5. depicts a single-well battery/facility where a three-phase separator is used to separate oil. the hourly rate may be determined based on the equipment manufacturers stated gas consumption rates and the actual operating conditions. Total gas production from the well is determined by adding the measured gas and the gas-in-solution (GIS) released at the oil storage tank.3. and water production from a well. Sample Calculations for Estimating Gas Volumes Using GOR and GIS Factors Example 1 Determination of Total Produced Gas for a Single-Well Oil Battery / Facility Figure 4.3-7. such as for fuel gas volumes. When the oil pressure drops at the tank. gas. 2013 105 . A computer simulation program may be used to determine the gas-oil ratio (GOR) based on the compositional analysis. The gas leaving the separator in this example is measured. 4) Other methods listed under the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) Guide for Estimation and Venting Volumes from Upstream Oil and Gas Facilities may be used. the total gas production may be determined by using only a gas-oil-ratio (GOR) factor.

03185m3gas/m3 oil/kPa pressure drop [determined using a method other than the “rule of thumb” described above in Section 4.3-7 Single-well Oil Battery/ Facility Example Sample Calculation: Total Gas Volume at a Single-Well Battery / Facility (Figure 4.03185m3/m3/kPa x 643. Example 2 Determination of Total Produced Gas for an Oil Proration Battery / Facility Figure 4.3e3m3 + 4.3m3 = 4097.3e3m3 (from chart readings) Oil meter volume = 643.3.1 (4)]. In this example.10e3m3 Step 2: Calculate the total battery/facility gas production for the month 96. 2013 106 .37m3gas/ m3 oil or 0.10e3m3 or 0.5. gas.8m3 = 4. and water leaving the test separator at the satellite are recombined with the June 1st.8m3 = 4. the oil.3m3 (from meter or tank gauging) Pressure drop = 200kPa GOR factor = 6. Step 1: Calculate GIS volume 6.37m3/m3 x 643.3-8.4e3m3 Note that total reported battery/facility gas production is to be rounded to one decimal place.1e3m3 = 100. below.3m3 x 200kPa = 4097.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 4.3-7) Monthly well data (hypothetical) given for this example: Gas meter volume = 96. depicts a multi-well oil proration battery/facility where production testing of individual wells is done by directing individual well production through a test separator at the main battery/facility site or through a test separator at a satellite facility located away from the main battery/facility site.

0e3m3 (from chart readings) Measured group gas production = 67.0399m3/m3/kPa (determined using a method other than June 1st. but the gas leaving the test separator recombines with the group gas downstream of the group gas measurement point.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations satellite group production and directed to the group separation and measurement equipment at the main battery/facility site. the measured group gas at the battery/facility. the gas-in-solution (GIS) with the oil will be released. At some facilities. 2013 107 . which is at atmospheric pressure (zero kPa gauge). and the gas-in-solution (GIS) released at the oil storage tank. Figure 4. The oil and water leaving the test separator at the main battery/facility site are recombined with the battery/facility group production. If the vapour recovery unit (VRU) is equipped with a meter or the recovered gas is directed through the group gas meter. a gas-in-solution (GIS) calculation will not be required because the measured vapour recovery unit (VRU) gas will either be added to or included in the other measured gas volumes.3-8) Monthly battery/facility data (hypothetical) given for this example: Oil production at the proration battery/facility =745. Trucked oil volumes received at the battery/facility must not be included with the total battery/facility oil volume when determining the gas-in-solution (GIS) released at the oil storage tank. When the oil pressure drops at the tank.0m3 for the month (from meter and/or tank gauging) Total test gas measured at the battery/facility site = 30. The oil in the group separator is under pressure until it is directed to the storage tank.4e3m3 (from chart readings) Pressure drop from the group vessel to oil storage tank =100kPa GOR factor = 3. The total gas production at the battery/facility will be the sum of all the measured test gas at the battery/facility site.3-8 Multi-well Oil Battery / Facility Example Sample Calculation: Total Gas Production at the Oil Proration Battery / Facility (Figure 4.99m3 gas/m3 oil or 0. a vapour recovery unit (VRU) may be installed to collect any gas-in-solution (GIS) that may be released at the oil storage tank.

0399m3/m3/kPa x 745m3 x 100kPa = 2972.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations the “rule of thumb”). In the example.46e3m3 Note that test gas volumes must be determined to two decimal places (in e3m3).27e3m3 (from chart readings) GIS factor = 25. determined using a method other than the “rule of thumb”) Step 1: Calculate the GIS volume 0.62m3 gas/m3 oil or 0. Sample Calculation: Test Gas Production for Wells in the Battery / Facility (Figure 4.0m3 = 0.97e3m3 Step 2: Calculate the total produced gas volume for the battery/facility 67.4e3m3 + 30.0e3m3 + 2. depicts a multi-well oil proration battery/facility where production testing of individual wells is done by directing individual well production through a test separator at the main battery/facility site or through a test separator at a satellite facility located away from the main battery/facility site.97e3m3 or 0.19e3m3 or 25. above.19e3m3 Step 2: Calculate the total test gas produced for well “A” for this test 1. 2013 108 .4e3m3 Note that total reported battery/facility gas production is to be rounded to one decimal place.3-8) Satellite test data (hypothetical) given for this example for well “A”: Measured test oil = 7.3-8.0427m3 gas/m3 oil/kPa pressure drop (combined GIS for both stages of pressure drop from test pressure at 600kPa to group pressure at 100kPa to oil storage tank pressure at atmospheric pressure or zero kPa gauge. In either case. The total gas produced by a well during a test will be the sum of the gas measured as it leaves the test separator and the gas-in-solution (GIS) that will evolve from the test oil volume after leaving the test separator.27e3m3 + 0.22m3 (from oil meter) Measured test gas = 1.97e3m3 = 100. and the oil leaving the test separator at the satellite will contain more gas-in-solution (GIS) than the oil leaving the test separator at the battery/facility.6m3 = 2.62m3/m3 x 7.22 m3 = 185. the oil leaving the test separator is under pressure and will be subjected to two stages of pressure drop—one at the group separator and one at the storage tank. Step 1: Calculate the GIS volume 3.85m3 June 1st. Sample Calculation: Test Gas Production for Wells in the Satellite (Figure 4.99m3/m3 x 745m3 = 2972. Example 3 Determination of Individual Well Test Gas for an Oil Proration Battery / Facility Figure 4.0m3 = 0. the test separators at the battery/facility and satellite operate at significantly different pressures.6m3 = 2.19e3m3 = 1.3-8) Battery/facility test data (hypothetical) given for this example for well “X”: Measured test oil = 3.0427m3/m3/kPa x 7.22m3 x 600kPa = 185.

33e3m3 + 0.36e3m3 Note that test gas volumes must be determined to two decimal places (in e3m3). are used to measure gas. the operator must use the 1985 or later editions of the AGA3 to calculate the gas volumes. and compressibility are required. volumes must be calculated according to the provisions of the 1991 or later edition of the ISO 5167 or the meter manufacturer’s recommended calculation procedures.85m3 x 200kPa = 30.85m3 = 30. The flowing density measured by the Coriolis mass meter is of insufficient accuracy in a gas application and must not be used to compute volumes. 4) If a Coriolis mass meter is used to measure gas.03e3m3 or 7.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations (from oil meter) Measured test gas = 2. ultrasonic.03e3m3 = 2. b. temperature. 4.3. The Gas Equivalent Volume can be determined using the volume fractions. 2) If a positive displacement meter or a linear type of meter (such as a turbine. 2013 109 .90m3gas / m3 oil or 0. volumes must be calculated according to the applicable industry accepted standard or the meter manufacturer’s recommendation. determined using a method other than the “rule of thumb”) Step 1: Calculate the GIS volume 0. volumes must be calculated according to the provisions of the 1985 or later editions of the AGA7.03e3m3 Step 2: Calculate the total test gas produced for well “X” for this test 2. Corrections for static pressure.0395m3 gas / m3 oil / kPa pressure drop (combined GIS for both stages of pressure drop from test pressure at 200kPa to group pressure at 100kPa to oil storage tank pressure at atmospheric pressure or zero kPa gauge. The following are the general requirements: a. or vortex meter) is used to measure gas. including corrections for compressibility.4 m3 = 0.33e3m3 (from chart readings) GIS factor = 7.90m3/m3 x 3. The Gas Equivalent Volume (GEV) is to be determined based on the latest condensate sample analysis. 5) If meter types other than those listed above. mole June 1st. such as v-cones or wedge meters. volumes must be calculated from the measured mass flow and the base density derived from a representative gas sample analysis.6. 6) If condensate production from a gas well is required to be reported as a gas equivalent volume. the calculation of the gas equivalent factor must be performed in accordance with the methodologies outlined in Appendix 2. 3) If a venturi or flow nozzle type of meter is used to measure gas. Volumetric Calculations The gas volume calculations comply if the following requirements are met: 1) If an orifice meter is used to measure gas.4m3 = 0.0395m3/m3/kPa x 3.

The full compositional analysis (Detail) method must be used rather than the less accurate partial composition (Gross) method.1. C7+ or other heavier component groups.3. or the C5 and/or heavier components in the sample can be grouped as C5+. the gas equivalent factor for the grouped components must be calculated using the molecular weight and/or relative density of the grouped components. a suitable reference and comparison to the AGA8 (1992) method or to experimental results and the justification for use must be documented and provided to the OGC for inspection on request. Purvis. Correction for deviation from the Ideal Gas Laws for compressibility is to be based on equations published in the November 1992. Compressibility Factors Used in Gas Volume Calculations Produced or injected gas volume measurements must be corrected for pressure. other methods can also be used. Physical Properties of Natural Gas Components The OGC adopts the physical properties contained in the most recent edition of the Gas Processors Suppliers Association (GPSA) SI Engineering Data Book2 or the Gas Processors Association (GPA) 21453 publication. whichever is the most current. If others are used. c. whenever the gas composition is updated. an earlier version can be used. If the heavier components are grouped. Other methods that could be used are: 1) Pitzer et al. . The AGA81 (1992) or Redlich-Kwong with Wichert-Aziz sour gas corrections method should be used for the calculation of the compressibility factors. 8 (AGA8): Compressibility Factors of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Gases or one of the methods listed in Section 4. and the compressibility of the natural gas. For EFM systems installed before 1994 with software or hardware limitations incompatible with the second edition of AGA8. Flow computers and other EFM systems used for gas measurement must calculate and update the compressibility (or supercompressibility) factor at a minimum of once every five minutes. The Gas Equivalent Volume can be determined using all of the individual components in the condensate analysis. Yarborough with Wichert-Aziz sour gas corrections The OGC will also accept the use of methods other than those mentioned above. or whenever the pressure or temperature changes by more than ± 0. If paper charts are used. The operator must ensure that it is using the up-toJune 1st. with Wichert-Aziz sour gas corrections 2) Dranchuk.3. Robinson with Wichert-Aziz sour gas corrections (Standing and Katz) 3) Dranchuk. provided that the operator documents the reason for their use. However.6. Abou-Kassam with Wichert-Aziz sour gas corrections (Starling) 4) Hall. gas composition.3. temperature.6. C6+.1 (below).6. 4.2. d. or mass fractions of the condensate analysis. the compressibility factor should be calculated at least once for each gas chart cycle.5%from the previous value used for calculation. 2013 110 . second edition of the AGA Transmission Measurement Committee Report No.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations fractions. The AGA8 publication includes several approaches for estimating the properties of natural gas for use in the AGA8 calculation. 4.

3. b. the measurement devices. 2) A record must be maintained that identifies the gas stream being metered.3. d. c. inputs. The reported data verification and audit trails must be in accordance with the following: 1) When a bypass around a meter is opened or when. This includes the record containing volume verification and calibration measurements for all secondary and tertiary devices. Production Data Verification and Audit Trail 4. purge gas or gas used to maintain a minimum heating value of the flared or incinerated gas is to be reported as flared gas. Incinerated gas must be reported as “flared” gas if an incinerator is used in place of a flare stack. In British Columbia. June 1st. that type of EFM system must not be used for the measurement of delivery point gas that meets sales specifications. Acid gas streams at a gas plant that are incinerated or flared as part of normal operations would be reported as shrinkage.4. not fuel gas. records. See Chapter 4. if necessary.7. Section 4.1. the operator of the facility must immediately correct the cause of the error and submit amended monthly production reports to correct all affected gas volumes.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations date list and. the required data must be collected and retained according to Section 4. times. For standards. 3) Any documentation produced in the testing or operation of metering equipment that affects measured volumes must be retained for not less than 72 months. 4. “Operations: Base Requirements for Creating Acceptable Gas Charts and Properly Reading Gas Charts. 2013 111 . and any volume calculations or estimations (including EFM) related to reporting requirements as outlined in the British Columbia Oil and Gas Royalty Handbook and submitted to the MOF must be kept for inspection on request. however. gas does not reach the meter or the recording device. fuel gas used in the course of operating a flare stack or incinerator for pilot purposes is to be reported as flared gas.3. a reasonable estimate of the unmetered volume must be determined. update its data. that have imbedded physical constants different in value from those in GPA 2145 or GPSA SI Engineering Data Book. such as AGA8.7. the method used to determine the estimate must be documented.” If EFM is used. The reported total flare volume must exclude any of these fuel volumes. for any reason. and events related to the determination of gas volumes. If an EFM system does not have the capability to accept updated physical constants.3.7. Dilution gas. 5) All flared and vented gas must be reported as described in the most recent British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission Flaring and Venting Reduction Guideline a. not as flared gas.2. then the existing set of physical constants may be used. changes to such standards are not required unless they are made by the relevant standards association. and a record of the event must be made. 4) When a gas metering error is discovered. General The field data. and all measurements.

2) Meter factor.5e3m3/d or may be estimated if not over 0. 5) Meter run diameter. 4) Transmitter range. 4. The volume must be measured on a per site basis if over 0. 4. a signoff procedure or an event log must be set up to ensure that the change is made in the EFM system and retained for a minimum of 72 months. UPS. If it is part of a Distributed Control System (DCS).3. The following systems are not defined as an EFM: 1) Any meter with an electronic totalizer or pulse counter that does not perform flow calculations (with or without built-in temperature compensation). All gas usage that is vented. Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) for Gas An Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) is defined as any flow measurement and related system that collects data and performs flow calculations electronically. such as June 1st.2. All data and reports must be retained for a minimum of 72 months. 3) System access must have appropriate levels of security.5e3m3/d. 2) A Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) that transmits any data other than flow data and does not calculate flow. 2) The EFM system must be provided with the capability to retain data in the event of a power failure (e. such as for instrumentation or compressor start gas must be reported as vent use on a per-site basis. Hardware and software requirements: 1) The EFM data storage capability must exceed the time period used for data transfer from the EFM system. 2013 112 .g. 3) Fluid analysis.7.. only the Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) portion has to meet the requirements in this Chapter. with the highest level of access restricted to authorized personnel. Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system (SCADA) or Programmable Logic Controller system (PLC). Flow calculation is affected by parameters such as: 1) Orifice plate size. When any of these parameters is changed.2. EPROM). the operator must be able to verify that it is performing within the OGC target limits defined in this Chapter. Base Requirements for EFM If EFM is used to calculate volumes for MOF reporting purposes.3. battery/facility backup.1.7. 4) The EFM system must be set to alarm on out-of-range inputs.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations e.

low power. flow. Other manufacturers’ recommended equations can also be used to evaluate the EFM performance. pressure. 5) Any EFM configuration changes or forced inputs that affect measurement computations must be documented either electronically via audit trails or on paper. It is recommended that a performance evaluation should also be performed as part of a calibration/verification event. June 1st. 2013 113 . each with different flow conditions and gas properties. The volumetric flow rate obtained from the flow calculation verification must agree to within ± 0. factors. The OGC considers either one of the following methods acceptable for performance evaluation: 1) A performance evaluation test on the system can be conducted by inputting known values of flow parameters into the EFM to verify the volume calculation. and flow rates are not updated simultaneously. 2) Evaluate the EFM calculation accuracy with a flow calculation program that performs within the target limits for all the factors and parameters listed in the test cases below.15%. Performance Evaluations A flow calculation verification (performance evaluation) must be completed within two weeks after the EFM is put into service and immediately after any change to the computer program or algorithms that affect the flow calculation. the acceptable volumetric gas flow rate limit is lowered to ±0. if no AGA3 factor or parameter outputs are available.7.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations temperature. multiple “snapshots” may have to be taken to provide a representative evaluation. The values calculated from forced data must be identified as such. and configuration information is to be taken from the EFM and input into the checking program. The first seven test cases included in this Chapter are for gas orifice meters (AGA3 flow calculations).3. If the ±0. For gas orifice meters. Note that some Distributed Control Systems (DCS) or other control systems have built-in and/or manual input of pressure and temperature for flow calculations. the EFM must be subjected to a detailed review of the flow calculation algorithm to resolve the deviation problem. flow rates. The performance evaluation must be documented for OGC audit purposes.25%of the volumetric flow rates recorded on the sample test cases or other flow calculation programs. A “snapshot” of the instantaneous flow parameters and factors. The seven AGA3 test cases could also be used to evaluate any compressibility or supercompressibility factors used in other flow calculations using the same gas composition.25%limit is exceeded. Since the pressure and temperature are not continuously updated. A performance evaluation must be conducted and submitted for OGC audit purposes on request. 4. differential pressure (if applicable). coefficient factors. If the instantaneous EFM flow parameters. and temperature as inputs in the calculation. they are not acceptable for OGC and MOF accounting and reporting purposes unless OGC approval is obtained. Test Case 8 is for the AGA7 flow calculation for positive displacement or linear meters.2.2. and other parameters. and communication failures. pressure.

5psia). 3) The heaviest carbon component was assumed to be normal heptane. 2) The atmospheric pressure is assumed to be 93.3.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4. The compressibility factors were calculated using the Redlich-Kwong (RK) equation with the Wichert-Aziz correction for sour gas. 2013 114 .3. Test Cases for Verification of Orifice Meter Gas Flow Calculation Programs The OGC uses the following test cases to verify that the EFM correctly calculates gas flow rates from orifice meters.7.3. viscosity = 0.) 8) The orifice plate material is assumed to be 316 stainless steel and the meter run to be carbon steel at reference temperature of 20° C.08kPa(a) (13. 9) The base conditions (101.325kPa[abs] and 15°C) are used in the calculated temperature base factor (Ftb) and pressure base factor (Fpb).010268 centipoise. isentropic exponent (k) = 1. 5) The same static pressure value is used for pressure taps that are located upstream (U/S) or downstream (D/S) of the orifice plate. even though the pressure tap may be downstream of the orifice plate.2. Part 1. The seven test cases recognized by the OGC were developed by the ERCB and based on the following: 1) They are for flange taps only.02831685. 7) The AGA3 (1990) results were calculated using the Detail AGA8 (1992) compressibility factor calculation and using the upstream expansion factor Y1 as recommended by the AGA3 (1990). June 1st. The metric conversion factor for the calculated gas volume is 0. (The Y2 factor is also provided for reference when applicable.8. 6) The AGA3 (1985) results were calculated based on upstream conditions (for both upstream and downstream static pressure tap) in imperial units (the Y2 factor is also provided for reference). Chapter 1. 4) The ideal gas relative density was converted to the real gas relative density.

9277 Fr 1.0184 iC4 .2818.73 psia) Differential pressure .0.0007 Y2 N/A 1. .0260 iC5 .10.0. .0012 Zf 0.7792 Meter Data (flange taps) Meter run I.0.0012 1.9897 inches H2O) Flowing temperature .0.9989 0.0043 C2 .0005 1.D.9981 Ev 1.9989 0.0.7068 nC5 .9.0.0.9351 0.52.0006 1.0.09 kPa(a) (408.0007 F tb 0.0.9981 0.0190 H2S .525 mm (0.600° F) Gas Volume Result AGA3 (1985) AGA3 (1990) Factors U/S Tap D/S Tap Factors U/S Tap D/S Tap Fb 28.0° C (134.2000 kPa (40.9959 0.9989 Y1 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations TEST CASE 1 (for AGA3 Flow Calculations) Gas Analysis N2 .1414 C6 .179 Q 2.0360 1.0006 Q 2.5990 0.0.0674 Cm .175 31.4286 Cd 0.0022 Ideal gas relative density .1308 Zb 0.7475e3m3/24hr June 1st.D.0. 2013 115 .4286 28.0023 1.0081 CO2 .0.0038 C1 .9959 Fa 1.7422 2.57.0361 C' 31.9280 0.1308 1.9351 F pv 1.7478 2.0000 nC4 .0023 Ftf 0.5990 Y1 0.0005 F gr 1.0.375 inches) Flow Data (24 hr) Static pressure .9989 Y2 N/A 1.7531 e3m3/24hr F pb 1.0026 C3 .0618 inches) Orifice I.370 mm (2.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

TEST CASE 2 (for AGA3 Flow Calculations)
Gas Analysis
N2 - 0.0156

iC4 - 0.0044

CO2 - 0.0216

nC4 - 0.0075

H2S - 0.1166

iC5 - 0.0028

C1 - 0.7334

nC5 - 0.0024

C2 - 0.0697

C6 - 0.0017

C3 - 0.0228

C7 - 0.0015

Ideal gas relative density - 0.7456
Meter Data (flange taps)
Meter run I.D. - 102.26 mm (4.026 inches)
Orifice I.D. - 47.625 mm (1.875 inches)
Flow Data (24 hr)
Static pressure - 9100.94 kPa(a) (1319.98 psia)
Differential pressure - 11.0000 kPa (44.2046 inches H2O)
Flowing temperature - 50.0° C (122.0° F)
Gas Volume Result
AGA3 (1985)

AGA3 (1990)

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Fb

733.697

733.697

Cd

0.6019

0.6019

Y1

0.9996

0.9996

Y1

0.9996

0.9996

Y2

N/A

1.0002

Y2

N/A

1.0003

F tb

0.9981

0.9981

Ev

1.0244

1.0244

F gr

1.1564

1.1564

Zb

0.9967

0.9967

Fa

1.0010

1.0010

Zf

0.8098

0.8097

Fr

1.0002

1.0002

Q

146.08

146.18e3m3/24hr

Fpb

1.0023

1.0023

F tf

0.9452

0.9452

Fpv

1.1072

1.1073

C'

888.905

889.000

Q

145.93

146.03e3m3/24hr

June 1st, 2013

116

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

TEST CASE 3 (for AGA3 Flow Calculations)
Gas Analysis
N2 - 0.0500

iC4 - 0.0000

CO2 - 0.1000

nC4 - 0.0000

H2S - 0.2000

iC5 - 0.0000

C1 - 0.6000

nC5 - 0.0000

C2 - 0.0500

C6 - 0.0000

C3 - 0.0000

C7 - 0.0000

Ideal gas relative density - 0.8199
Meter Data (flange taps)
Meter run I.D. - 590.55 mm (23.250 inches)
Orifice I.D. - 304.80 mm (12.000 inches)
Flow Data (24 hr)
Static pressure - 10342.14 kPa(a) (1500.00 psia)
Differential pressure - 22.1600 kPa (89.0522 inches H2O)
Flowing temperature - 60.0° C (140.0° F)
Gas Volume Result
AGA3 (1985)

AGA3 (1990)

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Fb

30429.66

30429.66

Cd

0.6029

0.6029

Y1

0.9993

0.9993

Y1

0.9993

0.9993

Y2

N/A

1.0004

Y2

N/A

1.0004

F tb

0.9981

0.9981

Ev

1.0375

1.0375

F gr

1.1028

1.1028

Zb

0.9968

0.9968

Fa

1.0013

1.0013

Zf

0.8216

0.8213

Fr

1.0001

1.0001

Q

8564.77

8575.48e3m3/24hr

Fpb

1.0023

1.0023

F tf

0.9309

0.9309

Fpv

1.1076

1.1078

C'

34636.6

34643.21

Q

8603.19

8614.04e3m3/24hr

June 1st, 2013

117

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

TEST CASE 4 (for AGA3 Flow Calculations)
Gas Analysis
N2 - 0.0029

iC4 - 0.0000

CO2 - 0.0258

nC4 - 0.0000

H2S - 0.0000

iC5 - 0.0000

C1 - 0.9709

nC5 - 0.0000

C2 - 0.0003

C6 - 0.0000

C3 - 0.0001

C7 - 0.0000

Ideal gas relative density - 0.5803
Meter Data (flange taps)
Meter run I.D. - 146.36 mm (5.7622 inches)
Orifice I.D. - 88.900 mm (3.500 inches)
Flow Data (24 hr)
Static pressure - 9839.99 kPa(a) (1427.17 psia)
Differential pressure - 6.6130 kPa (26.575 inches H2O)
Flowing temperature - 22.35° C (72.23° F)
Gas Volume Result
AGA3 (1985)

AGA3 (1990)

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Fb

2694.965

2694.97

Cd

0.6047

0.6047

Y1

0.9998

0.9998

Y1

0.9998

0.9998

Y2

N/A

1.0001

Y2

N/A

1.0001

Ftb

0.9981

0.9981

Ev

1.0759

1.0759

F gr

1.3116

1.3116

Zb

0.9980

0.9980

Fa

1.0001

1.0001

Zf

0.8425

0.8425

Fr

1.0002

1.0002

Q

503.44

503.63e3m3/24hr

Fpb

1.0023

1.0023

Ftf

0.9884

0.9884

Fpv

1.0843

1.0843

C'

3790.16

3790.31

Q

501.64

501.82e3m3/24hr

June 1st, 2013

118

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

TEST CASE 5 (for AGA3 Flow Calculations)
Gas Analysis
N2 - 0.0235

iC4 - 0.0088

CO2 - 0.0082

nC4 - 0.0169

H2S - 0.0021

iC5 - 0.0035

C1 - 0.7358

nC5 - 0.0031

C2 - 0.1296

C6 - 0.0014

C3 - 0.0664

C7 - 0.0007

Ideal gas relative density - 0.7555
Meter Data (flange taps)
Meter run I.D. - 154.05 mm (6.0650 inches)
Orifice I.D. - 95.250 mm (3.750 inches)
Flow Data (24 hr)
Static pressure - 2499.9 kPa(a) (362.58 psia)
Differential pressure - 75.000 kPa (301.395 inches H2O)
Flowing temperature - 34.0° C (93.2° F)
Gas Volume Result
AGA3 (1985)

AGA3 (1990)

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Fb

3111.24

3111.24

Cd

0.6042

0.6041

Y1

0.9894

0.9897

Y1

0.9894

0.9897

Y2

N/A

1.0044

Y2

N/A

1.0044

Ftb

0.9981

0.9981

Ev

1.0822

1.0822

Fgr

1.1485

1.1485

Zb

0.9962

0.9962

Fa

1.0005

1.0005

Zf

0.9240

0.9217

Fr

1.0001

1.0001

Q

799.83

813.00e3m3/24hr

Fpb

1.0023

1.0023

Ftf

0.9695

0.9695

Fpv

1.0382

1.0394

C'

3561.90

3567.34

Q

800.22

813.37e3m3/24hr

June 1st, 2013

119

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

TEST CASE 6 (for AGA3 Flow Calculations)
Gas Analysis
N2 - 0.0268

iC4 - 0.0123

CO2 - 0.0030

nC4 - 0.0274

H2S - 0.0000

iC5 - 0.0000

C1 - 0.6668

nC5 - 0.0000

C2 - 0.1434

C6 - 0.0180

C3 - 0.1023

C7 - 0.0000

Ideal gas relative density - 0.8377
Meter Data (flange taps)
Meter run I.D. - 52.500 mm (2.0669 inches)
Orifice I.D. - 19.050 mm (0.750 inches)
Flow Data (24 hr)
Static pressure - 2506.33 kPa(a) (363.50 psia)
Differential pressure - 17.0500 kPa (68.5171 inches H2O)
Flowing temperature - 7.2° C (44.96° F)
Gas Volume Result
AGA3 (1985)

AGA3 (1990)

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Fb

115.138

115.138

Cd

0.6005

0.6005

Y1

0.9978

0.9978

Y1

0.9978

0.9978

Y2

N/A

1.0012

Y2

N/A

1.0012

Ftb

0.9981

0.9981

Ev

1.0088

1.0088

Fgr

1.0902

1.0902

Zb

0.9951

0.9951

Fa

0.9996

0.9996

Zf

0.8588

0.8578

Fr

1.0003

1.0003

Q

14.687

14.746e3m3/24hr

Fpb

1.0023

1.0023

Ftf

1.0148

1.0148

F pv

1.0708

1.0714

C'

136.15

136.22

Q

14.602

14.660e3m3/24hr

June 1st, 2013

120

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

TEST CASE 7 (for AGA3 Flow Calculations)
Gas Analysis
N2 - 0.0070

iC4 - 0.0062

CO2 - 0.0400

nC4 - 0.0090

H2S - 0.0000

iC5 - 0.0052

C1 - 0.8720

nC5 - 0.0016

C2 - 0.0340

C6 - 0.0000

C3 - 0.0250

C7 - 0.0000

Ideal gas relative density - 0.6714
Meter Data (flange taps)
Meter run I.D. - 52.500 mm (2.0669 inches)
Orifice I.D. - 12.70 mm (0.50 inches)
Flow Data (24 hr)
Static pressure - 299.92 kPa(a) (43.50 psia)
Differential pressure - 6.3455 kPa (25.5 inches H2O)
Flowing temperature - 1.67° C (35° F)
Gas Volume Result
AGA3 (1985) AGA3 (1990)
Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Factors

U/S Tap

D/S Tap

Fb

50.523

50.523

Cd

0.6006

0.6006

Y1

0.9933

0.9935

Y1

0.9933

0.9934

Y2

N/A

1.0039

Y2

N/A

1.0039

Ftb

0.9981

0.9981

Ev

1.0017

1.0017

Fgr

1.2190

1.2190

Zb

0.9973

0.9973

Fa

0.9994

0.9994

Zf

0.9905

0.9903

Fr

1.0018

1.0018

Q

1.4335

1.4489e3m3/24hr

Fpb

1.0023

1.0023

Ftf

1.0250

1.0250

F pv

1.0035

1.0036

C'

63.013

63.029

Q

1.4263

1.4416e3m3/24hr

June 1st, 2013

121

2. 2) The compressibility factors were calculated using the Detail AGA8 (1992) or the Redlich-Kwong (RK) equation with the Wichert-Aziz correction for sour gas.7. 3) The calculation of the Fgr factor is within 0.25% of the value determined by the ERCB.01% of the values determined by the ERCB.2%of the value determined by the ERCB. Flow Calculation Tolerances The OGC considers a computer program that uses the AGA3 (1985) equation to be correct if for each of the test cases: 1) The calculation of the Y. 2013 122 . 2) The calculation of the Fb factor is within 0. 3) Fpm = Pf /Pb.25% of the value determined by the ERCB. Test Case for Verification of AGA7 Gas Flow Calculation Programs The OGC uses the following test cases to verify that the EFM system correctly calculates gas flow rates using the AGA7 equations.2% of the value determined by the ERCB. 3) The calculation of the compressibility factor at flowing conditions (Zf) is within 0.5598/Pb 5) Ftm = Tb/Tf. 4) The calculation of the gas rate is within 0.1%of the values determined by the ERCB. Tf = flowing temperature 6) Ftb = Tb/519. where Tb = base temperature.5.1%of the values determined by the ERCB.3. The OGC considers a computer program that uses the AGA7 equation to be correct if for the test case: June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4.2% of the value determined by the ERCB. The OGC considers a computer program that uses the AGA3 (1990) equation to be correct if for each of the test cases: 1) Both the gas expansion coefficient (Y1) and the velocity of approach factor (Eb) calculations are within 0.67 4.325kPa [abs] and 15°C) are used in the calculated temperature base factor (Ftb) and pressure base factor (Fpb). 6) The calculation of the gas rate is within 0. Fr. 5) The correct base conditions (101. and Ftf factors is within 0.7. 2) The calculation of both the discharge coefficient (Cd) and the base compressibility factor (Zb) are within 0. The test case recognized by the OGC was developed by the ERCB and based on the following: 1) The heaviest carbon component was assumed to be normal heptane.4. Pb = base pressure 4) Fpb = 101.1% of the value determined by the ERCB.2. where Pf = flowing pressure. Fa. 4) The calculation of the Fpv factor is within 0.3.

2% of the value determined by the ERCB (both AGA8 and RK factors are provided). June 1st.1% of the value determined by the ERCB. 3) The correct base conditions (101.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 1) The program’s calculation of both the flowing pressure factor (Fpm) and the flowing temperature factor (Ftm) are within 0.25% of the value determined by the ERCB. 4) The program’s calculation of the gas rate is within 0. 2) The program’s calculation of the compressibility factor (S) is within 0. 2013 123 .325kPa [abs] and 15°C) are used in the calculated temperature gas factor (Ftb) and pressure base factor (Fpb).

