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Introduction

"Intro to RFID" gives you the complete step-by-step instructions for 15 different fun RFID projects. Learn to make an RFID cat door, universal RFID key, door lock and
more. All projects come from Instructables.com, are written by our creative community, and contain pictures for each step so you can easily make these yourself.
Instructables is the most popular project-sharing community on the Internet. We provide easy publishing tools to enable passionate, creative people like you to share
their most innovative projects, recipes, skills, and ideas. Instructables has over 40,000 projects covering all subjects, including crafts, art, electronics, kids, home
improvement, pets, outdoors, reuse, bikes, cars, robotics, food, decorating, woodworking, costuming, games, and more. Check it out today!
Laura Khalil
Editor, Instructables.com

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

Table of Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Author and Copyright Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6

Disclaimer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

A Universal RFID Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Intro: A Universal RFID Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Step 1: How does RFID work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Step 2: Whats stored on the card? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Step 3: How do we emulate a card? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Step 4: The Software - Entering data into our card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Step 5: Etching the PCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Step 6: Mounting the components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Step 7: Programming the Micro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Step 8: Testing the project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Step 9: Further steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Intro: RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Step 1: Material and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Step 2: Building the RFID Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Step 3: RFID Reader Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Step 4: Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Step 5: Variations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
RFID cat door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Intro: RFID cat door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Step 1: Parts list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Step 2: Make the door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Step 3: Make an antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Step 4: Hook-up the RF reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Step 5: Add solenoids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Step 6: Add Hall effect sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Step 7: Add proximity sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Step 8: Add two buttons and load final code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
RFID Tagging a Souvenir to Play a YouTube Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Intro: RFID Tagging a Souvenir to Play a YouTube Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Step 1: Upload Your Movie to YouTube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Step 2: Plug in Touchatag Reader and Install Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

Step 3: Associate a Tag with an Online Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Step 4: Attach tag to Souvenir & Repeat! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Step 5: Hide Your Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Get creative and keep tagging! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
RFID Proof Soda Can Wallet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Intro: RFID Proof Soda Can Wallet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Step 1: Step one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Step 2: Step Two . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Step 3: Step Three . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Step 4: Step Four . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
How to make a RFID pet food access control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Intro: How to make a RFID pet food access control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Step 1: Materials and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Step 2: Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Step 3: Attachment and Positioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
RFID pet feeder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Intro: RFID pet feeder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Step 1: Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Step 2: Find an old CD-rom player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Step 3: Add open/close sensors (pushbuttons) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Step 4: Add auto/manual mode switch and open/close button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Step 5: Add proximity sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Step 6: Connect RF reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Step 7: Optional: Build your own RF antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Step 8: Put everything into the enclosure, load final code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Step 9: Train your cat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Arduino RFID Door Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Intro: Arduino RFID Door Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Step 1: Parts Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Step 2: Build the Arduino controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Step 3: Build the RFID Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Step 4: Program! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Step 5: Expand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Step 3: Repurpose the iPhone USB Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 How to connect Arduino and RFID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Step 1: The Schematic and how it works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . 75 Step 6: Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iPhone RFID Reader . . . . . . . . 63 Step 2: Connect Logic Level Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Intro: IPhone RFID Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Step 1: Wire the ID-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 http://www. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Step 3: All put together . . . 75 Step 5: The code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Step 2: RFID background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Step 4: Connect iPhone Cable to Logic Level Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Step 4: Results! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Step 9: . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Step 5: Download and Compile Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Step 2: PCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .instructables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Step 8: Elephants in the Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Step 1: Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Intro: Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bluetooth capable RFID reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Step 1: What you gonna need? . 72 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Step 4: Building the circuit . . . . 77 Weather proof. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Intro: How to connect Arduino and RFID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Step 1: Solder headers to the BlueSmirf Bluetooth module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Intro: RFID Car immobiliser with PIC12629 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Step 2: Configure the BlueSmirf module via USB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Step 2: Plugging all together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Step 7: The Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Intro: Weather proof. 68 Step 3: The code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 RFID Car immobiliser with PIC12629 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Step 3: The Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Step 4: Wrapping up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bluetooth capable RFID reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 82 Step 7: Test the reader with a PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Step 2: Find the Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 http://www. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Step 2: Connect the parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . .5V AA batteries . . . . . . . . . . 91 Step 3: Cut out the chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Step 4: Place the chip in your phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Step 5: Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Step 1: Get the Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 RFID Reader Data Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Step 6: Connect the BlueSmirf to the ID12 reader and 3 1. . . . . . . . .Step 3: Solder headers to the ID12 breakout board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Intro: AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Know when a tag has been submitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Step 3: Write the Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Step 1: Get your materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Parse RS232 Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .instructables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Step 4: Code and Farewell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Step 5: Hard-wire the ID12 reader to ASCII mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Step 4: Solder the RFID reader to the ID12 breakout board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Display Your Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 How to turn your cellphone into a credit/debit card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 File Downloads . . 85 AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C . . . . . . . . . . 90 Intro: How to turn your cellphone into a credit/debit card . . . . . . . . . . .

Author and Copyright Notices Instructable: A Universal RFID Key Author: drj113 License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag Author: nmarquardt License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: RFID cat door Author: landmanr License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: RFID Tagging a Souvenir to Play a YouTube Video Author: SwitchGirl License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: RFID Proof Soda Can Wallet Author: prometheus442 License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: How to make a RFID pet food access control system Author: mlarsen License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: RFID pet feeder Author: landmanr License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Arduino RFID Door Lock Author: pcmofo License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: IPhone RFID Reader Author: OniDaito License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: How to connect Arduino and RFID Author: otaviousp License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: RFID Car immobiliser with PIC12629 Author: andrew_h License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer Author: sketchsk3tch License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: Weather proof.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .instructables. Bluetooth capable RFID reader Author: tamberg License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) Instructable: AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C Author: nevdull License: Attribution-ShareAlike (by-sa) Instructable: How to turn your cellphone into a credit/debit card Author: Kikurimu License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (by-nc-sa) http://www.

including proper use of equipment and safety gear.instructables. or expense. http://www. and your safety is your own responsibility. including safety gear. It is your responsibility to make sure that your activities comply with all applicable laws. in order to show the project steps more clearly. and appearance of a project in this format does not indicate it has been checked for safety or functionality. Use of the instructions and suggestions is at your own risk. Inc. disclaims all responsibility for any resulting damage. Many projects on Instructables are user-submitted. Some illustrative photos do not depict safety precautions or equipment. The projects are not intended for use by children. injury.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .Disclaimer All do-it-yourself activities involve risk. and determining whether you have adequate skill and experience. Some of the resources used for these projects are dangerous unless used properly and with adequate precautions. Instructables.

A Universal RFID Key
by drj113 on November 16, 2010

Author:drj113
I have a background in digital electronics, and am very interested in computers. I love things that blink, and am in awe of the physics associated with making
blue LEDs.

Intro: A Universal RFID Key
RFID projects have been pretty prominent recently, ranging from projects here in Instructables, to our local Silicon Chip magazine in Australia publishing a RFID door
lock project in their November issue. Even I recently purchased a RFID door lock on eBay for $15 to lock my garage (so my front neighbor could get tools if he wanted
to).
We have known that the cheaper RFID technologies were pretty insecure for a number of years. Researchers have demonstrated cloners of all varieties, but simple
RFID tags are still being used for access control. Even my current employer uses them.
A while ago, I was looking at Hack A Day, and I saw an amazing project that somebody had made. It was an RFID card with a keypad on it. For the next couple of days,
I couldn't get the image of the card out of my mind; the project reminded me of how much I wanted to build a RFID spoofer myself. The original author didn't release
source code for their project, but they left enough clues that I could follow.
So, in typical fashion, I built my own reader hardware so I could have a look at the data from a card, and created my own version of the Universal RFID key.
The key I made works beautifully both on my garage door, as well as a number of other RFID readers I have tried!
I have decided to publish this, as more people should be aware of the design flaws that are inherent in older RFID implementations, and to allow others to make their
own universal key.
Will this key let you into anybodies RFID protected office? Yes it will, assuming a couple of things are true
1) The have to be using 125kHz RFID tags that use the same encoding standard as I have designed this project for, and,
2) You have to have access to the number printed on the back of the tag - with that number, you can simply key it into the Universal RFID key, and it will emulate that
tag.
So there you go - I hope you enjoy making this project. - And remember, with great power comes great responsibility!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

Step 1: How does RFID work?
RFID, or Radio Frequency IDentification is the term used to describe a wide variety of standards that allow data stored within electronic 'tags' to be read by a reader
without using wires. There are a number of standards, encoding formats, and frequencies in common use. I will describe the 125 kHz standard that is common for
access control mechanisms.
125 kHz RFID tags are commonly encased in a business card sized piece of plastic, or a round disk. The tag consists of a coil of wire, connected to a microchip. When
the tag is brought into close proximity to a reader, energy is coupled inductively from the reader to the microchip within the tag.
The energy from the reader has dual use; firstly, it provides power to run the card, and secondly, it provides a communication medium for data to be transmitted. Once
powered up, the tag modulates the bit pattern that is programmed into the tag using a signal that the reader can detect. The reader then reads this bit pattern, and
passes it onto the door controller. If the bit pattern matches one that is authorised, the door will be unlocked. If the bit pattern does not match an authorised one, then
the door won't unlock.
In the RFID system I was playing with, the bit pattern looked like this;
1111111110010111000000000000001111100010111110111101001111010000
I will describe what this pattern actually means in the next page.
One interesting feature of the data transfer between the card and the reader, is that data is encoded using Manchester Encoding, which is a way of encoding data so that
it can be transmitted over a single wire ensuring that the clock information is able to be recovered easily. With Manchester encoding, there is always a transition in the
middle of a bit. If you want to transmit a 1, the transition would be from low to high, and if you want to transmit a 0, the transition would from from high to low. Because
the transitions are in the middle of each bit, you can ensure that you have locked onto valid data. For a detailed description, have a look a this page.
The actual data is transmitted by the card effectively shorting the coil out - this applies an additional load to the transmitter in the reader, which can be detected.

Step 2: Whats stored on the card?
I started by building a RFID card reader (more details in a future article). That showed me the data that was being sent when the card transmitted its information.
The RFID cards that I brought have numbers printed on the back of them. This number says what data the card has included in it.
the card with 0007820706 119,21922 printed on it transmits this pattern:
1111111110010111000000000000001111011110101001010101000010101100
The first set of 111111111 bits are the start sequence - it is used to tell the reader that a code is coming - the reader also uses the sequence to lock onto the card data.
Data stored is transmitted in groups of 4 bits, with a parity bit at the end of every group.
The data can be broken up as follows;
00101 11000 00000 00000 01111 01111 01010 01010 10100 00101 0110

0

If we ignore the parity bit at the end of every nibble we have
0010
2

1100
C

0000
0

0000
0

0111 0111 0101 0101 1010 0010
7
7
5
5
A

0110
0
2 CHECKSUM STOP

This code is 2c 0077 55a2 if we break the code into 3 groups, we have 2c, followed by 0077 (which is 119 in decimal), and finally 55A2, which is 21922 in decimal - this
corresponds to the 119,21922.
The same number is also written in another way on these cards 0007820706 (in decimal) is simply the hexadecimal number 7755A2.
WOOT we now understand how the data is stored.
2C is a constant code that is sent with all of the cards. It is simply a facility identifier for this RFID system.
How does the parity and checksum work?
One final piece of data that the card transmits is a checksum word - this is used to ensure that all of the data has been received successfully. Firstly, the parity bit at the
end of each nibble of data is Even parity - this means that the transmitter will add a 1 to make sure that each block of data has an 'even' number of '1' bits - So if we look
a the '2', which is 0010 in binary - the parity system would detect that there was an odd number of '1' bits, and would add one to compensate. Compare that to the 'C'
which is 1100, the parity system would detect that there are an even number of '1' bits, so it would add a zero.
00101 2
11000 C
00000 0
00000 0

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

01111 7
01111 7
01010 5
01010 5
10100 A
00101 2
0110 checksum

+ 0 stop bit

Finally, the checksum is an even parity bit applied to each of the vertical row bits. This way, there is a horizontal and vertical check of every bit sent - everything has to
line up, or the reader will simply reject the transmission.
When I decoded the data for my work prox card, it followed a similar sequence here, but (for obvious reasons) I won't actually publish the numbers. Again, part of the
sequence was a facility code, and the rest of the sequence held the same number that was printed on the back of the card.

