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Submarines Built in Burrard Inlet

By David Shirlaw (Additional information contributed by Hillar Kalmar)

During the First World War Canada had two submarines in commission, the Seattle-built HMCS CC-1 and
CC-2 and eleven more built in Burrard Inlet. James Venn Paterson of Seattle was involved in all of them.
In the Spring of 1915 Paterson received an order from the Electric Boat Company for five submarines for
Russia, shipyards in B.C. were busy with other work. His solution was to organize the British Pacific
Construction and Engineering Company, incorporated in British Columbia with offices in Vancouver.
British Pacific would build the submarines in Burrard Inlet, watched over by Paterson and a representative
of the Electric Boat Company. This was to satisfy US neutrality which meant that they could not legally
build submarines for combatants.
The submarine design chosen was the US H-Class from the Electric Boat Company. In addition to
submarines for Russia, several were built by Canadian Vickers of Montreal for European combatants.
After completion the Barnet-built submarines were taken apart into what today in the shipping industry is
known as CKD (Car Knock Down) for shipment to Vladivostok. The first three were shipped in December
of 1915 with the final two going in early 1916.

Hull of a submarine suspended on scaffolding at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-014

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Partially-constructed submarine being built at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-017

Laborers standing inside the steel ribs of what would become the hull of a submarine being built at the submarine works
yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-018

Construction at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-019

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Three unidentified laborers working around the hull of a partially-completed submarine at the submarine works yard at
Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-021

Partially-completed hull of a submarine being supported by wooden brackets at the submarine works yard at Barnet.
Burnaby Archives 466-022

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Submarine hull under construction at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-023

Laborers working on the hull of a submarine at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-016

Submarine works yard at Barnet in Burnaby. Burnaby Archives 466-005

Laborers at the site of the submarine works yard at Barnet in Burnaby. Burnaby Archives 466-007.

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Photograph of a few laborers (all unidentified) at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-008.

Buildings and grounds of the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-009.

Submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-010

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An extensive system of scaffolding can be seen with power lines running alongside it. Burnaby Archives 466-011

Five laborers moving a cart loaded with materials near the scaffolding in the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby
Archives 466-012

Hull of a submarine suspended on wooden brackets. An unidentified laborer is discernible standing near the centre of the
hull while another is partially visible to the far right. Burnaby Archives 466-020

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Scaffolding set up for the manufacture of submarines at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Numerous laborers and two
industrial buildings can be seen in the background. Burnaby Archives 466-015

Large building at the site of the submarine works yard in Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-004

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Large number of laborers (all unidentified) seated outside a building at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby
Archives 466-003

Headquarter buildings at the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-001

Headquarters of the submarine works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-002

Some of the equipment used at the submarines works yard at Barnet. Burnaby Archives 466-013

Type "AG" (Google Translation)

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(11 units)

Scheme of a submarine AG-21 (1917)

AG 11 Built in 1915 for the British


Navy under the project of Electric
Boat via the Barnet Yard Vancouver
(Canada), but was acquired by the
18.08.1915 "Noblessner"
commissioned by Morveda Russia
and 06/04/1916, the enrolled in the
lists of the ships of BF, in the same
year in parts delivered by sea to
Vladivostok, and thence by rail to
the Baltic for the completion of the
plant Petrograd, was
recommissioned 04/02/1916,
launched in the summer of 1916
went into service 09/09 .1916 g,
(other sources: 02.09.1916,
the). Participated in the 1st World
War (search operations against
enemy communications, the bearing
of the positional and patrol service
on the approaches to ports and bases, flew 5 combat tours) and the February Revolution. 10/25/1917 city
became part of the Red Baltic Fleet, but was 03.04.1918, due to the inability to display in the heavy ice
conditions, with disassembled for repair mechanisms to avoid capture by German occupation forces
exploded in the harbor of the Ganges (Hanko) crew. Subsequently raised by Finnish salvagers and
scrapped.
AG 12 Built in 1915 for the British
Navy under the project of Electric
Boat via the Barnet Yard
Vancouver (Canada), but was
acquired by the 18.08.1915
"Noblessner" commissioned by
Morveda Russia and 04/06/1916,
enrolled in the lists of ships of BF,
in the same year in parts delivered
by sea to Vladivostok, and thence
by rail to the Baltic Shipyard in St. Petersburg for completion, recommissioned 04/02/1916, launched on
18.08.1916, entered into 17/11/1916 order, participated in the 1st World War (search operations against
enemy communications, the bearing of the positional and patrol service on the approaches to ports and
bases, made 4 combat campaign) and in the February Revolution. 25.10.1917 joined Red Baltic Fleet,
but was 03.04.1918, due to the inability to display in the heavy ice conditions, with disassembled for
repair mechanisms to avoid capture by German occupation forces exploded in the harbor of the Ganges
(Hanko) crew. Subsequently raised by Finnish salvagers and scrapped.