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations TEST CASE 8 (for AGA7 Flow Calculations) Gas Analysis N2 .6668 nC5 . S 1.0298 Ftb 0.7e3m3/24hr Using RK compressibility equations.0.0.33 kPa(a) (363.0.0000 C1 .0123 CO2 .0000 C2 .7.0.0.0000 Flow Data (24 hr) Uncorrected volume .0.0023 Ftm 1.50 psia) Flowing temperature .1467 Q 3740.128.1588 Q 3779.0.0. 2013 124 .2506.0000 iC5 .0180 C3 .1434 C6 .0.736 Fpb 1.0274 H2S .1023 C7 .2° C (44.0.2e3m3/24hr June 1st. S 1.9981 Using AGA8 compressibility equations.0.0030 nC4 .0268 iC4 .0.0 103m3 Static pressure .96° F) Gas Volume Result AGA7 (Volumetric Flow) Factors Fpm 24.

differential pressure (if applicable) b.2. estimated volumes made by the system b. temperature 6) Time stamp to reflect the time the report was created.7. 8) Identify the production date for the daily report. static pressure c. EFM Reports The required information in each report must be stored using electronic/magnetic (not necessarily on the EFM) or printed media and can exist individually on different formats or reports and must be produced for review for audit purposes as follows: Table 4. 2) Daily accumulated volume.3.3-5 Required EFM Reports Report Description Archive Frequency Daily Report Daily Meter Report Generate On Request For Current and Future Periods Event Log Regular Intervals before data is overwritten Alarm Log Regular Intervals before data is overwritten 4. This will include the average daily values for: a.7. alarms for end devices that would impact volumetric calculations 3) Production hours or hours of flow (specify). Daily Report The daily report is to include (as applicable for the given metering technology utilized): 1) Meter identification. with indicating flags for: a. 2013 125 .3.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4.2.6. 9) For a Cross Border facility. 4) Units of measure for volumetric data. well cycling June 1st. 5) Volumetric data audit trail. 10) Identify wells that use intermittent timers. indicate the jurisdiction from which a well volume originated.7. estimated volumes by operational personnel c. 7) Date stamp to reflect the date the report was created. plunger lifts. pump-off controls.

where audit/inspection results indicate they are warranted. c. well cycling control. 2) Current configuration information for differential meters or other types of meters. 4. it is also expected that the original data be maintained on file and that the modified data will have an appropriate comment included to explain the exception. Instantaneous relative density (if live). Meter Report The meter report must be generated on request. Instantaneous flow rate. The OGC may request upgrades. f. Meter identification. that are “operating normally and as designed” are to be considered on production even when the wells are not flowing or pumping. plunger lifts.3. Instantaneous differential pressure. b. June 1st. well throttling. In such a case. etc. These values are used as part of the audit trail to confirm that the flow calculation is functioning correctly. there is no way of verifying the accuracy of the system. whichever are applicable: a. Where exceptions (indicating flags) are present it is assumed that the data presented has been modified (either automatically or by user intervention) from the original data. Optional: instantaneous (AGA3) factors (see the orifice meter test cases above for output information). c.. Contract hour. b. Instantaneous flowing temperature. 2013 126 . The meter report must include the following (as applicable for the given metering technology utilized) to be produced on demand: 1) Instantaneous Flow Data a. Existing EFM systems that do not have any of the above audit trail capabilities and cannot develop the capability because of system limitations at the time of implementation must notify the OGC in writing and receive approval to continue operation in the current format. gas lift etc. Without them. Instantaneous gas composition (if live). h.8. Date and time of meter configuration information. Instantaneous static pressure. well throttling. This report details the configuration of each meter and flow calculation information.7. pump-off controls. e.2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations control. g. Physical well shut-ins and emergency shutdowns (ESDs) are considered downtime. Production hours for wells with intermittent timers. d. Instantaneous compressibility (if live).

Static pressure tap location. 2013 127 .3. r. Pressure base (unless fixed). Meter tube material. K factor. which must be generated on request. Meter factor and/or K factor. is used to note and record exceptions and changes to the flow parameters. The Event Log The event log. 6) Other manual inputs. configuration. f. 2) Transmitter range change. Orifice plate reference bore size. n.9.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations d. June 1st. Calibrated temperature range. or effluent correction factor changes. Orifice plate material. k. 5) Meter factor. Effluent correction factor. Compressibility (if not live). l. t. Temperature base (unless fixed). o. programming. u. The event log is to contain the following information with each entry: 1) Time stamp for the event. High/low differential cutoff. Calibrated differential pressure range. e. h. p.2. but not limited to: 1) Orifice plate size change. g. q. Meter tube reference inside diameter (upstream diameter). Metric conversion factors for Imperial calculations. j. and the database affecting flow calculations. This log is to include such events as. 4. i. Gas composition (if not live).7. s. Relative density (if not live). Atmospheric pressure. 4) Cut off values for measured inputs. Calibrated static pressure range. 3) Gas/liquid analysis update by component. m.

November 1992. 3436.. 8 (AGA8). 1. K. Hall. but are not limited to: 1) Master terminal unit failures. June 1st. The Alarm Log The alarm log includes any alarms that may impact the outcome of the calculation of volumes. and Abou-Kassam. L.H. J. 3.7. June 18.. pp. Dranchuk.M.4.. Gas Processors Association. “Computer Calculation of Natural Gas Compressibility Factors Using the Standing and Katz Correlation.3. 3) New and old values for each item changed.” Institute of Petroleum Technical Series No. P. SI Engineering Data Book.M. D. “A New Equation of State for Z Factor Calculations.A. Alarms to be reported must include. 4. References American Gas Association Transmission Measurement Committee Report No.. 3) Communication failures.R. 5) High differential pressure (for differential measurement devices). Purvis. 2013 128 . pp.” The Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology 14. “Calculation of Z Factors for Natural Gases Using Equations of State. The alarm log is to contain the following information with each entry: 1) The time of each alarm condition..10..2. 4) Low-power warning. and Robinson. IP 74-008. 2) The date of each alarm condition. 3) The time of clearing for each alarm. 1974.B. 4. 2) Remote terminal unit failures. R. 6) High/low volumetric flow rate (for other types of measurement). GPA 2145: “Table of Physical Constants for Hydrocarbons and Other Compounds of Interest to the Natural Gas Industry. 7) Over-ranging of end devices.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2) Date stamp for the event. Compressibility and Supercompressibility for Natural Gas and Other Hydrocarbon Gases. 82-92. and Yarborough.” Gas Processors Suppliers Association. P. July-September 1975.. 1973.” The Oil and Gas Journal. Dranchuk.

. 119-122. Compressibility Factor. 1974. C. Lippman. K. 2013 129 . February 18.. R. K. K.” The Oil and Gas Journal. E.S.. Huggins. May 1972. Vapour Pressure and Entropy of Vapourization.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Pitzer...N. “The Volumetric and Thermodynamic Properties of Fluids II. 51. Curl. An Equation of State.” Journal of the American Chemical Society. Vol.” Hydrocarbon Processing. 77. D. June 1st.. and Hall.. and Aziz.. No. O.” Chemical Review 44. Vol.R. “On the Thermodynamics of Solutions...M. J. pp. 1949. 86-88. V. L. 13. Yarborough. Wichert. “Calculate Z’s for Sour Gases. and Kwong.F. July 1955. Fugacities of Gaseous Solutions. Redlich. D. pp. and Petersen.Z..E. 233-244.S. “How to Solve Equation of State for Z-Factors. pp.

the freehold mineral holder receives the same royalty rate for each well. This also includes the gas equivalent volume (GEV) of measured condensate if the condensate is recombined with the gas downstream of the separator. 5. “Standards of Accuracy” states that an operator may deviate from the OGC’s minimum measurement. accounting. If there is more than one freehold mineral holder for the wells in a battery or facility. if there is more than one working interest participant. For emulsion. This Chapter indicates what information must be included in such an application. Site-Specific Exceptions Deviation from base measurement. When all the wells in a battery or facility are produced under Crown mineral leases. it may remain in place indefinitely. 2013 130 . and reporting requirements without specific approval if no royalty. Specialized Terminology Defined Common Ownership Common Crown or Freehold Royalty Measured Gas Source(s) Measured Oil All wells in a battery or facility belong to the same working interest participant. accounting. If the initial qualifying criteria have been met and the exception is implemented. and reporting requirements is allowed without submission of an application to the OGC. accounting. Operators may also apply for approval to deviate from the minimum requirements if the specific criteria are not met. provided that specific criteria are met. 5. the Crown receives the same royalty rate for each well. the delivery point measurement uncertainty limits apply to the total volume determination only. provided that all the initial qualifying criteria listed under the subsequent “Exception” Sections are met. each working interest participant has the same percentage interest in each well in the battery or facility. and reporting requirements or submit an application for site-specific approval of deviation from the base June 1st. the total royalty rate for each well is the same. These are single-phase measured gas source(s) downstream of separation and removal of liquids. as long as the exception does not meet any of the revocation clauses and no physical additions to the facility are made (new wells or zones). If these exceptions or approvals are in use. or reservoir engineering concerns are associated with the volumes being measured and the operator is able to demonstrate that the alternative measurement equipment and/or procedures will provide measurement accuracy within the applicable uncertainties. the initial qualifying criteria must be met for all the wells or zones added to the battery or facility for the exception to remain in place.2. Initial Qualifying Criteria These criteria (detailed in subsequent Sections) must be met to qualify for the exception. If the additions or changes are made to the battery or facility. This Chapter describes situations where an operator may deviate from the minimum requirements without OGC approval. or.1.2. If the operator anticipates that physical additions may not meet the initial qualifying criteria. 5.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 5. Chapter 5 Site-Specific Deviation from Base Requirements Chapter 1. when under leases granted by one freehold mineral holder. OGC inspectors and auditors will review the operator’s records for demonstrated compliance with the criteria specified in this Chapter or in the applicable approval. equity.1. the operator may reconfigure the facility to meet base measurement. or. Oil is measured using equipment and/or procedures meeting delivery point measurement uncertainty limits.

8) Latest six months’ gas. June 1st. If an operator anticipates that proposed changes to the facility may not meet the approval conditions. accounting. 2) Facility code and locations. The OGC may revoke an exception if an audit or inspection reveals a lack of adequate supporting data or documentation. 1) Well and/or facility list. at the OGC’s discretion. Approval must be in place prior to implementation. if applicable. 6) Royalty status (freehold/Crown. the operator may propose a plan to comply with the OGC exception requirements within an OGC-approved time period. and reporting requirements on approval of an application submitted to the OGC Operations Engineering Branch. 5) Indication as to unit or non-unit operation. 2013 131 . and reporting requirements or submit a new application for site-specific approval of deviation from the base requirements. Site-Specific Approval Applications If the exception criteria cannot be met.2.3. oil/condensate. including all tie-in locations. Additional or other appropriate requirements may be specified by the OGC. 5. the operator may reconfigure the facility to meet base measurement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations requirements. the approval may be revoked and the operator will be required to meet applicable base requirements immediately. new/old. The following information is required for all applications for site-specific deviation from base requirements. Other specific information that may be required is described in the following appropriate Sections. Submission of an application does not guarantee that an approval will be granted. 5. the operator may be allowed to deviate from base measurement. and water flow rates (or expected flow rates for new wells). Approvals will remain in place indefinitely.2. if applicable. accounting. or if a specific situation is not covered in this Chapter. Documentation Requirement The operator must retain the data and documentation to support the initial qualifying criteria and the last three testing records (if applicable) for as long as the exception is in place. Approval must be in place prior to implementation. 3) Well locations. 4) Respective pool/zone designations and unique identifier for each zone.). 9) Up-to-date measurement schematic(s) for the existing system(s) and the proposed new gas or oil source(s). Alternatively. provided that conditions specified in the approval are met. If an OGC audit or inspection finds that approval conditions are not being met. 7) Equity (ownership) issues.2. etc. if any. Submission of an application does not guarantee that an approval will be granted. If the operator cannot provide documentation requested for an OGC audit within 30 days the operator will be required to meet applicable OGC base measurement requirements immediately.

or June 1st. 2013 132 .1. the entire group facility or gas gathering system must be considered. all wells in the multi-well facility are gas wells.1.g.oil Low >2m3/d but ≤6m3/d . Initial Qualifying Criteria 1) In the case of gas well measurement. 3) The group oil battery/facility orifice gas meter desired chart cycle is greater than 8 days. economics. all wells in the battery/facility are oil wells. 5. 4) All wells flowing to the battery/facility have common ownership and either common Crown or freehold royalty..oil Medium 6m3/d but ≤30m3/d . if applicable. 2) The single-well oil battery/facility orifice gas meter desired chart cycle is greater than 24 hours. 2) In the case of oil well measurement.oil 5. 3) All wells are subjected to the same type of measurement (all well production is separated and all components are measured. Exceptions Orifice meter gas chart cycles may be extended without OGC site-specific approval if all the initial qualifying criteria below are met and no application is required.1. High >30m3/d . 11) Justification for deviation from measurement requirements (e. minimal impact on measurement accuracy). Mixing of wells with EFM systems and wells using extended chart cycle paper charts within the same facility requires approval from the OGC. and approvals for extension of the chart cycle for those meters will not normally be granted.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 10) Facility plot plan for the existing system and the proposed new gas or oil source(s).oil Stripper ≤2m3/d . Chart Cycles Extended Beyond the Required Time Perio Chart cycle is the time required for a circular chart to complete one 360° revolution. or all well production is subject to effluent measurement) and the same chart cycle. Group or sales/delivery point meters and High and Medium oil well test gas meters do not qualify for exception for chart cycle extension.3. and the well produces either to a single-well battery/facility or to a multi-well oil group where each well has its own separation and measurement equipment. A single-well facility does not qualify for this exception on its own.3. An extension of the required chart cycle time may be applicable under the following scenarios: 1) The gas well orifice meter desired chart cycle is greater than 8 days. 5.3.

Painting occurs when there are quick up and down movements of the pen. so that there is no visible separation between the up and down traces for a period of time. 6) Painted traces for any well exceeded 4% of the differential pressure range or the static pressure range. If there are no common Crown or freehold royalties and only freehold royalties are involved.9e3m3/d monthly average actual gas production rate (including gas equivalent of condensate for gas wells). June 1st. 2) There is mixed measurement within the battery/facility other than with EFM. plunger lifts. written notification has been given to all freehold royalty owners.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations a.9e3m3/d or less (including the gas equivalent of condensate in the case of gas well measurement). If there is a mix of freehold and Crown royalty involved. pump-off controls. Revocation of Exceptions If any of the following exists or occurs. 3) The oil well is not produced either to a single-well battery/facility or to a multi-well oil group where each well has its own separation and measurement equipment. and the static pressure pen should record at 20% or more within the chart range (if possible). with no resulting objection received. Base measurement requirements must be reinstated if the exception is revoked due to any of the above. flow control valve cycling). 7) Temperature must be recorded at least once per week. 5. with no resulting objection received. Painted traces must not exceed 4% of the differential pressure or static pressure range. 4) The working interest participants for any well flowing to the battery/facility have changed and a new working interest participant objects to the exemption. if that is not possible. battery or facility gas is added to a gas battery/facility. Unexpected or occasional well shut-ins are acceptable. 2013 133 . written notification has been given to all working interest participants. or one or more of the existing wells has been modified to operate on on/off flows but EFM is not used. and.3.. 6) The differential pen records at 33% or more within the chart range. the exception is revoked: 1) Oil well. 5) The monthly average volumetric gas flow rate for each gas meter is 16.1.g. continuous temperature measurement (temperature pen) is required. b. c. the operator must apply to the OGC for approval. 7) A new well with on/off flows is added to an effluent proration battery/facility.2. intermittent timers. 8) The wells must not be designed or operate with on/off flows (e. If there is no common ownership. 5) Any well within the battery/facility has exceeded the 16.

Considerations for Site-Specific Approval 1) Differential and static pressures are stable. intermittent timers. pump-off controls. with no resulting objection received.2. but the OGC has to decide on a case-by-case basis if the concerns are relevant. Additionally.4. noting the following: a.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 5. etc. gas proration without individual well measurement falls under the June 1st. Gas Proration without Individual Well Measurement – Unitization In the Province of British Columbia.3. the operator has the option to run the charts on the proposed chart cycle to gather test data for submission and then revert back to the required chart cycle after a maximum test period of 31 days. Applications The following information must be submitted with an application to extend orifice meter gas chart cycles: 1) All of the information listed in Chapter 5. does not normally qualify for chart cycle extension. The amount of painting that is acceptable is decided case by case. 3) A discussion of the impact on measurement accuracy of intermingling base chart cycles and extended chart cycles in a common battery/facility. consecutive. On/off flow as designed (including plunger lifts. from a reservoir perspective. The effects of painting are minimized. The original copies of any such charts created must be submitted with the application. 4) All gas meters producing into the same group measurement point use the same chart cycle. 5.3. 3) Reservoir engineering concerns: The concern for well measurement accuracy declines. and how it may relate to concerns about working interest equity and/or royalty considerations. b.).3 “Site-Specific Approval Applications. 2) There are minimal equity and royalty concerns. The applicant should provide an assessment/opinion. as the pool depletes. The differential pen should record at 33% or more within the chart range and the static pressure pen should record at 20% or more within the chart range (if possible). Section 5. c. which causes painting or spiking.2. 4) A minimum of two current. 2013 134 . with essentially uninterrupted flow. The trial run must be clearly identified on the charts. documentation to address royalty and equity issues. 5. representative gas charts. demonstrating that written notification was given to all freehold royalty holders and working interest participants.” 2) If there are no common Crown or freehold royalties or common ownership. so that they are subject to the same type of error.3.

but is not limited to. new gas or oil source errors may be difficult to detect because the proration testing errors in the original system can hide the new source errors. Unitization agreements are approved according to Section 114 of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.5-1 Measured Gas Source(s) Delivering into a Gas Proration – Unitization Battery / Facility June 1st. In the case of a proration battery/facility (effluent measurement. Figure 5. or periodic testing without continuous measurement). 5. (Note: All figures below are examples only.5. Mines and Natural Gas. some systems may be configured differently). Measurement by Difference Measurement by difference occurs when an unmeasured volume is determined by taking the difference between two or more measured volumes. provided that the measured source gas or oil rates are a small proportion of the total system delivery rates. 5. It results in the unmeasured volume absorbing all the measurement error associated with the measured volumes. Unitization proposals are to be submitted to the Director. a properly designed and operated measurement system can minimize the risk and attain reasonable accuracy. measurement by difference can include.” “single-well facilities” or “sales points” unless special approval is obtained from the OGC.5. Petroleum Lands Branch of the Ministry of Energy. Gas Measurement by Difference For gas streams. 2013 135 . Despite these concerns. Measurement by difference is not allowed for “multi-well group facilities. This agreement handles gas proration as applicable to the circumstances and is facilitated by the MOF.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations auspices of a Unitization Agreement. the following situations.1.

5-3 Measured Gas Source(s) Delivering into an Oil Proration Battery / Facility June 1st. 2013 136 .5-2 Measured Gas Source(s) Delivering into an Effluent (Wet) Measurement Gas Proration Battery / Facility Figure 5.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 5.

June 1st. 2) The monthly gas volume (including Gas Equivalent Volume (GEV) of condensate where appropriate) received from a tied-in measured gas source (and any other receipts) must be subtracted from the total monthly disposition gas volume (including Gas Equivalent Volume [GEV] of condensate where appropriate) to determine the monthly battery/facility gas production volume. 3) Measurement by difference in a coalbed methane gas proration battery/facility must have OGC site-specific approval. and vent volumes).75 (R)* = Ratio of volume of all tied-in measured gas volumes (including Gas Equivalent Volume [GEV] of condensate where applicable) to the total battery/facility gas disposition volume (including fuel. Table 5. flare.5e3m3/d ≤ 0. 4) Table 5.5-1 Prorated Gas Flow Rates and Ratios Prorated Gas Flow Rate (excluding all measured gas sources) Ratios (R)* Application Required No ≤0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 5.00 >0. the following applies: 1) The gas and liquids from all tied-in gas sources must be separately and continuously measured.35 Yes Generally Not Acceptable > 0.5-4 Measured Oil Facility Gas Delivering into a Gas Proration Battery / Facility If any measured gas source will be tied in to a gas proration battery/facility.35 > 0.5-1 below indicates when measurement by difference may be acceptable by exception and when submission of an application may be required.5e3m3/d < 1. 2013 137 .

Table 5. 2) The monthly gas volume (including Gas Equivalent Volume [GEV] of condensate where appropriate) received from a tied-in measured gas source (and any other receipts) must be subtracted from the total monthly battery/facility gas volume to determine the monthly battery/facility gas production volume.5-2 below indicates when measurement by difference may be acceptable by exception and when submission of an application may be required.35 >0. 3) If liquid condensate is received from a tied-in measured gas source. this situation does not qualify for an exception. Oil Measurement by Difference For oil streams.00 >0.80 (R)* = Ratio of volume of all tied-in measured gas volumes (including Gas Equivalent Volume [GEV] of condensate where applicable) to the total battery/facility gas disposition volume (including fuel. June 1st. 5.5e3m3/d <1. 4) Table 5.2. and vent volumes). and an application must be submitted to and approved by the OGC prior to implementation.35 Yes Generally Not Acceptable >0. the monthly liquid condensate volume where appropriate must be subtracted from the total monthly oil disposition (plus/minus inventory changes and minus any other receipts) to determine the monthly battery/facility oil production volume. flare. the following applies: 1) The gas and liquids from the tied-in gas source(s) must be separately and continuously measured. 2013 138 . measurement by difference can include but is not limited to the following situations.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations If any measured gas source will be tied in to a proration oil battery/facility.5-2 Prorated Gas Flow Rates and Ratios Prorated Gas Flow Rate (excluding all measured gas sources) Ratios (R)* Application Required No ≤0. Where a measured gas source will be tied into a single well battery/facility.5.5e3m3/d ≤0. as shown below.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 5.5-5 Measured Oil and/or Oil-Water Emulsion from a Battery / Facility Delivering into an Oil Proration Battery / Facility by Truck Figure 5. 2013 139 .5-6 Measured Oil and/or Oil-Water Emulsion (and gas if applicable) under Pressure from a Battery / Facility Delivering into an Oil Proration Battery / Facility by Pipeline June 1st.

initial qualifying flow rates must be based on average daily flow rates (monthly flow rate divided by number of production days in the month) recorded during the six months prior to implementation of the measurement by difference.5-3 (below) indicates when measurement by difference may be acceptable by exception and when submission of an application may be required.5. If the measurement by difference will involve existing production. the measurement uncertainty requirements apply to total volume determination only. 3) The liquids received from the delivered measured oil and/or oil-water emulsion source(s) must be subtracted from the total monthly oil and water disposition volumes (plus/minus inventory changes and minus any other receipts) to determine the monthly battery/facility oil production volume. A pipelined single oil well or oil wells in a multi-well group may also be considered as continuous or 31-day test and included as part of the oil proration battery/facility providing all production streams are flow lined to the receiving facility. must be tagged as “continuous test. Table 5.5. In that case. measurement by difference could be avoided.3. however.3.5-3 Oil Measurement by Difference Requirements Measured 0il Delivery/Receipt Volume ≤1000m3/month or if >1000 m3/month and ≤25% of monthly prorated battery/facility oil production volume >1000 m3/month and >25% of monthly prorated battery/facility oil production volume Application Required No Yes 5) Consideration should be given to incorporating the piped-in measured oil and/or oil-water emulsion source(s) as a satellite of the battery/facility (if the battery/facility is an oil proration battery/facility) and including it in the battery’s/facility’s proration system. Exceptions Measurement by difference is allowed without OGC site-specific approval if all of the applicable criteria below are met and no application is required. 2013 140 .” 5. 2) Measured oil volumes must be determined and reported at stock tank conditions.1. the following applies: 5. Initial Qualifying Criteria 1) Volumetric criteria for measured gas tie-in to a proration battery/facility June 1st. For measured gas source(s) from either gas or oil batteries tied into a gas proration battery/facility or an oil battery/facility. These wells. 4) Table 5. In the case of oil-water emulsions.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations If any measured oil and/or oil-water emulsion source will be delivered to a battery/facility including trucked-in volumes the following will apply: 1) Measured oil and/or oil-water emulsion delivery/receipt volumes must be determined using equipment and/or procedures that meet delivery point measurement uncertainty requirements.

flare and vent volumes).Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Table 5. written notification has been given to all June 1st. 2) All wells flowing to the battery/facility have common ownership and either common Crown or freehold royalty.5e3m3/d ≤0.00 >0. a. including volumes received from Gas Well D) Vgnew = 30e3m3/d (total of measured gas and GEV of condensate delivered to the battery/facility from Gas Well D) Prorated gas flow rate = Vgtot – Vgnew = 100 – 30 = 70e3m3/d R = 30/100 = 0. Figure 5.35 for the Well D tie-in. it is within the acceptable exception range.5e3m3/d and R is below 0.3 Since the pro-rated flow rate is above 0.5-7 Volumetric Criteria for Measured Gas Tie-In to a Proration Battery / Facility For the above gas battery/facility example: Vgtot = 100e3m3/d (total of measured gas and Gas Equivalent Volume [GEV] of condensate delivered out of the battery/facility.5e3m3/d <1.35 (R)* = Ratio of volume of all tied-in measured gas (including GEV of condensate where applicable) to the total gas disposition volume from the receiving battery/facility (including fuel. 2013 141 . If there is no common ownership.5-4 Prorated Gas Flow Rates and Ratios Prorated Gas Flow Rate (excluding all measured gas sources) Ratios (R)* ≤0.

Tie in the gas well gas and condensate stream downstream of oil battery/facility gas disposition measurement. Deliver condensate elsewhere. If there is no common Crown or freehold royalty and only freehold royalties are involved. b. N /A 6) If condensate from a tied-in measured gas source will be delivered to an oil battery/facility and reported as a liquid volume. 3) The gas and liquid phases from the tied-in measured gas source(s) are separately and continuously measured. 4) Gas volumes received at a gas battery/facility from the tied-in measured gas source(s) include the Gas Equivalent Volume (GEV) of the measured condensate volumes if the condensate is recombined with the measured gas volumes from the new tied-in gas source. Do not recombine it with the gas volumes delivered to the oil battery/facility.0m3/day and/or <5.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations working interest participants. If there is a mix of freehold and Crown royalty involved.5-5 below. 5) If the tied-in measured gas source(s) produces condensate and it is to be connected to an oil battery/facility. with no resulting objection received.0% of Total Prorated Oil Production >2. c. the licensee must apply to the OGC for approval if there is any Freehold objection. Table 5. 2013 142 .5-5 Condensate Requirements When Delivering to a Proration Oil Battery / Facility Condensate Rate (from measured gas sources) Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 ≤2. Deliver condensate elsewhere. written notification has been given to all freehold royalty owners. with no resulting objection received. it is measured with a meter proved to stock tank conditions. the operator must choose from the applicable condensate delivery/reporting options in Table 5. it is measured with a June 1st. 7) If condensate from a tied-in measured gas source will be delivered to an oil battery/facility and reported as a Gas Equivalent Volume (GEV).0% of Total Prorated Oil Production Deliver condensate to the oil battery/facility and report it all as liquid condensate if the following criteria have been met: 1) Most of the condensate will not be flashed during the oil treatment process (minimal pressure drop and/or temperature increase). Deliver condensate to the oil battery/facility and report it all as a GEV if the following criteria have been met: 1) Most of the condensate will be flashed during the oil treatment process (large pressure drop and/or temperature increase).0m3/day and/or > 5. Do not recombine it with the gas volumes delivered to the oil battery/facility.

9) In the case of an oil battery/facility.2. 8) In the case of an oil battery/facility or a gas proration battery/facility.1.2.1.3.3. 2) The monthly battery/facility oil and water production volumes are determined by subtracting the monthly measured oil and water receipt volumes from the total monthly June 1st.3. and minus any other receipts) to determine the monthly battery/facility oil production volume. 2013 143 . c.5.5.3(2) has been implemented. The volume is measured with a meter proved to stock tank conditions. 2) Measurement.3. The total volume does not exceed 2m3/day. Initial Qualifying Criteria 1) Oil and/or oil-water emulsions may be trucked into an oil battery/facility provided the total measured oil receipt volume is 1000m3/month or less. Exception for Measured Oil Streams Received by Truck 5. 3) Measurement. accounting and reporting of condensate in items 4 to 9 under Initial Qualifying Criteria above were not followed. The volume is reported as a liquid. accounting and reporting of oil in items 4 to 9 under Initial Qualifying Criteria above were not followed. the exception is revoked: 1) The gas and liquid phases from the tied-in measured gas source(s) were not separately and continuously measured. Unless option (2) under Section 5.5. 5. or if greater than 1000m3/month.5. the total measured oil receipt volume is less than or equal to 25% of the monthly battery/facility oil production volume. the monthly gas volume (including Gas Equivalent Volume [GEV] of condensate where appropriate) received from a tied-in measured gas source (and any other receipts) is subtracted from the total monthly battery/facility gas volume (including Gas Equivalent Volume [GEV] of condensate where appropriate) to determine the monthly battery/facility gas production volume. 5. the monthly liquid condensate volume (where appropriate) received from a tied-in measured gas source is subtracted from the total monthly oil disposition (plus inventory changes. Revocation of Exceptions If any of the following exists or occurs. b.2. 10) If oil and/or oil-water emulsion from a tied-in measured gas source will be delivered to a gas proration battery/facility.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations meter proved under flow line conditions and reporting volumes at standard conditions for GEV purposes.1. shrinkage [if applicable]. Base measurement requirements must be reinstated if the exception is revoked because of any of the above. then the following applies: a.

5. written notification has been given to all working interest participants. 5.3.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations battery/facility oil and water disposition volumes (plus inventory change and minus any other receipts). b. the exception is revoked: 1) Trucked-in oil receipt was greater than 1000m3/month and the total measured oil receipt volume was greater than 25% of the monthly battery/facility oil production volume. or 3) obtain OGC special approvals to continue. 5.5. Base measurement requirements must be reinstated if the exception is revoked due to any of the above. or 2) set up another treater train with separate inlet measurement. If there is a mix of freehold and Crown royalties involved.3. Revocation of Exceptions If any of the following exists or occurs.3. the total measured oil receipt volume is less than 25% of the monthly battery/facility oil production volume. 2013 144 . written notification has been given to all freehold royalty owners.3. 2) All wells that belong to the oil battery/facility and the tied-in oil source(s) have common ownership and either common Crown or freehold royalty: a.2. If there is no common Crown or freehold royalty and only freehold royalties are involved. 3) The monthly battery/facility oil and water production volumes are determined by subtracting the monthly measured oil and water receipt volumes from the total monthly battery/facility oil and water disposition volumes (plus inventory change and minus any other receipts).5. with no resulting objection received. with no resulting objections. Exception for Measured Oil Streams Received by Pipeline 5.2.1. tankage. Options after Revocation of Exceptions There are three options to follow after revocation: 1) truck all oil receipts over 1000m3/month elsewhere. and outlet measurement to process the truck-in receipts prior to commingling with the battery/facility production. 2) The accounting methodology in item 2 under Initial Qualifying Criteria above was not followed. the operator must apply to the OGC for approval.5. If there is no common ownership.3.5. Initial Qualifying Criteria 1) Oil and/or oil-water emulsions may be pipelined into an oil battery/facility provided that the total measured oil receipt volume is ≤1000m3/month or if greater than 1000m3/month.3. June 1st.2.3.

3. the exception is revoked: 1) Piped in oil receipt was greater than 1000m3 and the total measured oil receipt volume was greater than 25% of the monthly battery/facility oil production volume. tankage. or 3) obtain OGC special approvals to continue. There are three options to follow after revocation: 1) pipe all oil receipts over 1000m3/month elsewhere. Base measurement requirements must be reinstated if the exception is revoked due to any of the above.5. Revocation of Exceptions If any of the following exists or occurs.3. 5.2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) If the measured gas from a measured live oil/emulsion production source is also commingled with the production at an oil battery/facility.5. June 1st. and outlet measurement to process the pipeline receipts prior to commingling with the battery/facility production. the exception criteria for gas measurement by difference are also met (Section 5. 3) Gas measurement by difference exception criteria in item 4 under Initial Qualifying Criteria above was not met.3). or 2) set up another treater train with separate inlet measurement. 2) The accounting methodology in item 3 under Initial Qualifying Criteria above was not followed. 2013 145 .

0m3/d Battery B oil production volume = 90.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 5.0m3/d x 30 days = 600m3 Battery A oil volume as a percentage of Battery B oil production volume = 20m3/d / 90.0e3m3/d before tying in Battery A Step 1: Calculate the monthly measured oil volume from Battery A delivered to the proration battery (Battery B) and the percentage of the prorated oil production. the oil volumetric criteria June 1st.0m3/d before tying in Battery A Battery A gas production volume = 15. Given the following data: Battery A oil production volume = 20.43 Since the Battery A monthly measured oil volume is below 1000m3/month.5%uncertainty.0) = 0.5-8 Oil System Example Note that with the addition of Battery A production. Monthly measured oil production volume from Battery A = 20.0 / (15.0 + 20.0e3m3/d Battery B gas production volume = 20. if the measurement by difference meets all the initial qualifying criteria and the total oil delivery volume at Battery B is over 100m3/d.2% Step 2: Calculate the R ratio for the commingled gas: R = 15. the delivery volume must be determined by a measurement device(s) and/or procedures having ±0.0m3/d = 22. 2013 146 . which might require changes in measurement equipment and/or procedures at Battery B.

with no resulting objection received. discussion of this matter by the proponent with its own reservoir engineering staff or knowledgeable external personnel is required and must be addressed in the application.35 limit. documentation to address royalty and equity issues demonstrating that written notification was given to all freehold royalty holders and working interest participants. 4) If the tied-in measured gas source(s) produces condensate and it is to be connected to an oil battery/facility.5. Considerations for Site-Specific Approval 1) There are minimal equity.5. 5. 5.3: Site-Specific Approval Applications. the operator must choose from the following applicable condensate delivery/reporting options. so an application would be required.4.2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations are met. However. and the impact of any reduction in well measurement accuracy that may result from measurement by difference as it relates to reservoir engineering data needs. Applications The following information must be submitted with an application to add measured gas or oil/emulsion sources to a proration battery/facility: 1) All of the information listed in Chapter 5.5. the gas R ratio is over the 0. and reservoir engineering concerns. 2013 147 . 2) A discussion of the stage of depletion for pools involved. royalty. 2) Economic considerations: Would implementation of a proration system reduce costs enough to significantly extend operations? Have other options been considered? 3) The gas and liquids from the tied-in measured source(s) must be separately and continuously measured. June 1st. 3) If there are no common Crown or freehold royalties or common ownership.