Image Notes
1. This number is all you need to duplicate the card

Image Notes
1. This number is also useful - we can duplicate this card as well

Image Notes
1. My RFID Reader - I will document this on Instructables in the future

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

the diodes in the bridge are allowed to be turned on by the current induced in the coil. MODE 1 .Decimal Card ID The card waits for 8 digits to be entered signifying the CardID for the card to be spoofed (In this case. rename it to 'RFIDSpoofer-schematic.This is the long number printed on the back of the card. The coil is 100 turns of fine wire would on an open former that is just smaller than the card border. keypad. or a 1000pF through hole cap. it is 07820706) . the card has to output data in real time (most readers need a number of sequential valid reads).Step 3: How do we emulate a card? So the next step was to identify how to pretend to be a card .pdf (54 KB) [NOTE: When saving. MODE 5 . MODE 4 . That way.That is intentional c6 is a placeholder component allowing me to either use a 1000pF surface mount cap. You may notice that c6 is 0pF .Dump the facility and Card ID The Facility and Card ID are Dumped as Hex numbers using the 4 Leds at the top of the card. was well as a keypad to allow the data to be keyed in.21922 number.so this does not need to be entered. File Downloads RFIDSpoofer-schematic. if you see . it waits for the 'mode' button to be pressed. waiting for the reset button to be pressed to re-awaken it MODE 2 . Using the Arduino IDE. The attached PDF is the full schematic of the project. The current mode number is displayed using a set of 4 LEDs. Each press on the 'mode' button increments the current mode. a power supply. When the output of the micro is low. I worked around this problem by populating an array of bits that gets sent when the card is in transmit more.instructables. The job of the micro is simply to turn the output on and off in a way that makes sense to our reader.Enter low power (sleep) mode The card enters a low power mode.pdf'] Step 4: The Software .tmp as the file ext.arduino. it is 2C) .Emulate a card The card enters emulation mode .cc/playground/Code/Keypad File Downloads http://www. so it had to have a microprocessor on it. MODE 3 .The software defaults to 2C . Emulation mode can only be exited by pressing the reset button.Enter a Hex Facility ID The card waits for 2 digits to be entered signifying the facility code for this system (In this case. When the card is powered up. I also provided a way of displaying the data using the LEDs that I mounted on the board.Entering data into our card The software was next. and a bit transition is detected. Once the correct mode is displayed. The reader detects the additional load. The ATMega manipulates the 125kHz RF field by using a bridge rectifier. then the 'enter' key starts that function executing.I wanted a card that I could type a card number into. this effectively short it out. and some status LEDs on it.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . The software relies on Mark Stanley's and Alexander Brevig's Keypad Library http://www.To be read successfully. One problem I came across. not the 119. and adding subroutine and calculation delays caused the card to output invalid data as far as the reader was concerned.all LEDs are turned off. the calculations are done only once. I implemented a simple menu system that allowed me to enter the relevant facility and CardID data directly from the keypad. was when I was calculating the card data (parity and checksum) on the fly . So I created a board that had the micro.

if you see . if you see .25mm diameter coil winding wire.pdf (34 KB) [NOTE: When saving.I used a piece of scrap timber. as I did not have a surface mount crystal. I started by soldering the push buttons.instructables.pdf (31 KB) [NOTE: When saving. I mounted the coil on the back of the PCB. I was pretty happy with the result of my handiwork.pdf'] Step 6: Mounting the components To keep the project the same size as a normal prox card. The etched PCB had its edges cleaned up a bit using a file. I did not use a socket. Attached are the PDF files that I used for the Toner Transfer. Next. I decided to use surface mount push buttons that I brought from eBay. Then. with 4 screws mounted on it. http://www.tmp as the file ext.pde (14 KB) [NOTE: When saving. and holes were drilled for the IC legs. as I wanted to reduce the board thickness. I also installed 12 jumpers on the back of the card to connect the key columns together. I had to install the 16MHz crystal on the bottom of the PCB. resistors and capacitors. rename it to 'RFIDSpoofer-Silk. have a look here. The ATMega168 was mounted next.tmp as the file ext. I decided to make it on a small PCB that was the same size as a business card.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .RFIDSpoofer_Instructables. rename it to 'RFIDSpoofer-PCB. so that meant that all of the components must be soldered onto the copper side of the PCB to allow the buttons to be mounted and labeled. along with a small battery holder.tmp as the file ext. I wound the coil . I wound a small amount of clear tape around each edge to make sure that the coil didn't unwind. File Downloads RFIDSpoofer-Silk. rename it to 'RFIDSpoofer_Instructables.pdf'] RFIDSpoofer-PCB. If you want to see the details. and counted 100 turns of 0. then I mounted the LEDs. Before I removed the coil from the mounts.pde'] Step 5: Etching the PCB As per standard. if you see . I used toner transfer onto magazine paper to etch a board.

com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .instructables.http://www.

swiped the board against the reader.I typed the relevant code into the keypad.. (I just thought I would mention that :-) ) Step 8: Testing the project Testing was a breeze ..instructables. and was rewarded with a satisfying 'BEEP' indicating that the read was successful.pde Arduino sketch that was supplied in Step 4 .this was especially important..This is a small price to pay to have a nice compact project.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . It is not the version for the other IFID readers I have access too. The .. and scored infinite geek points!!! http://www.Step 7: Programming the Micro I used a standard 6 pin header mounted on the PCB to allow a FTDI 5V USB-232 cable to be used to program the chip in-situ . The chip was programmed using the .using the normal Arduino IDE.PDE file that I have provided is tailored to the standard cheap eBay RFID systems. so it couldn't be removed for insertion into a normal Arduino PCB. Testing at the other readers I have access to was just as rewarding. as the ATMega chip is soldered directly to the PCB.

.Step 9: Further steps This was a 'to prove I could do it' project . purchasing a new system from eBay for $15 is not the answer. but they also make it easy for somebody to use the details for their own purposes. And .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ iPhone RFID Reader by OniDaito How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt RFID based toll plaza using 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma How to make a RFID pet food access control system by mlarsen . So spoofing these systems is a lot more work. based on the intelligence of the chip in the card . and it would be great to use the one card. In my job. Enable Pass Back systems . Remove the numbers from the back of the cards . use internal passwords.in simple systems they are not equivalent. The first RFID systems deployed years ago used very simple protocols.I f you do need Visitor cards. Finally.I have completed it..... But there are a large number of low tech systems in place now. then implement a system where they are only active when they have been issued.. More modern systems use a number of techniques to ensure security.. don't equate cards to physical keys . Don't give out visitor cards . and while you may have the skeleton keys to the kingdom..instructables.They are easily duplicated . but I don't think that would be a great idea.while they may make it easier to enter card details.They also used a low frequency (125kHz) carrier.. Will this work on all RFID sytems? No it won't.. This is a good thing. such as one time codes. Related Instructables AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C by nevdull How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp Interfacing RFID with 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma http://www. you still need the little numbers on the back of the access card before you can use the key yourself. I have considered modifying my card so that it works as all of the compatible RFID tags that I hold. You are welcome to adapt the project however you would like to.. I need have access to multiple work sites. cryptography. look at how to upgrade your access system to a card system that is not trivially spoofed using $15 worth of parts. so it now sits on my shelf at work to remind others that simple RFID systems are simply not secure.If the card system believes you are in a particular room. make sure that the card can't be used in other rooms at the same time. What can I do to protect my system? Firstly. use bi-directional communication.No.. and use much higher frequencies.

many mobile phones incorporate readers to enable e-money payments in shops and vending machines. embedded in many corporate ID cards and passports. We offer some other possibilities that build on our examples at the end . a tag simply has to be brought into physical proximity with a reader to be read. RFID tags are found everywhere. Wal-mart use RFID tags and readers in their supply chain. Tilt-sensitive RFID tag 2. are optimized to be 'read' from predefined distances. In the two exercises that follow (building a RFID reader detector and a tilt-sensitive RFID tag ). That is. Readers are mostly used for industrial or commercial purposes. and some readily available electronics hardware.g. Longer preamble Radio frequency identification ( RFID ) is rapidly growing in popularity.instructables. The two exercises also hopefully show that the technology is relatively simple and how it can be extended to support some interesting interactions. RFID readers are used to track nearby tags by wirelessly reading a tag's unique ID (see Figure 4). Inside of RFID tags: antenna and connected chip . In Japan. e. Tilt-sensitive RFID tag Image Notes 1. asset tracking or electronic payment. the inner workings of a tag and its interaction with a reader is hidden from view. The technology is also used in mass transit systems in cities like London and Hong Kong .RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt on October 30. The tags have a few common properties: they transmit a unique ID number. we offer an example of how you can start revealing some of the workings of RFID and thus gain some control over the technology. They're attached to container freight. in those funny-looking white labels you find in newly purchased books.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Image Notes 1. and thus difficult to have much control over. etc. RFID reader detector http://www. 2008 Intro: RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag The 'rub' Want to detect the presence of RFID readers? Want to control when a RFID tag is active or readable? We describe how to do both using bits of copper and card. Small RFID stickers 2. Image Notes 1. the problem is that the technology is almost always black boxed . RFID tag in the form of a credit card 3. and are usually small so they can remain unobtrusive or hidden. Simple RFID reader detector Image Notes 1. For those of us who want to experiment with RFID.

around 100x70 mm 4.g.Low current LED (light-emitting diode) (e.com) Tools (see Figure 2 and 3): . order number 1003207at www.g. Advanced material (see Figure 5): The following material is necessary to build the second part of the project: the tilt-sensitive RFID tag.Micro tilt switches (e.com) ..RFID ICs (e.Insulating tape (e. Cardboard. www.Cardboard (around 100x70 mm) . order number 1138852 at www.farnell.com) .com) . There many readers for this widely used RFID standard.. as it uses a different frequency for communication with the tags (125 kHz).56 MHz.sonmicro..g.com) .farnell. LED (light-emitting diode) Image Notes 1. MIFARE Standard 1k.g.Soldering iron and solder RFID reader for testing (see Figure 4): To test our RFID tags we need an RFID reader that can operate at a frequency of 13.. Materials (see Figure 1): We need the following material to built the basic RFID reader detector..instructables. 568-2219-1-ND at www. for instance the Sonmicro MIFARE USB reader (http://www.. Capacitors (e. SMD) 82pF 3. order number 1373979 at www..g.com) Image Notes 1. Note: The Phidget RFID reader does not work with the tags created in this project.g. . order number 1218478 at www.g. part no.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .farnell. Insulation tape Image Notes 1. Conductive copper tape 2. .digikey.farnell.com/). Sonmicro 13. Antenna of the Sonmicro RFID reader 2.Craft knife and scissors .Step 1: Material and Tools This section provides an overview of the necessary materials and tools.Conductive copper tape (e.digikey.Capacitor 82 pF (picofarad) (e.56 MHz RFID Module http://www.

instructables. Cut the conductive copper tape into thin stripes of around 2mm (see Figure 1). but solder the connections if you want to be on the safe side. 1. 3. This induced current activates the RFID chip that is connected to the tag's antenna. 2. This chip then modulates a response (usually the unique ID number) that is transmitted back to the reader. Now we have created our RFID tag antenna.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Image Notes 1. Tape these stripes (see Figure 2) in loops around one half of the cardboard (see Figure 3 for the layout of the antenna). Sometimes. This EM field induces a current in the antenna for all RFID tags within reading distance. Taping the copper stripes onto the cardboard . Building the RFID tag antenna To build the tag's antenna follow these three steps. The tag should have between 3-4 loops for the antenna. Image Notes 1. The antenna of an RFID tag is usually a thin copper wire that is arranged in loops. Thin stripes of the conductive copper tape (around 2 mm thick) http://www. The loops allow the emitted EM field of the RFID reader to induce current to the antenna of the tag. this isn't necessary as the tape's adhesive backing is conductive. and we will add the "RFID reader detection" functionality in the following step. Solder all the connections between the copper tape. RFID ICs (MIFARE Standard 1k) Step 2: Building the RFID Antenna This step describes how to build the antenna for the RFID tag.Image Notes 1. A little background RFID readers transmit an electromagnetic (EM) field with their reader antenna. Micro tilt switches 2.

Soldering the copper tape connections 2. They are connected in parallel. This is to insulate the outer loops. the connected LED lights up. we add the capacitor (82 pF) and the low current LED to the tag as shown in Figure 3.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . our RFID reader detector is finished! By bringing our DIY RFID detector close to an RFID reader (as shown in Figure 5). we add a small piece of insulation tape for the connection of the inner end of the antenna loop (as illustrated in Figure 1). Soldering the copper tape connections Step 3: RFID Reader Detection This step describes how to add a simple mechanism to the RFID tag antenna that allows us detect nearby RFID readers. Antenna connection First. Adding insulation tape for the connection Image Notes 1. Then we add another copper tape strip to the inner end of the antenna as shown in Figure 2. Adding connection to the inner end of the antenna loops 2. Capacitor and LED Next. In the next step of the instructable we will show how to extend a basic RFID tag and make it tilt-sensitive. Testing With these simple steps. Three loops of the antenna Image Notes 1. Image Notes 1. there are RFID readers available with a stronger EM field and therefore a higher maximum reading distance.instructables. Here again we solder the two ends of the conductive copper tape together. Soldering connection again http://www. With the Sonmicro reader hardware the distance to the reader has to be below 8-10 cm. We also solder these two components to the copper tape (see Figure 4).Image Notes 1. however.