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AG 13 from 08.07.1917, the AG 16. Built in 1915 for the British


Navy under the project of Electric
Boat via the Barnet Yard Vancouver
(Canada), but was acquired by the
18.08.1915 "Noblessner"
commissioned by Morveda Russia
and 04/06/1916, the enrolled in the
lists of the ships of BF, in the same
year in parts delivered by sea to
Vladivostok, and thence by rail to the
Baltic Shipyard in St. Petersburg for
completion, was recommissioned
04/02/1916, launched on 31.08.1916,
entered into 17/11/1916 order, he
participated in the 1st World War
(search operations against enemy communications, the bearing of the positional and patrol service on the
approaches to ports and bases, made three military campaign) and in February
revolyutsii.25.10.1917g. joined the Red Baltic Fleet, but was 03.04.1918, due to the inability to display in
the heavy ice conditions, with disassembled for repair mechanisms to avoid capture by German
occupation forces exploded in the harbor of the Ganges (Hanko) crew. Subsequently raised by Finnish
salvagers and scrapped.
AG 14 Built in 1915 for the British
Navy under the project of Electric
Boat via the Barnet Yard Vancouver
(Canada), but Mr. 18.08.1915,
acquired by the "Noblessner"
pozakazu Morveda 06/04/1916
Russia and was enrolled in the Lists
of ships of BF, in the same year in
parts delivered by sea to
Vladivostok, and thence by rail to
the Baltic Shipyard in St. Petersburg
for completion, was recommissioned
02/04/1916, launched in autumn
1916, was commissioned 17.11.
1916 Participated in the 1st World War (search operations against enemy communications, the bearing of
the positional and patrol service on the approaches to ports and bases: military campaign has made
three) and in the February Revolution. In July 1917, lost by unknown causes near Libau (Liepaja).
AG 15 Built in 1915 for the British Navy under the project of Electric Boat via the Barnet Yard Vancouver
(Canada), but was acquired by the 18.08.1915 "Noblessner" commissioned by Morveda Russia and
06/04/1916, the enrolled in the lists of the ships of BF, shipped by sea to Vladivostok, and thence by rail
to the Baltic plant Petrogradedpyadostroyki, 04/02/1916, the recommissioned, launched in autumn 1916,
was put into operation, the 11/15/1916 participated in the February Revolution. 08/06/1917 was sunk
when developing learning tasks as a result of the accident, but was raised 06/16/1917 rescue vessel
"Volkhov" and in July 1917, newly commissioned. 10/25/1917 city became part of the Red Baltic Fleet,
but was 03.04.1918, due to the inability to display in the heavy ice conditions, with disassembled for
repair mechanisms to avoid capture by German occupation forces exploded in the harbor of the Ganges
(Hanko) crew. Subsequently raised by Finnish salvagers and scrapped. AG 21 , from 03.02.1931, the (submarine N 16), from 15.09.1934, the - A-5 , from 5/16/1949, the - CCD-8 . Built in 1916 for the British
Navy under the project of Electric Boat via the Barnet Yard Vancouver (Canada), but was acquired by the
19.09.1916 "Noblessner" commissioned by Morveda Russia and 08/21/1917, the enrolled in the lists of
ships BSF, in the same year in parts delivered by sea to Vladivostok, and thence by rail to the plant,