Deliver condensate to the oil battery/facility and report it all as a GEV if most of the condensate will be flashed during oil treatment process. Unlashed condensate: Report it as a liquid condensate delivery/receipt volume. such as low volumes or economics. Option 2 Option 3 Deliver condensate elsewhere and do not deliver it to the oil battery/facility.5. and/or oilwater emulsion volume (where appropriate) received from a tied-in measured source must be subtracted from the total monthly oil and/or water disposition (plus/minus inventory changes and minus any other receipts) to determine the monthly battery/facility oil and/or water production volume. 2013 148 . Proportionate June 1st. production from each zone usually has to be measured separately prior to commingling. In some cases. Surface Commingling of Multiple Gas Zones/Wells If gas wells have been completed in multiple zones and those zones are segregated in the wellbore and produced separately to surface or if there are multiple individual gas wells on the same surface location. such zones may be commingled at surface prior to the combined production being measured.0m3/day and/or ≤5.0m3/day and/or >5. 5. Where applicable. the monthly liquid condensate. N/A 5) In the case of an oil battery/facility or a gas proration battery/facility. Deliver the condensate elsewhere and do not deliver it to the oil battery/facility. if the conditions in the “Exceptions” Chapter below are met or on approval of an application.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Table 5. or a computer software simulation based on the condensate composition must be performed to determine the amount of the condensate that will be flashed during the oil treatment process.5-6 Condensate Reporting when Delivering into Oil Battery / Facility Condensate Rate (from measured gas sources) ≤2.0% of Total Prorated Oil Production Deliver condensate to the oil battery/facility and report it all as liquid condensate if most of the condensate will not be flashed during the oil treatment process (minimal pressure drop or temperature increase). 6) In the case of an oil battery/facility.6. Option 1 >2. the monthly gas volume (including GEV of condensate where appropriate) received from a tied-in measured gas source (and any other receipts) must be subtracted from the total monthly battery/facility gas volume (including GEV of condensate where appropriate) to determine the monthly battery/facility gas production volume. that may not be practical for various reasons. Flashed condensate: Report it as a GEV of condensate and include it with the gas delivery/receipt volume.0% of Total Prorated Oil Production A laboratory analysis. or oil.

2) Monthly average of total liquid production from both zones is less than or equal to 2m3d 3) The combined daily flow rate of both zones/wells is 16.6.1. c. initial qualifying flow rates are based on monthly average flow rates recorded during the six months prior to implementation of the commingling.5. Separation before measurement is required. 2013 149 . Initial Qualifying Criteria 1) Both zones/wells have common ownership and common Crown or freehold royalty. Exceptions Surface commingling of two gas zones in a gas well or separate gas wells on the same surface location prior to measurement is allowed without OGC site-specific approval if all the initial qualifying criteria below are met. 4) Shut-in wellhead pressure of the lower pressure zone/well is greater than or equal to 75% of the shut-in wellhead pressure of the higher-pressure zone. If there is no common Crown or freehold royalty and only freehold royalties are involved.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations monthly production volumes must still be determined and reported for each zone/wells. a. Each zone/well must be tested once per month for the first six months after commingling.1.6. June 1st. Annually thereafter. in accordance with the applicable procedures described below. 5. the initial qualifying flow rates are based on production tests conducted under the anticipated operating conditions. If there is no common ownership. b. written notification has been given to all freehold royalty owners. with no resulting objection received. If there is a mix of freehold and Crown royalty involved. 7) Testing requirements: a. 5.1. with no resulting objection received. the operator must apply to the OGC for approval. written notification has been given to all working interest participants. 6) Check valves are installed on each flow line upstream of the commingling point. Commingled production from two or more hydrocarbon bearing formations in the wellbore requires prior approval from the OGC Resource Development Branch. and/or immediately following any significant change to the producing conditions of either zone/well. a) If the zones/wells to be commingled will involve existing production. including GEV of condensate (if recombined).9e3m3 or less. 5) The combined production from both zones/wells is measured continuously. b) If new zones/wells are to be commingled.5.

June 1st. d. However. methods (i) and (ii) below are preferred. so that minimal stabilization time is required. Any of the three test methods described below may be used.5-9 Test Method 1 ii. Test taps must be installed upstream of the commingling point but downstream of the check valve so that a test separator unit can be hooked up to test each zone/well individually. 2013 150 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations b. The tests must be conducted for a period of at least 24 hours and must involve the separation and measurement of all gas and liquid production. c. Install permanent bypasses or taps to hook up temporary bypasses downstream of the check valve so that one zone/well will be bypassing the existing separation and metering equipment while the other zone/well is tested using the existing equipment. Figure 5. The tests for both zones/wells must be done consecutively with stabilization periods. i. e. Note that the production from the bypassed zone/well must be estimated based on the production test rates. a sample of the condensate must be taken annually and analyzed and used to determine the factor to be used to determine the GEV. If condensate is recombined with the gas production of the commingled zones/wells. because the testing is conducted under normal flowing conditions without shutting in zones/wells.

1. 5. 2013 151 . the exception is revoked: 1) The combined production from both zones/wells was not measured continuously or there was no separation before measurement. 3) Testing requirements in item 7 under Initial Qualifying Criteria above were not followed. The monthly measured combined production must be prorated to each zone/well based on the estimates. Base measurement requirements must be reinstated if the exception is revoked due to any of the above.7. and those pro-rated volumes must be reported as the monthly production for each zone/well. 4) The gas proration methodology in item 8 under Initial Qualifying Criteria above was not followed. Shut in one producing zone at a time and use the existing separation and measurement equipment to test each zone individually after stabilization. 8) The production rates determined for each zone/well by the periodic tests must be used to estimate the monthly production for each zone/well from the date they are conducted until the next test is conducted.5.5.6.5-10 Test Method 2 iii. Revocation of Exceptions If any of the following exists or occurs.2. Applications The following information must be submitted with an application to commingle production at surface prior to measurement from multiple zones in a gas well or multiple wells on the same surface location if the above criteria are not met: June 1st. 2) Check valves were not installed on each flow line upstream of the commingling point. 5.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 5.

The tests must be conducted for at least 24 hours in duration and must involve the separation and measurement of all gas and liquid production. 4) Proposed testing procedures to determine the individual zone/well production rates. a sample of the condensate must be taken annually and analyzed and used to determine the factor that will be used to determine the GEV. 6) Testing requirements: a.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 1) All of the information listed in Section 5.8. b. 5) Proposed accounting procedures for pro-rating total volumes to the individual zones/wells. 4) The combined production of all zones/wells must be continuously measured. so that minimal stabilization time is required. then annually after that. If condensate is recombined with the gas production of the commingled zones/wells. documentation to address royalty and equity issues demonstrating that written notification was given to all freehold royalty holders and working interest participants. 2) Shut-in and proposed operating pressures at the wellhead for all zones/wells. Considerations for Site-Specific Approval 1) Generally. c. 6) If there are no common Crown or freehold royalties or common ownership. methods (i) and (ii) are preferred. 3) Operating pressure for the gathering system at the well site measurement point. with the consideration that more than two zones/wells may be involved. 3) There are minimal equity. If there are gas and liquid components. 2013 The production rates determined for each zone/well by the periodic tests must be used to estimate the monthly production for each zone/well from the date they are 152 .5. d. there is 2m3/d or less of total liquid production from all zones/wells. 2) All zones must be classified as gas zones/wells. because the testing is conducted under normal flowing conditions without shutting in zones/wells. royalty. 5) Check valves must be in place on each zone’s flow line upstream of the commingling point. Each zone/well must be tested once per month for the first six months after commingling.3: Site-Specific Approval Applications. Any of the three test methods described in the exceptions Chapter above may be used. June 1st. The OGC may specify test procedures if specific circumstances warrant them. f. with no resulting objection received. 5. with stabilization periods.2. and reservoir engineering concerns. The tests for all zones/wells must be done consecutively. e. However. they must be separately measured. and/or immediately following any significant change to the producing conditions of either zone/well.

The monthly measured combined production must be prorated to each zone/well based on the estimates. June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations conducted until the next test is conducted. 2013 153 . and those prorated volumes must be reported as the monthly production for each zone.

Chapter 6 Determination of Production at Gas Wells 6. Common Ownership All wells in a facility belong to the same working interest participant. or if there is more than one working interest participant. Common Crown or Freehold Royalty When all the wells in a battery or facility are produced under Crown mineral leases. This Chapter: 1) Outlines the methods for determining the total monthly water and hydrocarbon production volumes. 4) Provides the conditions for exemption or reduction in well testing frequency. 2013 154 . accounting and reporting of production from gas wells. Water-Gas Ratio (WGR) and Condensate-Gas Ratio (CGR). Specialized Terminology Defined Initial Qualifying Criteria Criteria that must be met to qualify for a testing frequency reduction or exemption. pump jack.2. 5) Provides guidance around reporting production streams. each working interest participant has the same percentage interest in each well in the facility. 2) Sets out the requirements of what measurement schemes are applicable to gas well production. 3) Sets out the requirements of effluent well testing. If the initial qualifying criteria have been met and the reduction or exemption is implemented. gas lift. If there is more than one freehold mineral holder for the wells in a battery or facility. submersible pump. Introduction This Chapter sets out the requirements concerning the measurement. including the determination and calculation of a well’s Effluent Correction Factor (ECF).1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 6. 6. the total royalty rate for each well is the same. the freehold mineral holder receives the same royalty rate for each well. plunger lift. the Crown receives similar royalty rates for each well. as long as the wells do not meet any of the disqualifying criteria. June 1st. or any other method of enhancing production that is a supplement to a completed wellbore’s ability to flow. it may remain in place indefinitely. or when under leases granted by one freehold mineral holder. Artificial Lift A method of producing gas and/or liquids from a gas well that involves the use of an on/off controller. screw pump.

Referenced in m3/e3m3. June 1st.e. or water must be representative of the well’s production capability under normal operating conditions. Representative Flow When stabilized flow is not achievable. Non-Conservation Gas Natural gas produced from a well event other than conservation gas. 2003). condensate. kills the well. or water. condensate. Stabilized flow can only be achieved when all testing equipment associated in determining an actual volume has reached equilibrium (i. Wells must be tested for a minimum duration that completes multiple flow cycles to accurately determine a representative volume of gas. This phenomenon is initiated when the upward gas velocity in the well falls below a critical value.. Concurrent Production Gas produced from an oil well event where the oil well event is part of an approved concurrent production scheme. at which point the liquid that was initially entrained in the gas stream begins to fall back. destabilizes the multiphase flow in the well (following flow regime changes). 2013 155 . in severe cases. Conservation Gas Natural gas produced from an oil well event where the marketable gas is conserved but does not include gas produced from an oil well event granted concurrent production status. CGR Condensate Gas Ratio . condensate. such as for wells with artificial lift systems and wells with slugging characteristics then representative flow is required for testing purposes. Stabilized Flow Indicates a point at which flowing parameters of gas.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Critical Lift (critical value) Gas wells with liquid loading are incapable of removing the liquid associated with produced gas from the wellbore (Lea. The test volumes of gas. pressure and temperature stabilization to normal operating conditions). liquid levels in test separator. or water are producing under normal operating conditions and represent production levels equal to the well’s normal average flow rate.A ratio calculated by dividing the total condensate test volumes by the measured test gas volume. These representative production volumes are then extrapolated to accurately reflect the wells’ production over an extended period of time. decreases production rate and. This liquid accumulates down hole where it increases the hydrostatic back-pressure on the reservoir.

6. Referenced in e3m3/m3.5 of this manual.5 of this manual are adhered too in the event that there is mixed measurement. June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations ECF Effluent Correction Factor – A factor determined from periodic tests conducted at each well whereby a test separator is connected downstream of the effluent meter and the volumes measured by the test separator are compared to the volume measured by the effluent meter. Referenced in m3/e3m3. A reporting battery/facility may contain: 1) Measured gas wells which are not to be prorated along with effluent gas wells upstream of group measurement in a reporting battery/facility. GEV The volume of gas (e3m3) that would result from converting 1m3 of liquid into a gas by applying a GEF to the liquid volume. It is possible for a reporting battery/facility to include and report both measured and prorated volumes depending on the configuration of wells linked to a reporting battery/facility. Includes all free liquid. Batteries / Facilities Reporting batteries/facilities can be comprised of production from wells which are all measured (multiwell group). LGR Liquid Gas Ratio – A ratio calculated by dividing the total water and/or condensate test volumes by the measured test gas volume. are all effluent (multi-well effluent) or a combination thereof providing the requirements outlined in Section 5. This factor is mixture dependent and not a constant for all mixtures. 2) Gas from oil wells which is not to be prorated along with effluent wells upstream of group measurement in a reporting battery/facility. whereas measured well volumes are not. along with measured gas wells which are not to be prorated and effluent gas wells upstream of group measurement in a reporting battery/facility. GEF A factor based on the composition of a hydrocarbon liquid mixture that is used to convert the same hydrocarbon liquid mixture to its equivalent gas volume.3. Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) Any flow measurement and related system that collects data and performs flow calculations electronically. Effluent well volumes are prorated. 3) Gas from oil wells. Referenced in m3/e3m3. 2013 156 . Unitization batteries/facilities and wells are very uncommon and are governed by the terms outlined within the approved Unitization agreement. It should be noted that measured batteries/facilities and wells delivering into an effluent system are not subject to the effluent battery’s/facility’s proration factors as outlined in Section 5. PA Production Accounting WGR Water Gas Ratio – A ratio calculated by dividing the total water test volumes by the measured test gas volume.

3. 2013 157 . Utilizing a three-phase separator. The WGR test must be a minimum of 12 hours in duration. This June 1st.1. The above scenarios can involve the concept of Measurement by Difference which is outlined in Section 5. A WGR may be utilized to determine water production volumes on a three-phase separator if the following conditions are met: i. and proximity to a sales network. The WGR must be calculated from an annual WGR test. or 2) Be commingled with gas from well(s) in a Unitization facility upstream of group measurement.3-1). This requirement is “grandfathered’ for separators installed prior to March 1st 2013. For the purposes of group measurement. A two-phase separator is permitted to be utilized to measure a water/condensate mixture prior to having liquids recombined with the gas stream providing that the hydrocarbon liquid production is less than 2. type of production (conservation and nonconservation). Group Measurement Group measurement represents a point of separation of production into individual phases in which the volumes are used for reporting purposes (see Figure 6. however. A tag is to be attached to the water leg indicating that a WGR calculation is used for volume determination. all twophase separators left in service are still required to meet the criteria set out in Section 6. A reporting battery/facility must NOT: 1) Be commingled with gas from another reporting battery/facility (oil or gas) without group measurement.00m3/day on an annual average. b. Separators can measure liquid production by one of the following two options: a.00 m3/day.5 of this manual. 6. continuous single-phase measurement can be accomplished by: 1) Metering each of the single-phase production streams (gas.3.1(b) “Utilizing a two-phase separator” below. Production streams (gas. and ii. hydrocarbon liquid and water) downstream of a separator. Water is recombined with the metered gas and the metered hydrocarbon liquid at the well site. The location of group separation is influenced by a number of factors such as ownership. hydrocarbon liquid and water) utilize the same pipeline. facility design requirements. Utilizing a two-phase separator.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) Gas from another reporting battery’s/facility’s group measurement point along with effluent wells upstream of group measurement in a reporting battery/facility. A three-phase separator must be utilized if the hydrocarbon liquid annual average production is equal to or greater than 2.

With the use of a proportional sampler suitable for hydrocarbon liquid applications as not to allow flashing of the hydrocarbon liquids. A proportional sampler must be installed for a minimum of 30 consecutive days once per year to obtain a representative S&W. June 1st. The monthly water production volume can then be determined from the sum of delivery point volumes (by the receiving facility) and changes in tank inventory (by gauging the tank). If there is an auditable history of no hydrocarbon liquid production for the well or its respective facility. 2013 158 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations threshold is “grandfathered’ for separators installed prior to March 1st 2013. however. provisions must be used to determine the total S&W of the gross liquid volume. The WGR test must be a minimum of 12 hours in duration. A WGR cannot be utilized on 2-phase measured wells where there is the presence of hydrocarbon liquid production. The monthly production volume can then be determined from the sum of delivery point volumes (by the receiving facility) and changes in tank inventory (by gauging the tank). 3) Directing hydrocarbon liquid production to a tank and delivering by either truck or pipeline for processing. The WGR must be calculated from an annual WGR test. then a WGR may be used to determine the well’s water production. With the use of an in-line water cut analyzer. The S&W must be determined by one of the following methods and applied to the wells respective liquid volumes over the course of the year: i. 2) Directing water production to a tank and delivering by either truck or pipeline for disposal. A tag must be attached to the water leg indicating that a WGR calculation is used for volume determination and that no condensate production is present. or ii. 4) Any combination of the above.

3-1 Typical Group Measurement Design 6.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 6. Gas Well Types Three types of well measurement schemes exist within the province of British Columbia: 1) Unitization – Production volumes may be prorated or not prorated depending upon their specific approvals. It is imperative that operators understand their battery/facility to ensure all production is accounted for and reported correctly. 2013 159 . Water quantities must be reported to the Ministry of Finance in accordance with the DPR and Directive June 1st. The requirements for determining production vary among these three methods and there are variations within each method. and 3) Effluent (well production utilizes a wet meter) – Production volumes are prorated. 2) Measured (well production utilizes a separator) – Production volumes are not prorated.4.

If a well has had a test conducted. 6. a CGR (if applicable) and a WGR of 0. periodic well tests are conducted to determine a well’s respective ECF.3.00000 for the CGR (if applicable) and WGR. 6. Measured Gas Well A gas well in which production volumes are delivered to a dedicated separator and measured in a manner that meets the requirements outlined in Section 6.3. effluent measurement is not permitted for well measurement when the LGR is greater than 0. This well measurement scheme is commonly referred to as an effluent or wet metered gas well (see Figure 6.4. Unitization Well This type of well/facility is governed under the terms of a Unitization agreement.4.4. In the event that a well’s LGR is greater than 0. June 1st. Measurement uncertainty is introduced by the presence of liquids in the gas stream. Unless a specific effluent well testing exemption is granted by the OGC or the requirements outlined in Section 6.4. Effluent Gas Well A gas well in which production passes through a multiphase meter and is not configured with separation. based on each well’s estimated monthly gas production. Total battery/facility production must be measured and prorated back to the individual wells. To correct for the uncertainty of utilizing wet measurement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2010-07. Wells that are exempt from testing should utilize an ECF of 1.2.2800m3/e3m3.2800m3/e3m3 it must utilize a separator and meet the requirements outlined in Section 6. The CGR is used to determine the monthly estimated well condensate production should the battery/facility tank condensate production. an ECF of 1. The ECF is used to correct for the errors in the effluent meter volume due to the presence of multiphase fluid and to determine monthly estimated well gas production volumes.1 “Group Measurement. then the production data from the most recent well test is to determine the respective factors. CGR (if applicable) and WGR used for reporting well’s must be validated against the production history of the well from which the factor was determined. If a well has never had a well test conducted.5 are applicable due to the presence of load fluid/frac fluid.1.2. The WGR is used to determine monthly estimated well water production volumes. The ECF.3. Water that is in the vapor phase under separator conditions must not be reported as production.7.4-1). CGR (if applicable) and WGR. 2013 160 . Monthly estimated well production volumes are multiplied by battery/facility proration factors to determine the prorated well production volumes for reporting purposes. Likewise.00000 and use 0. It is expected that an operator will be familiar with their unitization agreement and adhere to the requirements outlined within it.0000 is to be utilized until such time that a test can be conducted.” 6.00000 must be applied until such time that an ECF can be determined. unless exempted from testing as per Section 6.

the OGC will permit effluent measurement on all wells. along with the following: 1) The well is anticipated to have the liquid production rates drop below the required LGR of 0.28m3/e3m3 within 12 months of a well being put into production – not inclusive of drilling and completion test periods. 2013 161 . Testing must be conducted through either a June 1st. regardless if the well is part of pad production or not. Load/Frac Fluid To align with the OGC’s Information Bulletin 2010-36. that have had load or frac fluid injected down the well bore providing an application is submitted to the OGC that addresses all the points identified within the bulletin. 3) The well has a minimum 12 hour test conducted monthly until such time that all load/frac fluid is recovered and the well stabilizes. 2) Individual well separation is to be maintained for a minimum of the first seven days of production.44-1 Typical Effluent Measurement Proration System Where Group Liquid Production is Recombined and Delivered Down the Production Line 6.5.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 6.

June 1st. may result in revocation of the well testing exemptions and impose.6-1 Decimal Place Holders Type of calculations Number of decimals to be Number of decimals calculated to to be rounded to Productions and estimated productions 2 1 Well test gas. or test water 3 2 Water-Gas ratio (WGR). Table 6. 2013 162 . Effluent Well Testing 6. test condensate. production data. on notice in writing. the OGC will advise the operator as to the reason for the revocation.28m3/e3m3.3.2 should the well’s LGR be greater than 0.1. CGR if applicable and WGR) are utilized for volumetric calculations and reporting. Effluent Correction Factor (ECF) 6 5 6.6. Decimal Place Holders for Volumetric Calculations in a Gas Proration Battery / Facility The required decimal places for volumetric calculations in a gas proration battery/facility (effluent measurement scheme) are outlined in the table below. Well’s utilizing artificial lift technology should have their testing duration extended to be representative of multiple flow cycles. provide a reasonable time period for the operator to meet the conditions set by the OGC. Frequency An effluent well test is required on an annual frequency for all effluent wells unless the one of the Well Testing Decision Tree’s exemptions can be applied as outlined in Section 6. Additionally. Proration factors. Liquid-Gas Ration (LGR) 5 4 Gas Equivalent Factor (GEF).7. Failure to do so. Gas Equivalent Volume (GEV) of test condensate.28m3/e3m3 after 12 months from the time the well is brought online.4. and provide an opportunity for the operator to comment.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations dedicated or temporary test separator until the LGR ratio is below 0. Condensate-Gas ratio (CGR). if the OGC has a concern with the activities. 4) Test results (ECF. operations. or substitute well testing conditions for any period of time. All new wells must have a well test conducted within the first 30 days of production. modify. 6. The Well Testing Decision Tree outlines the testing frequency requirements for effluent wells that are not being tested on an annual frequency.7. and 5) The well will have a permanent or temporary separator installed that meets the requirements outlined in Section 6. It will be expected that the operator comply or justify their actions. or reporting associated with well testing.7.

must be located upstream of the effluent meter or downstream of the well testing test taps at the time of testing. Production from the gas well passes through a line heater (optional). where it is heated. Therefore. if present. This requirement is “grandfathered’ on packages installed prior to March 1st 2013. This is to ensure that the test separator’s measurement is subjected to the same conditions and volumes as the effluent meter at the time of testing. compressor installation. a well must be (re)evaluated according to the applicable Well Testing Decision Tree being utilized for each activity in a wellbore that may alter the operating or production characteristics 6. The well’s fuel gas tap. This is typically done to vaporize some of the hydrocarbon liquids and heat up the water and the gas in the stream before metering to prevent hydrate formation. recompletion. It is preferable.7. Testing practices must account for respective fuel gas volumes that are taken off between the wet meter and test taps on grandfathered packages.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Wells that have their operational/production characteristics changed because events altering the flowing characteristics (i. artificial lift installation or chemical stimulation) must have a well test conducted within 30 days of the event(s) that caused the operational/production characteristics to change. June 1st. Procedure Figure 6.e. that packages be designed such that the fuel gas tap be located downstream of the effluent meter well testing test taps for well testing and accounting simplicity.2. The effluent meter’s well testing test taps must be located downstream of the effluent meter within the same pipe run. a well bore work over. 2013 163 . but not required.7-1 illustrates a typical gas well effluent measurement configuration.

or water. New or recompleted wells will not be eligible for a testing exemption if well testing test taps are not installed.7-1 Typical Effluent Well Measurement Configuration with Well Test Unit The provision of well testing test taps is inherent to well testing and therefore.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 6. These representative June 1st. New or recompleted wells are required to have test taps installed after March 1st 2013. 2013 164 . 3) Wells that use artificial lift systems or characteristically display slug flow must be tested for a minimum duration that completes multiple flow cycles to accurately determine a representative volume of gas. testing test taps are required and must be installed. hydrocarbon liquid. 2) The well test duration must be a minimum duration of 12 hours. the well test must meet the following: 1) The well test must begin only after a liquid level stabilization period occurs within the test separator. if a well is required to be tested in accordance with the Well Testing Decision Tree. Test taps must be designed in such a manner as not to disrupt the normal operation of the well when being utilized and are to be installed downstream of the wet meter run. For wells requiring well testing. Wells installed prior to March 1st 2013 are grandfathered from this requirement.

If necessary the minimum test duration must be increased to ensure that the test is representative (i. they must be able to provide upon request. 5) Well test equipment using two-phase separation is acceptable if hydrocarbon liquids are too small to be measured within the defined minimum 12 hour well test duration period. 8) Ratios determined from a well test must be used for reporting purposes within 60 days of the well test. Where a three-phase separator is not available. Decision Tree The Well Testing Decision Tree is designed around uncertainties developed from traditional orifice metering (i. 2013 165 . is acceptable.All effluent wells would be exempt from annual well testing 3) Well Based Testing Exemption . Therefore.Outlines the well testing requirements for a new or recompleted well 2) Facility Based Testing Exemption . Allocation Factors and Metering Difference. If an operator wishes to utilize an alternative metering technology for wet metering applications. the Measurement by Difference Section in Section 5. would apply. The hydrocarbon liquid sample may be taken from the hydrocarbon liquid leg of a three-phase separator or the liquid leg of a two-phase separator (the water must be removed from the hydrocarbon liquid before the analysis is determined). alternative equipment. The OGC’s Well Testing Decision Tree has been segregated into 3 sections to depict how an operator’s facility or well would apply.3. supporting evidence that the metering technology utilized does not provide a volumetric bias from other metering technologies utilized in the field. Therefore. such as a two-phase separator with a total liquid meter and continuous water cut analyzer. 24 to 48 hours). orifice measurement is currently the only approved effluent measurement technology accepted within the Province of British Columbia.e. 3 – Part 2) technology in effluent metering applications. 7) For orifice meters. hydrocarbon liquid and water volumes must be separately measured at the time of testing. The well testing unit gas meter must not utilize a chart where the well effluent meter utilizes EFM.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations production volumes are then extrapolated to accurately reflect the well’s production over an extended period of time. The proration factor ranges should prompt operators to investigate causes of proration factors that are outside of the defined parameters and to understand the reasons for them being insufficient. This analysis is to be used to calculate the GEF as appropriate.7.: AGA Report No.Specific effluent wells would be exempt from annual well testing June 1st.5. 6) The gas and hydrocarbon liquid must be sampled during the test with an accompanying compositional analysis obtained.e. The applicable Well Testing Decision Tree may require the installation of a separator at a well site. 4) The gas. These three sections include: 1) New or Recompleted Wells . the well effluent meter and the well testing unit gas meter must each use 24-hour charts unless EFM is used. Proration Factors. 6. The implementation of a Well Testing Decision Tree does not alter the requirements outlined in Chapter 3.

2013 166 .7-2 Well Testing Decision Tree June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 6.

A.. 1475. Although there have been further refinements to the Turner Correlation calculation.G.1. These simplified formulae assume fixed gas gravity (G) of 0. JPT (1969) 21. 2013 167 .7. The calculation below produces a value in mmscf/day.11. Well Testing Decision Tree – Notes Note 1: The Turner Correlation1 is used as an approximation methodology to ascertain critical lift. Recompletion includes anything that changes the flowing characteristics of a well.3.E.3168e3m3/mmscf is to be used. and Dukler. A simplified summary of the LGR and CGR calculation utilized to determine if a facility based well testing exemption can be applied is as follows: LGR = [Total group measured liquids (condensate + water) + (Disposition + Inventory change before group measurement) – Liquid received] / [Total group measured gas + (fuel + flare + vent before group measurement) + Disposition before group gas measurement – Gas received] CGR = [Total group measured condensate (Disposition + Inventory change before group measurement) – Condensate received] / [Total group measured gas + (fuel + flare + vent before group measurement) + Disposition before group gas measurement – Gas received] Note 3: A new or recompleted well must be tested within 30 days of production being online.: “Analysis and Prediction of Minimum Flow Rate for the Continuous Removal of Liquids from Gas Wells”.7.lb force / square inch T = Temperature (absolute) – degrees Rankine Vg = Minimum gas velocity required to lift liquids – ft / second Z = Compressibility factor A = Cross sectional area of flow – square feet Qg = Flow rate – MMscf / day 1 Turner. Conversion to metric units using a factor of 28.6 and fixed gas temperature (T) of 120°F. Hubbard. R. Note 2: Average Monthly LGR Calculation Production volumes at a reporting facility will be evaluated against the requirements of the applicable Well Testing Decision Tree in order to determine if a testing exemption is appropriate for specific wells that flow to the reporting facility. artificial lift installation or chemical stimulation.1 for further details. See Section 6. the formula below will be applied for the purposes of determining critical lift as it is relates to the Applicable Well Testing Decision Tree. but is not limited to: a well bore work over. M. This includes. No. Note 4: Wells that will be returning load fluid/frac fluids and are anticipated to have the liquid June 1st. Note: Volumes received from another reporting facility would be treated as a measured volume and netted from group production volumes.. G = gas gravity P = Pressure (absolute) .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 6.G.

7.e. The well test evaluation period must end two months earlier than the planned calendar quarter in which well testing must be conducted for a reporting facility. Well Testing Evaluation The well testing evaluation period is based on a 12 consecutive month cycle.5 for further details. Initializing the design will establish the cycle that is repeated year over year.7-3 Well Test Evaluation Example Calendar Quarters – Well Test Period 1 2 3 4 Well testing occurs in January. the reporting battery/facility and all the affected wells (i. The wells and/or the reporting battery/facility would be analyzed within the context of the specific section of the Well Testing Decision Tree utilized. a reporting battery/facility has operating characteristics such that a facility well testing exemption is not possible. See Section 6.: wells without well separation) are to be on the same Well Testing Evaluation Period.4-1 may typically fit a well testing system in which only winter road access is available. 6.7-3 provides an illustrated example. This practice can only be implemented for a maximum of 12 months. The operator is free to choose the well testing calendar quarter based on operational choices. When well testing is required. Figure 6.28e3m3/day after 12 months. it will remain fixed for a reporting facility.7. operators are required to have a well site separator installed.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations production rates drop below 0. Once the evaluation period is chosen. 2013 168 . Figure 6. the Well Testing Evaluation Period can become unique to a well. For the purposes of evaluating if a facility based well testing exemption is applicable based on the Well Testing Decision Tree. This means that a well requiring June 1st. Should liquid rates still be greater than 0.4. The illustrated example in Figure 6.28e3m3/day can be tested on a minimum monthly frequency until such time that all load fluid/frac fluid has been recovered. which all wells in a reporting facility will follow. it must occur once in a fixed calendar quarter period and occur once within a 4 consecutive calendar quarter period. February and / or March O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A 12 months November November 2 month period prior to January Well Testing Evaluation Period Well and facility data is gathered for the 12 month period identified. If however.

but the Well Testing Evaluation Period may not be the same for all of the wells in a reporting battery/facility. Revocation of Well Testing Exemption Below are the criteria under which an effluent gas well testing exemption may be revoked. The respective operator implementing a facility based testing exemption or well based exemption from testing must retain the following information. Notwithstanding the above. 6. If no tubing or casing pressure records is continuously recorded. Once the well testing period (calendar quarter) is chosen the operator must test once in the fixed calendar quarter period and the well test must occur once within a 4 consecutive calendar quarter period. Incorrect application/implementation of an applicable Well Testing Decision Tree. if the OGC has a concern with respect to the activities. annual baseline well testing for the wells included in an exemption decision must be implemented if any of the following occurs: 1) Non-compliance. 2013 169 . production data or reporting associated with well testing and/or well testing activities. and e. upon notice in writing the OGC can partially or fully revoke well testing exemptions and impose. is to be the monthly average for the last month of the well test evaluation period. but do not represent an exhaustive list: a. then the upstream static pressure data from the well’s flow meter can be used to approximate the tubing or casing pressure provided that the well’s flow meter is located on the same lease site as the wellhead. 2) All working interest participants and Freehold royalty holders (if present) were notified in writing and a working interest participant or Freehold royalty holder for any wells flowing to the reporting facility objects to the exemption. provide a reasonable period of time to meet a request as well as provide an opportunity for an operator to comment. The following are outlined as potential areas of non-compliance.5. 6. modify or substitute well testing conditions and for any period of time. The OGC will advise the operator in writing as to the nature of a concern. Well Testing Exemption Audit Trail The following list represents the minimum audit trail requirements related to well testing and/or any of the applicable Well Testing Decision Trees. which in turn determines the Well Testing Evaluation Period. an operator can choose the calendar quarter in which a well test is to occur. as June 1st. Inadequate recordkeeping. Well installed or recompleted after March 1st 2013 do not have testing taps installed on wells exempt from testing. operations. The pressure data. Exemption calculations are incorrect. d.7. c. At a minimum.7. If a battery/facility is of such a size that it would take more than one calendar quarter to test all of the wells. is to maintain a codified Well Testing Evaluation Period.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations testing to be conducted in accordance with the Well Testing Decision Tree – Well Based Testing Exemption. Source data for exemption calculations cannot be validated. b.6. as recorded by the well site measurement equipment.

2013 170 . Records must be retained for a minimum of 72 months. The following data must be made available upon request. C) – Listed by Month 21) Test Gas Rate (e3m3/day) 22) Test Condensate Rate (m3/day) 23) Test Water Rate (m3/day) 24) Current WGR (m3/e3m3) 25) Current CGR (m3/e3m3) June 1st. 1) Producer 2) Reporting Facility – Name and Surface Location 3) Well – Name 4) Well – Unique Well Identifier (UWI) 5) Production Formation(s) – Name(s) and/or Zone Codes(s) 6) Current Well Testing Date 7) Last Well Test Date 8) Effluent Well Meter Run – Internal Diameter (mm) 9) Meter Run Orifice size (mm) (if applicable) 10) Test Tap Location (relative to effluent meter) 11) Test Tap Connection – Diameter (mm) 12) Last Gas Sample Date 13) Last Condensate Sample Date 14) Wellhead Tubing Internal Diameter (mm) 15) Wellhead Casing Internal Diameter (mm) 16) Wellhead Tubing Pressure (kPa) 17) Wellhead Casing Pressure (kPa) 18) Effluent Meter Monthly Average D/P for Evaluation Period (kPa) – Listed by Month 19) Effluent Meter Monthly Average Static Pressure for Evaluation Period (kPa) – Listed by Month 20) Effluent Meter Monthly Average Temperature for Evaluation Period (Deg.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations applicable. to the type of well testing exemption being implemented (facility or well based).