Image Notes 1. We thus need another piece of cardboard and to repeat the steps described earlier in STEP 2 of this instructable. but our tag is then readable by the RFID reader and responds with the unique ID number of the chip. and in a open state while the tag is in a vertical position. Soldering connections Image Notes 1.g. Soldering connections 2. we also add an LED and a capacitor to the antenna as shown in Figure 3 (we use a different form factor of the capacitor here just to illustrate the alternative options). we add additional copper tape connections to the tag. The tag is activate while in a horizontal position as in Figure 5. By doing this. Using RFID chips We can now replace the connected capacitor and LED from our tag with an RFID chip (e. and the LED to the antenna. We add the three tilt switches to the tag as shown in Figure 3. Antenna The antenna for this second RFID tag is similar to the first antenna we built. Again. the activity of our tag is no longer visible through the LED. Again. These connections allow us to connect three tilt switches.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . RFID reader is near the tag 2. as shown in Figure 1. and it is important to connect them in a slight angle (around 5-10 degrees) as shown in Figure 4. This extends the previous exercise. http://www. Tilt-sensitive tag Next. LED lights up Step 4: Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag We now describe the process of how to build a tilt-sensitive RFID tag. and is inactive when in a vertical position as in Figure 6. the MIFARE 1k shown in Figure 7). Testing the tilt-sensitive tag We can now use our Sonmicro RFID reader again to test our new tilt-sensitive RFID tag.. 82pF Capacitor 2. The tilt switches are soldered to the copper tape. This makes sure that the silt switches are in a closed state while the RFID tag is in a horizontal position. a capacitor. all the connections of the copper tape are soldered together.instructables. Low current LED Image Notes 1.

As long as the tag is in a vertical position. The angle of the tilt sensors is important Image Notes 1. Again we use insulation tape for the connection 2. and the LED with the antenna. the capacitor. the tag is inactive http://www.instructables. This arrangement of the tilt sensors makes is possible to sense the horizontal or vertical position of the tag. Again a connected low current LED 3. Image Notes 1. SMD capacitor (82 pF) 2.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Soldering all copper tape connections Image Notes 1. Image Notes 1. Additional copper tape for connecting the tilt switches. The tag is activated when it is in a horizontal position Image Notes 1.Image Notes 1.

. and inactive in darkness (Figure 4) .Switching between the LED and an RFID chip (Figure 3) .Variable length of the tag antenna.Experiments with the tag size and material (Figure 2) . .Different material for antenna by using conductive silver ink (Figure 6) .. Experiments with form factors for the RFID tags .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Image Notes 1.Image Notes 1.Touch-sensitive: tag is active when someone touches the tag with a finger (Figure 5) . Variable length (and loops) of the antenna 2. Here are a few additional tags to show the possible variations. Happy DIY! Image Notes 1. Using the MIFARE RFID chips to create a tilt-sensitive RFID tag Step 5: Variations This section concludes our instructable of how to build custom RFID tags.instructables. .Stamped layout of an RFID tag antenna (Figure 7) that is in fact working! Many other variations of RFID tags are feasible. and therefore also variable reading distance of the tag (Figure 1). Switch to activate and deactivate the RFID IC http://www.Light-sensitive tag: the tag is active in daylight.

instructables. Light sensitive tag Image Notes 1.Image Notes 1. Voltage regulator 3. Button to switch between LED reader detection and the RFID tag 2.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Capacitive touch-sensitive pad 2. Image Notes 1. Diode Image Notes 1. RFID chip MIFARE 1k Image Notes 1. Antenna layout painted with conductive silver ink. This antenna layout is stamped with conductive silver ink (and the antenna is in fact working!) http://www.

instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ RFID based toll plaza using 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma A Universal RFID Key by drj113 RFID: The REAL Story by metrogdor22 USB RFID Reading Keyboard (video) by frank26080115 Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer by sketchsk3tch .Related Instructables Interfacing RFID with 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C by nevdull http://www.

http://www. 4. Door unlocks and a light comes on. Cat pushes open the flap and enters 6. which makes it easy for the animal to activate and quite reliable. an infrared proximity sensor detects the presence of an animal if within about 10 inches and unlocks the door.RFID cat door by landmanr on January 17. activates Hall effect sensor. Going from the inside out. and the door locks 7. Arduino controls the process.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . RFID door (entering) from champenoise on Vimeo. Flap falls back. Whereas the feeder controls access to a food bowl. The latest code can also distinguish between tags to allow the system to behave differently for different individuals. It is not further discussed in this Instructable however. cat is outside 2. Timer ensures that door stays unlocked long enough to give cat a chance to respond 5. In the beginning the door is locked. RF tag gets read within about 4 inches 3. the door controls access to an entire room.instructables. Most animals will quickly learn to push the flap in response to the click (lock) and the light. but it is advised to put an enclosure around the electronic parts once you're done. Some methods and techniques are borrowed from my previous project. the RFID cat feeder. It features a custom made antenna large enough to function as a gate. Make sure that the edges of the door and the doorway are padded with soft material for when the tail gets caught! A few painful experiences may be enough to make the cat never want to go in there again. How it works: 1. Cat walks up to the gate. 2011 Intro: RFID cat door This is a cat door/flap that can only be opened by the animal that wears the appropriate RFID tag. The electronics are shown without enclosure.

Arduino 3.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . pushbuttons) http://www. tip120.Image Notes 1. Hall effect sensor 4. additional circuitry (RF reader. The big square frame is the antenna Image Notes 1. LED 3. IR proximity sensor 2.instructables. 2 solenoids 2.

rubber padding on the door http://www.Image Notes 1. Rubber padding on the door post 4.instructables. Hall effect sensor 3.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Magnets on both sides of the plywood 2.

To use the custom made antenna discussed here.Two TIP120 Darlington transistors .Two pushbuttons .Hookup wire.Four 2 KOhm resistors .One LED .One Hall-effect sensor .5V RF reader module (Seeed Studio 125Khz UART or equivalent. Solenoids.One or more magnets to activate Hall-effect sensor over a range of about 2cm .Rubber isolation strip or other soft material for padding the edges of the door and door post The system comprises several 'modules' (solenoids. Most readers come with a small antenna.Two 12V electronic cabinet locks (Nordson electronic).Nuts. .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .One 6" x 9" piece of 1/8" thick Plexiglas and perhaps another piece of about 6" x 3" to mount the locks . for precision) . RF reader. In the next steps the mechanical parts and each of the modules will be discussed in detail. Step 1: Parts list . you need a reader that allows connecting an external antenna) .RF tag (I used these 35mm disc shaped ones) .Arduino Duemilanove .Image Notes 1. bolts and serrated washers .Sharp GP2D12 infrared proximity sensor .One 100 Ohm resistor . One of the pictures here shows the basic plan with the modules connected to the Arduino (the electronics). http://www. and so on).One hinge (one that moves easily but without much lateral movement.About 86 feet of 24 gauge magnet wire (longer than the piece shown in the photograph) . basically.instructables.One 12V DC power supply . including about 27" extra thin (26 AWG or thinner) . The tag was attached to the collar with a piece of twine.

Arduino Duemilanove 3. http://www. To achieve this it helps to have no heavy things hanging on one side. RF reader 2. Just a few things to keep in mind: Make sure that in the resting state. LED Image Notes 1. and to use a hinge with little friction. resistors 6.instructables. This will help to make the hall-effect sensor (a magnetactuated switch) work. Make the corners smooth and add padding on the edges and the door post to minimize tail tribulations. diodes 9. You need a longer piece than shown in the photo 8. the doorpost will have two solenoids. magnets 7. Solenoid. I tossed it and used my own. I will discuss this more in detail in step . Hall effect sensor Image Notes 1. It helps to have a hinge without much lateral movement (sideways movement within the plane of the wall). RFID tag 5. You need two of these 2. Pretty straightforward. At the bottom. one on each side of the flap. TIP120 Darlington transistor 4. Antenna that comes with RF reader. In the picture that is in the red area around the dotted line down the middle. to block unauthorized animals from getting in. Magnet wire. The door needs to be rigid but light-weight so that it is easy to push it open and doesn't hurt when a tail gets caught.. the flap is centered in between the two solenoids. Step 2: Make the door The door is a Plexiglas flap hanging on a hinge..com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .Image Notes 1.

but some allow the use of an external antenna. The 35mm disc tags that I use are read up to 4 inches of the plane of the coil. I mounted the thing on the plywood with two pieces of wood as spacers to make it stand off from the wall a bit so the cat could activate it farther from the wall. Most RF readers come with an antenna. the RF reader works better when the Arduino is plugged into the wall with the 9v power adapter.Step 3: Make an antenna The antenna is nothing more than a coil of magnet wire connected to the RF reader. The distance between turns has to be as small as possible. For this project I made a square antenna of 10 x 10 inches by winding 24 gauge magnet wire 24 turns around a sawed off bucket to make it sturdy. Antenna circuit design for RFID applications (pdf) http://www.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . More info about coil antennas: Microchip Inc. The RF reader and antenna are powered with the 5v from the Arduino.instructables. Even though the Arduino works fine with just the USB cable.

trying different shapes et cetera. Home made antenna 3. Now you can also start working on improving the antenna by trying adding or removing turns. This antenna came with the RF reader 2. Hook-up your antenna. but I don't use that either. It also has an RX pin to send info back to the RF reader.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . The RDM630 that I used also has pins for a led that I don't use. You can download the file named 'rfid3.pde' to test.h which can be obtained here http://www. and a digital port (I used 2) to get the signal. Power the Adruino with the 9v power supply. You can use the 5v output of the Arduino to power it. get a tag and use the serial monitor of the Arduino to see if it's detected. not just USB because at least in my case that didn't work.Image Notes 1. First hook-up the RF reader.instructables. The code requires NewSoftSerial. The antenna I ended up using Step 4: Hook-up the RF reader This project consists of several 'modules' that you need to hook up to the Arduino and test in advance.

One pin goes to ground.instructables. the other goes to the solenoid. within the range that closing the locks makes sense. contact sensors. I had to use thin. Add an LED to digital pin 7 with the appropriate resistor (used a green one with a 220 ohm resistor). beam break sensors. The range is about 3cm. such as mechanical/optical rotary encoders. http://www. so instead I put the switch on the door and the magnets in the door post. The main reasons for choosing a Hall effect sensor were that it does not add friction. I did not want to put magnets on the door because that would make it heavier. i. The sensor and wire is simply taped to the Plexiglas. and to the 12v supply in the end. There are other solutions possible. it can be covered entirely. Just connect all grounds of all components including the Arduino together. Connect that to the other grounds. with a diode across it (make sure you get the polarity right). Connect ground pin to the other grounds and the vcc pin to 5v. and I also was just curious how they work.e. Over here you can download code to specifically test the two solenoids.Step 5: Add solenoids Hook-up the solenoids up to the Arduino as in the schematic: connect the TIP120s to digital ports 5 and 6 with 2k resistors in between. Download Hall_effect.pde to test this part of the system. The other wire of the power supply is ground. very flexible wire otherwise the rigidity of it would push the flap off center. I have two little magnets in the door post. Connect the signal pin of the Hall sensor to pin 4 and to through a 100 ohm resistor to 5v. Step 6: Add Hall effect sensor The Hall effect sensor is for detecting whether the door is in the center. At the closest point the sensor and magnets are 5mm apart.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .

the ground pin to the other grounds and the vcc pin to 5v.Step 7: Add proximity sensor For this system I only cared about which cat enters. http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . 0x90}. one with and one without access. byte goodcode[6] = {0x1C. it is okay because in that part of the program. In the final code downloadable here. and any creature may exit. shortening the open time (smaller value for variable 'open_time') can help. An IR proximity sensor works well. Download IR_test_analog. It is a good idea to put an enclosure around the electronics. I stored the value of two tags worn by the our animals.pde to test this part of the system Step 8: Add two buttons and load final code Finally you can add buttons to open the locks manually (see schematic). I only needed RFID on one side. 0xFC. 0xB2. If the cat is inside and wants to go out. 0. byte badcode[6] = {0x16. the RF reader is not checked. you may need to calibrate the positioning of the antenna and the proximity sensor a bit to make sure the RFreader is not activated from the inside. 0xFE}. the door is locked immediately. if your antenna has a large range extending into the secured area. On a final note. the proximity sensor has to detect the cat first. 0xE7. although that puts the burden on the cat with access to respond faster. When the animal without access tries to get in. 0. 0x78. but that will not be discussed in this instructable. If you don't want to tag the other cat. Connect the out-pin of a Sharp GP2D12 to Analog port 0. . The values are hexadecimal which need '0x' in front of it in this programming language. Once that happens. Thus. You have to find the code of the tags you are using and put those values into the arrays 'goodcode' and 'badcode'. The door should open to any animal that approaches from the other side.

Related Instructables RFID pet feeder by landmanr How to make a RFID pet food access control system by mlarsen Remote Home Automation by dathomar http://www.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp A Free Range Habitat for Meller's and other Large Chameleons by GibbonsRock Xanboo/Homesite Laser Break How to Beam Sensor by block/kill RFID krich chips by w1n5t0n .instructables.