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"Nawal" in Nikolaev for completion, was


recommissioned 03/28/1917, launched
in autumn 1917, entered commissioned
in 1918 and joined the Navy Volunteer
South Russian White Army, was
captured 24/11/1918 at Sebastopol the
British and French invaders and Mr.
26.04.1919, on the orders of the British
High Command was flooded near
Sevastopol. 21/05/1928 Black Sea, the party raised EPRON and 12/30/1930, following the refurbishment
of the "North-morzavode" in Sevastopol newly commissioned and included in the MSCHM. 06/08/1931
was sunk near Sevastopol after the collision with the destroyer "Frunze", but was raised again 06/10/1931
01.01.1932g.posle and emergency repair of the newly commissioned. 01/11/1935, the joined the
BSF. Participated in World War II: the search for actions against enemy communications in the Black
Sea, has made 12 combat campaigns and has produced 7 attacks with the release of 11 torpedoes,
sinking the damaged aircraft, the 12.05.1944 the German transport "Durostor" (1309 GRT) and the
schooner Seepferd and damaging 11/06/1942, the Romanian Transport "Ardeal" (5695 grt). 03/06/1945
she was awarded the Order of the Red Star 27.08.1945. Taken out of service, disarmed and regrouped in
floating the charge station, and in the mid-1950s.excluded from the lists of vessels of the Navy in
connection with the transfer to the Department of the stock of property for scrapping.
AG 22 Built in 1916 for the British Navy under the project of Electric Boat via the Barnet Yard Vancouver
(Canada), but was acquired by the
19,09.1916 "Noblessner" pozakazu
Morveda Russia and was credited
21/08/1917 the lists of ships BSF by
sea to Vladivostok, and thence by
rail to the plant, "Nawal" in Nikolaev
for completion, was
recommissioned 30/03/1917,
launched in 1918, went into service
08/05/1919, and 10/09/1919 was
included in the naval forces of the South Russian Volunteer Army white. 14.11,1920 was taken away at
Wrangell evacuation of Sevastopol in Istanbul and was interned 12/29/1920 by the French authorities in
Bizerte (Tunisia). 29.10.1924, the Government of France recognized the property of the USSR, but
because of the complicated international situation has not been returned in the late 1920s. Sold
"Rudmetalltorgom" French private firm for scrapping.
AG 23 from 01.06.1920, the Imtov Trotskogo from 31.12.1922, the - Nezamozhny from 12.06.1923, the
- Miner (submarine N 12), from 15.09.1934, the - A-1 . Built in 1916 for the British Navy under the project
of Electric Boat via the Barnet Yard
Vancouver (Canada), but was
acquired by the 19.09.1916
"Noblessner" commissioned by
Morveda Russia and 08/21/1917,
the enrolled in the lists of ships
BSF, in the same year in parts
delivered by sea to Vladivostok,
and thence by rail to the plant,
"Nawal" in Nikolaev for completion,
recommissioned 29,04.1917 city,
launched on 6.1.1920, the, was commissioned 21.10.1920 (according to other sources: 9/18/1920), and
became part of MSCHM. Participated in the Civil War: combat tours in Odessa city 04-05.10.1920 and the
shores of the Crimea and Caucasus in February 1921 in 1922-1923. Made five trips to the Inebolu and
Samsun, a city 04-08.10.1930 paid a visit to Istanbul (Turkey). In 1928-1929 and 1932-1934 refitted
01/11/1935 g, became part of the BSF. Since 1941 was a major overhaul to "Sevmorzavod" in