Volumetric data obtained from multiple data sources will require that each data source can be validated by the OGC. Original source records may be requested to validate data. The OGC further expects that when non-compliance with these requirements is discovered. Regulatory Audit All calculations and records are to be auditable and verifiable. The OGC expects operators to comply with the requirements at all affected wells and facilities. plunger control) 35) Well EFM – Model and Make or Not Applicable 36) Well Chart – Yes / No 37) Well Test Evaluation Period Starting Month 38) Well Test Evaluation Period Ending Month 39) Date Well Dropped Below Critical Velocity 40) Critical Lift Calculation for Evaluation Period 41) Well Load Fluid Volumes for Evaluation Period 42) Meters used in Facility LGR Calculations a. corrective June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 26) Current LGR (m3/e3m3) 27) Last WGR (m3/e3m3) 28) Last CGR (m3/e3m3) 29) Last LGR (m3/e3m3) 30) ECF – Last Value Calculated 31) ECF – Current Value Calculated 32) Evaluation Period Average Reporting Facility LGR 33) Evaluation Period Average Reporting Facility CGR 34) Artificial Lift Method (ie: cycling. Meter Units (e3m3 etc. 2013 171 .7. All associated records are required to be kept for a minimum period of 72 months. Meter Location c. Well and facility data must be auditable.) 43) Well Flow Volume Prior to Recompletion 44) Well Recompletion Flow Volume 6. Meter Tag b.7. Meter Volume d.

10) A means must be provided to safely purge sample transfer tubing between the sample point and the connection point of the sample cylinder. 2013 172 . Existing separator packages installed prior to March 1st 2013 will be “grandfathered” to permit an available thread-o-let located downstream of the orifice fitting to be utilized for sampling. any temperature measurement device must remain upstream of the sample point. General Requirements The following have been implemented to parallel other jurisdiction’s requirements (i. 2) Gas samples must be taken off the top of horizontal lines. 6. dump valves. 5) Sample points must not be located downstream of pressure reducing components such as: control valves. Sampling and Analysis 6. 6. 4) Hydrocarbon liquid samples must be taken from upstream of back pressure valves. with an optional location off the side of vertical lines with the use of a sample probe tip sloping 45° downward. Production Volume Accounting See Appendix 4 of this manual for example calculations to be utilized as a result of implementing the Well Testing Decision Tree. 6) Meter impulse lines or transmitter manifold lines must not be used for taking samples.e.1. 3) Hydrocarbon liquid samples must be taken off the side of horizontal lines.9. regulators. ERCB) and must be adhered to when obtaining samples.8. etc. With the exception of royalty triggering points.9. 9) Suitable sample cylinders and transfer lines must be thoroughly cleaned and free of contaminants prior to sampling.e. 7) Level gauges (sight glasses) must not be used for taking samples. June 1st. Should a sample point be located downstream of an orifice plate. a sample probe must be used to take samples for both the gas and hydrocarbon liquid streams. any separator application where hydrocarbon liquids are present). However.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations actions are taken at all similar installations. with an optional location off the side of vertical lines with the use of a sample probe tip sloping 45° downward. flow conditioners. or long lengths of un-insulated piping. it must be located more than 5 pipe diameters downstream of the orifice plate itself. existing metering packages will be “grandfathered” if installed prior to March 1st 2013. to minimize flashing. 8) Samples are not to be taken off the side of separators/vessels. 1) For sampling applications where the gas is at or near its hydrocarbon dew point (i.

2. 13) Avoid liquid condensation in flow line sample cylinder (omit sample cylinder) by sampling gas upstream of any pressure reducing device. handling. June 1st. which would alter the composition of gas between source and sample cylinder.3. Several types and sizes of cylinders in various pressure ranges are available to accommodate special analytical requirements. It should be noted that either option is acceptable by the OGC. 15) Samples should be taken only when a stream is flowing (must not be stagnant or component stratification may occur within flow line). transportation.9. this may cause gas to drop below hydrocarbon dew point temperature resulting in a 2 phase condition).9. A basic routine analysis can be provided within one normal 500cc cylinder. 12) There must be no appreciable reduction in pressure and/or temperature between the source and the sample cylinder (i. operators must make certain that all wells within a reporting facility all utilize the same option when updating applicable well analysis for volumetric calculations. if at all possible. Effluent Gas Well Gas and hydrocarbon liquid samples for wells that require testing must be obtained in conjunction with the well test within 30 days of a well being online and annually thereafter.e. 17) H2S concentration should be measured on site at time of sampling. however. 14) Sample transfer lines should be kept as short as possible to minimize the potential for phase change. Measured Gas Well Gas and hydrocarbon liquid samples must be obtained within 30 days of a well being online and annually thereafter. The gas analysis to be used for volumetric calculations at the effluent meter my utilize one of the following two options: Option 1: Use the separated gas analysis from the effluent well test. however. 6.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 11) The procedures used for sampling. Respective analyses are to be utilized within 60 days for volumetric calculations and product allocations. Wells exempt from effluent well testing are permitted to utilize samples pulled from flow line sampling. The respective analysis is to be utilized within 60 days for volumetric calculations and product allocations. This option should only be considered if hydrocarbon liquids are recombined back into the gas stream. a duplicate sample should be collected. 2013 173 . 6. and analysis must ensure that atmospheric contamination does not occur. The type of analysis to be performed determines the quantity of samples required. storage. 16) Samples should not be taken during periods of chemical injection. if temperature decreases. The laboratory should be consulted to ensure sufficient types and volumes of samples are collected to meet analytical requirements. Option 2: Use the recombination of the gas analysis and the condensate analysis from the effluent well test.

Notwithstanding this exception. June 1st.0% of the average of the three qualifying RDs. Sampling and Analysis Exception A licensee is not required to update the analyses where three consecutive gas relative density (RD) determinations conducted at the specified determination frequency or. no more frequently than once per year are all within ±1. 2013 174 . 6.0% of the average of the three RDs. Wells installed after March 1st 2013 require sample probes to be installed for the purposes of obtaining gas samples should a well be exempt from testing. alternatively.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Flow line gas samples for wells that do not require testing must be obtained annually.9.4. the licensee must update the gas analyses when changes are made to producing conditions that could affect the gas density by more than ±1. The respective analysis is to be utilized within 60 days for volumetric calculations and product allocations. Records and data in support of this exception must be retained by the licensee and made available to the OGC upon request.

1. Qualification Criteria . natural gas. condensate. 7.. 2) The Province of British Columbia royalties are or can be impacted by natural gas and/or liquid hydrocarbon volume receipts and/or deliveries belonging to a jurisdiction outside the Province of British Columbia. 2013 175 . Yukon) prior to product sales measurement. and crude oil) that are subject to royalty payments are transported into or out of the Province of British Columbia and are commingled with fluids from other provincial or territorial jurisdictions (Alberta. it has become apparent that a document that provides specific guidance is required so that industry may refer to it during the planning stages of their projects. this direction is given through the Facility Approval process on a site-specific project basis. because of the proliferation in recent years of pipelines transporting fluids into and out of the province. Purpose The Cross Border Measurement Policy is designed to: 1) Ensure volumetric measurement controls are in place. 3) Ensure production accounting system supports volumetrics and allocations. 7. Below are some of the production scenarios that will provide guidance in determining whether or not a specific circumstance is considered as Cross Border.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7. Northwest Territories. However.Cross Border Measurement Volumes Facility The following criteria are to be referenced to determine the applicability of the contents of this guide: 1) The Province of British Columbia volumetrics are or can be impacted by natural gas and/or liquid hydrocarbon volumes belonging to a jurisdiction outside the Province of British Columbia. 2) Ensure proper design of gathering system(s). June 1st. Royalty impact includes royalty credit allowances and royalty rate reductions. At the present time.3. This is not an exhaustive set of examples. Chapter 7 Cross Border Measurement 7. Accurate measurement of the fluid streams prior to commingling ensures correct allocation. Introduction to Cross Border Measurement Volumes When volumes of fluids (i.2. 4) Ensure allocations are supported by sufficient and adequate volumetrics. the allocation of volumes from sales to the volumes from each jurisdiction is a critical factor in determining the royalties payable to each jurisdiction.e.

3-1 Cross Border Case 1 Figure 7.3-2 Cross Border Case 2 June 1st. 2013 176 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 7.

2013 177 .3-4 Cross Border Case 4 June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 7.3-3 Cross Border Case 3 Figure 7.

3-5 Cross Border Case 5 Figure 7. 2013 178 .3-6 Cross Border Case 6 June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 7.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 7. 2013 179 .3-8 Cross Border Case 8 June 1st.3-7 Cross Border Case 7 Figure 7.

A facility may receive non-BC production at the inlet (upstream) and commingle deliveries at the outlet (downstream) with non-BC production and consequently both inlet and outlet volumes would be required to follow the Cross Border requirements. the British Columbia production stream must be isolated and measured and follow the requirements in this Chapter unless otherwise approved by the OGC. gathering systems. in this situation.6. The OGC will consult with the appropriate regulatory authority to ensure that an equitable processing arrangement can be reached. 2013 180 . and follow the requirements in this Chapter unless otherwise approved by the OGC. Alternately. and production facilities or plants that are directly and indirectly involved in the Cross Border application. 4) The applicant is to provide a Process Flow Diagram and metering schematic for the well sites.4. 7. 2) For those facilities or plants located in the Province of British Columbia where British Columbia production is commingled with non-British Columbia production downstream of the facility or plant.5. The OGC does not have regulatory authority outside of the Province of British Columbia. a facility outside of the Province of British Columbia can present challenges to resolving crossborder measurement issues. or operating June 1st. 5) The OGC will perform a site-specific review of each Cross Border Measurement Facility for approval purposes. the treatment of volumes is expected as though the facility were in the Province of British Columbia. indicate in the project description and on the Engineering tab in KERMIT that the facility being applied for is a Cross Border facility. 3) In circumstances that dictate the involvement of another regulatory authority. Application 1) Measurement installations in British Columbia or Alberta that fall under the Cross Border requirements of Chapter 7 are to be applied for using the OGC’s facility application process through KERMIT. additions. 2) On the facility application. modification. the OGC will update and involve that authority. 7. New Construction or Modifications at a Cross Border Facility in the Province of British Columbia 1) Pipeline or facility construction.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7. deletions. 3) For those legacy facilities or plants located outside of the Province of British Columbia that process British Columbia volumes. Cross Border Facility Principle 1) For those facilities or plants located in the Province of British Columbia with British Columbia and/or non-British Columbia production upstream of the facility or plant. the OGC may impose measurement requirements on volumes within the Province of British Columbia. and. The above principles can produce scenarios from a single well being viewed as a cross-border facility to a gas plant being viewed as a cross-border facility. each jurisdictional production stream must be isolated and measured.

2) On application. the OGC may stipulate requirements on the relevant British Columbia production volumes as it deems necessary within the Province of British Columbia. additions to. An operator will be notified in writing as to any action taken. the OGC may modify/grandfather the requirements of this document for existing production systems that pre-date the release of this document. 2013 181 . 3) For approved production volume processing outside of OGC legal jurisdictional authority. design. The OGC will advise the operator with regard to the designation. June 1st. or deletions from a Cross Border measurement facility may require upgrades to measurement equipment or alter existing approvals. or Legacy Construction at a Cross Border Facility Outside the Province of British Columbia 1) On application. change. as though the facility were located within the Province of British Columbia. or impact the determination of volumetrics and/or allocations for British Columbia production. the OGC may consider production volume processing at a facility outside of OGC legal jurisdictional authority (i. Legacy Construction Inside and Outside the Province of British Columbia British Columbia operators must contact the OGC regarding the design of an existing gathering system that meets the Qualification Criteria. New construction must follow current requirements.7.. etc. Modifications. will require the approval of the OGC.8. When a combination of new construction and modifications occurs. This entitlement will not be extended to new construction or modifications of existing production systems unless otherwise approved by the OGC. 7.. 2) Approval for production volume processing outside of OGC legal jurisdictional authority will require the operator to follow the requirements in this Chapter for British Columbia production volumes. the operator is encouraged to consult with the OGC on a site-specific basis with respect to meeting the requirements. 7. if at any time the OGC deems the design or operational conditions in contravention of this Chapter.e. 2) Modifications to. 1) Facilities identified by the OGC as Cross Border Measurement Facilities prior to the release of this document may continue as approved under an existing Cross Border Measurement Facility approval. The operator is to adhere to the same process for approval. New Construction. New production volumes leaving the Province of British Columbia will have to be measured in a manner that is consistent with the OGC Cross Border policy and the measurement facility must be located within the geographic area of the Province of British Columbia unless otherwise approved. New construction or modifications of existing Cross Border facilities is to meet the requirements of this manual unless otherwise approved by the OGC.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations practices that affect. the Province of British Columbia) for British Columbia production volumes. alter. however determined. and operation of the gathering system.

c. or existing construction of inter-provincial pipelines that can or may impact volumetrics or allocations of natural gas production to the Province of British Columbia relative to a Cross Border Measurement Facility. 3) The OGC will note any variances from the requirements and take action appropriate to the nature of the variance. addition(s) or deletion(s) that changes or impacts volumetrics or allocations for the Province of British Columbia will require the review and approval of the OGC Operations Engineering Branch. located at an approved Cross Border facility outside of the Province of British Columbia. 5) On application. 7. modification. The notification is to include the following: a. 7. OGC review and approval does not apply to any construction. or plant construction. 2013 182 .11. This entitlement will not be extended to new construction or modifications of existing construction unless otherwise approved by the OGC. and internal inspections) for the calendar year based on the frequencies outlined in this document. additions(s) or deletion(s) of equipment used in the production of non-British Columbia volumes upstream of the Cross Border facility. 2) The OGC will also witness meter calibrations for start-up purposes. June 1st. The schedule is to contain specific dates maintenance will be conducted. the OGC may modify or grandfather the requirements of this document for production systems that pre-date the release of this document. Maintenance Schedule 1) The operator is required to provide the OGC with a written maintenance scheduled (i. Inter-Provincial Pipelines The operator is to advise the OGC of proposed. Time of start for calibration activities to commence. Detailed directions to location. proving. calibrations. Site Inspections 1) The OGC will conduct a site inspection to determine that construction meets the installation requirements as submitted to and approved by the OGC. modification. 2) The maintenance schedule is to be developed effective the commencement of operations and annually thereafter (provided to the OGC by no later than December 30 for each and every following calendar year). d. Written (e-mail or fax) notification is to be provided to the OGC four working days prior to expected startup. facility.e.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) For those facilities with British Columbia and/or non-British Columbia production. Operator representative at location. ongoing. any pipeline.10. b. Site contact telephone number. 7.9.

e. requires notification to be sent to the OGC’s Technical Advisor Responsible for Cross Border Measurement Applications so that their records can be updated accordingly. then: a. v. There is no commingling of BC and non-British Columbia liquid volumes. liquids from the separator are commingled with another jurisdictional gas stream(s). then an additional stream of stabilized June 1st. b. 4) Changes to maintenance dates as a result of a stage change. iv. The following are some examples: i.) Cross Border stream.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3) Maintenance schedules are to be submitted to the OGC’s Technical Advisor Responsible for Cross Border Measurement Applications.12.12. Two component (also known as two phase) separation (natural gas. water. iii. 7. Three component (also known as three phase) separation (natural gas. and water and hydrocarbon liquids or oil) may be used with natural gas/free liquids processing when no jurisdictional commingling of liquids may or does occur. and the gas stream commingles with another jurisdictional volume. If a producer chooses this option. There are a number of methods to achieve separation and the measurement of Cross Border streams will vary with site-specific design. 2013 183 . liquids from the separator are commingled with another jurisdictional liquid stream(s) via pipeline. then the production accounting is to use tank measurement and/or delivery point measurement for reporting purposes. free hydrocarbon liquids or oil) is to be used with natural gas/free liquids processing when jurisdictional stream mixing may or does occur. liquid hydrocarbons from a Cross Border BC gas facility are combined with oil from a Cross Border BC oil facility.1. oil from a Cross Border BC oil facility is combined with liquid hydrocarbons from a BC Cross Border gas facility. British Columbia. General Design of Cross Border Measurement 7. liquid water. BC liquids are produced to dedicated BC production tanks and transported by ground to a delivery point for final measurement. Phase Separation British Columbia or non-British Columbia natural gas and liquid hydrocarbon volumes is to be component separated (natural gas. liquids are re-injected to the same jurisdictional gas stream from the separator and delivered via pipeline. 1) If a producer uses only vertical or horizontal separation for any jurisdictional (i. etc. hydrocarbon liquids and/or oil). Natural Gas Liquids (NGL’s).. ii. Alberta. 2) If a producer chooses to use refrigeration (in addition to or instead of horizontal or vertical separation) at a Cross Border facility. The following is a typical example: i.

addition(s). The design of the facility will dictate how this occurs. The design of the facility will dictate how this occurs. component separation (natural gas. b. Again. Surface Location. 11) A facility with multiple jurisdictional inlets. 7) The addition of a non-British Columbia production stream to a designated Cross Border Measurement Facility for the Province of British Columbia will require the approval of the OGC. 5) Tie-in points for gas sources upstream of a designated Cross Border Measurement Facility or facility inlet is to include only well production of the jurisdiction in which measurement at a Cross Border Measurement Facility or facility inlet takes place unless otherwise approved by the OGC. 6) Commingling of jurisdictional volumes is to occur such that jurisdictional fluid commingling occurs downstream of dedicated Cross Border Measurement Facility or facility inlet measurement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations NGL’s can be created. 8) For those facilities with British Columbia and/or non-British Columbia production. 3) If a producer chooses to use dehydration at a Cross Border measurement facility. component separation (natural gas. free hydrocarbon liquids or oil. 9) A Cross Border Measurement Facility located outside of the Province of British Columbia is to have a unique sign that states: a. located at a facility outside of the Province of British Columbia. The unique sign is to be clearly legible to an individual entering the site location via the site road access and is to be clearly legible from the air via helicopter if the facility is in a remote location with winter only access. of which one or more inlets are used to process only non-British Columbia volumes and of which one or more inlets are used to process only British Columbia production volumes. 2013 184 .” 10) The unique sign may be placed on the road entrance to the facility or located on a site building. 4) Metering or measurement requirements will be placed on those streams that are deemed to be Cross Border measurement volumes. c. Again. will cause all inlets to the facility (British Columbia and non-British Columbia) to become “Cross Border” inlets. free hydrocarbon liquids or oil. or deletion(s) to the measurement system require the approval of the OGC. this process will typically produce a water stream and a gas stream. All inlets June 1st. liquid water. and/or NGL’s) will be required when jurisdictional stream mixing may or does occur. or NGL’s) will be required when jurisdictional stream mixing may or does occur. Operator. the Piping and Instrument Drawings (P&IDs) along with the metering schematic is to contain a note identifying the requirement that modification(s). The following text: “Province of British Columbia Cross Border Measurement Facility. liquid water.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations will adhere to the Cross Border requirements in both design and operation unless otherwise approved by the OGC.12. June 1st. 14) Process flow diagrams. This is also known as a “dedicated inlet. 2013 185 . will cause all inlets (British Columbia and non-British Columbia) to the facility to become “Cross Border” inlets. 16) Gas meter bypasses are to be permitted only on Royalty Exempt fuel gas meters.12-1 below. producers may be eligible to follow a “Measurement by Difference” scheme. 7. secondary. 13) Ideally.” The OGC has developed an option for operators when the economics of a “dedicated inlet” are prohibitive relative to the gas production. 17) All gas meter bypasses are to be double block and bleed. Design of Measurement by Difference 1) For a gathering system that involves commingling non-British Columbia and British Columbia production as per Figure 7.2. a facility inlet should process only British Columbia or non-British Columbia production volumes. All inlets will adhere to the Cross Border requirements in both design and operation unless otherwise approved by the OGC. metering schematics and accounting recipes will be used to determine where Cross Border measurement requirements apply. of which one or more inlets are used to process commingled British Columbia and non-British Columbia production volumes. 15) In no event will Cross Border volumetric production be allowed to bypass measurement (primary. 12) A facility with multiple inlets. as approved in writing by an authorized Commission employee. during a calibration or verification activity or b. and tertiary element) at a Cross Border measurement facility except: a. Refer to Measurement by Difference below for an alternative to the dedicated inlet concept.

An operator using the Measurement by Difference production scheme must meet the requirements of this document for the non-British Columbia production volume streams and the commingled non-British June 1st. volumes from the non-BC production source and the British Columbia facility will be governed by the ratio “R. “R” would be determined according to the design of the gathering system and the approval of the OGC if a different model were considered. .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 7. of the monthly calculations meeting the ratio requirement. (V1 + GEV M1) / (V2+ GEV M3) from the commingled inlet separator. The OGC typically would examine a rationalization or consolidation of the gathering systems before looking at a more complex model.. 2) Measurement data used in the calculations are to be that measurement data used to prepare monthly S Reports. The maximum value permitted for “R” is 0. the operator of the British Columbia facility is to provide proof to the OGC upon request. 3) Currently the OGC has only approved a design based on the diagram above. Accordingly. The annual calculation period is to be a period of 12 months ending June 30 of a given year.e. On exceeding this value. i.” “R” is defined as the ratio of non-BC gas production to total British Columbia facility gas production.” The calculation of “R” (the ratio) is to be determined by the following: 1) Production volumes are to be determined on a monthly basis. 2013 186 . On an annual basis.12-1 Commingled Non-British Columbia and British Columbia Production For accounting and reporting purposes. the monthly gas volume (including gas equivalent volume (GEV) of condensate where appropriate) received from a tied-in measured gas source must be subtracted from the total monthly facility gas volume (including GEV of condensate where appropriate) to determine the proration monthly facility gas production volume.35. a producer will be required to construct a “dedicated inlet.

The OGC will review and approve Measurement by Difference on a site-specific basis. The OGC may request the applicant to provide records to verify that no objections were received. 2013 187 . Non-standard fuel gas consumption encompasses situations such as providing fuel gas to commission and to start a Cross June 1st.3. 2) The HL-ESD is to shut in production volumes to the separator and prevent fluid carryover to the gas measurement meter. whether continuous or non-continuous in duration.1.4.3. 2) Fuel gas taps downstream of the Cross Border facility gas measurement meter are permitted for non-standard fuel gas consumption or under specific OGC approval. Standard fuel gas consumption is consumption of fuel gas sourced on a permanent basis and is required in order to allow a Cross Border facility to operate as designed. In support of a measurement by difference application. written notification of the proposed measurement by difference model must be given to all working interest participants.4.e. Design of Fuel Gas Measurement 7.2. Nonstandard fuel gas consumption is consumption of fuel gas sourced on a temporary basis and is required in order to allow a Cross Border facility to operate as designed.12.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Columbia and British Columbia production streams.12.12. a note is to be made on the chart when the HLESD is tripped. every attempt should be made to ensure that the location of the Cross Border gas meter run and associated equipment is not subjected to ambient or process temperatures less than the temperature at the separator. 7. Design of Natural Gas Measurement 7. 7.12. 4) For those locations with a chart recorder.3. Royalty Exempt Fuel Gas 1) Fuel gas taps for standard fuel gas consumption at a Cross Border facility are to be located upstream of the Cross Border gas measurement meter unless otherwise approved. Separators used in Cross Border applications must have HL-ESD’s that are latching and require to be manually reset.1. 3) The HL-ESD is to be logged in the event log of the Cross Border measurement RTU when the HL-ESD is tripped. until such time as the standard fuel gas supply is available. the separator is to have a High Level Emergency Shut Down (HL-ESD).12. 7. Location of Cross Border Meter 1) Where the Cross Border gas measurement meter is not downstream of a gas dehydrator.: orifice meter run vintage) to the affected separators or processing equipment. with no resulting objections received in writing. High Level Emergency Shutdown 1) When the Cross Border gas measurement meter is directly downstream of a separator and there is no processing equipment between the separator and the meter. The OGC will not apply grandfathering of equipment design (i.

an Alberta compressor) is used in the processing of nonBritish Columbia production or when the location of production and use is not held by the same producer. such fuel gas can be subject to royalties on production from a gas well.5e3m3/d threshold has been exceeded. 7.5e3m3/day Downstream of Cross No Yes Border Gas Measurement Meter at Cross Border Facility * The OGC prefers that a meter be installed in this instance only.. 2013 188 .12-1 is to be adhered to.1 below applies to Cross Border fuel gas measurement used for the production of British Columbia natural gas. 4) Design of the fuel gas piping is to permit only one fuel gas stream to flow through a fuel gas meter at any given time: either the gas stream from the fuel gas tap located upstream of the Cross Border gas measurement meter or the gas stream from the fuel gas tap located downstream of the Cross Border gas measurement meter.. Additionally.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Border Measurement Facility or in a shut-down situation where standard fuel gas is unavailable to operate a Cross Border Measurement Facility until the facility is restarted. 5) Appropriate check valves may need to be installed in piping to determine fuel gas ownership for accounting and/or royalty purposes when British Columbia and non-British Columbia gas sources are available for consumption at a Cross Border facility.12. 7) Table 7. fuel gas sourced for equipment (i.5e3m3/day Downstream of Cross Yes No * Border Gas Measurement Meter at Cross Border Facility >0.12-1 Cross Border Fuel Gas Measurement Volume ≤0. Comments N/A N/A Subtract from Cross Border Gas Measurement Volume Subtract from Cross Border Gas Measurement Volume It is expected that the operator will meter the entire fuel gas volume consumed for a facility rather than just a specific stream for which the 0.5e m /day Between Well Production No Yes Meter and Cross Border Gas Measurement Meter ≤0.5e3m3/day Tap Location Estimate * Yes Meter Between Well Production No Meter and Cross Border Gas Measurement Meter 3 3 >0. 3) Fuel gas may also be consumed downstream of the Cross Border facility for the processing of British Columbia production volumes.e.2. Table 7. Table 7.4.e. Non-Royalty Exempt Fuel Gas When fuel gas sourced for equipment (i.12. 6) Valves used to source non-standard fuel gas downstream of the Cross Border gas measurement meter is to be tagged and identified. an Alberta compressor) used in the processing of production may be June 1st. However. the design of the Cross Border system will dictate how fuel gas is handled in the accounting recipe for reporting and allocation purposes.

3) Fuel gas supplied from a British Columbia fuel gas source to process non-British Columbia natural gas production is to be separately metered to the standards outlined in this document.” For a joint processing arrangement. 2013 189 . the meter is to be identified as shown in Figure 7. 5) The operator is to complete and submit a BC 21 form to the OGC to ensure that the linkage structure(s) is (are) correct for reporting purposes for the fuel gas transaction(s). 2) A natural gas transaction with an end-use as fuel gas is to be reported to the Ministry of Small Business and Revenue as a sale of gas unless otherwise directed by the Ministry of Small Business and Revenue.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations approved under a gas swap arrangement as directed by the MOF. June 1st.12-2. The fuel gas is to be separately metered to the standards outlined in this document. and royalties may not be directly attached to the metered fuel gas volumes. but indirectly to another gas stream. 4) Fuel gas supplied from a British Columbia fuel gas source to jointly process British Columbia and non-British Columbia production is to be pro-rated to the fuel gas volumes consumed in the processing relative to the total British Columbia production and nonBritish Columbia production processed. The following provides direction on treating these gas volumes: 1) Natural gas transacted for fuel gas as noted above will require a gas meter regardless of the volume. 6) A gas meter used for non-royalty exempt fuel gas is to be marked on the Piping and Instrument Drawings (P&ID) and metering schematic drawings as a “Fuel Gas Sales Meter.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 7. There are other possible design scenarios and the operator should contact the OGC for further information.12-3 represents a Cross Border design scenario that may provide some clarity regarding fuel gas measurement.12-2 Joint Processing Agreement Meter Identification Below. June 1st. 2013 190 . Figure 7.

June 1st. If a bypass is installed.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure 7.5. the order of installation is typically pump. Hydrocarbon Liquid Meter with Re-injection Pump (Continuous Pump Operation) i. 2013 191 . and back pressure control valve (as necessary). b. pump recycle line and recycle valve.12. Installation is to meet the manufactures recommendations. hydrocarbon liquid meter proving taps. 4) Liquid meter bypasses are to be double block and bleed. See section 7. The liquid meter is to be located downstream of the blowcase.12-3 Cross Border Design Scenario 7. ii.5. A check valve is to be in place between the blowcase and the hydrocarbon liquid meter. they are to be locked or car sealed in the closed position.13. check valve. 3) Hydrocarbon liquid installations may be configured according to the following (as applicable): a. Blowcase Installation i.5%. 2) Continuous Sediment and Water (S&W) measurement is required if hydrocarbon sampling results in a water content greater than 0. If none exist. Design of Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement 1) K plots may be required for those locations with condensate production greater than 10m3/d.2(2)(g) for further details.

3.Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 5) Proving taps are to be the same nominal pipe size or larger than the meter piping. 3.0m in length. 7.6. General Equations and Uncertainty Guidelines. b. 3. To a delivery point meter b. 3) Each orifice meter run is to be equipped with a dual chamber fitting to enable the orifice plate to be removed for inspection. June 1st. 2000 . Design of Natural Gas Measurement For a meter design not included in the discussion below. 3. 5) All sensing lines are to have a slope of 25. please contact the OGC.1.4.12. 2000 (AGA3) .12. For further processing c. 4) All sensing lines are to not exceed 1. 8) Orifice plate sizing is to follow AGA Report No. Non-Royalty Exempt Fuel Gas metering equipment is to be installed in accordance with AGA Report No.3.Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids except when fuel gas is sourced on a permanent basis downstream of a Cross Border meter and the fuel gas meter is used in the accounting recipe. 3. Chapter 1. For market transaction is to contain only those volumes produced from the Province of British Columbia. 7. with the exception of orifice meter runs for Royalty Exempt Fuel Gas.7mm. 6) Hydrocarbon or oil volumes transported via ground transport from hydrocarbon or oil storage tanks a. 2000 .Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids or with AGA Report No. Royalty Exempt Fuel Gas metering equipment is to be installed in accordance with AGA Report No. 2000 -Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids.6. 2) Gas meter equipment used for fuel gas purposes: a.0mm per 300mm from the transmitter to the changer.12. 3. 6) The minimum tubing size is to be 12. with an internal diameter no smaller than the internal diameter of the sensing lines.Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids. 1991 . In this circumstance the fuel gas meter is to be installed in accordance with AGA Report No. which is to be allowed a single chamber fitting. 7) Full port valves are to be used. Orifice Metering – Design/Construction 1) Gas meter equipment is to be installed in accordance with AGA Report No. 1990. 2013 192 .

13) For chart recorders. 12) For EFM.Detail Method for compressibility should be used. 3. 17) For EFM.12. 3. differential and static pressure measurement equipment used in conjunction with the orifice meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0. complete with flow conditioner. Turbine Metering .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 9) The Beta Ratio is to be in a range from 0. must undergo a standard calibration June 1st. Measurement of Gas by Turbine Meters. 7.Volumetric Calculations 1) Volumes are to be calculated in accordance with AGA Report No.12. 2) The turbine meter used is to be of a type and quality that meets Measurement Canada specifications. 10) Orifice meter runs are to be designed based on a maximum differential pressure of 50. 6) The meter assembly.2. 14) The thermowell is to be located downstream of the orifice fitting as per AGA Report No. 16) Temperature measurement equipment is to be installed with a flexible cable to allow removal from the thermowell for calibration/verification.28°C. 5) The measured gas stream must be of sales gas (marketable gas) quality. 2013 193 .6. 7. the maximum allowable differential pressure range shall be 0 to 62.5kPa.6.1. the static pressure may be taken from the downstream tap on the orifice meter.65. 2000 .1% of range. Orifice Metering . 1992 – Natural Gas Applications.5 15) The tip of the thermowell is to be located within the center third of the pipe.Design/Construction 1) Metering equipment is to be installed as per manufactures recommendations or in accordance with the latest edition of the AGA Transmission Measurement Committee Report No. 11) For EFM. Section 2.6. 4) The flow conditioner is to meet Measurement Canada specifications.Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids. temperature measurement equipment used in conjunction with the orifice meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0. 3) Turbine meters are to be installed with a flow conditioner. AGA8 – Compressibility Factors of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Gases .0kPa.1. 18) Secondary measurement equipment on an orifice meter run is to be connected to one nonshared set of orifice flange taps.15 to 0. 7.

7) Pressure measuring equipment used in conjunction with the turbine meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0.0m in length. 12) A thermowell pipe tap should be located within 3-5 pipe diameters downstream of the meter body’s flange face. 7. 7.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations at a facility accredited by Measurement Canada.3. 7.5.0mm per 300mm from the transmitter to the changer.1. 10) The minimum tubing size is to be 12. 1996 – Measurement of Gas by Turbine Meters.12.2.28°C. Rotary Metering – Design/Construction 1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. 15) Check valves are to be installed downstream of the meter. The tip of the thermowell is to be located within the center one-third of the inside pipe diameter.6. 13) Temperature measurement equipment used in conjunction with the turbine meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0. 16) Pulse inputs to a Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) are to be raw pulses from the meter. 2) The ultrasonic meter is to be of a type and quality that meets Measurement Canada June 1st. 7.7mm. A pre-amplification card should not volumetrically scale the raw pulse output from the meter. Diaphragm Metering – Design/Construction 1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. Turbine Metering .12.6.12. 9) All sensing lines are to have a slope of 25. please consult the OGC 7. Ultrasonic Metering – Design/Construction 1) Metering equipment is to be installed as per manufactures recommendations or in accordance with the latest edition of AGA Report No. 14) Temperature measurement equipment is to be installed with a flexible cable to allow removal from the thermowell for calibration/verification. 9 – Measurement of Gas by Multipath Ultrasonic Meters.Volumetric Calculations 1) Volumes are to be calculated in accordance with AGA Report No.12.6.4. please consult the OGC. 2013 194 .6. with an internal diameter no smaller than the internal diameter of the sensing lines. 8) All sensing lines are to not exceed 1. 11) Full port valves are to be used.1% of range.