She is the producer of www. and a computer equipped with Internet access and USB 2. you will need the appropriate video and audio connection cables. The Touchatag system is a low cost RFID reader that reads the number on an RFID tag and then associates that number with a webpage.RFID Tagging a Souvenir to Play a YouTube Video by SwitchGirl on October 13. If you don’t have a movie to upload you can link to one of the millions of movies to already on the site. movie. and the Boston Globe. Wired. in my home. the Touchatag starter system.instructables. Photo by Ryan Collard for the NY Times Step 1: Upload Your Movie to YouTube Upload a movie to YouTube following their guidelines. or doing anything to make technology more accessible to a wide female audience.0. file. or more. All you need is the souvenir of your choice. 2009 Author:SwitchGirl iHeartSwitch Alison Lewis is a fashion hound who loves technology and DIY. like I did. USA Today. http://www. it plays a movie from my trip to South Korea on my LCD screen. [Note: If you want to hook this up so you see the videos on your home LCD or Plasma. Bust. Her work has been featured internationally and in such publications as the NY Times. You can find Alison shopping in New York.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .iheartswitch. if a guest picks up one of the pieces from my tea set and places it on an area of my coffee table. Her next challenge getting Martha Stewart Switch Crafty on October 26th! Intro: RFID Tagging a Souvenir to Play a YouTube Video Surprise your guests by linking any object in your home to online videos! For example. writing up a new DIY. Read your TV owners manual to find out which ones are right for you] Image Notes 1. This is a really fun and easy project and requires very little effort.com and the author of Switch Craft.

Go to the internet and download and install the Touchatag software client on your PC or MAC for your touchatag reader to communicate with the Touchatag online service. http://www. Follow the directions of the installer. Once that is done you have access to what is called the DASHBOARD this is your homepage for setting up each tag number and associating it with a movie.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .instructables.Step 2: Plug in Touchatag Reader and Install Software Connect your Touchatag RFID reader to your computer via the USB port. It will ask you to create a user name and password. If you do not see the video click here. Step 3: Associate a Tag with an Online Video Follow this tutorial movie on Vimeo to learn how to link your Touchatag tag to a YouTube movie with the video player application.

stick it under a place mat and paint a circle or image directly above the green logo of the Touchatag reader to indicate where to place the souvenir.com] Get creative and keep tagging! There are many more applications to discover and play with on the Touchatag site. [Note: If you need to run your USB cable longer than 16 feet. Related Instructables How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer by sketchsk3tch http://www. you need to purchase a USB extension cable that boosts the signal.g.Step 4: Attach tag to Souvenir & Repeat! Peel off the back and stick the tag to your object (e. send us pictures of your projects and will post them up on Switch. They are readily inexpensive.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ USB RFID Reading Keyboard (video) by frank26080115 RFID: The REAL Story by metrogdor22 Arduino RFID Door Lock by pcmofo How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp Interfacing RFID with 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma . Step 5: Hide Your Reader To hide your reader. Souvenir). and you can find them easily. Repeat the steps above for each item or souvenir you want to open a movie. We found ours from Newegg.instructables. As always.

but I didn't have any around. except it's made out of two soda cans and some packaging tape. So. In fact. 2 Soda cans 3. felt-tip pen .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Image Notes 1. packaging tape 4.' It's the same concept. 2 Soda cans 3. here we go. I'm quite ashamed of my sloppiness. 2008 Intro: RFID Proof Soda Can Wallet This is a response to dogsrcool2me's 'RFID Secure Wallet.RFID Proof Soda Can Wallet by prometheus442 on September 9. You'll need: hobby knives/scissors 2 soda cans packing tape/duct tape felt tip pen sand paper Image Notes 1. And it's very sloppy. hobby knives 2. hobby knives 2. felt-tip pen http://www.instructables. I would suggest using duct tape. packaging tape 4.

instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .http://www.

anonymous anarchist friend. felt-tip pen Step 1: Step one Get a hold of two cans of soda.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . 2 Soda cans 3. hobby knives 2. packaging tape 4.Image Notes 1. http://www. Either dump them out or give one to your very close.

Step 2: Step Two
Cut the cans so that you have two nice strips of aluminum. sand down both sides of the aluminum and flatten them down if you can(I tried. All I did was put them under a
big book. It didn't work.)
Cut those two pieces of aluminum in half.
Remember to recycle!

Step 3: Step Three
Wrap your tape around the pieces of aluminum individually, then bind the four pieces of aluminum together into pairs. After that, tape those pieces together so that you
have something that resembles a wallet.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

Step 4: Step Four
Now, put your RFID card in there and put it up to a RFID scanner and see if it works.
I would appreciate it if someone who has an RFID card an scanner tries this.
Again, sorry about how sloppy this is. I hope it gave everyone a good idea of what I'm thinking.

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Wallet by
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How to make a RFID pet food access control system
by mlarsen on September 1, 2007

Intro: How to make a RFID pet food access control system
In this instructable I will explain how to make a simple RFID pet food access control system. This system uses a stand-alone RFID system that can be purchased either
pre-assembled or in kit form if you desire to do the soldering yourself, and also wish to save a few dollars in the process.
The reason I made this was out of pure necessity. I have two dogs, and when my vet placed one of them on a special diet I needed some way to ensure they ate their
own food... and only their own food. Since they are open-bowl fed and I'm gone part of the day, I decided to look for a product that would do what I needed. This meant I
wouldn't have to spend a great deal of time trying to re-train them and still give them the freedom to eat whenever they chose. This is where my frustrations begun...
****** CONTENT REMOVED - SEE BELOW ******
Frustrated with the situation, I decided to roll my own. This first version does the job, but I would eventually like to make the antenna extend around the entire perimeter
of the bowl. If anyone has experience with RFID technology, I would appreciate any feedback that would assist in modifying the antenna into that configuration.
***** UPDATE *****
Anthony Targa, holder of patent #5570655 contacted me. Apparently he DID manufacture the device and it was featured in numerous Veterinary publications. Because
of this, I fully retract my "patent troll" statement. I simply wish Anthony's device was produced on a larger scale so more people could have access to it.

Step 1: Materials and Tools
Materials
KL042 Proximity Card Access Control Kit
Assembly Required
Assembled & Tested

SK02 - 125 kHz Proximity Key Fob
The smallest quantity sold is a 10 pack. I asked QKits if they would substitute the access cards that come with the kit for the key fobs, and they did... I'm
not sure if this was a "one off" case, but it doesn't hurt to ask. If they won't do this for you try contacting AVEA, the mfgr of the kit and see if you can
purchase from them.

Radio Shack 500mA AC to 12VDC Adapter

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/

8. I bent one side of an l-bracket to make a hook shape. Tools Dremel In case you decide to resize the circuit board.instructables. Soldering gun & solder If you buy the unassembled version of the kit. 4 holes cut into cover for sound to escape. Hole cut into cover for the Adaptaplug M. Adaptaplug M .This comes with one adaptaplug tip. Antenna included in the KL042 kit. The KL042 circuit board can be cut down to a min. Annoying buzzer(s) Also available at Radio Shack Wire or L-Bracket Used to secure the box to the food bowl. Antenna connection 10. Image Notes 1. SK02 125 kHz Proximity Key Fob 6. size of 9cm x 5.7cm. Project box The dimensions of the box I used are 13cm x 7cm and was purchased at a local electronics dealer.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Make sure to get the adaptaplug M with the blue tip. so make sure your box is at least this size PLUS the dimension of your adaptaplug and buzzers. http://www. but you can also buy them at Radio Shack. Black Piezo Buzzer 4. Hot glue gun Drill For adding the sound and adaptaplug holes. 9. Buzzer connections. You can also use your Dremel if you have the bits. 7.Blue Tip 3. White Electric Buzzer. KL042 Proximity Card Access Control Kit 5. Radio Shack 500mA AC to 12VDC Adapter 2.

Then. program the RFID key fobs via the DIP switches.. have a look at the pictures below to put it all together..instructables. http://www.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . consult the diagram that's included with the kit and put it together.Step 2: Assembly There isn't much to this step. If you purchased the unassembled version of the kit. You need to program the RFID key fobs that DO NOT have access to the bowl. but when a pet who DOES NOT have access to the bowl. Consult the manual that comes with the kit for this. Before you close the box. when the pet who DOES have access to the bowl tries to eat nothing will happen. This way. a successful read will occur and the buzzers will sound.

Since this is http://www.instructables. of about 2" away from the device. All that's left to do is position the box so the key fob hovers over the box while the dog eats! I hope this helps other pet owners who are in my situation. Image Notes 1. you can do whatever you want. The RFID key fob can be a max. Please feel free to comment and suggest modifications. Then I cut a slit in the charcoal colored mat and ran the power cord underneath for safety reasons.Step 3: Attachment and Positioning I used the modified l-bracket I mentioned in step 1 to attach the box to to the bowl. Of course.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .

com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Distinguishing Pet Bowl by prabbit22m Cat enclosure: cat walk/tunnel. the buzzers did not sound. utilizes wasted space (Photos) by katerlyn Filtered Pet Watering Bowl by Dirkus RFID: The REAL Story by metrogdor22 Pets Month '08: Tips to Keep the ants out of your dog's food! by alvincredible .instructables.her bowl. Related Instructables RFID pet feeder by landmanr RFID cat door by landmanr HOW TO PACK AND MOVE YOUR CAT SAFELY TO A NEW RESIDENCE by rentagreenbox http://www.

but the range was limited.Timer-controlled open duration . Little Cat Toos demonstrates cat feeder from champenoise on Vimeo.instructables. The antenna is described in step 7. 2010 Intro: RFID pet feeder If you have two cats and one of them is on a diet but the other needs free food. Paint job 3. . which works 100% of the time. so it did not always activate the reader even when he was in the exact same place every time.An old CD-rom player is used as a sliding door .Mine was made out of cardboard so it is easily broken into by smart/strong animals. Proximity sensor http://www. This latest version of the feeder has a SEEED studio reader with a self-made antenna for more range.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . which worked.Sensors detect whether the door is fully opened/closed.RFID pet feeder by landmanr on June 20. Features: .Arduino controlled On the downside: .It doesn't hold a lot of food. 2. The cat's tag sometimes hangs on the side. you can build a feeder with RFID capability that only opens for the cat that needs free access. but my latest version (shown in the photograph) uses a SEEED studio RDM630 RF-reader with a self-made circular antenna. This antenna is large enough that the cat can poke his head through. Image Notes 1. The free-food cat wears a collar with an RFID tag.Proximity sensor (Sharp GP2D120) prevents door from closing while the cat is eating .Automatic/manual mode switch (on manual it opens with a pushbutton) . Not that big a deal because the cat usually just tried from different angles. The first version (shown in the video) used an ID-20 (ID Innovations). One could use a stronger material and add a servo that slides a bar into the door to lock it into place. The video shows the first version with the ID-20 as the reader. .

1 Toggle Switch .1.html) and a low one (100-220 ohm) between the button and the analog channel just so the resistance is not infinitely small.ladyada.html.Sharp GP2D120 Proximity sensor .e.g. and when it is all the way closed. it pushes the other button.net/make/mshield/faq.A working CD player tray mechanism+motor from an old cd-rom player .The material for the enclosure (such as cardboard.instructables.25" diameter 125KHz RFID tag (or as large as can be worn comfortably on the animal's collar. I have mounted a metal strip on the tray in such a way that when the door is all the way open.Step 1: Materials . Tag size influences read range. Put the Adafruit Motorshield on top of the Arduino. You can test the mechanism with a bit of Arduino code that is downloadable here: http://www.1 Red LED . Connect the motor to the motor shield. door closed) should be on channel 1 and the button actuated when the tray is retracted (door open) should be on channel 0. the strip pushes on one button. The button that is actuated when the tray is extended (i. which get pressed when the door is all the way open/closed.Arduino Duemilanove .1 adafruit motorshield .htm http://www.5 100-220? Resistors .ladyada.1 Green LED .4 10k? Resistors .? Step 3: Add open/close sensors (pushbuttons) To ensure that Arduino stops turning the motor when an open/close action has been performed. any other door with a dc motor would work.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .125KHz RFID reader (e. wood or plastic) Step 2: Find an old CD-rom player Strip an old CD rom player until you have only the tray with the DC motor that moves it back and forth. More info about the motor shield: http://www. SEEED studio RDM630. I use m3 (digital pin 5). Alternatively. Connect pushbuttons to Arduino analog channel 0 and 1 (in Arduino code pin 14 and 15).net/learn/arduino/lesson5. This also helps to keep track of what state the system is in at all times. Add a 10K resistor between each button and ground as a pull down resistor (http://www. Parallax) .com/arduino/cat_feeder.3 Pushbuttons . I mounted two pushbuttons in the tray. ID-innovations ID-20. Bigger is better in most cases) .writtensound.

motor stops. right now the door is closed. This metal strip pushes against a button when tray is all the way out.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Image Notes 1. This can also be tested with the code that can be downloaded over here: http://www.com/arduino/cat_feeder. For clarity. door state = closed.instructables. LEDs http://www. motor stops) 4. open/close pushbutton (manual mode) 3.writtensound. Thus.Image Notes 1. 2. the schematic shows only this latest addition without anything else. button 3. The food bowl is under this panel. when you want to fill it with food for example. When the tray is all the way in. Step 4: Add auto/manual mode switch and open/close button You have to be able to open the feeder without a tag. auto/manual mode switch 2. the metal strip pushes against this button (door state=open. we add a switch that puts it in 'manual mode' in which the feeder opens by pressing a button.htm.