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Sevastopol, where the city of 06/26/1942 due to the inability to output parsed and housing arrangements,
on the orders of command detonated crew before leaving the city by the Red Army and was excluded
from 13.07.1942 the Navy. At the beginning of 1945 raised the rescue service and fleet 24.04.1945, in
view of a second inappropriate recovery is excluded from the Navy in connection with the transfer to the
Department of the stock of property for scrapping.
AG 24 from 01.06.1920, the Imtov Lunacharskogo from 31.12.1922, the - Communist (submarine N
13), from 15.09.1934, the - A-2, with the city of 06/16/1949 - M- 52. Built in 1916 for the British Navy
under the project of Electric Boat
via the Barnet Yard Vancouver
(Canada), but was acquired by the
19.09.1916 "Noblessner"
commissioned by Morveda Russia
and was credited 21/08/1917 the
lists of ships BSF, in the same year
in parts delivered by sea to
Vladivostok, and thence by rail to
the plant, "Nawal" in Nikolaev for
completion, was recommissioned
11/22/1919, launched on 4.2.1921,
entered 22/07/1921 in order, and
joined the MSCHM. In 19221923 made seven trips to the
Inebolu and Samsun, and the 0408.10.1930 was paid a visit to
Istanbul (Turkey). In 1927-1928,
1932-1934 and from 10.02.1939 to
1941, was renovated. 01/11/1935,
the joined the BSF. From 17 to 31/12/1935, made a long-term autonomous navigation and, after 1498.7
miles over water and 100.2 miles under water, the first of the Black Sea Fleet submarines twice exceeded
the norms of the autonomous navigation. Participated in World War II: the search for actions against
enemy communications in the Black Sea, the defense of Sevastopol in June 1942, made 17 battle
campaigns and made 3 attacks with the release of six torpedoes, sinking a high-speed amphibious
10/10/1943, the barge F 474 ' ( 220 t). 12/01/1949, the Division assigned to small submarines, and
28/11/1950, the disarmed and removed from the Navy in connection with the transfer to the Department
of the stock of property for the removal and cutting of metal.
AG 25 from 23.03.1923, the - Marxist (submarine N 14), from 15.09.1934, the - A-W. Built in 1916, for the
British Navy under the project of Electric Boat via the Barnet Yard Vancouver (Canada), but was acquired
by the 19.09.1916 "Noblessner" commissioned by Morveda Russia and 21/08/1917, the enrolled in the
lists of ships BSF, in the same
year in parts by sea to
Vladivostok, and thence by rail to
the plant, "Nawal" in Nikolaev for
completion, recommissioned
11,07.1921 g (girlfriend data:
22/11/1919), the launched on
05.04.1922, entered into service
26/05/1922, and became part of
MSCHM. In 1922-1923 made five trips to the Inebolu and Samsun, a city 30.08-06.09.1929 paid a visit to
Istanbul in 1934-1935 was refitted. 01/11/1935, the joined the BSF. Participated in World War II: the
search of the communication to the enemy in the Black Sea, has made 19 battle campaigns and made 3
attacks with the release of six torpedoes, sinking 20.05.1942, the Romanian transport "Sulina" (3495
grt). 28/10/1943 was attacked and sunk by German anti-submarine ship Schiff 19 in Karkinitsky Bay.
Retired from service March 13, 1944.

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AG 26 from 23.10.1920, the Imtov Kameneva from 23.03.1923, the - political worker (boat Lodvodnaya
N 15), from 15.09.1934, the - the A4 . Built in 1916 for the British Navy, under the project of Electric Boat
via the Barnet Yard Vancouver
(Canada), but was acquired by the
19.09.1916 "Nobles-snare-drum"
on the order Morveda Russia and
21.08. 1917 enrolled in the lists of
ships BSF, in the same year in
parts delivered by sea to
Vladivostok, and thence by rail to
the plant, "Nawal" in Nikolaev for
completion, recommissioned
23/10/1920 (according to other
reports: 26.09. 1920), launched on 24.02.1923, entered into service 11/07/1923, and became part of
MSCHM. 30.08-06.09.1929 was paid a visit to Istanbul (Turkey). In 1930-1931 and 1936-1938 was
refitted. 11,01.1935 city became part of the BSF. Participated in World War II: the search for actions
against enemy communications in the Black Sea, the defense of Sevastopol in June 1942, made 15
combat tours. 22/02/1947, the disarmed, removed from the Navy and 06.03.1947 was put into the stock
division of property for the removal and cutting of metal.
Elements of an AG Class Submarine
Displacement : 361 tons of buoyancy, underwater 440.5 m, length 45.7 m, width 4.8 m, draft 2.7
m, power : 2x480 hp diesel engines, electric motors 2x240 hp Maximum speed : 12.8 knots surfaced, 7.5
knots submerged, a cruising range of economic progress : over 2,700 miles by water, under water, 100
miles; depth : 50 meters Armament : 4 bow 457-mm torpedo tubes, one 47mm gun; since 1938: the "AG
21", "AG 23", "AG 24", "AG 25" and "AG 26" - a 45-mm gun, crew : 37 people. since 1941: the "AG 21",
"AG 23", "AG 24", "AG 25" and "AG 26 - 32 people.