11) A thermowell pipe tap should be located within 3-5 pipe diameters downstream of the meter body’s flange face. 7. 6) Pressure measuring equipment used in conjunction with the ultrasonic meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0. please consult the OGC. 7. 14) Pulse inputs to a Remote Terminal Unit are to be raw pulses from the meter. 7. 10) Full port valves are to be used.7.12.6. 3) Ultrasonic meters are to be installed with a flow conditioner. Coriolis Metering . Ultrasonic Metering .1.0mm per 300mm from the transmitter to the changer.6.0m in length. 12) Temperature measurement equipment used in conjunction with the ultrasonic meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ± 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations specifications.28° C.Design/Construction 1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. With bi-directional meters. complete with flow conditioner.12.6. Natural Gas Measurement .7mm.5. 9 – Measurement of Gas by Multipath Ultrasonic Meters. 7. 9 – Measurement of Gas by Multipath Ultrasonic Meters. with an internal diameter no smaller than the internal diameter of the sensing lines.6. must undergo a standard calibration at a facility accredited by Measurement Canada. 2013 195 . the thermowell should be located at least 3 pipe diameters from either meter body flange face. 7) All sensing lines are to not exceed 1. A preamplification card should not volumetrically scale the raw pulse output from the meter.Volumetric Calculations 1) Volumes are to be calculated in accordance with AGA Report No. 1996 – Measurement of Gas by Turbine Meters and as discussed in AGA Report No. 13) Temperature measurement equipment is to be installed with a flexible cable to allow removal from the thermowell for calibration/verification. 4) The flow conditioner is to meet Measurement Canada specifications. 8) All sensing lines are to have a slope of 25. 9) The minimum tubing size is to be 12.Chart Recorders 1) Chart recorders are to follow the following provisions: June 1st. The tip of the thermowell is to be located within the center one-third of the inside pipe diameter. The flow conditioner is to be installed as per the manufacturer’s recommended design and as per AGA Report No.12.1% of range. 5) The meter assembly.

It is noted on the charts if the differential pressure. ii. The correct orifice plate size is recorded on the chart.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations a. or temperature range has been changed. p. When there is a painted differential band. l. The time and the date of start and finish of the record. The identification of the gas stream being metered (i. static pressure. i. The correct meter tube size is identified on the chart. A copy of the chart calibration report is kept on site or readily available for on-site inspection if it is a manned facility. A notation is made on the chart with regard to whether or not the meter is set up for atmospheric pressure (for square root charts). k. m. d. 2013 i.. f. Any data or traces that require correction must not be covered over or obscured by any means. it is reasonable to read the differential near the centre of the band or in a sine wave motion alternating between the top and bottom of the painted area. n. 196 . pens out of ink. Proper chart reading instructions (draw in the estimated traces. or provide estimate of the differential and static) are provided when the pen fails to record because of clock stoppage. c. On and off chart times are recorded on the chart to the nearest quarter hour. The time to the nearest quarter hour of any orifice plate change is indicated on the chart and the new orifice size is properly indicated relative to the chronology of the chart. it is reasonable to read the differential near the top of the band (or vice versa). Differential pen recordings are at 33% or more within the chart range. request to read as average flow for the missing period. If the differential pen is in constant up and down motion. b. instructions are provided as to where it should be read. or other reasons.e. There are various ways to read a painted chart: June 1st. h. If the differential pen normally records at the top of the painted band but spikes quickly down and up during separator dump cycles. e. or if these ranges are different from the ranges printed on the chart. g. Static pen recordings are at 20% or more within the chart range. The accuracy of the meter clock speed is checked and the chart reader is instructed about any deviations. meter surface location) is properly identified on the chart. j. The differential pen is zeroed once per chart cycle. o.

Examples of conditions applicable to orifice chart recorders are as follows: a. This requirement is designed to ensure that the June 1st. a request in writing by the OGC inspector or auditor to implement changes to improve measurement accuracy will become enforceable. The OGC will not accept an audit trail found only in the transmitter(s).8. s.12. high shut-in pressure. t. and equipment or operating pressure range limitations. Natural Gas Measurement . large bands of painting suggest that the chart recorder is not able to properly measure the process and remedial action is required. Excessive painting.6. Painted traces exceeding 4% of the differential pressure or static pressure range is the base for evaluation purposes. 3) Control logic is to be minimized in the RTU and is generally restricted to the following: a. Small narrow bands of painting can be dealt with as noted above. Chart recorders used in Cross Border Measurement are to be equipped with a 24-hour chart. r. 2) If an inspection of a measurement device or of procedures reveals unsatisfactory conditions that reduce measurement accuracy. Chart recorders will not be acceptable for use with production volumes greater than 60e3m3/d. minimal shutdown processing 4) Some forms of transmitter-Remote Terminal Unit combinations do not create “As Found”-“As Left” audit trails in the Remote Terminal Unit and are logged only in the transmitter(s). Pen tracings are not over-lapping. 2) Alternate Measurement Canada approved equivalents may be considered by the OGC. measurement system b. The operator is to be responsible to ensure that the Remote Terminal Unit has “end to end” audit trail capability either inherent in the Remote Terminal Unit design or by programming a Remote Terminal Unit. u. 7. In some cases. c. This is normally associated with the differential pen.Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) 1) The EFM hardware is to be of a type and quality approved by Measurement Canada. flow control c. Chart recorders are to be equipped with continuous temperature measurement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations q. an agency of Industry Canada. Written approval must be received from the OGC for an equivalent alternate. b. Thick pen traces that will cause excessive error when reading the traces. Differential or static pens recording too low on the chart. Pens are not over-ranged or under-ranged. this cannot be avoided because of low flow rate. however. 2013 197 .

Average hourly differential pressure. Average hourly static pressure. h. Time on production on an hourly and daily basis. g. Average hourly static pressure. the EFM device must be capable of generating a data file that contains the following. K-Factor. Average hourly flow rate. Average hourly flow rate.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations inputs to a transmitter(s) are followed by the Remote Terminal Unit. f. Daily volume total. c. Average hourly temperature.Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) An EFM device must store (historicize) the following data for gas volumetrics: 1) Orifice Meter a. Average daily temperature. k. Turbine Meter. e.Data Reporting . Uncorrected hourly volume. Average daily static pressure. 2) Ultrasonic Meter. 3) General Reports On request. Corrected hourly volume.12. j. as applicable: June 1st. c. 2013 198 . f. j. d. Time on production on an hourly and daily basis.8. i. Natural Gas Measurement . i. e. 7. b. g. Coriolis Meter a.6. Average hourly temperature.1. Average daily static pressure. Corrected daily volume. Orifice plate size either at top or bottom of the hour. b. Hourly volume total. Average daily temperature. Average daily differential pressure. d. h.

i. Meter run diameter (1 inch upstream of the orifice plate). Identify that the upstream tap is used in flow calculation.12. 4) Telephone number for individual creating the report(s). C factors used in flow calculations (Y. delivery point measurement. etc. Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement .1 7.1. 7.Volumetric Calculations 199 . j. d.Design This Section covers inventory measurement. k. K Factor (as applicable). f.7. Pressure base for flow calculations.). l. c.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations a. Orifice plate construction material (as applicable). g. Meter identification. Meter Factor (as applicable). tankage of hydrocarbon liquids. For a meter design not included in the discussion below. o. 3) Individual creating the report(s). Relative density. Orifice diameter. and re-injection of hydrocarbon liquids. 2) Time report(s) created. Temperature base for flow calculations.12.1. June 1st.12.7. m. Contract hour. h. b.12. 7. Meter tube construction material (as applicable). Gas composition. the operator are to include the following with the report(s): 1) Date report(s) created. 2013 Orifice Metering . e.1. 5) Identify if the information was collected On-Line or Off-Line with the EFM device.6. Atmospheric pressure. When the OGC makes a request for information for data from an EFM device. n.7. Orifice Metering – Delivery Point Measurement – Design/Construction 1) Refer to the requirements for Natural Gas – Orifice Metering – Section 7. please contact the OGC.

5 % and a repeatability of at least 0. please consult the OGC. 7. 3. 11) Static pressure measurement equipment is to be able to determine the static pressure at the turbine meter. “Measurement of Liquid Hydrocarbons by Turbine Meters” which indicates that 10 D can be utilized when a flow conditioner is installed.2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 1) Volumes are to be calculated in accordance with AGA Report No. 4) Upstream pipe diameters (D) on a turbine meter must be 20 D unless otherwise determined from American Petroleum Institute (API) Chapter 5. 7) All sensing lines are to not exceed 1. “Accessory Equipment for Liquid Meters and the Drilling and Production Regulations” as relevant and/or applicable to the design of the liquid metering system. The design of the liquid metering system is to include considerations for the operation of liquid pumps or separator installations as appropriate.4.0mm per 300mm from the transmitter to the changer. 12) Pulse inputs to a Remote Terminal Unit are to be raw pulses from the meter. 1990 – Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other Related Hydrocarbon Fluids. 9) The minimum tubing size is to be 12.3.3. 7. Chapter 5.28°C.7. 5) Temperature measurement equipment used in conjunction with the turbine meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0. 2013 200 .0m in length. with an internal diameter no smaller than the internal diameter of the sensing lines.7. 3) Liquid meter installation are to be in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.12.12. June 1st.3.1% of range.7mm. A preamplification card should not volumetrically scale the raw pulse output from the meter. “Measurement of Liquid Hydrocarbons by Turbine Meters”. American Petroleum Institute (API) Chapter 5. 10) Full port valves are to be used. Turbine Metering – Delivery Point Measurement – Design/Construction 1) Meters are to have a linearity of at least 0. 8) All sensing lines are to have a slope of 25. 2) Turbine meters are to be selected such that their design operating point is greater than 30% of their range. Vortex Shedding Metering – Delivery Point Measurement – Design/Construction 1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. 6) Static pressure measurement equipment used in conjunction with the turbine meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0.1 per cent.

Chapter 5. 3) Volumetric computations are to occur in the EFM device.7mm. Turbine Metering – Volumetric Calculations – Delivery Point Measurement 1) Volumes are to be calculated in accordance with American Petroleum Institute (API) Chapter 12.325kPa or the liquids equilibrium vapour pressure is to be determined and applied in all instances as per the American Petroleum Institute (API) Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards.0m in length.7.” 2) Correction to metered volumes measured at pressures other than the greater of an absolute pressure of 101.” The design of the liquid metering system is to include considerations for the operation of liquid pumps or separator installations as appropriate.5. “Calculation of Liquid Petroleum Quantities Measured by Turbine or Displacement Meters.28°C.7. 6) All sensing lines are to have a slope of 25.1 %and a turndown of at least 10:1. with an internal diameter no smaller than the internal diameter of the sensing lines. Positive Displacement Meters – Delivery Point Measurement – Design/Construction 1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. 7.3. 7) The minimum tubing size is to be 12. 5) All sensing lines are not to exceed 1.12.7.0mm per 300mm from the transmitter to the changer. “Measurement of Liquid Hydrocarbons by Coriolis Meters”. 3) Temperature measurement equipment used in conjunction with the coriolis meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of ±0. “Accessory Equipment for Liquid Meters.1. please consult the OGC. 9) Pulse inputs to a Remote Terminal Unit are to be raw pulses from the meter. American Petroleum Institute (API) Chapter 5.4. 4) Static pressure measurement equipment used in conjunction with the coriolis meter is to have a minimum specified uncertainty of 0.4.1% of range.12. A preamplification card should not volumetrically scale the raw pulse output from the meter. 2013 201 . June 1st. 8) Full port valves are to be used.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7.2. Coriolis Metering – Delivery Point Measurement – Design/Construction 1) Meters are to have an accuracy of at least 0. 2) Meter installation is to be in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.6. Chapter 11. 7.12.

Tank Gauging – Inventory Measurement – Design/Construction 1) A level transmitter or gauge board should have a specified resolution (minor markings) of ±75mm. or by Manual Tank Gauging. Gauge Boards. “Calculation of Liquid Petroleum Quantities Measured by Turbine or Displacement Meters. Hydrocarbon Liquid Measurement – Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) 1) The EFM hardware is to be of a type and quality approved by Measurement Canada.325kPa or the liquids equilibrium vapour pressure is to be determined and applied in all instances as per the American Petroleum Institute (API) Chapter 11.Volumetric Calculations . 3) Manual tank gauging requires one reading of the tape.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7.12.” 3) Volumetric computations are to occur in the EFM device.1. Written approval must be received from the OGC for an equivalent alternate.7. Sediment and Water 1) Sediment and water determinations from a lab analysis/field analysis of a liquid sample is to be applied to the hydrocarbon liquid volumes 7. 3) Control logic is to be minimized in the RTU and is generally restricted to the following: a. Tank Gauging of Liquid Hydrocarbons 1) Tank volumes can be determined either by Electronic Tank Gauging.12.7.7. 2) Alternate Measurement Canada approved equivalents may be considered by the OGC.2.12. an agency of Industry Canada.” 2) Correction to metered volumes measured at pressures other than the greater of an absolute pressure of 101.12.8. measurement system b. 2013 202 .Delivery Point Measurement 1) Volumes are to be calculated in accordance with American Petroleum Institute (API) Chapter 12.6. 4) A strapping table or calculation used to convert tank levels to a liquid volume is to be prepared.12. 7. minimal shutdown processing June 1st.9.7. 7. 7.7. flow control c. 2) Gauge board markings (major markings) must be no farther apart than 150mm.5. “Volume Correction Factors. Coriolis Metering .7.

13. This requirement is designed to ensure that the inputs to a transmitter(s) are followed by the Remote Terminal Unit.1 – Orifice Meter for requirements. Positive Displacement Metering 1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering.12.1. Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement.12. 8) K-Factor. 7. 4) Average daily temperature.2.7.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) Some forms of transmitter-Remote Terminal Unit combinations do not create “As Found”-“As Left” audit trails in the Remote Terminal Unit and are logged only in the transmitter(s).3.7.12.13. The OGC will not accept an audit trail found only in the transmitter(s).13. 6) Meter proving factor (dimensionless).7. Vortex Metering 1) Daily total net standard volume (corrected).Design Oil meters are to follow the above requirements as listed under Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement. Oil Measurement . Operations – Natural Gas Measurement. 7.10. 3) Daily total pulse counts (raw pulse counts from meter).1.12.1.8.7.12. Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement Data Reporting – Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) An EFM device must store (historicize) the following data for hydrocarbon liquid volumetrics: 7. June 1st. 7. Coriolis Metering. Calibration/Verification Test Equipment 7.12. 7. 7.10. Turbine Metering.8.1.10. 7) Sediment and water content (% volume). Oil Measurement 7. 2) Daily total gross volume (uncorrected). The operator is to be responsible to ensure that the Remote Terminal Unit has “end to end” audit trail capability either inherent in the Remote Terminal Unit design or by programming a Remote Terminal Unit. please consult the OGC. Lab Calibration Equipment 1) The minimum uncertainty for calibration equipment at a lab is to be one-half the minimum uncertainty of the calibration/verification equipment being calibrated.10.6. Orifice Metering 1) Refer to Section 7. 5) Average daily static pressure. 2013 203 .

2) High-pressure calibrations/verifications (i.: differential pressure) is to use a pressure source that is not liquid based. Failure to meet this requirement will result in the calibration/verification being null and void.2. 2) A meter calibration/verification report is to be created during the calibration/verification process for audit purposes. Failure to meet this requirement will result in the calibration/verification being null and void.e.1. 4) Field calibration/verification equipment is to be calibrated and certified annually by a standards laboratory meeting the criteria under Lab Calibration Equipment. 7.e.1. 3) Low-pressure calibrations/verifications (i.13.13.3. The intent of the checking process is to ensure that measurement point equipment is reading correctly according to a certified standard. Field Calibration Equipment 1) The minimum uncertainty for field calibration equipment is to be equal to or better than that of the device under calibration/verification.13.: static pressure) is to use nitrogen as a pressure source.1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7.2. 7. the High Level Emergency Shut Down on the Cross Border Measurement separator is to be checked and the results of the check identified on the meter/calibration report.13.Frequencies. Natural Gas Measurement .2. High Level Emergency Shut Down (ESD) 1) At the frequency stipulated for Natural Gas Measurement .Operations 7. 2013 204 . June 1st. Calibration/Verification Procedures – Orifice Metering and EFM The definition of verification (to compare) and calibration (to correct) are used interchangeably for Cross Border Measurement purposes. 8) The serial numbers of the certified standard (test equipment) is to be recorded on the meter/ calibration report. 1) All calibration/verification activities at a metering station are to be logged in the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) such that an audit trail exists in the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU). 7) Using field calibration/verification equipment that is past the re-certification date will render the calibration/verification null and void. 5) The laboratory Calibration Certificate is to be available for inspection during a calibration/ verification. This applies to those situations where the Cross Border Measurement meter includes the requirement for a High Level Emergency Shut Down. 6) Failure to produce the calibration certificate within 24 hours of the calibration/verification may result in the calibration/verification’s being declared null and void.

h. 5) An orifice plate inspection is to be made. 4) A verification/calibration is to meet the following conditions: a. and spacing must be inspected and adjusted. linkage. b. 80% (or 75%).1. e. The orifice plate inspection will consist of: a. A check to ensure that the orifice plate size in the Remote Terminal Unit matches the physical orifice plate size. At a minimum.28°C. one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating differential pressure to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0. 50%. d. i.10% of range. The static pressure loop calibration is to consist of a check at the zero. At a minimum. The test will consist of an ice water point (or a cold as possible when in remote sites).1.25% of the correct value as determined by a recognized flow calculation method. The temperature element and/or transmitter loop is to be calibrated if the verified reading is outside the acceptable tolerance limit of ±0. 80% (or 75%).2. The acceptable tolerance for calculated gas flow volumes by the EFM device must be within ±0. 7. span. a midwarm point and a hot point (as hot as possible when in remote sites). 2013 205 .13. At a minimum. June 1st. f. pressure stops. A physical examination of the orifice plate. if necessary. Pen arc.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3) The certified standard is to be applied to the secondary element and the indicated value for that standard is to be read at the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) for calibration/verification purposes.28°C.10% of range. one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating temperature or as close as possible to the operating temperature to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0. b. 50% and 20% (or 25%) points. This check is to be performed at the end of any calibration/verification process.10% of range. and 20% (or 25%) points. The static pressure and differential pressure transmitters are to be calibrated if the verified readings are outside the acceptable tolerances of ±0. g. one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating static pressure to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0. Calibration/Verification Procedures – Orifice Metering and Chart Recorders 1) The procedure for orifice meter chart recorder (end device) calibration must be in accordance with the following: a. The differential pressure loop calibration is to consist of a check at the zero. span. The temperature loop calibration is to consist of a three-point test. c.

c. The static pressure element must be calibrated at zero. g. 3) A meter calibration report is to be created during the calibration/verification process for audit purposes.13.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations b.10% of range.10% of range. 2) All calibration/verification activities at a metering station are to be logged in the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) such that an audit trail exists in the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU). A detailed report indicating the tests conducted on the meter during the calibration and the conditions “As Found” and “As Left” must be either left with the meter (or end device) or readily available for inspection by the OGC.2. one colder temperature (i. e. The full name of the person performing the calibrations. The static pressure transmitter is to be calibrated if the verified readings are outside the acceptable tolerances of ±0. a tag or label must be attached to the meter ( or end device). The differential pressure element must be calibrated at zero. and nine ascending/ descending points throughout its range.2. At a minimum. The meter serial number. iv. iii. The tag or label must identify: i.) 7. Subsequent to the meter calibration. A zero check of the differential under normal operating pressure must be done before and after the calibration. Calibration/Verification Procedures – Turbine Metering and EFM 1) Turbine meters are to undergo a standard calibration at a facility accredited by Measurement Canada. and one warmer temperature. v. 80% (or 75%). (If the detailed report is left with the meter. The meter element calibration ranges. 4) The certified standard is to be applied to the secondary element and the indicated value for that standard is to be read at the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) for calibration/verification purposes.e. one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating static pressure to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0. 2013 206 . The site location. span. ii. The date of the calibration. The temperature element must be calibrated at three points: operating temperature. 50% and 20% (or 25%) points. d. b. ice water if possible). f. the foregoing requirement relating to the tag or label is considered to be met. June 1st. full span. 5) A verification/calibration is to meet the following conditions: a.

The static pressure loop calibration is to consist of a check at the zero.10% of range. d.28°C. The test will consist of an ice water point (or a cold as possible when in remote sites). 4) The certified standard is to be applied to the secondary element and the indicated value for that standard is to be read at the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) for calibration/verification purposes. b. The temperature loop calibration is to consist of a three-point test. The temperature element and/or transmitter loop is to be calibrated if the verified reading is outside the acceptable tolerance limit of ±0. 2) All verification/calibration activities at a metering station are to be logged in the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) such that an audit trail exists in the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU). e. d.13.28°C.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations c. span. 2013 The temperature loop calibration is to consist of a three-point test. c.2. one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating static pressure to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0. The test will consist of an ice water point (or as cold as possible when in remote sites). 50% and 20% (or 25%) points.28°C. June 1st.28°C. f. 7. 80% (or 75%).3. At a minimum. one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating temperature or as close as possible to the operating temperature to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0. span.10% of range. a mid-warm point and a hot point (as hot as possible when in remote sites). The static pressure transmitter is to be calibrated if the verified readings are outside the acceptable tolerances of ±0. At a minimum. The static pressure loop calibration is to consist of a check at the zero. one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating temperature or as close as possible to the operating temperature to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0. 207 . Calibration/Verification Procedures – Ultrasonic Metering and EFM 1) Ultrasonic meters are to undergo a standard calibration at a facility accredited by Measurement Canada. f. 5) A verification/calibration is to meet the following conditions: a. 50% and 20% (or 25%) points. 3) A meter verification/calibration report is to be created during the calibration/verification process for audit purposes. e. The temperature element and/or transmitter loop is to be calibrated if the verified reading is outside the acceptable tolerance limit of ±0. 80% (or 75%). At a minimum. a midwarm point and a hot point (as hot as possible when in remote sites).

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations

7.13.2.4.

Calibration/Verification Procedures - Rotary Metering

1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering, please consult the OGC.
7.13.2.5.

Calibration/Verification Procedures - Diaphragm Metering

1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering, please consult the OGC.
7.13.2.6.

Calibration/Verification Procedures – Coriolis Metering and EFM

1) Coriolis meters are to undergo a standard calibration at a facility accredited by
Measurement Canada.
2) All verification/calibration activities at a metering station are to be logged in the Remote
Terminal Unit (RTU) such that an audit trail exists in the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU).
3) A meter verification/calibration report is to be created during the calibration/verification
process for audit purposes.
4) The certified standard is to be applied to the secondary element and the indicated value
for that standard is to be read at the Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) for
calibration/verification purposes.
5) A calibration/verification is to meet the following conditions:

a. The static pressure transmitter is to be calibrated if the verified readings are
outside the acceptable tolerances of ±0.10% of range.
b. At a minimum, one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating
static pressure to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0.10% of range.
c. The temperature element and/or transmitter loop is to be calibrated if the
verified reading is outside the acceptable tolerance limit of ±0.28°C.
d. At a minimum, one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating
temperature or as close as possible to the operating temperature to meet the
tolerance requirement of ±0.28°C.
e. The static pressure loop calibration is to consist of a check at the zero, span,
80% (or 75%), 50% and 20% (or 25%) points. Nitrogen is to be used as a
pressure source.
f.

7.13.3.

The temperature loop calibration is to consist of a three-point test. The test will
consist of an ice water point (or a cold as possible when in remote sites), a midwarm point and a hot point (as hot as possible when in remote sites).
Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement – Operation

7.13.3.1.

Calibration/Verification Procedures – Orifice Metering

1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering, please consult the OGC.
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7.13.3.2.

Calibration/Verification - Turbine Metering and Associated Equipment

1) Use of a volumetric prover, ball prover, or piston prover is accepted; however, the design
of the liquids system will determine the type of prover.
2) Portable proving equipment must be water drawn and calibrated bi-annually.
3) Temperature measuring equipment used in conjunction with the prover is to have a
specified uncertainty equal to or less than that of the uncertainty specified for the
temperature-measuring equipment associated with the meter under prove.
4) The prover operator is to attempt to be consistent in the volume of each run during a
prove. The volume of condensate used for each prove can be adjusted to the proving
volumes of hydrocarbons available.
5) Following the initial meter calibration, a turbine meter is to be proved following a change
to the meter or repairs to the installation that will affect the meter factor.
6) The temperature element and/or transmitter loop is to be calibrated if the verified reading
is outside the acceptable tolerance limit of ±0.28°C.
7) At a minimum, one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating
temperature or as close as possible to the operating temperature to meet the tolerance
requirement of ±0.28°C.
8) The temperature loop calibration is to consist of a three-point test. The test will consist
of an ice water point (or a cold as possible when in remote sites), a mid-warm point
and a hot point (as hot as possible when in remote sites).
9) The static pressure transmitter is to be calibrated if the verified readings are outside the
acceptable tolerances of ±0.10% of range.
10) The static pressure loop calibration is to consist of a check at the zero, span, 80% (or
75%), 50% and 20% (or 25%) points.
11) At a minimum, one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating static
pressure to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0.10% of range.
12) A meter is considered successfully proved when the meter factor determined from four
consecutive runs are all within ±2% of the mean factor and the new meter factor is not
more than ±2% of the previous meter factor nor more than 20% greater than the original
meter factor.
13) Other than the initial proving and proving after meter repairs, verification with one
proving run is sufficient if the new meter factor is within 0.5% of the previous meter
factor. Otherwise, four runs are required as above.
14) When continuous water cut determination is not installed, a liquid analysis is required
which is to identify the sediments and water (S&W) for the liquid volume. This S&W is
to be used in determining the total hydrocarbon liquid volume. This S&W percentage
may be applied at any point (as a function of the meter factor, in the FDC system, etc.)
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providing that an audit trail exists that the S&W percentage has been applied to the gross
volume.
15) The K factor for the turbine meter is not change; rather, after each prove, a Meter Factor
is to be adjusted.
16) Low volume condensate production (less than 2m3/d) is to be eligible for bench proving.
Alternately, if the rate of flow through the meter is less than or equal to 3m3/d with the
gas equivalent volume of the daily condensate volume less than or equal to 3% of the
daily gas volume related to the condensate production the meter will be eligible for
bench proving.
7.13.3.3.

Calibration/Verification Procedures – Positive Displacement Metering

1) Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering, please consult the OGC.
7.13.3.4.

Calibration/Verification Procedures – Coriolis Metering

1) Use of a volumetric prover, gravimetric prover, ball prover, or piston prover is
acceptable.
2) Portable proving equipment must be water drawn and calibrated bi-annually.
3) The prover operator is to attempt to be consistent in the volume of each proving run.
The volume of condensate used for each prove should be adjusted to the proving volumes
available.
4) Temperature measuring equipment used in conjunction with the prover is to have a
specified uncertainty equal to or less than the uncertainty specified for temperature
measuring equipment associated with the meter under prove.
5) Following the initial meter calibration, a mass meter is to be proved following a change
to the meter or repairs to the installation that will affect the meter factor.
6) The temperature element and/or transmitter loop is to be calibrated if the verified reading
is outside the acceptable tolerance limit of ±0.28°C.
7) At a minimum, one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating
temperature or as close as possible to the operating temperature to meet the tolerance
requirement of ±0.28°C.
8) The temperature loop calibration is to consist of a three-point test. The test will consist
of an ice water point (or a cold as possible when in remote sites), a mid-warm point
and a hot point (as hot as possible when in remote sites).
9) The static pressure transmitter is to be calibrated if the verified readings are outside the
acceptable tolerances of ±0.10% of range.
10) The static pressure loop calibration is to consist of a check at the zero, span, 80% (or
75%), 50% and 20% (or 25%) points.

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11) At a minimum, one reading must be applied (verified) at the current operating static
pressure to meet the tolerance requirement of ±0.10% of range.
12) A meter is considered successfully proved when the meter factor determined from four
consecutive runs are all within ±2% of the mean factor and the new meter factor is not
more than ±2% different from the previous meter factor nor more than 20% greater than
the original meter factor.
13) Other than the initial proving and proving after meter repairs, verification with one
proving run is sufficient if the new meter factor is within 0.5% of the previous meter
factor. Otherwise, four runs are required as above.
14) When continuous water cut determination is not installed, a liquid analysis is required
which is to identify the sediments and water (S&W) for the liquid volume. This S&W is
to be used in determining the total hydrocarbon liquid volume. This S&W percentage
may be applied at any point (as a function of the meter factor, in the FDC system, etc.)
providing that an audit trail exists that the S&W percentage has been applied to the gross
volume.
15) The meter factor is to be adjusted in the Remote Terminal Unit after each prove as
appropriate.
7.13.3.5. Calibration/Verification Procedures – Tank Gauging – General - Inventory
Measurement
1) Electronic level transmitters are to be calibrated in accordance with the manufacturer’s
recommended practice.
2) Calibration of transmitters is to include an audit trail to verify that the certified standard
applied to the transmitter is read at the termination point (logic device) for
calibration/verification purposes. The logic device is to be interpreted to be the device
that provides indication for the transmitter and is used in volume determinations.
3) Gauge board calibration procedures are to be in accordance with the manufacturer’s
recommended practice. A copy of the calibration procedure is to be produced on request.
7.13.4. Oil Measurement – Operation
Oil meters are to follow the above requirements as listed under Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement
except as follows:
1) Three consecutive runs must be used when proving, each with a tolerance of ±0.25
percent of the mean factor, and, following a meter calibration, the average meter factor
must be applied to meter readings until the next meter calibration.
2) Following the initial proving, each oil meter must be calibrated at least every month for
which one run is sufficient if the new meter factor is within 0.5% of the previous mean
factor; however, if the new meter factor is not within 0.5% of the previous meter factor,
the meter must be calibrated.

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Natural Gas, Liquid Hydrocarbon, and Oil Measurement – Operation – Reporting

7.13.5.

7.13.5.1.

Remote Terminal Unit Data – Audit Trail

1) Data downloads are to be kept for a minimum of one year and made available for viewing
by a representative from the OGC.
2) Remote Terminal Unit data downloads can be archived electronically and are not to be
submitted to the OGC unless requested.
3) The data is to be available in a format that can be interpreted by the OGC (i.e., PDF,
Word, Excel).
4) The data downloads is to include files as applicable to the Remote Terminal Unit in use
that provides the following:

a. Configuration file: file(s) containing the “load” used to configure the Remote
Terminal Unit.
b. Event log: file used to track changes to the configuration, volumetrics or other
system events.
c. Alarm log: file used to track alarm items.
d. Daily volume report: file containing the production history.
e. EFM report: file indicating flow parameters and flow calculations.
f.

Other reports (as applicable): speed of sound calculation verifications
(ultrasonic meters), meter self-diagnostic data downloads.

5) Data downloads are to occur at the same frequency as the calibration/verification.
6) Gas analysis updates in the production accounting system is to have an audit trail to
verify that an update has occurred. A paper trail is to be available for audit purposes from
the field to the production accounting system, specifically to the volumetric and
allocation worksheets.
7) Liquid analysis updates in the production accounting system are to have an audit trail to
verify that an update has occurred. A paper trail is to be available for audit purposes from
the field to the production accounting system, specifically to the volumetric and
allocation worksheets.
7.13.5.2.

Natural Gas Measurement – Operation – Reporting

1) Natural Gas Sampling

a. Gas sample analysis, reporting, and updating to the measurement and accounting
systems is to occur at the same frequency as the gas calibrations/verifications
for the measurement point.
b. The gas sampling points are to meet the requirements outlined in Section
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6.9.1.
c. Automatic gas samplers are also an acceptable alternative to spot sampling to
determine a representative gas sample.
d. All gas sampling points are to be identified with a tag to ensure a consistent
sampling location.
e. Gas analysis trending is recommended as a check on gas composition change.
f. As a minimum, gas analysis is to determine mole fractions for He, H2, N2,
CO2, C1, C2, C3, iC4, nC4, iC5, nC5, and C6+.
g. The H2S content in a gas stream with a concentration of 2100mg/m3 (1500
ppm) or less is to be obtained by gas sample and examined by gas
chromatography.
h. A Tutweiler test is to be used to determine the H2S content when the H2S
concentration exceeds 2100mg/m3 H2S.
2) Liquid Hydrocarbon Sampling – Liquid Measurement

a. Liquid sample analysis, reporting, and updating to the measurement and accounting
systems are to occur at the same frequency as the liquid calibrations.
b. The liquid sampling points are to meet the requirements outlined in Section

6.9.1.
c. Automatic liquid samplers are also an acceptable alternative to spot sampling to
determine a representative liquid sample.
d. All liquid sampling points are to be identified with a tag to ensure a consistent
sampling location.
e. As a minimum, liquids analysis are to determine volume fractions for N2, CO2,
C1, C2, C3, iC4, nC4, iC5, nC5, and C6+.
f.