The schematic shows only this step. Because of its limited range it is less tolerant to variations in the position of the tag on the animal's collar. By the way. code: http://www. so the door is opened for ANY tag (i.Step 5: Add proximity sensor Hook up the IR sensor to analog ch 4.tigoe. for my application I did not need to distinguish between tags. his head is at a distance that makes the output reliably cross your threshold. Mount it in such a way that when the cat is eating. the output will be low. When you put the tag on the animal's collar. and set the threshold at a value that doesn't give a lot of false positives. as in the code you find here. Closer to. The sensor used here (Sharp GP2D120) has a range of 4-30 cm. with an LED to show that it works.cc/playground/Code/ID12 It is not exactly clear who wrote it. my code Useful sites about using RFID readers with Arduino: http://www.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Now the door will never close whenever something is in the way. so I set the threshold at 200. but it still works. mount it in a way that the door itself does not activate it.htm Step 6: Connect RF reader If you use a Seeed studio RDM630: Connect the TX pin of the RDM630 to the RX (pin 0) of the Arduino Connect the +5V pin of the RDM630 to the +5V of the Arduino Connect the GND to the GND of the Arduino I ended up using the RDM630 because I wanted to add my own antenna (see next step). The code for both readers is the same. Also. or farther away than that.practicalarduino.writtensound.com/projects/rfid-access-controlsystem http://www. Code for testing the IR sensor can be found here: http://www.instructables.com/arduino/cat_feeder.e.net/pcomp/code/category/PHP/347 http://www. try to make it so that the plane of the tag is most likely to be in parallel to the plane of the antenna.htm The sensor has an optimal range. but with the IR added.writtensound. for clarity. With a simple code like below you can test what the output is when you put your hand or other objects at various distances.arduino. but the code does extract the actual tag value so you could modify it to do more sophisticated processing. therefore I only use pin D0. when RFID returns a 1). If you use an ID-20 (ID-innovations): Connect the +5V pin and RES pin of the ID-20 to the +5V of the Arduino Connect the GND pin and FMT pin of the ID-20 to GND of the Arduino Connect the D0 pin of the ID-20 to RX (pin 0) of the Arduino I do not need to communicate anything back to the reader. I basically copied it from this source: http://www. and increases to over 230 when anything is within 10cm. My sensor output hovers between 50 and 150 with nothing in front of it.com/arduino/cat_feeder. In your Arduino code you have to set a threshold value above which the sensor output triggers action to keep the door open. However. I have also used an ID-20 (ID Innovations) which has a built-in antenna. The code is about the same as step 4. Now you can test whether the reader works by first writing an Arduino sketch that has only this function plus something that uses the output value to toggle an LED.

I myself had to do a lot of debugging before it worked flawlessly. Guides for the construction of antennas are available for download on the web (e.instructables. without having to bother your cat.pdf). no range measurement 3. range 3-3. Wait until it is dinner time. Larger than that. and a proximity sensor that prevents the door from closing when the cat is eating.1" diameter. start with putting it on for a short time.Step 7: Optional: Build your own RF antenna If you have a 125KHz RF reader that allows an external antenna. range 1" So the largest range was with a 9" diameter coil. Important: if your cat is not used to wearing a collar. your pet learns to operate it somehow. The following worked well (range is in distance from the plane of the coil): Circular coil 1. http://ww1. When the animal succeeds.microchip.g.writtensound. 48 turns. Over the course of several days. Even if the door does not open every single time. load final code By now you should have an RF reader that reads your tag. I used 24 Ga magnet wire and a 1. put food in the feeder and encourage the animal to point his nose where it is likely to activate the reader. it is still likely that over time. http://www.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . you can build it to fit your needs.imageshack. Final code for this project: http://www. the lower jaw can get caught.us/i/coil2sm. While the animal tries to get it off. 90-110 turns. but I still ended up just trying a bunch of things to see what worked best. the range first went down to zero and then disappeared from the center. You can draw a target on the enclosure. which is not good. I chose to make an antenna large enough that the cat can stick his head through. he/she will have to get used to it. Do monitor your feeder's behavior though. If you hear strained breathing. 75 turns.25" diameter tag to test the antenna. In my case the activation tag on the cat's collar is not always hanging nicely down. a cd tray that opens and closes automatically or manually depending on the mode switch. because the latter provides less power. put everything in it.6" diameter. then progressively longer. 31 turns.jpg/.com/arduino/cat_feeder7.com/downloads/en/devicedoc/51115f. the collar should not be too loose. make sure no wires are in the way of moving parts. In my experience it is about right when you can still squeeze in two fingers.pde Step 9: Train your cat This shouldn't be too difficult. no range measurement 6" diameter. use the 9v adapter.5" 9" diameter. It is helpful to have an extra tag at hand just to test the device now and then. which activates the reader almost 100% of the time. 35 turns. To prevent this. They help quite a bit. no range measurement 4. If you draw power from the Arduino. loosen it immediately. Build the enclosure. but sometimes hangs on the side of his head. An antenna coil is as simple as this: http://img101. Step 8: Put everything into the enclosure. for the animal's protection. just a wire wound up a bunch of turns with the two ends connected to the RF reader. 43 turns.1" diameter. the wire should be guided away from the coil. there is instant reward. just because getting food is a strong motivator. Monitor your cat closely while he/she wears the collar in the beginning. If your reader has a small range it will not always detect the cat even when he is in the exact same place every time. not USB only. Also important is when the coil is complete. range 4" Square coil 10" square shape. make sure the enclosure is shut.

com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Cat Genie three beep solution replacement electronic water sensor by ku4zs CAT FEEDING PLATFORM by Thinkenstein How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp Cat-Powered Automatic Cat Feeder by labelreader Infrared Proximity Sensing Coffee Table Module & Color Changing Glowing Faucet by grahmaustin .instructables.Related Instructables RFID cat door by landmanr How to make a RFID pet food access control system by mlarsen A very simple proximity detector by offlogic http://www.

This means the door stays locked when no current passes through it. When 12vDC is passed through the electromagnet in the door lock. or Fail Secure. The circuit consists of 3 separate parts. In this case I have put both on separate bread boards for testing. even with my hands full I can unlock the door and push it open! I built a simple circuit with a basic ATMega 168 arduino chip and a ID-20 RFID reader to control an electronic door lock. and PCB designs have been tested and refined.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Intro: Arduino RFID Door Lock ***Updated 8/9/2010*** I wanted to make an easy and secure way to enter my garage. In most cases you want a Normally Open circuit on the door lock. a Reader to read RFID tags. Here is a video overview of the system in action Read on to see how to build one for your self! **Update** All of the code. http://www. sometimes they go back together sometimes they end up as something entirely different then where they started. schematics. The controller receives serial data from the Reader and controls the RGB led and the Door lock. a Controller to accept data from the reader and control the output of the RGB LED and the Electric door lock. 2009 Author:pcmofo author's website I like to take things apart. a plate in the lock gives way and allows the door to be pushed open freely. The reader is placed on the outside of the door and is separate from the controller on the inside so that no one can circumvent the security by breaking open the Reader and trying to short circuit the reader. The door lock is first installed in a door and tested with a 9v battery to ensure correct installation. RFID was the best way to unlock my door. They are all posted here as of 8/9/2010 Updated video of the final system installed and working.instructables.Arduino RFID Door Lock by pcmofo on November 13.

Reset button for micro controller 5. 12vDC connection to Door Lock 7. Jumper to switch between programing and reading serial data from the RFID module Image Notes 1. 6 pin header going to reader 9. RGB LED is blue showing its on and ready. Programing Header 7. 12v DC power 2. RFID keychain tag 4. Master programming card 6. 12vDC power input Image Notes 1. Spark Fun break out board 6.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .Image Notes 1. 12v output to door lock 3. Power on LED 6. http://www. Controller portion of circuit 3. RFID card tag 5. 2N2222 transistor for buzzer 3. ID-12 RFID reader glued to front inside of project box 5. Jumper wires used to mount RFID reader 90deg away from the main board. Resistors for Buzzer 4. ATMega168 8. Image Notes 1. TIP31A transistor to trigger door lock 4. Reader portion of the circuit 2. Reader mounted outside door.instructables. 6 Pin header to Controller 2.

95 RFID stuff Either one of these. RGB LED with hole cut in front 8.95 Crystal 16MHz $1.95 RFID Reader Breakout $0. RFID card tag 5. 12vDC connection to Door Lock 7.25 Mini Push Button Switch $0. Door Fail Secure access control Electric Strike v5 NO $17.95 Other TIP31A transistor (radio shack/local electronics store $1.com where I bought them.125kHz $1. I am assuming you have a breadboard.50) Door Lock is from ebay.Diffused $1.instructables.35 Triple Output LED RGB .25 (x2) Resistor 10k Ohm 1/6th Watt PTH $0. bay) Image Notes 1.50 Capacitor Ceramic 22pF $0.50 (kawamall.Straight $2. Master programming card 6.95 Break Away Headers .95 RFID Reader ID-20 $34. 12vDC power input http://www. This is the basic set of parts you need to build and arduino and a circuit to read RFID tags into the arduino. Reader portion of the circuit 2. power supply and hookup wires already. RFID keychain tag 4.Can also be mounted on the PCB without the SF break out board shown (green) 7. 20 has better range.50 RFID Tag . Arduino Stuff ATmega168 with Arduino Bootloader $4. PCB cut to slot into groves on project box Step 1: Parts Needed Here are a list of parts and links to SparkFun. 12 is smaller RFID Reader ID-12 $29. Controller portion of circuit 3.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .

The hardware portion of this RFID reader would be too simple if we used a regular arduino with built in USB programmer. The hookup for this is well known but I have included the entire schematic for the circuit. ATMega168 Arduino 3.Step 2: Build the Arduino controller The first step to building a RFID door lock with a basic Arduino is to bread board out a basic working arduino. Breadboard Powersupply 2. push button and a breadboard. In testing I used a bread board power supply. Ground output from TIP31A 5. Serial data input http://www. Serial input Image Notes 1. 5v/ground to reader 12. 12vDC from power supply 6. RGB LED outputs 7. Because I chose to make a basic Arduino circuit myself I need an external USB->Serial FDIT programmer. Serial Data in from ID-20 8. 22pF Capacitors 8. The arduino is going to trigger 4 outputs.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Image Notes 1.instructables. and 1 to trigger the TIP31A to send 12vDC to the door lock. 1 each for Red/Green/Blue LEDs. 10ohm Resistor 7. Serial input to arduino 11. Output to open door lock via TIP31A 9. Connection to Door Lock 9. 2x 22pF capacitors. Breadboard Powersupply 2. TIP31A Transistor 3. The arduino receives serial data in on its Rx line from the ID-20 RFID reader. RGB outputs to reader 10. 22pF capacitors 7. ATMega168 Arduino 4. RGB LED outputs . 16mhz Crystal 6. 12vDC to door lock 4. To get an arduino up and running all you really need is the ATMega168 with the arduino software flashed on it. Connect a LED to digital output 13 and verify that everything is working. Reset Button 5. Image Notes 1. I have included Eagle schematics of the controller with a power supply built from a 7805 voltage regulator. Most Arduino pre-flashed ATMega 168 chips come with the default blink program pre installed. 16mhz Crystal 6. Since I plan on putting this into the wall and not touching it again I dont want to use a big bulky $30 arduino board when I can buy a $5 ATMega 168 and make a much smaller custom PCB. Reset Button 4. 16mhz crystal. 10k ohm Resistor (for reset) 5. 12vDC 3. 10k ohm resistor. TIP31A Transistor 2.

This is a very simple circuit to connect.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Brown in the pictures. To make it easier to breadboard the ID-10/ID-20 Sparkfun sells a Breakout board that allows you to attach longer pin headers that are spaced to fit a bread board. Also send over 3 wires from 3 of the arduino output pins to control the RGB LED. Serial input to arduino 9. The schematic should be strait forward and easy to follow.pdf ((612x792) 12 KB) [NOTE: When saving. we are going to send 5v/Ground over from the primary bread board to a secondary bread board we are building the Reader on. if you see . This part and the pinheaders and listed in the parts list. One more wire.pdf'] Step 3: Build the RFID Reader Now that you have your arduino bread boarded and working you can put together the RFID reader portion of the circuit that will contain the ID-10 or ID-20 and RGB LED to indicate the status of the circuit. http://www. one for each color. LED's get resistors and a few points on the ID-20 are tied to ground/5v to set the correct status. will be a serial connection for the ID-20 to talk to the arduino's Rx serial input.tmp as the file ext.8.instructables. RGB outputs from arduino File Downloads Controller_PCB. Remember that the reader will be outside and separate from the controller inside so that someone cannot easily break in. rename it to 'Controller_PCB. To build this.

Serial coming out of ID-20. Soldered to the Sparkfun break out board and pin headers. Optional Resistor/transistor that I was playing with to connect a buzzer 7. RGB LED wires connected to Arduino output pins. Serial out of ID-20 and into arduino Rx 6. Guess which one is which?? 5. ID-20 reader.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .Image Notes 1. 2. 5v/Ground to power the reader from the main Controller power supply 9. (ID-10 is smaller).instructables. Resistors for LEDs 4. Common ground for the RGB LED http://www. RGB LED 3. It allows me to Plug it into the bread board easily. hidden under the chip 8.

pdf'] http://www.pdf ((612x792) 8 KB) [NOTE: When saving.instructables.File Downloads reader_PCB. rename it to 'reader_PCB.tmp as the file ext. if you see .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .

Each RFID card has a 5 Hex Byte serial number and a 1 Hex Byte Check sum that we can use to verify there were no errors in the transmission between the ID-20 and the arduino. Valid cards are stored in the EEPROM by using the first Byte as a counter. Currently I have not programmed a way to delete a card as the reasons for deleting a card would most likely be it was lost or stolen. If the card is the master card we have the arduino go into a "programming mode" where it flashes RGB and waits for another valid tag to be read. I used a FTDI programmer which allows you to program the arduino via USB with only 4 wires. Whenever a card is read. if there are 3 valid cards stored the first Byte in the EEPROM would be 3. The ATMega168 has 512 Bytes of EEPROM memory.txt (16 KB) [NOTE: When saving.read(0). rename it to 'RFIDLock. We can make a loop that looks through the EEPROM 5 bytes at a time and tries to find the card that was read in by the reader. If the user is valid. When the card is read it decides if it is a valid card or not by comparing what it read in to a list of valid cards. After 5 seconds the door lock re-locks and the LED turns back to blue to wait for another card to be read. It also turns on another output high for 5 seconds. It is important that the door lock still work even if the arduino loses power overnight or is reset.tmp as the file ext. I have never made a PCB before so I am still working on the design and layout of the parts. and the fact that each ID is 5 Bytes long we know that 1-5 is card one.txt'] Step 5: Expand This is only some of the cool stuff you can do with RFID. you WILL get an upload error if you do no temporarily disconnect the ID-20 serial line to the arduino's Rx line. if you see . The program turns on the Blue LED to indicate it is ready to read a new card. which only takes a few seconds. A very important thing to remember. . The code is attached in a text file along with a copy of the parts list.txt (22 KB) [NOTE: When saving. rename it to 'Updated_Code. I plan on making a finished PCB version of this circuit. Disconnect the ID-20 while programming then plug it back in when your done. The ATMega168 only has 1 Rx input and it uses it to upload code to talk to the programmer. File Downloads RFIDLock. This output is connected to the TIP31A transistor and allows the tiny arduino to control a much larger 12v 300mA door lock without being damaged. EEPROM. logging of who enters and when. The Controller schematic shows a pin header connection to allow you to plug one in directly. 6-10 is card 2 and 11-15 is card 3. if not. This can be a bit tricky using a basic arduino. First of all. Once I have them complete I will post them as well.Step 4: Program! Time to program your arduino.tmp as the file ext. you may have to press the reset button multiple times before and during the first part of the upload. I did not want any external buttons/switches/etc and I did not want to reprogram the arduino every time I wanted to add a new card. The reader then returns to normal mode and waits for a new card to be read. But how can we add new cards to the EEPROM after the circuit is installed?? I have read in one of the RFID cards I have and hard coded it to be the Master RFID card. If the card is invalid then the LED changes to RED for a few seconds and back to Blue to wait for another card. Sparkfun also sells this part but many may already have it. So even if the entire EEPROM is wiped the master card will still function. As this would most likely be used with 1-10 people the easiest thing to do would be to hard program a Master Erase card that will wipe all cards from the EEPROM then re add them all.txt'] Updated_Code. I have added code to wipe the EEPROM but I have not implemented this feature yet. I encourage anyone to take the code I have written and modify it to do even more cool things! Related Instructables A Universal RFID Key by drj113 RFID cat door by landmanr Control a Schlage electronic deadbolt with an arduino! by quadmasta http://www. The next tag that is read is added to the next free spot in the EEPROM and the counter is incremented 1 if the card does not already exist in the EEPROM memory. then it continues to see if it is a valid card or not. Therefore I wanted to use only RFID to control the operation of the circuit as well as control over the door lock. the arduino turns OFF the Blue LED and turns on the Green LED for 5 seconds. network/twitter connection etc. it checks first to see if it is the Master card. For example.instructables. = 3. Therefore all valid card ID's are stored in EEPROM memory. You can easily upload my code to your arduino and never look back but whats the fun in that? Let me explain the basic idea of how it works. You could expand this much further with a LCD output. Knowing this. if you see .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ RFID pet feeder by landmanr Very Simple Arduino Electric Lock by RKlenka Build an easy temporary door chain lock by fastcar123 Secret Knock Detecting Door Lock by Grathio Proper lock releasing etiquette by dsv4724 .

This was built as part of an up and coming project from The Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.iPhone RFID Reader by OniDaito on March 13. An iPhone USB Cable (genuine one is best and probably at least 3!) A JAILBROKEN iPhone! An ID-12 RFID Reader An ID-12 Breakout Board A Logic Level Converter It's useful to have some IC Sockets for Soldering Glass Tags if you want extra fun or any 125Khz Tags If you don't like the idea of taking iPhone Cables apart. I should point out that I don't work for Sparkfun. 3. 9. http://www. 12. 4. use an iPhone Breakout Board A Battery Pack with a 5V step up Wire. A box to put it all in. 11. This instructable assume knowledge of compiling iPhone custom software (in C++) . 10. 5. Some kind of switch. 2010 Intro: IPhone RFID Reader The idea behind this project is to see what the iPhone's serial is capable of and to try and have a little fun with RFID along the way. 2.instructables. 6. This reader works with the low frequency (125Khz) tags but I have a half working version for MiFARE Hi-Frequency as well. basic soldering and electronics. 8.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . For this project you will need: 1. 7.

The Schematic and Instructions can be found in this PDF .com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . To do this you need to solder: A Red wire from 5V (11) to /RST (2) A Black wire from FS (7) to GND (1) This sets up the ID-12 into ASCII mode. there is an excellent write-up Here Step 2: Connect Logic Level Converter The next step is to wire up the Logic Level Convertor.Step 1: Wire the ID-12 The first stage is the wiring of the ID-12.3V whereas the ID12 runs at TTL5V. The key is to Solder the ID12's 5V. 5V power and TX Lines VCC to 5V (Pin 11) GND to GND (Pin 1) RX-I to D0 (Pin 9) If this is confusing. This little board is quite easy to use.instructables. Wire the battery's ground wire into the GND of the logic level board and the ID12. You should attach it to the breakout board then attach a series of IC Sockets to the board so you can easily add and remove your wires later on. This particular unit does need to be set to ASCII output however. We need to step up and down. From here we need simply need to solder in the Ground. GRND and signal lines to the first channel on the High Voltage Side of the Board. Wire the positive of the battery into the switch and out of the switch into the logic board and the ID12. At this point. Wiring up the ID-12 is quite easy. http://www. you can wire in the switch and the battery box into the High Voltage side of the circuit. This is needed because the iPhone works at TTL3.

the plugs will not fit back into their sockets. Taking apart the plug should reveal 4 cables. Be careful at this stage though as its VERY HANDY TO KEEP THE PLUG INTACT. We are aiming to use the iPhone's built in serial connection. You can decide which colour goes into which socket. Place the black wire into the ground. Regardless. Remember which is which! http://www. The geunine ones wear much less. the better. you need to run a thin blade around the inside of the plastic case. A small amount of force should release the clips on either side and then pulling on the metal plug with a pair of pliers should do the job. if you are using an iPhone cable. you are limited on how many times you can place the plugs as the sockets will wear out.instructables. I chose green for Pin12.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . two of them were genuine. A genuine iPhone cable will have a sheath and small gold connectors. Also. If you use a breakout board. If anyone knows why this is so. The pins we need are: Pin 1 for GND Pin 13 for RX Pin 18 for 3. white for Pin13 and Red for Pin18.ru's iPod Guide that lists the ports we need. The connectors are attached to the wires with a very small amount of solder. First. Firstly. I personally went through 5 cables with this method. Removing the small plugs requires a lot of force and yet.3V(+ve) We could use pin 12 for TX as well but the ID-12 doesn't need data sent to it and I have had significant problems in sending data FROM the iPhone. You should make yourself familiar with the connector. this is quite easy. Cheaper cables will be glued in place and this can wreak the project.Step 3: Repurpose the iPhone USB Cable The next step is to work on the iPhone's connection. the iPhone only needs to receive and this is well because these two pins are very close together. either solder your wires into the breakout board or open up the iPhone cable. do let me know. If the connectors snap they cannot be used and if the solder snaps. You dont want glue inside the unused sockets and the less force you need to remove the cables. To open a genuine iPhone cable. you MUST be as delicate as possible. However. you should look at Pinout. things are a little trickier. you will need to solder them again and if you use too much.

But you need some tags to read. you need only solder the Live. As this worked. I decided simply to transplant it into a simple OF example. RX and GND but you may do the TX as well. build with Xcode and use a fake signature as written on Saurik's site. you can remove it if need be or swap out the actual tag. 6. you can place it all in a box and begin testing. Download the code from GitHub Open the project in Xcode. The basic C/C++ code there works quite well for testing if you comment out the sending code. I didn't use the serial class mentioned in this blog. 2. I used a custom built FTDI USB TTL adaptor and read the the values being sent with my laptop. There is a small program called LDID by Saurik who is the definitive source for all iPhone development. 3.app to /private/var/stash/applications Download LDID in Cydia Use ldid on a terminal app to sign your app.Step 4: Connect iPhone Cable to Logic Level Board The next step is to wire the cable into the LOW level side of the Logic level board. Jailbroken software is really another topic all together but there are some interesting choices. So now you have the ability to read RFID Tags. 4. In short. There was an odd trend of implanting glass RFID tags into the flesh near your thumb but why bother with that when you can simply make an RFID earring? That way. Again. Once this is all soldered together. Step 5: Download and Compile Software The next step is to design the software. Serial Communication on the iPhone has been covered very well on DevDots page. I followed the advice given on This Page which talks about OpenFrameworks and iPhone Serial. For me. Compiling OpenFrameworks for the iPhone requires signing in order to run on a jailbroken device.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . It can be useful to practice this on a breadboard first to make sure you get it right. As I'm a big fan of OpenFrameworks. http://www. In the main.instructables. I quite like the idea of home automation and similar. Compile the code using your own signature fake signature or simnply don't sign at all Using SSH/SCP. To generate a working program you need to: 1. The iPhone should be receiving from the TX-O pin on the board whereas the ID-12 is sending to the TX-I on the board. copy the executable . I had previously written some standard C++ to open serial ports for the ID-12 specifically and use it. I chose this approach. 5. However.

com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Interfacing RFID with 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt Arduino RFID Door Lock by pcmofo Twitter Poem Box by saccpcomp .Related Instructables AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C by nevdull How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer by sketchsk3tch http://www.instructables.

How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp on September 13. 2009 Intro: How to connect Arduino and RFID On this instructable I will try to show how to interface a RFID sensor with the Arduino. I am using the RFID sensor from seeedstudio the serial version of it. RFID sensor board 3.RFID Sensor from seeedstudios .Arduino Board . Sample TAGs . RFID antenna 4. The card I used to deny others TAGs 3. 2.Protoboard . Card that I used to add another tag. There are a few parts you will gonna need.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Image Notes 1. I also bought some RFID keys. Wires http://www.instructables.Wires .RFID tags (125kHz) from seeedstudios Image Notes 1. Arduino Board 2. UPDATE: Now it works with IDE 021 Step 1: What you gonna need? .

Arduino PIN2 (Rx) SoftSerial 2. Image Notes 1. Moving on to next step. Only 3 wires are required to interface.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Image Notes 1. 2 wires for supply and another for the serial line(communication) The wires as connected as the third photo shows. Tx 4. the software. Plug the RFID sensor to the protoboard like the second photo above. Antenna http://www. Tx PIN 2. GND 3. GND 6.instructables. Vcc 5. That is all you gonna need to wire. Vcc . On RFID sensor: PIN 1 -> Tx PIN 2 -> Rx (Not Used) PIN 3 -> NC PIN 4 -> GND PIN 5 -> VCC (+5V) Tx from RFID board goes to Digital PIN 2 on Arduino Board.Step 2: Plugging all together Connect the antenna on the appropriate pins like the first photo. Image Notes 1. NC 3. Some tape to hold the wires.

rate it. The code is really simple. Please. Any doubt.Step 3: The code I'm not a software guy.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer by sketchsk3tch How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C by nevdull Seeeduino Curtain Control by suqingxiao . so this code is just for demonstration. just through the serial line. I hope that the images spokes more then words. rename it to 'RFID_2_eng.pde (1 KB) [NOTE: When saving. I don't make any kind of checksum at the tags code. The video demonstrate how to use the software. sound or LCD for debug or visualization. feel free to ask. I didn't post any kind of explanation as text on the video.instructables.tmp as the file ext. please ask me. With the two white cards you can deny or allow the access of others keys.pde'] Step 4: Results! There is no LED. or correct me. xD Any doubt or suggestion. if you see . I used a new library for the serial. if you like it. thank you Related Instructables RFID cat door by landmanr RFID pet feeder by landmanr Twitter Poem Box by saccpcomp http://www. File Downloads RFID_2_eng. but it seems to work fine. using software emulation.