AG-14

Class overview
In service:

1916

In commission: Circa 1950


Planned:

17

Completed:

17

General characteristics
Displacement:

355 long tons (361 t) surfaced 433 long tons (440 t) submerged

Length:

150 ft 3 in (45.80 m)

Beam:

16 ft (4.9 m)

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Draught:

12 ft 6 in (3.81 m)

Propulsion:

2 shafts 2 diesel engines (480 bhp (360 kW)) 2 electric motors (640 hp (480 kW))

Speed:

13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph) (surfaced) 10.5 knots (19.4 km/h; 12.1 mph) (submerged)

Range:

1,750 nm (3,240 km; 2,010 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) (surfaced) 25 nm (46 km;
29 mi) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) (submerged)

Test depth:

50 meters (160 ft)

Complement:

30

Armament:

4 bow 18-inch (457 mm) torpedo tubes (8 torpedoes) 1 47-millimeter (1.9 in) gun

The American Holland Class Submarines, also AG Class or A Class, were Holland 602 type submarines
used by the Imperial Russian and Soviet Navies in the early 20th Century. The small submarines
participated in the World War I Baltic Sea and Black Sea theatres and a handful of them also saw action
during World War II.
The AG type was designed by John Philip Holland at Electric Boat Company. The design was known as
Holland 602GF/602L, which was very similar to the American H class. The Russian abbreviation "AG"
comes from "Amerikansky Golland" ("American Holland"). In 1916, the Russian Naval Ministry ordered 11
units.
The boats were built at Barnet Yard in Vancouver, Canada as knockdown kits. The kits were transported
by ship to Vladivostok and over the Trans-Siberian Railroad to European Russia. The boats were
assembled at the Baltic Shipyard in Saint Petersburg and its subsidiary in Nikolayev by the Black Sea
(now Nikolayev, Ukraine).[1] Like some of the British H-class boats (of the same design), they were
equipped with Fessenden transducers, an early form of sonar.
The Russian Revolution of 1917 slowed assembly in Nikolayev, but they were completed after much
travail. In 1918, submarines AG 21 AG 26 were included the Ukrainian State Navy.[3] In 1920, one (AG
22) was taken over by the Russian White movement at Bizerte and five were taken over by the Red Army
after the Civil war. The submarines were all completed after the war. All surviving Soviet AG submarines
were modernized before World War II.
The Russians had also ordered an additional six submarines, but these could not be delivered due to the
Revolution. These were instead taken over by the US Navy as the H class in 1918.

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Submarine Tender Cressida

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Operational service
Five of the submarines were allocated to the Baltic Fleet, while the remaining six were allocated to the
Black Sea Fleet.
During World War I, the Russian subs operated together with the British submarine flotilla in the Baltic
against the German Navy. This all changed with the October Revolution and the Finnish Civil War.
In 1918, the German occupation of Tallinn and the Brest-Litovsk Peace Treaty forced the British flotilla to
move to Helsinki, then under the protection of the Finnish Socialist Workers' Republic. The German
intervention in the Finnish Civil War and the landing of the 10,000-strong German Baltic Sea Division in
Hanko forced the crew to scuttle the eight remaining submarines and the three support ships, Cicero,
Emilie and Obsidian, outside Helsinki.
The crews of the Russian ships were in a state of panic. Through negotiations with the Germans the
many vessels of the Russian Navy moored in Helsinki were allowed to depart to Kronstadt. However, the
difficult ice situation made it impossible for smaller vessels to follow, and they had to be abandoned.
Among these were the four Russian AGs in Hanko. The arrival of German troops under Rdiger von der
Goltz on 3 April forced the Russians to hastily scuttle the submarines, including AG 12 and AG 16, in
Hanko.
The Finns located and raised the two boats. Extensive plans were made to refurbish them, but the
strained economical situation of the 1920s and the new shipbuilding program of the 1930s finally led to
their scrapping.
The Soviet Navy renamed their remaining five AGs A class, and all saw major modernization in the late
1930s. Two of the class were sunk during World War II.
Baltic Fleet (BF)
AG 11 (scuttled at Hanko, 3 April 1918)
AG 12 (scuttled at Hanko, 3 April 1918, raised by the Finns and later scrapped)
AG 14 (sunk by a mine 6 July 1917 off Libau)
AG 15 (scuttled at Hanko, 3 April 1918)