The liquids analysis is to indicate the following:
i. Density.
ii. Sediment and water content (S&W).
iii. Molecular mass.

g. A vapour-liquid equilibrium ratio (K-Plot) is to be performed at three-phase
separation facilities as per the following:
i. When raw condensate production exceeds 10m3/d average over a reporting
period (monthly).
ii. Unless otherwise approved, K-Plot calculations may be performed on the first
two scheduled liquid sample analyses immediately after reaching the trigger
point of 10m3/d and annually thereafter.
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213

2013 214 . The liquids analysis is to indicate the following: i. Sediment and water content (S&W). Density. Liquids analysis trending is recommended to verify liquids composition changes. Liquid analysis trending is recommended to verify liquids composition changes. Natural Gas Measurement – Frequencies – Operation The frequencies stipulated for natural gas measurement under a Cross Border designation exceed the annual or semi-annual measurement frequencies for natural gas at well sites or plants or facilities.13. K-Plot results that provide a reasonable doubt as to the quality of separation will be subject to further scrutiny and/or action by the OGC. Each K-Plot result is to be available upon request by the OGC.6. June 1st. v. h. iii.1. The liquid sampling points are to meet the requirements outlined in Section 6.  An interpretation of the data. Molecular mass. iv. ii. Automatic liquid samplers are also an acceptable alternative to spot sampling to determine a representative liquid sample. 7. reporting.9. d. 3) Oil Sampling – Liquid Measurement a. The producer is to be responsible to examine and sign off K-Plot results.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations iii. e.  An explanation for the results of the sample. All liquid sampling points are to be identified with a tag to ensure a consistent sampling location. An analysis that addresses the following for each K-Plot is to be performed:  Theoretical K-Value versus Actual K-Value. c. b. and updating to the measurement and accounting systems is to occur at the same frequency as the liquid calibrations. Liquid sample analysis.

a Grace Period of four days may be used to determine if a Frequency Period has been missed. The four days will not be used to spread out the Frequency Period.0 150. Possible Reduced Period Frequency. outside of which the operator will be denied appeal.e. b. application can be made to the OGC to move to a Reduced Period Frequency. Approval to move to a Reduced Period Frequency will involve a consideration of the following: a. 6) Data downloads. then appropriate action is to be taken in regard to the three stages. A Discretionary Allowance of 5%of the Cut-Off Point will be permitted.6.13-1 Cut-Off Points for the Three Stages Stage Operand 1 2 3 < > > Volume e3m3/day 25. 5) At the discretion of the OGC. 3) On attaining the Cut-Off Point. Thus. i. if the cut-off volume is exceeded. Only the first Initial Period following the commencement of Cross Border measurement will applicable documentation be required to be forwarded onto the OGC no later than fifteen days following the month of production or as otherwise directed.. June 1st. Initial Period Frequency.0 And Operand Volume e3m3/day ≤ 150. 2) There are two modes: a. gas analysis and liquid analysis data for the Cross Border measurement meter information must be kept up to date and made available upon request by the OGC.13. Calibration/verification records. depending on the situation. 4) The OGC may use data filed for reporting purposes in ascertaining threshold violations. 2013 215 . 8) On completion of the Initial Period. the operator is to move to the next appropriate stage.1. meter maintenance reports. 9) The OGC will approve or reject an application to move to the Reduced Period Frequency. The cut-off volume is to be considered an absolute threshold.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7.0 The volumes indicated in this table are volumes that would be used for reporting purposes. the volume may include not only a gas metered volume but additionally a gas equivalent volume of liquid hydrocarbon production. Operating Principles 1) There are three stages with the following cut-off points: Table 7.0 25. 7) Initial Period Frequencies are to be maintained for the time indicated or until a Reduced Period Frequency approval is obtained.

will result in immediate revocation of a Reduced Period Frequency approval resulting in permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and all future stages. past or present. A change of operator may allow for a reconsideration of the Reduced Period Frequency. Operator’s compliance record with a Cross Border measurement approval. An inspection/audit that identifies non-compliance at any point in time with a Reduced Period Frequency at any stage. 12) A notice will be provided in writing to indicate that the operator has been permanently assigned the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and all future stages. The Notice will also identify that the operator is remanded to the Initial Period Frequency because of not meeting Initial Period Frequency calibrations. requires notification to be sent to the OGC’s Technical Advisor Responsible for Cross Border Measurement Applications so that their records can be updated accordingly. 13) Failure to meet a Reduced Period Frequency will result in permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at all future stages. past or present. will result in immediate permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at all future stages. the operator may follow the Reduced Period Frequency for the new stage. 15) The OGC may relieve or modify a Period Frequency requirement when the operator provides an explanation in writing as to why a Period Frequency was missed.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations b. June 1st. Changes to maintenance dates as a result of a stage change. Additional site specific inspections and follow up by the Compliance and Enforcement Branch may result from a failure to meet these requirements. 2013 216 . 11) Failure to meet an Initial Period Frequency will result in permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at all future stages. 14) A notice will be provided in writing to indicate that the operator has been permanently assigned the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and all future stages The Notice will also identify that the operator is remanded to the Initial Period Frequency because of not meeting Reduced Period Frequency calibrations. An operator that has had more than three communicated deficiencies relative to Cross Border measurement will be denied the Reduced Period Frequency for a period of three years. 10) If an operator is following a Reduced Period Frequency mode and production volumes change requiring a stage change. This is to be used only in extraordinary circumstances. An inspection/audit that identifies non-compliance at any point in time with an Initial Period Frequency at any stage.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7.13.2.0e3m3/day 1) Orifice Metering Table 7. Stage 1: Average Monthly Raw Cross Border Measurement Volume ≤25.13-3 Stage 1 Turbine Metering Description Turbine Meter Calibration Turbine Meter Inspection Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting ESD High Level Inspection June 1st. 2013 Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency .EFM 3 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 3 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 217 .13-2 Stage 1 Orifice Metering Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency EFM Possible Reduced Period Frequency Chart 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Thirdly 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Thirdly 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Semi-Annual Orifice Plate Inspection 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Thirdly ESD High Level Inspection 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Thirdly Description Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting 2) Turbine Metering Table 7.6.

EFM Ultrasonic Meter Calibration N/A 6 years N/A 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual 3 Months Monthly Semi-Annual Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting ESD High Level Inspection Speed of Sound Calculation Independent Verification Meter Internal Diagnostic Data 6) Coriolis Metering a.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3) Rotary Metering a. 2013 218 . Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. June 1st. 4) Diaphragm Metering a. Please consult the OGC due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. 5) Ultrasonic Metering Table 7. please consult the OGC.13-4 Stage 1 Ultrasonic Metering Description Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency . Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. please consult the OGC.

3.0e3m3/day 1) Orifice Metering Table 7.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7.13-6 Stage 2 Turbine Metering Description Turbine Meter Calibration Turbine Meter Inspection Temperature Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting ESD High Level Inspection June 1st.13. 2013 Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency .6. Stage 2: Average Monthly Raw Cross Border Measurement Volume >25.0e3m3 and ≤150. 2) Turbine Metering Table 7.0e3m3/day.13-5 Stage 2 Orifice Metering Description Initial Period Temperature Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification 12 Months 12 Months 12 Months 12 Months 12 Months 12 Months 12 Months Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting Orifice Plate Inspection ESD High Level Inspection Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency EFM Possible Reduced Period Frequency Chart Monthly Thirdly Quarterly Monthly Thirdly Quarterly Monthly Thirdly Thirdly Monthly Thirdly Thirdly Monthly Thirdly Thirdly Monthly Thirdly Quarterly Monthly Thirdly Quarterly * Charts recorders will not be acceptable for use with production volumes greater than 60.EFM 12 Months Semi-annual Semi-annual 12 Months Semi-annual Semi-annual 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 219 .

5) Ultrasonic Metering Table 7. please consult the OGC. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. 2013 220 . 4) Diaphragm Metering a. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. please consult the OGC.EFM N/A 6 years N/A 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly 12 Months Monthly Quarterly ESD High Level Inspection 12 Months Monthly Quarterly Speed of Sound Calculation Independent Verification 12 Months Monthly Quarterly Meter Internal Diagnostic Data 12 Months Monthly Quarterly Description Ultrasonic Meter Calibration Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting 6) Coriolis Metering a. please consult the OGC.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3) Rotary Metering a. June 1st.13-7 Stage 2 Ultrasonic Metering Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency . Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering.

13-9 Stage 3 Turbine Metering Description Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency EFM Turbine Meter Calibration 12 Months Semi-annual Semi-annual Turbine Meter Inspection 12 Months Semi-annual Semi-annual 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting ESD High Level Inspection 3) Rotary Metering a.4. Stage 3: Average Monthly Raw Cross Border Measurement Volume >150. 4) Diaphragm Metering a. please consult the OGC. June 1st.13-8 Stage 3 Orifice Metering Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency EFM 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days Orifice Plate Inspection 12 Months Monthly 60 days ESD High Level Inspection 12 Months Monthly 60 days Description Temperature Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting 2) Turbine Metering Table 7.6.13. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. please consult the OGC.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7. 2013 221 . Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering.0e3m3/day 1) Orifice Metering Table 7.

13-10 Stage 3 Ultrasonic Metering Description Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency EFM Ultrasonic Meter N/A 7 Years N/A 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days 12 Months Monthly 60 days Temperature Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/ Verification Gas Analysis Sampling Update Gas Analysis Measurement Update Gas Analysis Production Accounting ESD High Level Inspection Speed of Sound Calculation Independent Verification Meter Internal Diagnostic Data 6) Coriolis Metering a. Liquid hydrocarbon measurement in Cross Border scenarios is typically at flow-line conditions. 2013 222 . 7.7. such condensate would be required to meet the frequency requirements for dead oil measurement. June 1st. Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement – Frequencies – Operation The frequencies stipulated for liquid hydrocarbon measurement under a Cross Border designation exceeds the frequencies for liquid hydrocarbon measurement typically found in gathering systems and recognized as condensate or Natural Gas Liquids (NGL’s) at flow-line conditions.13. If condensate at equilibrium conditions were involved in a Cross Border system. please consult the OGC.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 5) Ultrasonic Metering Table 7. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering.

6) Data downloads.. Operating Principles 1) There are four Cut-Off Point Stages: Table 7.0 And And Operand Volume e3m3/day ≤ ≤ 10. outside of which the operator will be denied appeal. Possible Reduced Period Frequency. a Grace Period of four days may be used to determine if a Frequency Period has been missed. The four days will not be used to spread out the Frequency Period.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7. 7) Initial Period Frequencies are to be maintained for the time indicated or until a Reduced Period Frequency approval is obtained. The cut-off volume will be considered an absolute threshold. Only the first Initial Period following the commencement of Cross Border measurement will applicable documentation be required to be forwarded onto the OGC no later than fifteen days following the month of production or as otherwise directed.0 10. application can be made to the OGC to move to a Reduced Period Frequency. b. the operator is to move to the next appropriate stage. 4) The OGC may use data filed for reporting purposes in ascertaining threshold violations.0 2.e.13-11 Four Cut-Off Point Stages Stage Operand 1 2 3 4 ≤ > > > Volume e3m3/day 2. gas analysis and liquid analysis data for the Cross Border measurement meter information must be kept up to date and made available upon request by the OGC. Initial Period Frequency.1. i.0 60. 2013 223 .0 2) There are two modes: a. 9) The OGC will approve or reject an application to move to the Reduced Period Frequency.0 60.7. An operator that has had more than three communicated deficiencies relative to June 1st. 5) At the discretion of the OGC. 8) On completion of the Initial Period. b. Operator’s compliance record with a Cross Border measurement approval. Calibration/verification records.13. A Discretionary Allowance of 5% of the Cut-Off Point will be permitted. Approval to move to a Reduced Period Frequency will involve a consideration the following: a. 3) On attaining the Cut-Off Point. meter maintenance reports. if exceeded then appropriate action is to be taken relative to the four stages.

past or present. 11) Failure to meet an Initial Period Frequency will result in permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at all future stages.7. will result in immediate revocation of a Reduced Period Frequency approval and permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and all future stages. 12) A Notice will be provided in writing to indicate that the operator has been permanently assigned the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and all future stages. Stage 1: Average Monthly Raw Cross Border Measurement Volume ≤2. will result in immediate permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at all future stages. 15) The OGC may relieve or modify a Period Frequency requirement when the operator provides an explanation in writing as to why a Period Frequency was missed. 13) Failure to meet a Reduced Period Frequency will result in permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and permanent assignment of the Initial Period Frequency at all future stages.2. An inspection/audit that identifies non-compliance at any point in time with a Reduced Period Frequency at any stage. 14) A Notice will be provided in writing to indicate that the operator has been permanently assigned the Initial Period Frequency at the relevant stage and all future stages The Notice will also identify that the operator is remanded to the Initial Period Frequency because of not meeting Reduced Period Frequency calibrations. past or present. Additional requirements. June 1st. This is to be used only in extraordinary circumstances 7. 10) If an operator is following a Reduced Period Frequency mode and production volumes change requiring a stage change.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Cross Border measurement will be denied the Reduced Period Frequency for a period of three years. The Notice will also identify that the operator is remanded to the Initial Period Frequency because of not meeting Initial Period Frequency calibrations. 2013 224 . the operator may follow the Reduced Period Frequency for the new stage.0m3/day 1) Orifice Metering a. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering.13. An inspection/audit that identifies non-compliance at any point in time with an Initial Period Frequency at any stage. site specific inspections and follow up by the Compliance and Enforcement Branch may result from a failure to meet these requirements. please consult the OGC. A change of operator may allow for a reconsideration of the Reduced Period Frequency.

7. please consult the OGC.13-12 Stage 1 Turbine Metering . 2013 225 . 4) Coriolis Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7.Delivery Point Measurement Description Coriolis Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Liquid Analysis Sampling Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 7.3. Stage 2: Average Monthly Raw Cross Border Measurement Volume >2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2) Turbine Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7.13.0m3/day 1) Orifice Metering a. please consult the OGC.0m3 and ≤10. June 1st. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering.13-13 Stage 1 Coriolis Metering .Delivery Point Measurement Description Turbine Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration /Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Liquid Analysis Sampling Update Liquid Analysis– Measurement Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 6 Months Quarterly Annual 3) Positive Displacement Metering a.

June 1st.7.13. 4) Coriolis Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7.4. 2013 226 . please consult the OGC.13-14 Stage 2 Turbine Metering .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2) Turbine Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7.Delivery Point Measurement Description Coriolis Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration /Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration /Verification Liquid Analysis Sampling Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 7.13-15 Stage 2 Coriolis Metering . please consult the OGC. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering.Delivery Point Measurement Description Turbine Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Liquid Analysis Sampling Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 6 Months Quarterly Semi-Annual 3) Positive Displacement Metering a.0m3 and ≤60.0m3/day 1) Orifice Metering a. Stage 3: Average Monthly Raw Cross Border Measurement Volume >10.

0m3/day 1) Orifice Metering a.Delivery Point Measurement Description Turbine Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Liquid Analysis Sampling Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 3) Positive Displacement Metering a.7. June 1st. please consult the OGC. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. Stage 4: Average Monthly Raw Cross Border Measurement Volume >60.Delivery Point Measurement Description Coriolis Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Liquid Analysis Sampling Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 6 Months Quarterly Thirdly 7.13-17 Stage 3 Coriolis Metering . Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. please consult the OGC.13-16 Stage 3 Turbine Metering .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2) Turbine Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7. 2013 227 .5. 4) Coriolis Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7.13.

Delivery Point Measurement Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Monthly 60 days 6 Months Monthly 60 days 6 Months Monthly 60 days Liquid Analysis Sampling 6 Months Monthly 60 days Update Liquid Analysis Measurement 6 Months Monthly 60 days Update Liquid Analysis 6 Months Monthly 60 days Description Turbine Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification 3) Positive Displacement Metering a.13-19 Stage 4 Coriolis Metering .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2) Turbine Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7.13-18 Stage 4 Turbine Metering . please consult the OGC.Delivery Point Measurement Description Coriolis Meter Calibration/Verification Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Liquid Analysis Sampling Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting June 1st. 4) Coriolis Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. 2013 Initial Period Initial Period Frequency Possible Reduced Period Frequency 6 Months Monthly 60 days 6 Months Monthly 60 days 6 Months Monthly 60 days 6 Months Monthly 60 days 6 Months Monthly 60 days 6 Months Monthly 60 days 228 .

Operating Principles Oil measurement proving frequencies will be governed by the classification of the oil as follows: 1) Dead oil measurement is to be monthly.Delivery Point Measurement Description Period Frequency Turbine Meter Calibration/Verification Monthly Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Monthly Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Monthly Liquid Analysis Sampling Monthly Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Monthly Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Monthly 2) Positive Displacement Metering a.13-20 Turbine Metering .13. June 1st. 2013 229 . 7.1.8 “Liquid Hydrocarbon Measurement .8. 2.Oil Measurement .6. 2. 1) Turbine Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7.2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 7. Sec.13.13. please consult the OGC. Due to the infrequent use of this type of metering. Sec.Frequencies – Operations”. Oil Measurement Frequencies – Operations The frequencies stipulated for oil measurement under a Cross Border designation follow Section 7.8.6. 2) Group oil measurement is to be monthly.1 (4) Group and Test Oil Meter Exceptions – Live Oil and Chapter 2. The classification will depend on the design of the gathering system and how the oil meters fit into a Cross Border scenario. There will not be consideration given to Chapter 2.1 Dead Oil Meter Exceptions for the above classes of meters.

documentation must be kept and provided to the OGC upon request. g.9. and September to December. the operator should conduct performance evaluations periodically to ensure that the EFM systems are performing adequately. Bi-annually means at least once every eighth calendar quarter. 2013 230 . and October to December.Delivery Point Measurement Description Period Frequency Coriolis Meter Calibration/Verification Monthly Temperature Transmitter Calibration/Verification Monthly Pressure Transmitter Calibration/Verification Monthly Liquid Analysis Sampling Monthly Update Liquid Analysis Measurement Monthly Update Liquid Analysis Production Accounting Monthly For the purposes of this document.13-21 Coriolis Metering . Electronic Flow Measurement for Hydrocarbon Systems If an EFM is used to calculate clean hydrocarbon volumes. b. April to June. 7.13. each with different flow conditions. July to September. The OGC considers either one of the following methods acceptable for performance evaluation: 1) Conduct a performance evaluation test on the system by inputting known values of flow parameters into the EFM to verify the volume calculation and other parameters. Thirdly means at least once each calendar period as follows: January to April. Quarterly means at least once per calendar quarter. Annually means at least once every fourth calendar quarter. 2) The test cases included in this Section are for oil/emulsion meters. f. The hydrometer June 1st. the operator must be able to verify that it is performing within the OGC target limits defined in this Section. May to August. A performance evaluation must be conducted and submitted for OGC audit on request. Semi-annually means at least once every second calendar quarter. Monthly means at least once per calendar month. c. Calendar quarters are January to March.Oil Measurement . calibration or proving frequency has the following meanings: a. d. A performance evaluation test must be completed within two weeks after the EFM is put into service and immediately after any change to the computer program or algorithms that affects the flow calculation. For existing EFM systems. Test Cases 1 to 5 are for oil density correction from flowing temperature to 15°C.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3) Coriolis Metering – Delivery Point Measurement Table 7. e.

The OGC uses the following test cases to verify that an EFM system is correctly calculating oil flow rates.325kPa and 15°C. 2013 Outputs Oil density @ flowing temperature(kg/m3) Observed temperature (° C) Oil density corrected to 15° C (kg/m3) (with hydrometer correction) 875. Test Cases 6 to 10 are for volume correction using CPL and CTL factors to correct to 101. Table 7.8 705.9 689.1% of those recorded on the sample test cases.5 693 644 625.1% of those recorded on the sample test cases.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations correction is used to compensate for the glass expansion when used to measure the oil density. Evaluate the EFM calculation accuracy with a flow calculation checking program that performs within the target limits for all the factors and parameters listed in the test cases below. Density correction to 15°C is only required for blending shrinkage calculations.9 704. Chapter 9.45 53.4 786. The test cases recognized by the OGC were developed by the ERCB.4 84.9.1 (May 2004). Chapter 11. and configuration information is to be taken from the EFM and input into the checking program. provided that the volumes obtained from a performance evaluation test agree to within ±0. Other manufacturers’ recommended methodologies may also be used to evaluate the EFM performance. A snapshot of the instantaneous flow parameters and factors.13.1% limit is exceeded.8 231 . and the CTL calculation. The densities (Test Cases 1 to 5) or volumes (Test Cases 6 to 10) obtained from a performance evaluation test must agree to within ±0. the EFM must be subjected to a detailed review of the calculation algorithm to resolve the deviation problem.8 786. The hydrometer correction is based on API MPMS.5 779 120 11.7 660.05 25 942. mass-based measurement.7 Oil density corrected to 15° C (kg/m3) (without hydrometer correction) 945 689. Test Cases for Verification of Oil Flow Calculation Programs Density and volume corrections in the table below are based on API MPMS. and flow rates are not updated simultaneously.7 661.3 (November 2002). If the instantaneous EFM flow parameters. multiple snapshots may have to be taken to provide a representative evaluation. 7. flow rates.13-22 Density Correction to 15oC Inputs Test Case 1 Test Case 2 Test Case 3 Test Case 4 Test Case 5 June 1st.1. factors. If the ±0.

5 5 200 1.0112 1.325 corrected volume kPa volume (m3) (m3) 60 903.2 100 1008 89 3700 .00799 1.5 95.00034 15.9 400 1.00255 95. 2013 Outputs CTL to 15° C CTL & CTL CPL to CPL corrected 101.2 15.00365 136.0005 58.13-23 Volume Correction Using Pressure and Temperature Correction Factors (CPL and CTL) Inputs Oil Flowing Metered density Flowing pressure volume @ temperature (kPa (m3) 15° C (° C) [gauge]) 3 (kg/m ) Test Case 6 Test Case 7 Test Case 8 Test Case 9 Test Case 10 June 1st.5 700 0.98071 1.2 136.90802 1.8 58.5 40.7 250 875.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Table 7.95472 1.9 15 779 3.00013 252 252 150 640 75 1000 0.7 232 .

and for measurement but does not include a processing plant. or other materials. and/or carbon dioxide (C02). Absolute densities are generally expressed in kg/m³ at 101. a mixture mainly of butanes that ordinarily may contain some propane or pentanes plus. 2013 233 . Bias is the result of a predictable systematic error. June 1st.325kPa(a) and 15°C. steam. Butane: In addition to its normal scientific meaning. They are not a legal definition and the user is to refer to the appropriate Acts and Regulations for legal purposes. may include equipment or devices for separating the effluents into crude bitumen. Bias: Any influence on a result that produces an incorrect approximation of the true value of the variable being measured. totally reduced sulphur compounds. hydrocarbon. Acid Gas: Gas separated in the treating of solution or non-associated gas that contains hydrogen sulphide (H2S). and may include equipment or devices for separating the effluents into oil. gas. Calibration: Procedures or operations that establish the accuracy of the values indicated by a measuring device as compared to the values indicated by a measuring standard by making changes or adjustments to the measuring device. Authorized Commission Employee: An employee of the Commission who is designated in writing by the Commissioner as an authorized Commission employee for the purposes of that provision. Battery: A system or arrangement of tanks or other surface equipment receiving the effluents of one or more wells prior to delivery to market or prior to other disposition. Bias: Any influence on a result that produces an incorrect approximation of the true value of the variable being measured. Absolute Density of Liquid: The liquid’s mass per unit volume at a specific pressure and temperature. or water and for measurement. Allowable: Used in connection with a well. Absolute Density of Gas: The gas’s mass per unit volume at a specific pressure and temperature. gas. for water treatment and recycling. Clean Oil: Oil with 0.5% S&W or less. after application of any applicable penalty factor. gas. Absolute density of a liquid is generally expressed as kg/m³ at 101. means the amount of oil or gas a well is permitted to produce. Central Processing Facility: A battery/facility system or arrangement of tanks or other surface equipment receiving the effluent of one or more wells or a satellite prior to delivery to market or other disposition. or water for the injection and distribution of air. Bias is the result of a predictable systematic error. Accuracy: The ability of a measuring instrument to indicate values closely approximating the true value of the quantity measured.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Appendix 1 – Glossery The following definitions have been provided for reference purposes only.325kPa(a) and 15°C. in accordance with an order of the ERCB Board for this purpose.

or gathering system prior to delivery to market or prior to other disposition and is intended to maintain or increase the flowing pressure of the gas. June 1st. Crude Oil: A mixture mainly of pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons that may be contaminated with sulphur compounds. includes all other hydrocarbon mixtures so recovered or recoverable except raw gas. Dehydrator: An apparatus or a process designed and used to remove water from raw gas. Condensate: A mixture mainly of pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons. Compressor Station: An installation of service equipment that receives natural gas from a well. and that is liquid at the conditions under which its volume is measured or estimated. Crude Bitumen: A naturally occurring viscous mixture. which may be contaminated with sulphur compounds. 2013 234 . Delivery Point Measurement: The type of measurement required at a delivery point. that is recovered or is recoverable at a well from an underground reservoir and that may be gaseous in its virgin reservoir state but is liquid at the conditions under which its volume is measured. the total royalty rate for each well is the same. Disqualifying Criteria: Criteria that lead to an exception or exemption being revoked. Confidence Level: The degree of confidence that may be placed on an estimated range of uncertainty. Custom Treating Plant: A system or arrangement of tanks and other surface equipment receiving oil/water emulsion exclusively by truck for separation prior to delivery to market or prior to other disposition. mainly of hydrocarbons heavier than pentane. or if there is more than one working interest participant. or gas plant to gas plant meters. Dead Oil: Oil containing mainly pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons and is in a stabilized (degassed) form at atmospheric conditions. Delivery Point: The point at which the delivery of oil or gas production from a battery or facility is measured. includes any equipment for measurement.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Common Crown or Freehold Royalty: When all the wells in a battery/facility are produced under Crown mineral leases and the Crown receives the same royalty rate for each well. condensate. that is recovered or is recoverable at a well from an underground reservoir. the freehold mineral holder receives the same royalty rate for each well. If there is more than one freehold mineral holder for the wells in a battery/facility. that may contain sulphur compounds and that in its naturally occurring viscous state will not flow to a well. or crude bitumen. Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM): Any flow measurement and related system that collects data and performs flow calculations electronically. each working interest participant has the same percentage interest in each well in the battery/facility. Dead oil may be at the wellhead or battery/facility. such as sales. gas plant to facility. battery/facility. cross border. or when under leases granted by one freehold mineral holder. The volumes determined at this point are typically used in royalty calculations (royalty trigger points). Common Ownership: All wells in a battery/facility belong to the same working interest participant.

Ethane: In addition to its normal scientific meaning. thermal. pressure maintenance.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Emulsion: A combination of two immiscible liquids. or any other surface equipment deemed to be a facility by an authorized Commission employee. cycling. condensate. When a hydrocarbon liquid has an EVP above the standard pressure (101. Gas: Raw gas or marketable gas or any constituent of raw gas. Note: The primary device may consist of one or more elements necessary to produce the primary device signal. Flowmeter primary device: The device mounted internally or externally to the fluid conduit which produces a signal with a defined relationship to the fluid flow in accordance with known physical laws relating the interaction of the fluid to the presence of the primary device. Enhanced Recovery: The increased recovery from a pool achieved by artificial means or by the application of energy extrinsic to the pool. End device: means the tertiary device or equipment that records the various values used to calculate a gas volume.325kPa at 15°C). or explosive means. Exemption: Circumstances under which if specific criteria are met or approval is granted. 2013 235 . Equilibrium Vapour Pressure (EVP): The pressure at which a liquid and its vapour are in equilibrium at a given temperature. the end device may also perform the calculations necessary to arrive at the measured gas volume. In the case of electronic flow measurement. Flowmeter secondary device: The device that responds to the signal from the primary device and converts it to a display or to an output signal that can be translated relative to flow rate or quantity. Exception: Circumstances under which if specific criteria are met or approval is granted. crude bitumen. or  stimulating the reservoir at or near the well by mechanical. Error: The difference between true and observed values. measurement devices or procedures are allowed to deviate within specified limits from base measurement requirements. or injection to the pool of a substance or form of energy but does not include the injection in a well of a substance or form of energy for the sole purpose of  aiding in the lifting of fluids in the well. such artificial means or application includes pressuring. chemical. a mixture mainly of ethane that ordinarily may contain some methane or propane. measurement devices or procedures are not required to meet base measurement requirements. Facility: A gas processing plant. ERCB: Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board. Functionality Test: Refers to procedures or operations performed to metering equipment where there is no effective means of verifying the equipment using conventional techniques. or crude oil that is recovered in processing and that is gaseous at the conditions under which its volume is measured June 1st. the EVP at 15°C is the pressure base. production facility. or liquids that do not mix together under normal conditions.

Gas Processing Plant (Gas Plant): A plant for the extraction from gas of hydrogen sulphide. but limited to what can be produced without adversely and significantly affecting conservation. ethane. Gas Equivalent Volume (GEV): Gas Equivalent Volume. separation. helium. The gas volume equivalent determined from the physical properties of liquid at standard conditions. new wells or June 1st. dew point control. NGL. pentane plus. or exemption. carbon dioxide. and/or other facilities to another facility (usually a gas plant). ethane. line heaters. in the opinion of the Commission. Gas Battery: A system or arrangement of surface equipment receiving the effluent from one or more gas wells that might provide compression. propane. Group oil represents the total volume of oil.. or the opportunity of each owner in the pool to obtain his share of production. dehydration. natural gas liquids. This factor is mixture dependent and not a constant for all mixtures.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations or estimated. Group Oil: Oil that is grouped and measured at a facility where test oil is produced to. such as ethane. dehydrators. bitumen. or exemption is implemented. butane. unless at a single well battery/facility where group oil and test oil are one in the same. 2013 236 . Gas-in-Solution (GIS): Gas dissolved in an oil volume under pressure. and in some cases pentanes plus. the prevention of waste. is producing or is capable of producing from a natural gas bearing zone. as long as the wells do not meet any of the disqualifying criteria and there are no physical additions to the battery or facility (e. Hydrocarbon Liquid: A fluid in the liquid state that may consist of one or more of the following: oil. or other heavier hydrocarbon compounds. propane. gas batteries. Gas Equivalent Factor (GEF): A factor based on the composition of a hydrocarbon liquid mixture that is used to convert the same hydrocarbon liquid mixture to its equivalent gas volume. Good Production Practice (GPP): Production of crude oil or raw gas at a rate not governed by a base allowable. does not include gas processing equipment. Gas Gathering System: A facility consisting of pipelines used to move gas production from oil batteries. or other substances.g. reduction. Heavy Oil: Crude oil having a density of 920kg/m3 or greater at 15°C. High Vapour Pressure Liquids: Fluids extracted from raw gas that has been processed at a gas facility. condensate. Gas Well: A well in which casing is run and that. may include compressors. If the initial qualifying criteria have been met and the exception. or other gas handling functions prior to the delivery to market or prior to other disposition. testing frequency reduction. but does not include a production facility. Initial Qualifying Criteria: Criteria that must be met to qualify for an exception. it may remain in place indefinitely. and other equipment. Gas Fractionation Plant: An arrangement of equipment to reprocess an NGL inlet into one or more instream components. butane.

Ontario. Innage Gauge: The depth of liquid in a tank as measured from the surface of the liquid to the tank bottom or to a fixed datum plate. reduction. Linearity: The ideal accuracy curve of a volume meter is a straight line denoting a constant meter factor. the delivery point measurement uncertainty limits apply to the total volume determination only. Live oil is commonly measured at the wellhead or battery/facility. For emulsion. Measurement: A procedure for determining a value for a physical variable. or exemption to remain in place. Meter Factor: A dimensionless number used to correct indicated meter volumes to adjusted volumes if June 1st. It is produced either as a by-product of natural gas processing or during refining and processing operations. with minor components ranging from ethane (C2) to normal hexane (C6). If additions or changes are made to the battery or facility. LPG: Liquefied petroleum gas. Mean: A value in the middle of two extremes (the two values farthest apart in a group of values).Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations zones). Measurement by Difference: Any situation where an unmeasured volume is determined by taking the difference between two or more measured volumes. Meter linearity is expressed as the total range of deviation of the accuracy curve from such a straight line between the minimum and maximum recommended flow rates. LPG consists primarily of propane (C3) and butane (C4) in a mixture or essentially pure form. Live Oil: Oil containing mainly pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons that may also contain lighter hydrocarbons. also includes the gas equivalent volume (GEV) of measured condensate if the condensate is recombined after measurement with the gas downstream of the separator. Master Meter: A meter of known accuracy that is connected in series with another meter for the purpose of checking the accuracy of that meter and providing a meter factor. Maximum Uncertainty of Monthly Volume: Relates to the limits applicable to equipment and/or procedures used to determine the total monthly volume. Measured Oil: Oil measured using equipment and/or procedures meeting delivery point measurement requirements and/or uncertainty limits. Measured Gas Source(s): Single-phase measured gas source(s) downstream of separation and removal of liquids. and is not in a stabilized form. Injection/Disposal Facility: A system or arrangement of surface equipment associated with the injection or disposal of any substance through one or more wells. Measuring Standard: A device used in calibration or proving that has a known value traceable to national reference standards maintained by the National Research Council in Ottawa. the initial qualifying criteria must be met for all the wells or zones added to the battery or facility for the exception. 2013 237 . Liquid-Gas Ratio (LGR): A ratio calculated by dividing the total water and/or condensate test volumes by the measured test gas volume.

or carbon dioxide. The K Factor is typically determined by the meter manufacturer and does not take into consideration all of the specific operational conditions the meter may be subjected to. Pentanes Plus: A mixture mainly of pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons.. compressor station. also known as British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission. Metering Difference: The volume used to balance. helium. production.g. or crude oil. nitrogen. butanes. that are not defined as petroleum. MOF: Ministry of Finance. oil and gas battery/facility. and helium produced from a well. and reclamation of any production facility or plant. and all equipment for the wells in the battery must share a common surface location. recovered from natural gas. Natural Gas Liquid (NGL): Ethane. Natural Gas: All fluid hydrocarbons. similar to a single-well battery. OGC: Oil and Gas Commission. Methane: In addition to its normal scientific meaning. 2013 238 . similar to a single-well battery. and abandonment of a well. and all wells in the battery must be connected by flow line and delivered to the same facility. or pentanes plus. This “gauge” is then subtracted from the full height gauge (from the same reference point) of the tank to determine the depth of the liquid. Multiwell Group Gas Battery: Each well must have its own separation and measurement equipment. operation. June 1st. or for the general construction. Multiwell Group Oil Battery: Each well must have its own separation and measurement equipment. Oil: Petroleum (see Petroleum). Operator: The owner responsible to the Commission for the drilling. meter slippage. gas plant. carbon dioxide. meter wear).” which is used to convert the number of pulses generated by a meter into units of volume (where electronic pulse technology is the basis of the meter operation). and any other condensates. Oil Well: Petroleum well (see Petroleum). a mixture mainly of methane that ordinarily may contain some ethane. operation. propane. gas entrained in liquids. Outage Gauge: The distance from a reference point at the top of a tank to the surface of the liquid. Oilfield Waste: A substance unwanted by the generator substance or a mixture of substances that results from the construction. It is not to be confused with the “K Factor. and includes hydrogen sulphide. condensate. any difference that occurs between the measured inlet/receipt volumes and the measured outlet/disposition volumes at a facility. pipeline.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations the two volumes differ due to operational conditions (e. crude oil terminal. or any combination of them. on a monthly basis. completion. that is obtained from the processing of raw gas. which ordinarily may contain some butanes. before and after processing. gas gathering system or related facility. abandonment or reclamation of a well site.