Standard Automotive relay 4. If there is no match. Image Notes 1.instructables. This was a project i done some time ago and it has been a long time since i touched it. Advantages: The ID-12 chip is/can be remotely mounted away from the main PCB. reading available data from the ID12. This is a simple immobiliser based on a PIC12F629 and an ID-12 chip from innovations. it compares the string with up to 10 tags it has in EEPROM. click on the 'i' in the top left then click on the 'original file' link for an uncompressed version. behind a panel with no external components viewable. ID-12 3.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . What good is a car alarm with 3+ point immobilisation if someone manages to get the keys and of course the alarm remote. 7805 vreg 2. I will be happy to answer questions though. BD667 darlington Transistor 5. 2010 Intro: RFID Car immobiliser with PIC12629 Ok. if someone has your keys. so there are heaps of immobilisers out there but with most of them. I know the schematic is hard to read. it will not be startable again. The PIC is in an endless loop at this point. If someone carjacks you or something like that (after you have started the car) then if they stop the car. it activates the transistor which in turn activates the relay and the program stops.. I have posted this on here as it was requested by a few people. Cheap and effective I apologise for the slight lack in detail. http://www. it just keeps waiting for data.. If one matches.RFID Car immobiliser with PIC12629 by andrew_h on April 26. Once a card/tag is read. The bi-colour LED indicates the status. Bi-colour LED Step 1: The Schematic and how it works The PIC and the ID-12 are powered by a 7805 5v regulator via some basic filtering caps. This can be built for about $50. Initial setup is done by shorting the jumper and then reading up to 10 tags in sequence. they have you car. This overwrites each tag if it's alreading in eeprom.

7805 vreg 2. I would suggest the use of shielded cable as cars are electrically noisy and it might cause dodgey readings. BD667 darlington Transistor 5. The only connections needed are: Pin 1: GND Pin 2: +5v Pin 7: GND Pin 9: Data Pin11: +5v This means you only need 3 wires going to the ID-12. solder it all up and program the chip with your fav. The ID12 is wired in standard ASCII mode. Image Notes 1. you can connect pin 2 (GPIO5) and a ground pin to the serial port of a PC's Rx and ground @ 9600 baud to see the actual tag values and what the chip is doing.pdf ((595x842) 10 KB) [NOTE: When saving.pdf'] Step 3: All put together Once you have the PCB done.. if you see . it may not work properly on all PC's without the addition of a max232 chip as it is only pseudo RS232 and not true levels. HEX file attached. programmer.tmp as the file ext. ID-12 3. Not that i have come across any in recent times.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . rename it to 'immobiliser_pcb2. However. File Downloads immobiliser_pcb2. Bi-colour LED File Downloads http://www. If the run is long (more than say 20cm). There's not much to it. Standard Automotive relay 4. Print. drill etc. transfer..instructables. For debugging. The others can be jumpered on the chip.Step 2: PCB The PCB is fairly straight forward when teamed up with the schematic. etch.

Once you have programmed your tags in. then swipe the tag over the ID-12. rename it to 'immobliser_v1. The main power for the circuit should come from an 'ignition' circuit on the car. Bench test the setup and once you are happy with it.2_12f675.tmp as the file ext.hex'] Step 4: Wrapping up Programming: Power up the immobiliser with the jumper in place.2. if you see . If a bad tag is read. Then connect the 'switched' relay contacts between a feed to the coil(s) or ignition input to your EFI computer.hex (5 KB) [NOTE: When saving. You can then program up to 10 tags.tmp as the file ext. The LED will go orange when a tag is read. car or anything you want by simon72post Knex Bazooka by fobblewabble K'nex MP5 by Trauts http://www. Best is to just keep reading the same tag over and over till all 10 positions are filled. The unit is now in 'operation' mode and the LED is red. you can remove the jumper. turn on the ignition of the car. you can wire it into your car. you must reprogam that position or 'key number'. then go back to red (waiting for another tag). if you see . the relay closes. then extinguish totally and the relay will close. or reprogramming the pic will clear the eeprom if needed. If the car is turned off.2_12f675.instructables. The LED should go green and then go red.Immobiliser_1. When a tag is read. rename it to 'Immobiliser_1. To operate. the LED will go orange and If a good tag is read.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Steampunk Turbo Lighter (Howto) by MurphyHarris KNEX RBG REPEATER TRIGGER by rivera364 knex light hybrid crossbow by stf13 DD-KYT by kingghaffari Knex Wall-E Home: Spinning wheel by Seleziona .2.hex (5 KB) [NOTE: When saving.hex'] immobliser_v1. the LED will go green for 1/2 a second. the process must be repeated. Related Instructables Mobile Phone Alarm for a motorbike. then start the car. it will go back to red waiting for another tag. If you want to 'erase' a tag.

instructables. This instructable will show how you can use an Arduino and a few simple components (wire coil. inventory tracking . This is version 1. resistor) to make a device that can spoof an 125 KHz (low frequency) RFID tag.net/doku.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . I'm using a Metalized polyester film cap I got from Radio Shack.01 uF). . They're used in building access control systems. but this version is stupid simple. Step 1: Parts Parts: *Some enamel coated solid core copper wire (I used the green spool from the 3 spool set Radio Shack carries). 2010 Intro: Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer RFID tags are all over the place. UPDATE: Here is a link to an Arduino Mini shield based on these instructions http://wiki. capacitor. . I need to pick up one of those). transistor. so there are many enhancements that can be made. I did this in a few hours without much previous knowledge of RFID and without any fancy equipment (like a radio tuning hardware or an oscilloscope . passports.php?id=terd:projects:rfidspoofer . I used a 2N3904 *A 10 K Ohm Resistor *A 10 nF capacitor (0.smallroom.I guess an oscilloscope is fancy. *A NPN transistor. . yet it works. . others should work though *A toilet paper roll to wind the wire on I tested my circuit using a Parallax RFID serial reader connected to a second Arduino http://www.Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer by sketchsk3tch on April 9.

org/wiki/Manchester_code. http://www. When the tag is close to the RFID reader then the magnetic field powers the chip on the tag.com/doc/30215336/RFID-Faker-Code The serial number of a tag is sent over using a fairly simple protocol. This all works on the principle of inductive coupling.flickr.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . An RFID reader has a coil in it that has a coil in it that creates a varying electronic field (in this case 125 KHz). It starts by sending 9 one's Then it sends 10 sets of 4 bits. to learn more about his see www. Manchester encoding basically takes the XOR of the bit that needs to be transmitted and the clock value.com/photos/kurtisscaletta/2473469841/ and used under the creative commons license.the card serial number) (the first 4 bits are the data.html 125 KHz cards use manchester encoding to encode the data to send it to the reader.instructables.scribd. This has to be done on every clock cycle.Step 2: RFID background A passive RFID tag has a coil and a chip with data on it.de/rfid/types_of_rfid. So if the clock value is low (0) and the value to transmit is 1 then it would be 0 XOR 1 which is 1. even parity of the rows above) 1101 (last a 0 stop bit) 0 See the pdf in the first link in the references section for more details on this Image provided by Flickr user at www. which then responds by tuning and detuning its own antenna. For more information on manchester encoding see en.wikipedia. or get it here: www. which is called the carrier signal. then one parity bit (it's using even parity) Then it sends "column" parity bits (even parity of the rows in the previous step) Last it sends a 0 stop bit So an example looks like this: (start bits) 111111111 (10 rows of data . the last is the even parity bit) 11110 10100 10001 11000 10010 11101 11110 00000 00011 01010 (then it sends the column parity bits. Step 3: The Data You can either download the code below.rfid-handbook.

The code generates a tag ID that's 10 hex F's. Just connect pin 9 on the Arudino to a 10 K Ohm resistor. Next you can put your capacitor between the collector and emitter of the transistor. then to the base of the transistor. File Downloads rfidFaker. Next connect the coil the the emitter and collector of the transistor. When pin 9 is low then the antenna is tuned (sending out a "high" signal). You probably want to leave a little extra wire in case you need to wind some more to get your antenna tuned right. The emitter also needs to be connected to ground.shtml.crystalradio. if everything's right you should see the tag ID you're hoping to see.tmp as the file ext. http://www. After you have your coil you can connect it to your circuit.net/cal/indcal2. To determine how many winds to do you can use an induction calculator like the one here www. rename it to 'rfidFaker. I have no tuning equipment). which "detunes" the antenna.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Step 5: The code The Arduino now needs to tune and detune the antenna. if you see . We just need to do this in the right sequence to send data to the reader. Once it's working at really short ranges (touching the reader) you can mess with the coil some more to tune the antenna better and you should be able to get a range of a few inches. If that's what you get in your reader then you know it's working. I used the green spool from the Radio Shack set of wires and wound it about 133 times around the toilet paper roll (I did this both by working with a calculator and some trial and error. This reduces the resistance between the two ends of the coil. If not (and you're sure the sketch is uploaded properly and the circuit is connected correctly) start adding and removing winds from the coil and retesting it.Step 4: Building the circuit You need to create a coil that's about 150 to about 162 uH (different sources say it should be different values). The schematic is pretty easy.instructables.pde (1 KB) [NOTE: When saving. It should be somewhere in the 120-140 range with the green Radio Shack wire I used. When the pin is high then it sends power to the base of the transistor.pde'] Step 6: Testing To test the circuit hold the antenna right up to the reader (go ahead and touch it to the reader for the first test).

The image for this step is from www. By experimenting with the coil winds and the capacitor you should be able to get a few inches of range.flickr.com/photos/exfordy/123900378/ used under the creative commons license. It should be easy to modify this though by simply collapsing the coil. http://www.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . More range would probably need some type of an amplified coil.instructables. First. Next I hold my coil up and the reader sees it as a tag and reads the serial number off it. This isn't a huge deal because in my experience they end up matching up close enough every about every second or two. Step 8: Elephants in the Room This project does have a few deficiencies that should be mentioned. The second issue is the form factor of the antenna. At that point though you'll need to use a different calculator that does multi-level coils to figure out how to wind it. there's the range.Step 7: The Video First I hold up a real tag to the reader. Last. and you'll see by the screen behind it that the tag ID is read and displayed on the screen behind it. If you wanted to modify this so it could brute force tag IDs it might be more important that every tag ID is broadcast correctly. since the RFID emulator runs on it's own clock instead of using the one from the magnetic field the reader creates not every serial ID broadcast is received by the broadcaster.

instructables.cq. good discussion of how it all works and schematic mrl. including C code www.cx/2008/09/using-an-avr-as-an-rfid-tag/ A similar project. also a reader www.Step 9: References PDF on a similar project. missing some details though www.alexanderguthmann. cool ideas.com/senior-design-rfid/ Related Instructables A Universal RFID Key by drj113 How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp Arduino Magstripe Emulator by sketchsk3tch http://www.dennislambing.navi.cz/projects/rfid/rfid.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Magnetic stripe card spoofer by powerpants AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C by nevdull Arduino RFID Door Lock by pcmofo Interfacing RFID with 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n .de/en/emulator.html An RFID tag that's just a small Microchip uController and a resistor micah.cx/prox.pdf Similar project.pl School project.

Weather proof. Created as a prototype for an online swim lap counter system named Rfish . Bluetooth capable RFID reader This instructable connects the popular BlueSmirf Bluetooth module to the ID12 RFID reader and shows how to make a dust and water resistant (IP55 ) RFID reader that sends IDs to your PC or mobile phone over Bluetooth radio without an additional micro controller and without an external power source.5V AA batteries Battery holder with button connectors Battery wire with button connectors 2 short pieces of wire Solder Tape Tools Cutter Soldering iron Helping hands http://www. Bluetooth capable RFID reader by tamberg on March 30. weather proof RFID reader.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Material ID12 RFID reader ID12 breakout board 125kHz RFID Tag USB to serial adapter BlueSmirf Gold Bluetooth module Right angle break away headers Jumper wires premium F/F Ensto junction box IP55 3 1. 2009 Intro: Weather proof. it can be used for any project in need of a self contained.

BlueSmirf Bluetooth module 3.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .Image Notes 1.5V AA batteries Step 1: Solder headers to the BlueSmirf Bluetooth module Image Notes 1. Solder on this side of the BlueSmirf module and do not heat the contacts longer than necessary http://www. 3 x 1. ID12 RFID reader soldered to breakout board 2.instructables.

COM17. Write down the COM port number (to talk to the BlueSmirf module over USB we will open a connection to this COM port). Download SerialUsbBlueSmirfConfig. "Edit") to match your COM port number and baud rate (default for BlueSmirf Gold is 115200 baud) and save the changes. source included for educational purpose) and unzip it.96<RETURN> AOK ---<RETURN> END When in command mode. (Note: If you want to use SerialUsbBlueSmirfConfig.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .) http://www. This opens the Device Manager.g.bat again don't forget to change it to 9600.Step 2: Configure the BlueSmirf module via USB Connect the BlueSmirf to the USB to serial adapter as follows (you might use headers to connect female jumper cables to the female connector of the USB to serial adapter): VCC to 3.instructables. type "devmgmt. Edit SerialUsbBlueSmirfConfig. Open the node "Ports (COM & LPT)" in the device tree.3V GND to GND TX-O to RX-I RX-I to TX-O Then plug the USB into your PC (the following instructions apply to Windows XP and might differ for other operating systems). After leaving command mode.bat (right click.bat and as soon as the program displays your COM port in the command shell.zip (requires . the BlueSmirf's red LED starts to flash faster.NET 2. There should be a node called "USB Serial Port (COM<X>)" e. The red LED on the BlueSmirf should now blink. type the following commands (BlueSmirf's response shown in italic ): $$$<RETURN> CMD SU.0 . Press "<Windows key>-R" on your keyboard to open the "Run" command line. Start SerialUsbBlueSmirfConfig. the BlueSmirf Bluetooth module is set to 9600 baud which is necessary to communicate with the ID12 RFID reader.msc" and press "<RETURN>".