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AG 16 (ex-AG-13, scuttled at Hanko, 3 April 1918, raised by the Finns, scrapped in 1929)
Black Sea Fleet (BSF)
AG 21 (fell into German and later British hands, scuttled 24 April 1919 in Sevastopol. Later raised by the
Soviets and renamed A-5)
AG 22 (interned with Wrangells fleet in 1921 at Bizerte and eventually scrapped)
AG 23 (later A-1; scuttled June 1942 in Sevastopol)
AG 24 (later A-2)
AG 25 (later A-3; lost 28 October 1943)
AG 26 (later A-4)
Vancouver Built
1916 - Ordered for Russia - Contract 602-R, Group 4, Submarines, 6 knockdown kits, Russian AG17AG20, AG 27 & AG 28, for Imperial Russia & USSR, Hulls - British Pacific Construction & Engineering
(Paterson), Vancouver, BC. LOA 150ft 3in, Beam 15ft, Draught 12ft 4in, Surface 355 tons/Dived 467 tons,
Twin 480HP, Non-reversible 8 Cylinder Nelesco, 13kts, normal fuel load 16.4 tons/maximum 18 tons,
2800nm/10kts, 2 X 160HP 11kts 130/2kts. Order not delivered due to Russian Revolution. Kits completed
Sep 1917, and placed in Storage. Taken over and purchased for USN 20 May 1918, USS H4-H9,
assembled at Puget Sound Navy Yard

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USS H 4
(SS-147; dp. 358 n.; l. 150'4" ; b. 1510" ; dr. 12'5" ; s. 14 k.; cpl. 25; a. 4 18" tt.; cl. H-l)
H-4 (SS-147) was launched 9 October 1918 at Puget Sound Navy Yard, and commissioned there 24
October 1918, Lt. Ralph O. Davis in command. Stationed at San Pedro, Calif., first with SubDiv 6
and then SubDiv 7, H-4 participated in various battle and training exercises along the West Coast with
her sister H-subs. These exercises were interrupted by occasional patrol duty off Santa Catalina Island
and periodic overhauls at Mare Island. In company with the two sub divisions and tender Beaver, H4 sailed from San Pedro on 25 July 1922 and reached Norfolk on 14 September via Magdalena Bay,
Corinto, and Coco Solo. She decommissioned there 25 October 1922. H-4 was struck from the Navy
List 28 February 1931 and sold for scrap 14 September.

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US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS H 5
(SS-148: dp. 358 (n.) ; l. 150'4" ; b. 15'10" ; dr. 12'5" ; s. 14 k.; cpl. 25; a. 4 18" tt.; cl. H-l)
H-5 (SS-148) was launched by Puget Sound Navy Yard 24 September 1918; and commissioned there
30 September 1918, Lt. Gordon Hutchins in command. Operating out of San Pedro with SubDiv 6 and
SubDiv 7, H-5 participated in various training and battle exercises, with periodic overhauls at Mare
Island. She departed San Francisco 25 July 1922 in company with both divisions and arrived at
Norfolk 14 September. H-5 decommissioned at Norfolk on 20 October 1922. Her name was struck
from the Navy List 26 February 1931. She was sold for scrapping 28 November 1933.

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View from the bridge, looking forward while the submarine was underway off San Pedro, California, circa 1919.
Photographed by J. Edwin Hogg, Los Angeles, California. Note the radio antenna at the top, "Y-Tube" hydrophone
mounted on the bow, limber holes drilled in the deck plating, and the small crane in the foreground. US Naval Historical
Center Photograph.