Pool: An underground reservoir containing an accumulation of petroleum or natural gas. other paraffinic hydrocarbons. waste processing facility. and minor impurities. dehydrator. water injection station. The meter factor is subsequently applied to indicated meter volumes to determine the adjusted or corrected volume. June 1st. but does not include a gas processing plant. helium. which conveys petroleum or natural gas. separated or apparently separated from another reservoir or accumulation. on designation of an authorized Commission employee. carbon dioxide. the meter factor may be incorporated into the software such that the indicated meter volume is already corrected to read the adjusted volume. or some of these. Proration: An accounting procedure or system in which the total actual monthly battery/facility production is equitably distributed among the wells in the battery/facility. Prover Run: The operation of a prover or master meter whereby a representative volume is sampled and measured. or incidental to their operation. Provers typically use volumetric or gravimetric means to determine the quantity of the sample. a mixture mainly of propane that ordinarily may contain some ethane or butanes.) Raw Gas: A mixture containing methane. or water used or obtained in drilling for or in the production of petroleum or natural gas. Propane: In addition to its normal scientific meaning. or. waste disposal facility. that is recovered or is recoverable at a well from an underground reservoir and is gaseous at the conditions under which its volume is measured or estimated. Production Facility: A battery/facility. any other system of vessels and equipment designed to accommodate production or disposal. pumping station. If the meter is connected to an electronic readout. Prover: A device used to collect and determine the volume of a sample of fluid that has passed through a meter.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Petroleum: Crude petroleum and all other hydrocarbons. Proving: The procedures or operations whereby a prover volume is compared to an indicated meter volume (both corrected to applicable pressure and temperature conditions). or both production and disposal. (Care should be taken in such cases not to apply the meter factor again. The prover volume divided by the indicated meter volume yields a meter factor. line heater. Proration Battery: A battery for which all well production is commingled prior to the total battery production volumes being separated and measured (or estimated where appropriate) as single phases. and that sample volume is compared to the volume indicated by a meter through which the same sample has passed to determine a meter factor. Individual monthly well production volumes are estimated based on periodic well tests and are corrected to the actual monthly volumes through the use of proration factors. hydrogen sulphide. oil treater. or both. but does not include a pipe or system or arrangement of pipes to distribute natural gas in a community to ultimate consumers. that are or can be recovered in liquid form from a pool through a well by ordinary production methods or that are or can be recovered from oil sand or oil shale. and property used for. in such cases the meter factor should be indicated on the tag or label as being 1. regardless of gravity. Pipeline: Includes a pipe or system or arrangement of pipes wholly in British Columbia. 2013 239 . of well effluent products and byproducts. with.0000. nitrogen. gas injection station. compressor station. water disposal facility.

does not include a dehydrator. S&W: “sediments and water” commonly refers to settled solid and/or semi-solid components and water in tanks and other containment vessels. Revocation of Exemption: Criteria that leads to an exception. may include such materials as concrete.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Relative Density of Gas: The ratio of the mass of the gas to the mass of an equal volume of air. and storage or delivery. core-type sampling device used to secure samples from storage tanks. or is delivered to a storage facility. 2013 240 . Segregate: To confine each fluid in a well to its proper pool or flow channel so that it is separate from the fluid in or passing from or to any other pool. measurement. after which the fluids are recombined and piped to the main battery for separation/treating. Solid: A substance that does not contain free liquids and is not gaseous at standard conditions. It is also referred to as gas gravity or specific gravity of gas. S&W was formerly referred to as BS&W (basic sediments and water). Test oil is usually measured as live oil. or exemption being revoked and baseline requirements reinstated. plastic. and used by the upstream petroleum industry that is constructed of impervious materials to provide structural support. that is derived from crude bitumen and is liquid at the conditions under which its volume is measured or estimated. or test tank. or as an industrial raw material. which may also contain sulphur compounds. or steel. Stock Tank Vapours: The solution gas present in the oil/bitumen storage tanks that may be released from the tanks. treater. commercial or industrial fuel. Satellite or Satellite Battery: Surface equipment (located between a number of wells and the main battery) intended to separate and measure the production from each well. Test Oil: Oil that is measured at a test separator. Thief: An industry term for a bottom closure. Tank: A device designed to contain materials produced. Sales Gas (Marketable Gas): Natural gas that is available for sale for direct consumption as a domestic. Separator: An unfired apparatus specifically designed and used for separating fluids produced from a well into two or more streams. generated. if necessary through the processing of the raw gas for the removal or partial removal of some constituents. includes all other hydrocarbon mixtures so derived. commercial. fiberglass reinforced plastic. testing frequency reduction. A mixture mainly of methane originating from raw gas. Single Point Measurement Uncertainty: Relates to the limits applicable to equipment and/or procedures used to determine a specific volume at a single measurement point. whether this gas occurs naturally or results from the processing of natural gas. or industrial fuel or as an industrial raw material. and that meets specifications for use as a domestic. Synthetic Crude Oil: A mixture mainly of pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons. June 1st. Test oil is an estimate of a well’s production based on the test to test method. Solution Gas: Volatile hydrocarbons that are dissolved in solution with produced oil or bitumen.

or horizon in a well. develop or use a storage reservoir for the storage of petroleum or natural gas. Well Event: A unique identifier code for an interval. oilfield. boring. or in any other manner. water or another substance into an underground formation. or oil sands operations. Verification: Procedures or operations that establish the accuracy of the values indicated by a measuring device as compared to the values indicated by a measuring standard without making any changes or adjustments to the measuring device. 3) Used. air. that is: 1) Made or being made by drilling. each of which is identified as a well event. Waste Processing and Disposal Facility: A system or arrangement of tanks or other surface equipment receiving waste material for processing and disposition from any gas. Well: A hole in the ground. 2) Used. drilled or being drilled to obtain geological or geophysical information about petroleum or natural gas. 2013 241 . or horizons.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Treater: A fired apparatus specifically designed and used for separating gas and water from crude oil. from which petroleum or natural gas is obtainable. pool. zones. drilled or being drilled to inject natural gas. Truck Terminal: A system or arrangement of tanks and other surface equipment that receives hydrocarbon liquids by truck for the purpose of delivering those liquids into a pipeline. in connection with the production of petroleum or natural gas. pools. A well may be completed in multiple intervals. June 1st. other than a water source well. or to obtain petroleum or natural gas or to explore for. zone.

56 3.00 8.414 x (273.00 Mass per cent 0.55 100.28 11.93 6.62 8.08 1.91 4.15 + 15) / 273.13-1 Example Liquid Analysis Component N2 CO2 H2S C1 C2 C3 IC4 NC4 IC5 NC5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10 C11 C12 Total June 1st.00 16.31 3.00 4.27 5.70 3.65 8.58 0.83 5.49 4.00 242 . This is generally used for condensate and other hydrocarbon liquids. The volume analysis method is most commonly used in industry.62 15. 2013 Liquid Volume per cent 0.05 10.19 1.32 7.44 100. depending on the type of analysis of the liquid (by volume.80 8.36 1.92 5.17 12.325kPa and 0°C 1kmol = 22.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Appendix 2 – Gas Equivalent Factor Determination Gas Equivalent Factor Determination 3 3 3 Definition: Gas equivalent is the volume of gas (10 m ) that would result from converting 1 m of liquid into a gas.94 8. mole.325kPa and 15°C Table 7.40 7.87 10.78 5.22 1.81 0.33 3.26 4.68 2.35 10.06 0.56 8.98 9.00 Mole per cent 0.89 3.25 7. Method of Calculation The gas equivalent of a liquid may be calculated by one of three methods.35 4.80 3.05 6.645 m3 at 101.47 100. or mass fractions) and the known properties of the liquid.54 10.75 3.10kg/m3 at 15°C 1 mole = 22.14 6.09 0.15 = 23.63 2.414L at 101.17 14. Engineering Data Certain constants are used in the various methods of calculating the gas equivalent factor: Density of water = 999.

0090249 0.78 23. June 1st.0000000 0.0540 0.44217 0.0483 0.7 48. Wt.08 36.740 0.22906 0.5546 0.1275 0.14598 for C7 + factor in table Constants derived from GPA 2145-03.2247771e3 m3 (g)/m3(l) Note: For C7 + Volume Fraction: Properties of C7 + sample at 15°C: Relative Density (RD) = 0.645 x RD / Molecular Weight x 999.0098860 0.23763 0.3620 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x e3m3 Gas/m3 liquid at 101.325 kPa and 15° C 0.0765 0.0139352 0.0828 0.0081 0.0211728 0.0111677 0.14598 1.848 C5 and C7 + Properties Mole per cent Wt.0035737 0.0000 0.0006 0.6804 0.41 API Gravity 99.2 e3m3(g)/m3(l) = 23.052844 0.786 Molecular Weight = 127. per cent C5+ C7+ 38.613 0. 2013 243 . Sp.4 Liquid Volume per cent 54.3 35.28151 0.034708 0.2 0.5 Gas Equivalent Factor by Volume Fraction Calculation Component N2 CO2 H2S C1 C2 C3 IC4 NC4 IC5 NC5 C6 C7+ C8 C9 C10 Total Volume Fraction Liquid Analysis 0.18216 0.2247771 Gas Equivalent Factor = 0.4 Mol. API 107.2 Molecular Weight (gm/mol) 64.0394 0.786 59.1/1000 e3m3 (g)/m3 (l) = 0.24 46.0891 0.44120 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Properties at 15oC Total Sample C12+ Specific Gravity 0.20681 0.1117 0.036612 0.20468 0.27222 0.0000 = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Total Pseudo e3 m3 Gas/m3 Liquid 0.35 65.0314446 0.0 192. Gr.0004082 0.7 127.

08399 0.786 Molecular Weight = 127.0935 0.0493 0.034751 0.05359 0.1533 0.2 m3/kmol = Molecular Weight / 999.325 kPa and 15° C 0.042634 0.1617 0.0024913625e3m3(g)/m3 (l) Note: For C7 + Mole Fraction: Properties of C7 + sample at 15°C: Relative Density (RD) = 0.0000000 0.1462 0.645 x 0.0398 0.0050368 0.0079699 0.0041082 0.0019 0. 2013 244 .16198 for C7 + factor in table Constants derived from GPA 2145-03. June 1st.2335 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 1.115523 0.0008467 0.0000 0.0436 0.0378 0.05347 0.00930325 0.008646 0.1 / RD m3/kmol = 0.129803 0.08685 0.16198 = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Total Pseudo m3 (l)/kmol 0.1053653 Gas Equivalent Factor = 23.0158 0.11433 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Gas Equivalent Factor by Mole Fraction Calculation Component N2 CO2 H2S C1 C2 C3 IC4 NC4 IC5 NC5 C6 C7+ C8 C9 C10 Total Mole Fraction Liquid Analysis 0.0056346 0.103223 0.0122793 0.0995 0.0614 0.0000 m3/kmol 101.1053653/1000 Gas Equivalent Factor = 0.0133141 0.000066 0.

0405 0.0000 = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Total Pseudo Molecular Weight 0.122 72. June 1st.122 58.1956125 59.163256448e3m3(g)/m3(l) Note: For C7 + Mole Fraction: Molecular Weight is obtained from Sample Analysis Constants derived from GPA 2145-03.0687 0.4641 Molecular Weight x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 28.03352 88.149 72.069 44.613 / 88.479709 0.0130 44.175 127.1040164 4.096 58.0362 0.649701 2.0849 0.149 86. 2013 245 .6565376 2.0109 0.645 x 999.0008 0.613 Gas Equivalent Factor = 23.0114844 7.0556 0.0492 0.7030202 / 1000 Gas Equivalent Factor = 0.0000000 0.0000 0.082 16.1 x 0.7030202 Relative Density for entire sample = 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Gas Equivalent Factor by Mass Fraction Calculation Component N2 CO2 H2S C1 C2 C3 IC4 NC4 IC5 NC5 C6 C7+ C8 C9 C10 Total Mass Fraction Liquid Analysis 0.5497308 4.042 30.010 34.0224104 0.2 1.1056 0.0657403 4.0835 0.9345578 3.

3) + Water Volume per Month / (35494 / 3962. Specific Heat of Oil = 150 BTU/bbl/°F = 1698. They are only estimates and are to be treated as such. Method 1 This method uses the specific heats of oil and water to calculate the amount of fuel required to heat up one unit of oil-water mixture.8)) x (dT / Firetube Efficiency) The treater firetube efficiency can be obtained from the manufacturer’s specification.3 BTU/m3/°C Specific Heat of Water = 350BTU/bbl/°F = 3962.8 BTU/m3/°C Temperature difference [dT (°C)] = Oil (water) Outlet Temperature – Emulsion Inlet Temperature Assuming BTU content of gas = 1000 BTU/ft3 = 35 494 BTU/m3 Fuel consumption (m3/month) = (Oil Volume per Month / (35494 / 1698. 2013 246 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Appendix 3 – Determining Fuel Gas Estimates Treaters The two methods below can be used to estimate fuel gas use for treaters and lease fuel reporting. This method uses the percentage of water in the oil-water mixture to look up on a graph the heat required to increase the temperature of the oil-water mixture and then calculate the amount of fuel required.02831685 (m3/ft3) Appendix 2 Determining June 1st. Method 2 Use the graph below. Heat Required (BTU) = Emulsion per Month (bbl) X dT (°F) X BTU of Heat (from graph)/bbl/°F Fuel Consumption (m3/month) = Heat Required (BTU) / [Firetube Efficiency X 1000 (BTU/ft3)] X 0.

the density of natural gas (from gas analysis). Chemical Pumps. software). Manufacturer’s specifications can also provide fuel gas usage based on design criteria. This will be based on design criteria and will need to include usage rates. published data. Line Heaters Similar to the calculation of fuel consumption for treaters. June 1st. temperature change from inlet to outlet. efficiency factor (manufacturer’s specifications). 2013 247 . Usage rates will need to be considered in the calculations. Catadyne Heaters. Manufacturer’s specifications can provide fuel gas usage. Reboilers. TEG’s.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Fuel Gas Estimates Compressors Fuel gas usage data may be obtained from the manufacturer’s specifications or from Figure 15-35 of the GPSA Engineering Data Book – 12th Edition. and the volume of natural gas. Etc. fuel consumption for line heaters can be determined by using the specific heat of the natural gas (gas analysis.

treaters. Alternative calculations that utilize generally accepted engineering procedures and principles may be sufficient. June 1st. Appendix 2 has been adapted from the ERCB Appendix E – E1 Method to Estimate Fuel Gas in Guide 46: Production Audit Handbook.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Alternative Calculations There are available in the marketplace software packages that will perform volume calculations for line heaters. and compressors. 2013 248 .

Reporting of production for a facility containing a combination of different measurement schemes (mixed measurement). Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) Any flow measurement and related system that collects data and performs flow calculations electronically. Referenced in m3/e3m3. Definitions CGR ECF Condensate Gas Ratio . 2013 249 .3 of this document prior to implementing a reporting structure to determine which exemption. Reporting of production for wells utilizing a facility based exemption from annual well testing. Reporting of production for individual wells that are utilizing a well based testing exemption for both tested and testing exempt wells. The following exemption scenarios are outlined in this appendix: A. Operators must review Section 6. This appendix presents the details around reporting of facilities and wells that make use of the effluent well testing exemption process. if any. PA Production Accounting. June 1st. B. testing exempt wells.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Appendix 4 – Effluent Well Testing Decision Tree Accounting Sample Calculations Introduction to Volumetric Reporting for Effluent Metered Gas Production Utilizing the applicable effluent well testing decision tree to apply an effluent well testing exemption requires changes to the volumetric reporting methodologies. Includes all free liquid.A ratio calculated by dividing the total condensate test volumes by the measured test gas volume. LGR Liquid Gas Ratio – A ratio calculated by dividing the total water and/or condensate test volumes by the measured test gas volume. and C.7. This would include non-testing exempt wells. Effluent Correction Factor – A factor determined from periodic tests conducted at each well whereby a test separator is connected downstream of the effluent meter and the volumes measured by the test separator are compared to the volume measured by the effluent meter. “Measured” Gas Source Production that is diverted through a separator and includes measurement of each phase (gas and liquid) production. and measured production all included within a common reporting facility. pertains to your specific reporting facility. Referenced in m3/e3m3.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations WGR Water Gas Ratio – A ratio calculated by dividing the total water test volumes by the measured test gas volume. Referenced in m3/e3m3. June 1st. 2013 250 . GEV The volume of gas (e3m3) that would result from converting 1m3 of liquid into a gas by applying a GEF to the liquid volume. Referenced in e3m3/m3. This factor is mixture dependent and not a constant for all mixtures. GEF A factor based on the composition of a hydrocarbon liquid mixture that is used to convert the same hydrocarbon liquid mixture to its equivalent gas volume.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Multiple Inlet Separators into a Facility In the event that multiple inlet separators are installed in parallel to one another at a Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility. the decision tree must be applied individually for each separator. Figure A In the event that select wells deliver to a dedicated separator at a given facility. 2013 251 . the inlet separator volumes must be summed together to determine the total facility production. Each Inlet will be considered a separate reporting entity. See Figure A for example. See Figure B for example. June 1st.

2013 252 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Figure B June 1st.

3) Condensate volumes will be prorated based on one of the two following configurations: a. If the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate volumes are tanked and trucked or pipelined out for sale at the facility. Considerations 1) Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility based exemption may be applied if the facility’s annual weighted average LGR is <0.1. the GEV of the recombined condensate must be calculated and added to the measured group gas. flare and/or vent gas extracted from the production line (i. If the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate volumes are recombined back into the gas stream at the facility.0500m³/e³m³. Method of Calculation 1) Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility gas production will be determined at the group point and prorated to all wells within the reporting facility based on an ECF of 1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 1. Facility Based Testing Exemption Applicability 1) Applies when the initial assessment is performed on a reporting Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility following the introduction of the facility based effluent testing decision tree.00000 and a calculated facility WGR and CGR if applicable (condensate volumes are tanked at the facility).e. 2013 253 .1500m³/e³m³ and the facility CGR is <0. 2) Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility water production will be prorated back to each well based on a calculated facility WGR which will be applied to all wells. June 1st. b.4 Note: Any fuel. well or compressor station) within the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility must be added to the facility gas production volume. the condensate liquid volumes must be prorated back to the wells based upon a calculated facility CGR which will be prorated to all the wells within the facility.00000 applied to all wells. 4) Proration targets for effluent proration batteries must remain consistent with existing effluent proration facility limits outlined in Section 3. 2) Wells qualifying for effluent measurement and are included within a Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility based testing exemption will use ECF’s of 1. Applies where a Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility has qualified for a testing exemption based on the decision tree and an annual evaluation of this exemption remains valid.

Hydrocarbon Liquids Recombined at Facility Figure C Example: Typical Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility configuration in which liquids are recombined and a facility based exemption from annual testing is implemented. i. is for recombined hydrocarbon liquid production at a facility and. is for tanked and trucked out hydrocarbon liquid production at the facility. June 1st. Example Calculation . Section ii.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations The following are two examples to be utilized to model accounting recipes around: Section i. 2013 254 .

000000 N/A as Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent.00e³m³ GMC Group Separator Condensate Meter 0. 1.00e³m³ -Exempt from Testing GMG Group Separator Gas Meter 20. Based upon calculated facility WGR. EM1 Effluent Meter EM1 10.75m³ GMW Group Separator Water Meter 1. Based upon calculated facility WGR. June 1st.000000 N/A as Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent. See below for example calculation. A Volume Through Meter Applied ECF Applied CGR Applied WGR 1. A Meter Function in Fig.00e³m³ -Exempt from Testing EM2 Effluent Meter EM2 11.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Month End Hypothetical Accounting Information: Meter ID in Fig. See below for example calculation. 2013 255 .50m³ Applicability Criteria outlined in Chapter 6 are to be adhered to.

75 / 20.03750 Because the LGR is less than 0. The gas equivalent factor (GEF) of 0.75 / 20.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Effluent Facility LGR: Facility Water Volume + Facility Condensate Volume / Facility Gas Volume (e³m³) (m³) Facility LGR = (m³/e³m³) GMW + GMC / GMG = 1.25 / 20. this Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility qualifies for facility based well testing exemption providing there is no objections from working interest participants or freehold royalty holders (if present). This factor is only utilized as an example supplied from Appendix 1.00 = 0.1500m³/e³m³ and the CGR is less than 0.00 = 2.22478e³m³/m³ is used within the calculation to convert the liquid condensate to a GEV below. Each facility must determine its own unique GEF representative of the condensate production present. June 1st.0500m³/e³m³.11250 Calculate Facility CGR: Facility Condensate Volume / (m³) Facility CGR Facility Gas Volume (e³m³) = (m³/e³m³) GMC / GMG = 0. Gas Calculations The total reportable Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility gas production is equal to the sum of the group measured gas production and the group measured condensate production converted to a gas equivalent (GEV).50 + 0.00 = 0. 2013 256 .

00 + 0. 2013 257 .00 = = Facility Gas Proration Factor 0.17 Calculate Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Well # Well’s Monthly Effluent Metered Volume (e³m³) * Well’s ECF = Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) EM1 10. June 1st.75 * 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Facility Gas Production: Measured Facility Gas (e³m³) + Measured Condensate Production (m3) * GEF (e³m³/m3) = GMG + GMC * GEF = 20.00 EM2 11.00 Total 21.169 = Facility Gas Production (e³m³) 20.000000 = 11.00 * 1.00 + 0.17 / 21.960476 The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is prorated back to the wells by multiplying each well’s theoretical gas production (well’s monthly effluent metered volume * well’s ECF) by the facility’s gas proration factor.00 Calculate Facility Gas Proration Factor: Sum of Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) Facility Actual Gas Production (e³m³) / See Facility Gas Production Above / See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 20.000000 = 10.22478 = 20.00 * 1.

Condensate Calculations The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate liquid volume is recombined back into the gas stream at the facility and therefore reported as a gas equivalent volume.17 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes. There is no water inventory and it is assumed that there are no receipts for this example. There is no proration of condensate liquid volumes back to the wells independent of the gas production. The PA system will then calculate each well’s theoretical water production (well theoretical gas production * well WGR).00 * 0.17 = (m³) Facility WGR (m³/e³m³) 0.00 * 0. water is measured and put back into the gas stream (note that no GEV applied).960476 = 10.07437 This calculated Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s WGR will be input into the PA system for every well within the facility as all wells are exempt from testing. Production will equal the 1.960476 = 9. Water Calculations Calculate Facility Water Production: In this example. Calculate Facility WGR: Facility Water Production / Facility Gas Production (e³m³) = GMW / See Facility Gas Production Above = 1.57 Total 21. 2013 258 .50 / 20.50m³ monthly metered volumes.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Gas Production: Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Well # (e³m³) = * Facility Proration Factor Prorated Facility Gas Production (e³m³)1 EM1 10. June 1st.60 EM2 11.00 20.

5 / 1.961538 = 0.71 EM2 0. 2013 259 .00 * 0.961538 = 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) = * Well’s WGR (m³/e³m³) Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m3) EM1 10.00 * 0.56 = Facility Water Proration Factor 0.07437 = 0.79 Total 1.00 1.50 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.82 Total 21. June 1st.82 * 0.961538 Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Water Production: * Facility Water Proration Factor = Well # Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) Well’s Prorated Water Production (m³)1 EM1 0.74 * 0.56 Calculate Facility Water Proration Factor: Facility Water Production (m³) / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) = GMW / See Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above = 1.07437 = 0.74 EM2 11.56 1.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations ii. 2013 260 . Example Calculation .Hydrocarbon Liquids Tanked at Facility Figure D Example: Typical Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility configuration in which Facility liquids are tanked and trucked out while implementing a facility based testing exemption. June 1st.

Based upon calculated facility WGR.00e³m³ -Exempt from Testing EM2 Effluent Meter EM2 11.00m3 June 1st.67% DelCond For simplicity there are no trucked out volumes.00m³ OI% Opening Inventory Water Cut % 66. 0. EM1 Effluent Meter EM1 10. 2013 261 . See below for example calculation.000000 Based upon calculated facility CGR. 1.00e³m³ Vent Vented Gas 2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Month End Hypothetical Accounting Information: Meter ID in Fig.00m3 RecWTR For simplicity there are no receipt volumes. See below for example calculation.67% CI Closing Inventory 12. D Meter Function in Fig. D Volume Through Meter Applied ECF Applied CGR Applied WGR 1. 0.00e³m³ -Exempt from Testing GMG Group Separator Gas Meter 18.00m³ DelWTR For simplicity there are no trucked out volumes. See below for example calculation.00e³m³ OI Opening Inventory 10. 0.25m³ CI% Closing Inventory Water Cut % 66. 0.000000 Based upon calculated facility CGR.00m³ RecCond For simplicity there are no receipt volumes. Based upon calculated facility WGR. See below for example calculation.

00 - 0.00 = 2.0.00 = Effluent Facility LGR (m³/e³m³) 0. 2013 = (1 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Applicability Criteria outlined in Chapter 6 are to be adhered to.0.CI% ) DelCond - = (1 .00 - (1 .25 / 20.00 + 0.33 = 0.75 262 .6667) + 0.00) / 18.00 - 0.6667) 4.00 – 10.00 - 3.11250 Calculate Facility Condensate Production: Closing Inventory (m³) Dispositions (m³) + - Receipts (m³) + - RecCond Opening Inventory - (m³) = Facility Condensate Production (m³) OI * CI * (1 .25 * 10.00 – 0.00 * + 0.00 + 2.00 – 0.08 June 1st.OI%) 12.25 + 0. Calculate Effluent Facility LGR: Liquid Production (m³) / Facility Gas Production (e³m³) = (Closing Liquid Inventory + Deliveries – Receipts – Opening Liquid Inventory / Group Metered Gas + Vent = (CI + DelCond + DelWTR – RecCond – RecWTR – OI) / GMG + Vent = (12.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Facility CGR: Facility Condensate Production / (m³) Facility CGR Facility Gas Production (e³m³) = See Facility Condensate Production Above / GMG + Vent = 0.75 / 20.00 = 0. Calculate Effluent Facility Gas Production: Facility Vented Gas Facility Gas Production (e³m³) + GMG + Vent = 18. 2013 = (e³m³) Facility Gas Production (e³m³) 20.00 = (m³/e³m³) 0. the condensate production is not considered when determining the overall facility gas proration factor.03750 Because the LGR is less than 0.0500m³/e³m³ this Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility qualifies for a facility based well testing exemption providing there is no objections from working interest participants or freehold royalty holders (if present).00 + 2.75 / 18. Therefore.00 + 2. The total reportable facility gas production is equal to the measured gas production and does NOT include the GEV of any condensate production. Gas Calculations The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas proration factor is calculated slightly different when condensate volumes are not recombined at the facility.00 = June 1st.00 263 .1500m³/e³m³ and the CGR is less than 0.

2013 264 .00 * 1.000000 = 11.52 EM2 11.00 * 0.952381 = 10. Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Gas Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) EM1 10.00 Calculate Facility Gas Proration Factor: Facility Gas Production (e³m³) / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) = See Facility Gas Production Above / See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 20.952381 = 9.00 = Facility Gas Proration Factor 0.00 EM2 11.00 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.48 Total 21.00 * 0.00 * 1.000000 = 10.00 / 21.00 Total 21.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Well # Well’s Monthly Effluent Metered Volume (e³m³) * Well’s ECF = Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) EM1 10.00 Facility = Proration Factor * Prorated Facility Gas Production (e³m³)1 20. Condensate Calculations Where condensate volumes are delivered to a tank at the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility and trucked or pipelined for sale. the condensate liquid volumes will be prorated back to the wells based upon June 1st.952381 The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is prorated back to the wells by multiplying each well’s theoretical gas production (well’s monthly effluent metered volume * well’s ECF) by the facility’s gas proration factor.

00 = Facility CGR (m³/e³m³) 0. Calculate Facility CGR: Facility Condensate Production Facility Gas Production / (m³) (e³m³) = See Facility Condensate Production Above / See Facility Gas Production Above = 0. The PA system will calculate each well’s theoretical condensate production (well theoretical gas production * well CGR).00 - 3.00 - - Receipts (m³) DelCond - 0.0.08 = (1 .00 - 0.6667) + 0. Calculate Facility Condensate Production: Closing Inventory (m³) Disposition + (m³) CI * (1 .33 = 0.75 The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate production is to be prorated back to the wells based on a facility CGR applied to each well.OI%) = 0.00 * (1 .CI% ) + + - Opening Inventory (m³) Facility Condensate = Production (m³) RecCond - OI * (1 .0.25 * 10.03750 This calculated Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility CGR will be input into the PA system for every well within the facility that is exempt from testing.75 / 20. 2013 265 .00 - 12.6667) 4.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations a facility CGR. June 1st.

00 * 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production: * Well’s CGR (m³/e³m³) = Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) 10.03750 = 0.75 / 0.79 Calculate Facility Condensate Proration Factor: / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) = See Facility Condensate Production Above / See Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above = 0.36 EM2 0.949367 = 0.38 EM2 11. 2013 266 .949367 Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Condensate Production: * Facility Condensate Proration Factor * Well’s Prorated Condensate Production (m³)1 0.79 = Facility Condensate Production (m³) Facility Condensate Proration Factor 0.949367 = 0.38 * 0.79 Well # Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) EM1 0.41 * 0.00 * 0.00 Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) EM1 0. June 1st.03750 = 0.41 Total 21.75 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.39 Total 0.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Water Calculations Calculate Facility Water Production: Closing Inventory Opening Inventory Facility Water Production = (m³) Dispositions (m³) + - Receipts (m³) CI * CI% + DelWTR - RecWTR - OI * OI% = 12.00 * (0.25 * (0.00 = Facility WGR (m³/e³m³) 0.07500 = 0. 2013 1. Calculate Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) = * Well’s WGR (m³/e³m³) Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) EM1 10.00 - 0.17 + 0.07500 = 0. The PA system will calculate each well’s theoretical water production (well theoretical gas production * well WGR).00 * 0.6667) = 8.07500 This calculated Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s WGR will be input into the PA system for every well within the facility exempted from testing.83 Total 21.00 - 0.75 EM2 11.50 Calculate Facility WGR: Facility Water Production Facility Gas Production / (m³) (e³m³) = See Facility Water Production Above / See Facility Gas Production Above = 1.58 267 .00 June 1st.6667) + 0.00 - 6.67 = (m³) - (m³) 1.50 / 20.00 * 0.00 - 10.

949367 Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Water Production: * Well # Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) Facility Water Proration Factor = Well’s Prorated Water Production (m³)1 EM1 0.71 EM2 0.949367 = 0.58 1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Facility Water Proration Factor: Sum of Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) Facility Water Production (m³) / See Facility Water Production Above / See Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above = 1.50 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.75 * 0.949367 = 0.50 / 1.79 Total 1.83 * 0. 2013 268 .58 = Facility Water Proration Factor = 0. June 1st.

2) Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility water production will be prorated back to each well based on a calculated facility WGR which will be applied to all wells. Please see the sample calculations that pertain to your reporting scenario below. facility liquid production delivered to a tank at a facility must be prorated back to all wells based upon a calculated facility CGR and facility WGR.” Considerations: 1) Wells must qualify for testing exemption based on the Chapter 6 effluent well testing decision tree considerations. June 1st. These include: 1) Scenario 1 – Facility Includes Only Wells Exempt from Testing and a Facility Based Exemption Cannot be Applied 2) Scenario 2 – Facility Includes Only Wells that Require Testing 3) Scenario 3 – Facility Includes both Wells Exempt from Testing (Scenario 1) and Wells Requiring Testing (Scenario 2) 4) Scenario 4 – Facility Containing Mixed Measurement Schemes Note that the calculations below include examples for facilities that tank hydrocarbon liquid production and sample calculations where the hydrocarbon liquids are recombined and sent down the pipeline. Scenario 1 – Facility Includes Only Wells Exempt from Testing and a Facility Based Exemption Cannot be Applied Applicability This Section outlines the criteria where all individual wells may be exempt from testing even when the facility based testing exemption criteria cannot be met as a result of the Well Testing Decision Tree – Well Based Testing Exemptio. Well Based Testing Exemption There are four potential scenarios that could arise when implementing a well based exemption based on the specific delineation of the asset. 1. Method of Calculation 1) Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility gas production will be determined at the group point and prorated to all wells within the reporting facility based on an ECF of 1. 2) Assuming all the wells within the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility are exempt from testing due to the criteria outlined in the Well Based Testing Exemption. 2013 269 .00000 applied to all wells. the respective calculations would be the same as the example provided in Section ‘A’ above: “Facility Based Testing Exemption.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 2. In this case.