Solder on this side of the breakout board 2.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Make shure the headers are in a right angle to the breakout board Step 4: Solder the RFID reader to the ID12 breakout board http://www. Right angle headers Step 3: Solder headers to the ID12 breakout board Image Notes 1.Image Notes 1.instructables.

5V) and make shure the BlueSmirf starts to flash its red LED. Take care not to create a short cut and do not heat the contacts longer than necessary 2.instructables.(Minus) If you use solder to create a durable connection it might be better to unplug the jumper cable before soldering.5V AA batteries (equals 4.5V (maybe with a slightly lower range). Put everything into the box and try to close it tightly without squeezing any cables. http://www. attach 3 1. Once you got the connections ready.Image Notes 1. Also. For the following test (next step) you might want to open the box again to be sure the BlueSmirf LED works as supposed.5V.3V it does work pretty well with 4. The ID12 which is laid out for 5V also functions with 4. Take care not to create a short cut Step 6: Connect the BlueSmirf to the ID12 reader and 3 1. A small solder tip makes soldering this a lot easier Step 5: Hard-wire the ID12 reader to ASCII mode Solder the two short wires as follows: Red wire from 5V (11) to /RST (2) Black wire from FS (7) to GND (1) Image Notes 1.5V AA batteries Connect the BlueSmirf to the ID12 reader as follows: VCC to 5V (11) GND to GND (1) RX-I to D0 (9) Then connect the ID12 to the batteries: 5V (11) to + (Plus) GND (1) to . the jumper cable's plastic cover melts really quick so take care not to heat it too long. Note: While the BlueSmirf is marked as 3.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .

http://www.instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .

Congrats .you're done. the top of the case) and you should see the read IDs being displayed on the PCs console shell. source included for educational purpose) and unzip it. "Edit") to match your COM port number and baud rate (must be 9600 baud) and save the changes.Step 7: Test the reader with a PC To test the reader you need a PC with Bluetooth and a test program.NET 2. without (!) encryption Write down the COM port number of the serial Bluetooth connection on your PC Edit Serial.zip (requires . Hold the RFID tag very close to the front of the reader (i. Start Serial.instructables.) http://www. Once the LED is green you can start scanning RFIDs. Pair your PC with the BlueSmirf: Enable Bluetooth on your PC Disconnect and then reconnect the BlueSmirf to the batteries (inquiry only works right after module startup) Start Bluetooth inquiry on your PC Select the device called "FireFly .bat and wait for the BlueSmirf's LED to turn green... (Note: if you see questionmarks instead make shure your batteries are fully loaded and check the wiring in step 5.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ .0 ." Enter the PIN 1234 Choose "Serial Profile" or SPP or similar. This does only work if you connect to the right Bluetooth serial COM port (not the same COM port as in step 2). Download Serial. maybe with some additional characters.bat (right click.e.

instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Low Tech Lap Counting by cleversomeday How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n iPhone RFID Reader by OniDaito AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C by nevdull Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer by sketchsk3tch .Related Instructables Moleskine RFID reader-external hard drive (Photos) by Deslivres Arduino RFID Door Lock by pcmofo RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt http://www.

instructables.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Intro: AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C RFID is the craze. The code is in C and doesn't use any external libraries.99) AVR or Arduino clone (if you use a stock AVR. 2009 Author:nevdull AVR-based Network Combat Gian is a microbial biochemist by education but an avid computer science flunky and wishes this hobby could be self-sustaining. and this instructable focuses on installing the Parallax RFID reader (Serial TTL) on an AVR. with emphasis on the C code needed to read the serial input. then you've seen RFID. He has a collection of 8-bit microcontrollers and a room full of computer junk that he believes talks to him. He is also scared of zombies. and a DE9 connector) Solderless breadboard Optional 4 position header Wire (and the max232 etc for communication of the tag information) You could also connect your favorite LCD screen in lieu of sending tag data via RS232. it speaks 2400 baud directly without the use of a UART by synchronizing to the RFID reader's baud rate and reading the digital pin that it's connected to.AVR/Arduino RFID Reader with UART Code in C by nevdull on August 13. There are several places to find good information on setting up RFID.from inventory systems to badge ID systems. Excited? Me too. If you've ever been to a department store and walked through those metal-detectorlooking things at the entrace/exit points. 5 x 1uF capacitors. In fact.99) RFID tag ( Parallax #32397 $0. you'll also need a max232. found everywhere . Step 1: Get the Goods You'll need the following list of parts: RFID Reader (Parallax #28140 $39. He is a sympathizer with the Robot Overlords and is adroitly maneuvering himself to be in a comfortable position when the AVR global domination begins.. http://www.

you pull it LOW to activate it. you can connect it to ground. Note. while a red LED means the unit is active. The OUT pin is where the reader sends its serial data after it reads a tag.instructables. I just cut off 4 positions from a female socket header strip I had lying about and soldered on three wires. I simply chose to keep it on. Electrical tape completed the ghetto connector. The RFID reader has 4 connections: Vcc ENABLE OUT Gnd As you probably guessed it. http://www. I connected it to PIND2. in the Parallax Universe. I connected it to PIND3 to give me options of enabling/disabling if I decided to. That is. connect Vcc to +5V and Gnd to ground. you can bang the ENABLE pin to turn it off and on at various intervals. *shrug* Go figure.Step 2: Connect the parts The hardware side of things is pretty easy. For that. Instead of plonking my RFID reader directly into my breadboard I opted to make a quick cable so I could move the RFID reader around a little bit better. red means go. a green LED means the unit is inactive and idle. Because the RFID reader consumes so much power. Because it's inverted.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . Alternatively.

I do the following at each interrupt: Check to ensure I'm on a start bit Center the timing onto the middle pulse at 2400 baud (the speed of the RFID reader) Skip the start bit and pause to the middle of the next bit Read each bit into an unsigned integer When I've got 8 bits. put the byte into a character array When I've collected 12 bytes.Step 3: Write the Code To read the data from the RFID reader. since the reader could be set off from random noise.PCINT18). // pin change interrupt control register pcie2 BSET(PCMSK2. the 10-byte RFID is bounded by a start and stop sentinel. Configure PCINT BSET(PCICR.instructables. Know when a tag has been submitted I used a Pin Change Interrupt on the AVR that notifies the firmware that a change has occurred on a monitored pin. // enable pin change interrupt for PCINT18 (PD2) Write your interrupt service routine You want to keep your ISR short so in my interrupt vector I read the entire byte. telling the MCU which pin you want to monitor. and setting the global interrupt bit. It looks like this: [Start Sentinel |Byte 1|Byte 2|Byte 3|Byte 4|Byte 5|Byte 6|Byte 7|Byte 8|Byte 9|Byte 10| Stop Sentinel] These are the three primary steps. Configuring the AVR for this is easy and requires setting the flag.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ B .PCIE2). In order to allow for error detection/correction. then send it somewhere. bit by bit. glacial pace of 2400 baud. RFID Reader Data Format The Parallax RFID reader sends data at a fixed. let the MCU know the tag has been read for error detection. http://www. pull the data off of the serial port. An RFID tag is 10 bytes. The start sentinel is line feed (0x0A) and the stop sentinel is carriage return (0x0D). you have to know when a tag has been submitted. and store the byte in a global volatile character array.

If you have any suggestions on how it could be improved don't hesitate to let me know! File Downloads RFID_Reader. Also note.16)). It was written in AVR Studio 4. I check to see if bDataReady has been set.tmp as the file ext.16. uint8_t bit = 0. eclipse. rename it to 'RFID_Reader.zip (30 KB) [NOTE: When saving. you will need to experimentally determine the tuned delays to center on the baud rate pulses.RFID_IN)) // Start bit goes low return.zip'] Related Instructables Stupid Simple Arduino LF RFID Tag Spoofer by sketchsk3tch Interfacing RFID with 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma How to connect Arduino and RFID by otaviousp http://www. signalling that the entire RFID structure has been sent. When I've gotten 12 bytes (10-byte RFID plus sentinels) I set bDataReady to 1 and let the main loop process the data and display it. TunedDelay(CENTER_DELAY). the timing for the serial reading section is based on a 16MHz MCU. for (. I send it out my RS232 connection.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ RFID based toll plaza using 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma Twitter Poem Box by saccpcomp USB RFID Reading Keyboard (video) by frank26080115 Telnet to your Arduino/AVR! by nevdull A Universal RFID Key by drj113 . or vi (or something else) you'll need to copy a trusted Makefile into the directory and add these files to the source line. ibuff[0] = 0.. respectively). If you are running at a different clock frequency.I modified SoftSerial code from Mikal Hart who modified code from David Mellis for the experimentally determined delays in the serial routines. I then check to see if it's a valid tag (ie start and stop characters are 0x0A and 0x0D.&ibuff[0].instructables. // this is the interrupt handlerISR(PCINT2_vect){ if (BCHK(PIND. // Cente Display Your Tag In the main().){ if (bDataReady) {#ifdef __DEBUG__ USART_tx_S("Start byte: "). Parse RS232 Output The PCINT routine contains the code for reading the RS232 output from the RFID reader. If you use programmer's notepad. during the for(ever) loop. if you see . I hope this instructable helped you in some way. and if so. USART_tx_S(itoa(RFID_tag[0]. Step 4: Code and Farewell This page contains a zip file with the relevant code.

Spare credit/debit card with embedded RFID chip (if go to your bank and request a new card they will typically send you a new card w/ the same number and info). Image Notes 1. Using this method.How to turn your cellphone into a credit/debit card by Kikurimu on March 5.instructables. etc. This will allow you to present your cellphone at Paypass terminals (movie theaters.. you should be able to do this mod.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . McDonalds. If your card has this symbol.Cellphone .Magic marker/ Sharpie Image Notes 1.) and pay using the RFID chip. 2009 Intro: How to turn your cellphone into a credit/debit card Easy to do mod for an extra credit/debit card with RFID chip (i. you will be able to locate and extract the RFID chip in your spare Paypass-capable card and place it in your cellphone. http://www. .e.Scissors . Paypass). My env2 Step 1: Get your materials Items needed: .

This will yield a decent size chunk of the card with the RFID in the center. as you could obviously damage the chip and make it unusable. Less is more! The initial size may be fine for many people and is small enough to be placed in many cellphones or anything else you can think of.instructables. Going any further than the initial cutout comes with the risk of damaging the chip. I do not know if all cards are setup with the RFID in the same location. 2. You DO NOT want this to happen as you want the plastic for insulation around the chip. Consider yourself warned. I DO NOT recommend this method if you don't know where the chip is. RFID chip extracted from a previous card. but if they are. I found the RFID chip in a previous card by cutting into it randomly. my guidelines will give you a good idea where to start. Image Notes 1. I am using an old. Make sure to mark out a guideline to cut along that goes from the bottom of the magnetic strip to the top of the imprinted card numbers.Step 2: Find the Chip In this instructable. General area around RFID chip Step 3: Cut out the chip Be very careful when cutting out the chip. I was able to see the impression of the chip on the back of the card when I looked at it from an angle in a well lit room (it appeared as a small square impression only a few millimeters across). General location of RFID chip Image Notes 1. Chip is about here http://www. deactivated debit card. When cutting close to the chip you may break the seal around it and the sides may begin to separate. But if you're like me and have an env2 or similarly compact phone you need it a little bit smaller.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . If not. This is as small as you can trim it. Image Notes 1.

I would trim the card more than shown in order to create a lower profile inside the battery compartment. In the case of my env2 and other compact cellphones. there are two possible ways to go about it. Just make sure you can remove the chip from the slot and that there is no way to cause a short while the chip is in the slot. 2. However.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ . This second option is for those are not utilizing their microSD card slots (if available).instructables. RFID chip and both plastic sides 2. For my phone. Unseperated chip Step 4: Place the chip in your phone This last step is pretty self-explanatory. 1.Image Notes 1. there is very little wiggle room available to place anything extra in the battery compartment. http://www. For others the chip in the size I show here may be more than adequate. I only offer this option as an alternative for those willing and able to do so. I've found that the easiest way of placing the chip inside the phone is by placing it inside the battery cover.The plastic around the RFID can usually be trimmed enough so that it is able to fit into a microSD card slot.

and please let me know what you think as this is my first instructable. My env2 Related Instructables How to block/kill RFID chips by w1n5t0n RFID Secure Wallet by dogsrcool2me how to block anoying cell phone interference by thematthatter http://www.Image Notes 1. whoever they may be. Image Notes 1. Try as I might I can't seem to find the site anymore.com/id/Intro-to-RFID/ Interfacing RFID with 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma Make purchases with your cell phone by: Jason Valalik by jvalal RFID Reader Detector and Tilt-Sensitive RFID Tag by nmarquardt RFID based toll plaza using 8051 Microcontroller (video) by ashoksharma RFID: The REAL Story by metrogdor22 . I did not come up with this completely on my own.S. microSD card slot when viewed w/o the battery cover Step 5: Success Congratulations! You now have a fully operational RFID-embedded cellphone.instructables. before I forget. I had seen something similar almost a year ago online. Oh. P. I just want to give credit for the inspiration to the author of that webpage.