4) Proration targets for effluent proration batteries must remain consistent with existing effluent proration facility limits outlined in Section 2. Scenario 2 – Facility Includes Only Wells that Require Testing Applicability This Section covers the specific handling of individual wells that are not exempt from testing based on the decision tree and require effluent testing on an annual or bi-annual frequency. 2. Method of Calculation 1) The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility gas production will be determined at the group point and prorated to all wells that require annual or bi-annual testing based on the well’s theoretical gas production (monthly effluent metered volume multiplied by the calculated well’s ECF). b. 3) Condensate volumes will be accounted for based on one of the two following configurations: a. If the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate volumes are recombined back into the gas stream. 2013 270 .e. the GEV of the recombined condensate must be calculated and added to the measured group gas. and CGR if applicable (condensate volumes are tanked at the facility). If the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate volumes are recombined back into the gas stream at the facility. ECF. June 1st. If the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate volumes are tanked and trucked or pipelined out for sale at the facility. If the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate volumes are tanked and trucked out for sale at the facility. flare and/or vent gas extracted from the production line (i. b. 2) Water production will be prorated to all wells that require annual or bi-annual testing based upon their individual WGR (derived from the respective well test) multiplied by the wells theoretical gas production. Considerations Applies to wells not meeting testing exemption criteria. well or compressor station) within the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility must be added to the facility gas production volume. the condensate liquid volumes must be prorated back to the wells based upon a calculated facility CGR which will be prorated to all the wells within the facility. the gas equivalent of the recombined liquids must be calculated and added to the measured group gas volume. the condensate liquid volumes must be prorated back to the wells that require annual or bi-annual testing based upon their individual CGR (derived from the well test) multiplied by the wells theoretical gas production. and therefore testing of individual wells is deemed necessary to determine their respective WGR. Note: Any fuel.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3) Condensate volumes will be prorated based on one of the two following configurations: a.

well or compressor station) within the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility must be added to the facility gas production volume. 2013 271 . June 1st. Note: Any fuel. flare and/or vent gas extracted from the production line (i.e.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 4) Proration targets for effluent proration batteries must remain consistent with existing effluent proration facility limits outlined in Section 2.

Hydrocarbon Liquids Recombined at Facility Figure E Example: Typical Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility configuration including one well that requires testing. is for recombined hydrocarbon liquid production at a facility and. 2013 272 . June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations 3. is for tanked and trucked out hydrocarbon liquid production at a facility. Example Calculation . i. Section ii. Scenario 3 – Facility Includes both Wells Exempt from Testing (Scenario 1) and Wells Requiring Testing (Scenario 2) The following are two examples are to be utilized to model accounting recipes around: Section i.

28000 273 . See below for example calculation.Testing Exempt 11.00e³m³ GMC Group Separator Condensate Meter 1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Month End Hypothetical Accounting Information: Meter ID in Fig.00m³ June 1st. 2013 0. N/A as Well #3 Effluent Meter EM3 12. Based upon calculated facility WGR. See below for example calculation.930000 Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent. E Volume Through Effluent Meter ECF based upon exemption or well test data Applied CGR WGR m³/e³m³ based facility WGR or well test data N/A as Well #1 Effluent Meter EM1 . E Meter Function in Fig.000000 Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent. N/A as Well #2 Effluent Meter EM2 .00e³m³ -Testing Required GMG Group Separator Gas Meter 31.Testing Exempt 10. Based upon calculated facility WGR.00e³m³ 1.00m³ GMW Group Separator Water Meter 6.000000 Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent. 0.00e³m³ 1.

22 274 .0 + 1. which is only utilized as an example supplied from Appendix 1.22581 Gas Calculations The total reportable Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is equal to the sum of the group measured gas production and the group measured condensate production converted to a gas equivalent (GEV). Calculate Effluent Facility Gas Production: Measured Facility Gas (e³m³) + Measured Condensate Production (m3)* GEF (e³m³/m3) = GMG + GMC * GEF = 31.00 + 0.00 = 0.22478 = June 1st.22478 = 31.00 / 31.22478e³m³/m³ is used within the calculation to convert the liquid condensate to a GEV below. Calculate Effluent Facility LGR: Facility Water Volume + / Facility Condensate Volume (m³) Facility Gas Volume (e³m³) Facility LGR = (m³/e³m³) GMW + GMC / GMG = 6.00 = 7.1500m³/e³m³ a facility testing exemption cannot be applied. 2013 Facility Gas Production (e³m³) 31. Each facility must determine its own unique GEF representative of the condensate production.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Applicability As the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility LGR is >0.00 / 31.00 * 0.00 + 1. The gas equivalent factor (GEF) of 0.

970771 The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is to be prorated back to the wells by multiplying each well’s theoretical gas production (well’s monthly effluent metered volume * well’s ECF) by the facility gas proration factor.000000 = 11.00 EM2 11.16 = 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Well’s Monthly Effluent Metered Volume * Well # (e³m³) Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Well’s ECF = (e³m³) EM1 10.16 Total 32.00 * 1.00 * 0.00 EM3 12.930000 = 11.16 Calculate Facility Gas Proration Factor: Facility Gas Production / (e³m³) Sum of Well’s Theoretical Gas Production = Facility Gas Proration Factor (e³m³) See Facility Gas Production Above / See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 31.00 * 1. 2013 275 . June 1st.22 / 32.000000 = 10.

970771 = 10.16 31.00m³ for a monthly metered volume.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Gas Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical.16 * 0. Water Calculations Calculate Effluent Facility Water Production: The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s water is measured and put back into the gas stream. Gas Production (e³m³) * Facility Gas Proration Factor = Well’s Prorated Gas Production (e³m³)1 EM1 10.71 EM2 11. Calculate the Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Tested Well’s WGR = * (m³/e³m³) (e³m³) (m³) See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above * EM3 WGR = 11.00 * 0.68 EM3 11. Production will be 6.16 * 0.22 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes. Condensate Calculations The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate liquid volume is recombined back into the gas stream at the facility and therefore reported as a gas equivalent volume. There is no water inventory for this example and it is assumed that there are no water receipts. There is no proration of condensate liquid volumes back to the wells independent of the gas production.83 Total 32.00 * 0.970771 = 9.970771 = 10. 2013 Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production 3.28000 = June 1st.12 276 . Theoretical water volumes are first determined for the wells that require testing prior to determining water production for wells that are exempt from testing.

00 - 3.00 + 1.06 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s WGR: Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production / Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Test Exempt Well’s WGR = (m³/e³m³) (e³m³) (m³) See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above / See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 2.12 = 2.14357 277 .00 * 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Group Metered Water Volume Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Volume - (m³) Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) = (m³) GMW - See Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above = 6.16 = 20.00 + 0.16 = 31.88 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Group Metered Gas Volume Group Metered Condensate Volume + (m3) * GEF (e3m³) - Tested Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Test Exempt Well’s = Theoretical Gas Production (e3m³) (e3m³/m3) (e3m³) = GMG + GMC * GEF - See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above 31.22478 - 11.22478 - 11.88 / 20. 2013 0.06 = June 1st.

00 * 0.977199 278 .00 * 0.00 / 3.00 / 6.02 + 3.58 Total 22.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) * Well’s WGR (m³/e³m³) = Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) EM1 10.44 EM2 11. Water Production = Facility Water Proration Factor (m³) See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above GMW / + = See Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above 6.12 = 6.00 3.14 = June 1st. 2013 0.14357 = 1.14357 = 1.02 Calculate the Effluent Facility’s Water Proration Factor: Facility Water Production (m³) / Sum of Well’s Theoretical.

05 Total 6.54 EM3 3.977199 = 3.00 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes. One of the three wells require annual or bi-annual testing.Hydrocarbon Liquids Tanked at Facility Figure F Example: Typical Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility configuration where liquids are tanked and trucked out at the facility. June 1st.14 6. ii.977199 = 1.44 * 0.58 * 0.977199 = 1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Water Production: Well’s Theoretical Water Production Well # (m³) Prorated Water Production * Water Proration Factor = (m³)1 EM1 1.1 EM2 1. 2013 279 .12 * 0. Example Calculation .

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Month End Hypothetical Accounting Information: Meter ID in Fig. CGR m³/e³m³ based facility CGR or well test data Based upon calculated facility CGR.00 m³ 40. 2013 Group Separator Gas Meter Vented Gas Opening Inventory Opening Inventory Water Cut % Closing Inventory Closing Inventory Water Cut % For simplicity there are no trucked out volumes.00m3 280 .00e³m³ 1.Testing Exempt 10.19000 WGR m³/e³m³ based facility WGR or well test data Based upon calculated facility WGR.00e³m³ 1.930000 GMG Vent OI OI% CI CI% DelCond DelWTR RecCond RecWTR June 1st. For simplicity there are no receipt volumes.20m³ 0.000000 EM2 Well #2 Effluent Meter .00e³m³ 10.00m³ 40.00e³m³ 2.00m3 0. See below for example calculation.28000 29. See below for example calculation. Based upon calculated facility CGR.00% 0. F Volume Through Effluent Meter ECF based upon exemption or well test data EM1 Well #1 Effluent Meter .00% 17. 0. 0.000000 EM3 Well #3 Effluent Meter -Testing Required 12.00m³ 3. F Meter Function in Fig. See below for example calculation. Based upon calculated facility WGR. See below for example calculation. Trucked out water volumes For simplicity there are no receipt volumes.Testing Exempt 11.00e³m³ 0.

00 – 10.RecWTR – OI / GMG + Vent = (17.00 + 3.00 + 2. a facility based testing exemption cannot be applied.00 + 2.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Applicability As the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility LGR is >0. Calculate Effluent Facility LGR: Closing Liquid Inventory + Liquid Deliveries – Liquid Receipts – Opening Liquid Inventory / Facility Gas Volume (e³m³) Effluent Facility LGR = (m³) CI + DelCond + DelWTR – RecCond . the condensate production is not considered in determining the overall gas proration factor.00 281 . Calculate Effluent Facility Gas Production: Facility Vented Gas Facility Gas Production (e³m³) + GMG + Vent = 29.00 = 10.20 / 31.00 + 0.00 – 0.00 = June 1st. The total reportable effluent facility gas production is equal to the group measured gas production and does NOT include the GEV of the condensate production as the condensate is not recombined back into the gas stream.1500m³/e³m³. 2013 = (e³m³) Facility Gas Production (e³m³) 31.32903 Gas Calculations The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas proration factor is calculated slightly different when condensate volumes are not recombined back into the gas stream at the facility.20 – 0.00) / 29. Therefore.00 = (m³/e³m³) 0.

000000 = 11.00 EM2 11.930000 = 11.16 = 0.16 Calculate Facility Gas Proration Factor: Facility Gas Production (e³m³) / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Gas Production = Facility Gas Proration Factor (e³m³) See Facility Gas Production Above / See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 31.00 EM3 12.00 * 1.963930 The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is to be prorated back to the wells by multiplying each well’s theoretical gas production (well’s monthly effluent metered volume * well’s ECF) by the facility gas proration factor. 2013 282 . June 1st.00 * 1.00 * 0.000000 = 10.00 / 32.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Well’s Monthly Effluent Metered Volume(e³m³) * EM1 10.16 Well # Well’s ECF = (e³m³) Total 32.

40) 10.00 * + 0. Theoretical condensate volumes are first determined for the wells that require testing prior to determining condensate production for wells that are exempt from testing.CI% ) = (1.76 Total 32.00 - 6.64 EM2 11.963930 = 10.00 * 0. the condensate liquid volumes must be prorated back to the wells based upon each well’s unique CGR.963930 = 10.16 31.20 (m³) Facility Condensate Production (m³) = (1.00 - 0.16 * 0.00 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.20 The PA system will calculate each well’s theoretical condensate production (well theoretical gas production * well CGR).0.00 - 0. Condensate Calculations Where condensate volumes are delivered to a tank at the facility and trucked or pipelined for sale.00 - (1 . Calculate Facility Condensate Production: Closing Inventory (m³) Dispositions (m³) + - Receipts (m³) + - RecCond Opening Inventory - CI * = OI * DelCond - (1.0.963930 = 9. June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Gas Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production * Facility Proration Factor Prorated Facility Gas Production = (e³m³)1 (e³m³) EM1 10.00 * 0. 2013 283 .40) + 0.OI%) 17.60 EM3 11.00 = 4.00 * 10.

2013 Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e3m³) 19.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production: Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Tested Well’s CGR * (m³/e³m³) = Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (e³m³) (m³) EM3 CGR * See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 0.12 = 2.16 = 2.00 - 11.20 - See Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above = - 2.84 284 .16 = June 1st.12 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production: Facility Condensate Volume - (m³) Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Volume = Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) (m³) See Facility Condensate Production Above 4.08 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Facility Gas Volume - (e3m³) Tested Well’s Theoretical Gas Production = (e3m³) See Facility Gas Production Above - See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 31.19000 * 11.

05 EM2 11.10484 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production: * Well’s CGR (m³/e³m³) = Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) 10.84 = 0.10484 = 1.10484 = 1.20 285 .08 / Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production = (e³m³) Test Exempt Well’s CGR (m³/e³m³) / See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = / 19.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s CGR: Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above 2. 2013 2.00 Well # Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) EM1 June 1st.00 * 0.15 Total 22.00 * 0.

20 / 2. June 1st.12 EM3 2.20 + 2.32 4.972222 = 2. 2013 286 .02 EM2 1.06 Total 4.20 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.20 / 4.15 * 0.05 * 0.972222 Calculate Individual Well’s Condensate Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production * (m³) Condensate Proration Factor = Prorated Condensate Production (m³)1 EM1 1.12 = 4.972222 = 1.32 = 0.972222 = 1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Effluent Facility’s Condensate Proration Factor: Facility Condensate Production (m³) Sum of Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production / = (m³) Facility Condensate Proration Factor See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above See Facility Condensate Production Above / = + See Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above 4.12 * 0.

40) + 3.16 = June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Water Calculations Calculate Effluent Facility Water Production: Closing Inventory Dispositions + (m³) - Receipts (m³) - Opening Inventory (m³) (m³) Facility Water = Production (m³) OI * CI * (CI% ) + DelWTR - RecWTR - = (OI %) 17. Calculate the Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Tested Well’s WGR * (m³/e³m³) Well’s Theoretical Gas Production = (e³m³) EM3 WGR * See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 0.28000 * 11.20 - 0.00 - 4.20 - 0.40) = 6.00 - 10.00 The PA system will calculate each well’s theoretical water production (well theoretical gas production * well WGR).00 * (0.80 + 3.00 = 6.12 287 .00 * (0. 2013 Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) 3.

88 June 1st.00 - See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 11. 2013 Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Test Exempt Well’s WGR = / See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = / 19.00 - 3.16 = 19.14516 288 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Facility Water Volume Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Volume - (m³) = (m³) See Facility Water Production Above - See Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above = 6.84 = (m³/e³m³) 0.12 = Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) 2.88 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Tested Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Group Gas Volume (e3m³) See Facility Gas Production Above Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e3m³) = (e3m³) - 31.84 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s WGR: Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production / (e³m³) (m³) See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above 2.

972447 289 .14516 = 1.17 = June 1st.00 * 0.00 * 0.05 Calculate the Effluent Facility’s Water Proration Factor: Facility Water Production (m³) / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Water Production = (m³) Effluent Facility Water Proration Factor See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above See Facility Water Production Above / + = See Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above 6.05 + 3.12 = 6.60 Total 22.45 EM2 11.00 3.14516 = 1.00 / 6.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) * Well’s WGR (m³/e³m³) = Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) EM1 10.00 / 3. 2013 0.

12 * 0. Method of Calculation 1) When a facility receives measured gas production (production streams utilizing a separator.60 * 0.00 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.17 6.Facility Containing Mixed Measurement Schemes Applicability This Section provides the detailed method of calculation and examples for reporting production from the following sources: 1) Effluent metered wells that are testing exempt based on the applicable Effluent Well Testing Decision Tree 2) Effluent metered wells that are require testing to be conducted based on the Effluent Well Testing Decision Tree – Well Based Testing Exemption 3) Measured gas sources that produce to a common facility in which effluent wells also deliver into.45 * 0.5 must be adhered to as applicable. well or compressor station) within the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility must be added to the facility gas production volume. or gas with free liquids removed) into a Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility. Note: Any fuel. Scenario 4 .56 EM3 3. upstream of the effluent June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Water Production * (m³) Water Proration Factor = Prorated Water Production (m³)1 EM1 1.e. flare and/or vent gas extracted from the production line (i.972447 = 3.41 EM2 1.972447 = 1.03 Total 6. 4.972447 = 1. Considerations 1) Applicable Measurement by Difference requirements outlined in Section 5. 2) Proration targets for effluent proration batteries must remain consistent with existing effluent proration facility limits outlined in Chapter 3. 2013 290 .

4) If the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility produces its hydrocarbon liquids to a tank the operator must report the condensate for the measured source as a receipt – not as a GEV of gas.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations facility group separator. 2013 291 . The following are two examples to be utilized to model accounting recipes around: Section i.. 2) The PA system is to calculate the total effluent facility production by first subtracting off the measured production to derive the facility’s gas production subject to a proration. Section ii. June 1st. Tanked and trucked out hydrocarbon liquid production from the Facility.5. Recombined hydrocarbon liquid production at the Facility and. then the operator is to calculate the gas equivalent of the recombined hydrocarbon liquids and add the gas equivalent volume to the metered gas volume. operators must ensure that the measured gas source remains whole and is not subject to the facilities proration factor’s as outlined in Section 5. 3) Should a facility be recombining liquids for sale.

2 wells that are exempt from testing and one well that requires testing based on the Well Testing Decision Tree.Hydrocarbon Liquids Recombined at Facility Figure G Example: Typical Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility configuration that recombines liquid volumes. 2013 292 . June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations i. Example Calculations . The reporting facility contains multiple measurement schemes including: one measured well reported within the facility.

Applied WGR Based upon calculated facility WGR. G Meter Function in Fig.00e³m³ 3. See below for example calculation. Based upon calculated facility WGR.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Month End Hypothetical Accounting Information: Meter ID in Fig.00e³m³ 0.00m³ Applicability As the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility LGR is >0.00e³m³ 2. G Well #1 Effluent Meter -Exempt from Testing EM1 Volume Through Meter 10. N/A as Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent.00e³m³ 1. 2 wells are exempt from testing based on the Well Testing Decision Tree. See below for example calculation.00m³ 40. 0.00e³m³ Applied ECF 1.000000 EM2 Well #2 Effluent Meter -Exempt from Testing 11. For the purposes of this example.1500m³/e³m³ a facility based well testing exemption cannot be applied.00m³ 11.000000 EM3 Well #3 Effluent Meter -Testing Required 12.00m³ 5.28000 9. June 1st. 2013 293 . N/A as Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent.930000 M4G M4C M4W GMG GMC GMW Well #4 Gas Meter Well #4 Condensate Meter Well #4 Water Meter Group Separator Gas Meter Group Separator Condensate Meter Group Separator Water Meter Applied CGR N/A as Facility Condensate is Recombined back into the gas stream and reported as a gas equivalent.

00 + 3.00 – 9. Calculate the Facility’s Gas Production: Measured Facility Gas (e³m³) + Measured Condensate Production (m3)* GEF = Facility Gas Production (e3m3) (e³m³/m3) GMG + GMC * GEF = 40.22581 Gas Calculations The total reportable Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is equal to the sum of the group measured gas production and the group measured liquid condensate production converted to a GEV less the measured receipts. The GEF factor (0.00 + 3. Each facility must determine a unique GEF that is representative of their condensate production.00 * 0.00 – 5.00 ) / 40.67434 = June 1st.00 – 2.67 294 .00 + 0.00 = Effluent Facility LGR (m³/e³m³) 0.22478e³m³/m³) is used to convert the condensate to a GEV and is only utilized as an example value referenced from Appendix 1. 2013 40.00 = 7.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Effluent Facility’s LGR: Facility Water Volume + Facility Condensate Volume – Well #4 Water Meter – Well #4 Condensate Meter (m³) / (GMW + GMC – M4W – M4C) Facility Gas Volume – Well #4 Gas Meter (e³m³) = / GMG – M4G = (11.00 / 31.22478 = 40.

00 + 0.00 June 1st.000000 = 11.00 * 1.44956 = Measured Well’s Gas (e³m³) Measured Well’s Gas Production (e³m³) 9.00 + 2.000000 = 10.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Measured Gas Wells Production + Measured Well’s Condensate Production (m3) * GEF(e³m³/m3) = M4G + M4C * GEF = 9.16 295 .00 * 0. 2013 32.00 * 1.22478 = 9.00 * 0.00 EM2 11.45 Calculate Effluent Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Well # Well’s Monthly Metered Volume * Well’s ECF = (e³m³) Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) EM1 10.00 EM3 12.16 Total 33.930000 = 11.

16 = 31.16 = – See Measured Gas Well’s Gas Production Above 0.970771 The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is then to be prorated back to the effluent wells by multiplying each well’s theoretical gas production (well’s monthly effluent metered volume * well’s ECF) by the facility gas proration factor.22 / 32. Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Gas Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production * (e³m³) Prorated Facility Gas Production (e³m³)1 Facility Gas Proration Factor = EM1 10.61 40. 2013 296 .45 Total 41.970771 = 10.67 – 9.71 EM2 11.67 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.970771 = 9.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Effluent Facility Gas Proration Factor: Facility Gas Production Measured Gas Well’s Gas Production(e³m³) / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Gas Production = Facility Gas Proration Factor (e³m³) See Facility Gas Production Above / See Well’s theoretical Gas Production Above = 40.45 * N/A – Measured Receipt = 9.45 / 32.16 * 0.970771 = 10.83 M4 9.00 * 0. June 1st.00 * 0.68 EM3 11.

00 * 0. Effluent Facility’s Water Production GMW = 11.28000 * 11. There is no proration of condensate liquid volumes back to the wells independent of the gas production.12 297 . Measured water receipts must be deducted from the facility water prior to the theoretical water volumes being determined for the wells that require testing.16 = June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Condensate Calculations The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s condensate liquid volume is recombined back into the gas stream at the facility and therefore reported as a gas equivalent volume.28000 * 12.0m³ Calculate the Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Tested Well’s WGR = * (m³/e³m³) Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production (e³m³) (m³) EM3 WGR * EM3 * EM3 ECF = 0. Then a facility is able to determine water production for wells that are exempt from testing. 2013 3. Water Calculations The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s water production volume must be prorated back to the effluent wells based upon applicable WGR’s.930000 = 0.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Facility Water – Measured Well’s Water Receipt - Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) = Test Exempted Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) (m³) GMW – M4W - See Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above 11.00 + 9. 2013 = Test Exempted Well’s Theoretical Gas Production M4G + - 40.00 + - (3.00 .00 * 0.00 * 0.22478) June 1st.12 = = 2.06 298 .00 * 0.00 - 3.00 - 3.16 = (M4C * GEF) 40.22478) - 9.88 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Facility Gas (e3m³) - Measured Gas Receipts (e3m³) GMG + (GMC * GEF) (e3m³) (e3m³) - EM3 * EM3 ECF = - 12.930000 = - 11.5.67 - Tested Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (2.45 20.12 = 6.

2013 Effluent Facility Water Proration Factor 0.14357 = 1.00 * 0.00 * 0.14 = June 1st.00 / 6.00 – 5.14357 = 1.977199 299 .58 EM3 11.44 EM2 11.14 = 6.00 / 6.16 * 0.16 6.28000 = 3.14357 Calculate the Effluent Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) * Well’s WGR (m³/e³m³) = Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) EM1 10.06 = 0.88 Test Exempt Wells WGR (m³/e³m³) / See Test Exempted Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = / 20.12 Total 32.14 Calculate the Effluent Facility’s Water Proration Factor: Facility Water to be Prorated (m³) / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Water Production = (m³) GMW – M4W / See Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above = 11.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s WGR: Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production Exempt Wells Theoretical Gas Production / = (e³m³) (m³) See Test Exempted Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above 2.

58 * 0.14 11.41 EM2 1.977199 = 1.05 M4 5.44 * 0. June 1st.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Water Production: Well’s Theoretical Water Production Well # (m³) Prorated Water Production Water Proration Factor * = (m³)1 EM1 1.12 * 0.54 EM3 3.00 * N/A – Measured Receipt = 5.977199 = 3.00 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.977199 = 1. 2013 300 .00 Total 11.

Example Calculations . 2013 301 . June 1st.Hydrocarbon Liquids Tanked at Facility Figure H Example: Typical Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility configuration wher liquids are tanked and trucked out at the Fcaility. The reporting facility contains multiple measurement schemes including: with a measured gas source tied in upstream of the effluent facility’s group seperator. 2 wells that are exempt from testing and one well that requires testing based on the Well Testing Decision Tree.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations ii.

See below for example calculation.30m³ 0. 2013 Applied CGR Based upon calculated facility CGR. Applied WGR Based upon calculated facility WGR.00m³ 38.000000 EM2 Well # 2 Effluent Meter -Exempt from Testing 11.00m³ 2. June 1st.00m³ 30. H Volume Through Meter Applied ECF EM1 Well # 1 Effluent Meter -Exempt from Testing 10.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Month End Hypothetical Accounting Information: Meter ID in Fig.00e³m³ 2.930000 EM3 M4G M4C M4W GMG VENT OI OI% CI CI% DelCond DelWTR RecCond RecWTR Well # 3 Effluent Meter -Testing Required Well # 4 Gas Meter Well # 4 Condensate Meter Well # 4 Water Meter Group Separator Gas Meter Vented Gas Opening Inventory Opening Inventory Water Cut % Closing Inventory Closing Inventory Water Cut % Trucked Out Condensate Volumes Measured at Delivery Point Trucked Out Water Volumes Determined at Delivery Point For simplicity there are no receipt volumes.00m3 302 .00m³ 30.000000 12. Based upon calculated facility CGR.00% 13. See below for example calculation.00e³m³ 1.00m3 0.00e³m³ 10. H Meter Function in Fig.54000 0. Based upon calculated facility WGR. See below for example calculation. For simplicity there are no receipt volumes.00e³m³ 0.70m³ 5. See below for example calculation.28000 9.00e³m³ 1.00e³m³ 2. 0.00% 7.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Applicability As the Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility LGR is >0.00 – 0.1500m³/e³m³ and therefore a facility well testing exemption cannot be applied.00 – 2.00 . Calculate the Facility’s Gas Production: Facility Vented Gas Facility Gas Production (e³m³) + GMG + Vent = 38.00 – 2. 2013 = (e³m³) Facility Gas Production (e³m³) 40.00 / 31. For the purposes of this example.00 + 2.00 = June 1st.00 + 7.0 – 9.30 – 0. 2 wells are exempt from testing based on the Well Testing Decision Tree.10. Calculate Effluent Facility LGR: Monthly Liquid Effluent Production / Effluent Facility Gas Volume (m³) = (e³m³) Effluent Facility LGR (m³/e³m³) Closing Liquid Inventory + Liquid Deliveries – Liquid Receipts – Well #4 Condensate Meter – Well #4 Water Meter – Opening Liquid Inventory / Group meter + Tank Vent – Well #4 Gas Meter = CI + DelCond + DelWTR – RecCond – RecWTR – M4C – M4W – OI / GMG + Vent – M4G = 13.0 = 12.38710 Gas Calculations The total reportable Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is equal to the sum of the group measured gas plus vent gas off the condensate production tank.70 + 5.00 = 0.00 / 38.00 303 .0 + 2.

00 * 0. 2013 32.000000 = 11.00 June 1st.44956 = Measured Well’s Gas Production (e³m³) 9.00 EM2 11.00 EM3 12.00 * 1.000000 = 10.16 304 .00 + 0.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Measured Well’s Monthly Metered Gas Volume: Measured Well’s Gas + Measured Well’s Condensate Production (m3)* GEF = (e³m³/m3) (e³m³) M4G + M4C * GEF = 9.22478 = 9.45 Calculate Effluent Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Well # Well’s Monthly Metered Volume * Well’s ECF = (e³m³) Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) EM1 10.00 + 2.00 * 0.16 Total 32.930000 = 11.00 * 1.

Calculate Individual Well’s Prorated Gas Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production(e³m³) * Facility Gas Proration Factor = Prorated Facility Gas Production (e³m³)1 EM1 10.949938 = 10.949938 = 9.16 = Facility Gas Production Measured Gas Wells Gas Production (e³m³) Facility Gas Proration Factor See Facility Gas Production Above – See Measured Well’s Gas Production Above 0.45 / 32.949938 The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s gas production is to be prorated back to the effluent wells by multiplying each well’s theoretical gas production (well’s monthly effluent metered volume * well’s ECF) by the facility gas proration factor. June 1st.949938 = 10.45 * N/A – Measured Receipt = 9.60 M4 9. 2013 305 .00 – 9.00 * 0.16 = 30.61 40.45 EM3 11.50 EM2 11.16 * 0.00 * 0.45 Total 41.55 / 32.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Effluent Facility Gas Proration Factor: / Sum of Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) = / See Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 40.00 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.

30) 9.80 Calculate Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production: Tested Well’s CGR Tested Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) * EM3 EM3 * ECF * EM3 CGR = EM3 12 * 0.930000 * 0.10 = (1 .0. 2013 306 .0.00 * 10.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Condensate Calculations Calculate Facility Condensate Production: Closing Inventory (m³) Dispositions (m³) + - Receipts (m³) + - RecCond Opening Inventory - CI * = (m³) Facility Condensate Production (m³) OI * DelCond - (1.03 The PA system will calculate each well’s theoretical condensate production (well theoretical gas production * well CGR).70 - 0.16 * 0.70 - 0. June 1st.00 - (1 .00 = 9.00 - 7.54000 = Well # = (m³/e³m³) Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) 6.0 * + 7.30) + 7.OI%) 13.CI% ) = (1 .54000 = EM3 11.

80 - 2.84 = June 1st.00 * 0.00 Facility Gas Volume (e3m³) Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e3m³) Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s CGR: Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) / See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above / See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 1.00 - 12. 2013 (e³m³) (m³/e³m³) 0.77 / 19.930000 = - 9.16 = 19.00 40.00 - 11.03 Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) 1.77 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: - Tested Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e3m³) = M4G - EM3 * EM3 ECF = - 9.08921 307 .00 + 2.00 - 6.84 = Test Exempt Well’s CGR - Measured Well’s Gas Volume (e3m³) GMG + Vent - 38.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production: Facility Condensate Volume (m³) - Measured Well’s Condensate Volume (m³) - Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Volume (m³) = = = See Facility Condensate Production Above - M4C - See Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above 9.

Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production: Well # Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) * Well’s CGR (m³/e³m³) = Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) EM1 10.00 / 1.03 = 7.98 Total 22.00 * 0.90 = June 1st.987342 308 . 2013 Effluent Facility Condensate Proration Factor See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above See Facility Condensate Production Above - Sum of Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production (m³) 0.87 Calculate the Effluent Facility’s Condensate Proration Factor: Facility Condensate Production .Measured Well’s Condensate Production (m³) / = / See Measured Well’s Condensate Production Above + = See Tested Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production Above 9.00 * 0.89 EM2 11.00 1.80 / 7.08921 = 0.87 + 6.80 – 2.08921 = 0.

90 + 5.80 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.987342 = 5.00 * N/A Measured Receipt = 2.00 - 10.98 * 0.30 - 0.987342 = 0.95 M4C 2.30 = 3.3 + 5.00 Total 9. Measured water receipts must be deducted from the facility water prior to the theoretical water volumes being determined for the effluent wells. Wells that require testing are required to have their theoretical water determined prior to determining theoretical water production for testing exempt wells Calculate Facility Water Production: Closing Inventory Dispositions + (m³) - Receipts (m³) - (m³) Opening Inventory = (m³) CI * CI% + DelWTR - RecWTR - OI * OI % = 13.89 * 0.00 * 0.88 EM2 0. 2013 Facility Water Production (m³) 6.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Condensate Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Condensate Production * (m³) Condensate Proration Factor = Prorated Condensate Production (m³)1 EM1 0.90 9.00 = June 1st.987342 = 0. Water Calculations The Multi-Well Effluent Proration Facility’s water production volume must be prorated back to the effluent wells based upon applicable WGR’s.97 EM3 6.30 - 0.03 * 0.00 * 0.20 309 .00 - 3.

930000 = 0.20 - 3.00 + 2.00 * 0.28000 * 12.12 = (m³) Test Exempted Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) 1.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Tested Well’s WGR (m³/e³m³) * Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) = EM3 WGR * EM3 * EM3 ECF = 0.00 - 3.08 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production: Facility Gas Volume (e3m³) - Measured Well’s Gas Volume (e3m³) - Tested Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e3m³) = GMG + Vent - M4G - EM3 * EM3 ECF = 38.12 Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Facility Water – Measured Well’s Water Receipt - Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) = See Facility Water Production Above – M4W - See Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above = 6.16 = June 1st.12 = 4.00 - 11.00 - 9.00 - 12.00 * 0. 2013 Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e3m³) 19.20 .84 310 .16 = Tested Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) 3.00 - 9.930000 = 40.2.28000 * 11.

00 * 0.54 EM2 11. 2013 Effluent Facility Water Proration Factor 0.26 = June 1st.28000 = 3.05444 = 0.12 Total 32.05444 Calculate the Effluent Well’s Theoretical Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) * Well’s WGR (m³/e³m³) = Well’s Theoretical Water Production (m³) EM1 10.26 = 4.00 * 0.05444 = 0.26 Calculate the Effluent Facility’s Water Proration Factor: Facility Water to be Prorated (m³) / Sum of Wells Theoretical Water Production = (m³) See Facility Water Production Above – M4W / See Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above = 6.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate the Test Exempt Well’s WGR: Test Exempt Wells Theoretical Water Production (m³) / See Test Exempted Well’s Theoretical Water Production Above / See Test Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production Above = 1.985915 311 .20 / 4.00 / 4.08 / 19.16 4.60 EM3 11.20 – 2.16 * 0.84 = Exempt Well’s Theoretical Gas Production (e³m³) = Test Exempt Wells WGR (m³/e³m³) 0.

08 M4W 2.12 * 0.53 EM2 0.54 * 0. 985915 = 3.20 1 These are the monthly volumes to be utilized for reporting purposes.60 * 0.26 6.00 * N/A – Measured Receipt = 2. 985915 = 0. 985915 = 0.00 Total 6. June 1st. 2013 312 .59 EM3 3.Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Calculate Individual Well’s Water Production: Well # Well’s Theoretical Water Production * Water Proration Factor = Prorated Water Production (m³)1 (m³) EM1 0.

2013 313 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Appendix 5 – Schematic Example June 1st.

2010-36 June 1st. 3) Information Bulletin . 2013 314 .Measurement Guideline for Upstream Oil and Gas Operations Appendix 6 – OGC Documents Replaced by This Manual The following documents have been replaced by this OGC Manual: 1) FMG 04-01 Fuel Gas Tap Locations. 2) FMG 03-03 Gas Meter Calibrations. Measurement and Reporting Requirements (Revised 2004/10).