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Crewman poses with submarine's "SC-Tube" hydrophone, mounted immediately in front of her fairwater. Taken at San
Pedro, California, circa 1919. Photographed by J. Edwin Hogg, Los Angeles, California. Note the rubber heads on the ends
of the hydrophone bar, lifelines at the deck edge, and limber holes drilled in the deck plating. US Naval Historical Center
Photograph.

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"Y-Tube" hydrophone mounted above the submarine's bow diving planes. Taken at San Pedro, California, circa 1919.
Photographed by J. Edwin Hogg, Los Angeles, California. A crewman is demonstrating the flexibility of the rubber "rats"
that housed the hydrophone's listening elements. US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

View looking aft toward the fairwater, while the submarine was underway off San Pedro, California, circa 1919.
Photographed by J. Edwin Hogg, Los Angeles, California. Note the large numerals "5" painted on both sides of the bridge,
and radio antenna wires running from the raised antenna mast to the bow. US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

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View from the bridge, looking forward while the submarine was submerging off San Pedro, California, circa 1919.
Photographed by J. Edwin Hogg, Los Angeles, California. Note the small crane in the foreground. US Naval Historical
Center Photograph.

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US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

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Crewman using a Corona typewriter while sitting on the bar of an "SC Tube" type hydrophone. Taken at San Pedro,
California, circa 1919. Photographed by J. Edwin Hogg, Los Angeles, California. Note the submarine's fairwater in the
immediate background. US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS H 6
(SS-149: dp. 358 (n.) ; l. 150'4" ; b. 15'10" ; dr. 12'5" ; s. 14 k.; cpl. 25; a. 4 18" tt.; cl. H-l)

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H-6 (SS-149) was launched 26 August 1918 by Puget Sound Navy Yard; and commissioned there 9
September, Lt. Robert P. Lucker in command. As part of SubDiv 6 and later 7, H-6 was based at San
Pedro, Calif. From there she operated along the West Coast, participating in various battle and
training exercises with her sister submarines. Occasional patrol duty off Santa Catalina Island and
overhauls at Mare Island varied this effective training routine. Departing San Pedro on 25 July 1922
with SubDivs 6 and 7, H-6 reached Norfolk on 14 September. She decommissioned there 23 October
1922. H-6 was struck from the Navy List 26 February 1931. She was sold for scrapping 28 November
1933.

US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS H 7
(SS-150: dp. 358 (n.) ; l. 150'4" ; b. 15'10" ; dr. 12'5" ;. s. 14 k.; cpl. 25; a. 4 18" tt.; cl. H-1) H.7
(SS-150) was launched at Puget Sound Navy Yard 17 October 1918 and commissioned there 24
October, Lt. Edmund A. Crenshaw in command. The submarine, attached to SubDiv 6 and later to
SubDiv 7, operated out of San Pedro on various battle and training exercis es with the other ships of
her division. She also patrolled out of San Pedro with interruptions for overhaul at Mare Island. H-7
reached Norfolk on 14 September 1922, having sailed from San Pedro on 25 July, and
decommissioned there on 23 October 1922. Her name was struck from the Navy List 26 February 1931.
She was sold for scrapping 28 November 1933.

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US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS H 8
(SS-151; dp. 358 (n.) , l. 150'4"; b. 15'10"; dr. 12'5"; s. 14 k.; cpl. 25; a. 4 18" tt.; cl. H-l)
H-8 (SS-151) was launched at Puget Sound Navy Yard on 14 November 1918, 3 days after the signing
of the Armistice, and commissioned there 18 November 1918, Lt. Comdr. Ralph W. Holt in command.
From there she sailed to San Pedro, where she was attached first to SubDivs 6 and 7. Operating
with her sister ships, H-8 engaged in extensive battle and training exercises out of San Pedro, varying
this routine with patrols-off Santa Catalina Island. In company with SubDivs 6 and 7, and tender
Beaver, H-8 departed San Pedro on 25 July 1922 and arrived in Norfolk on 14 September. She
decommissioned there 17 November 1922. Her name was struck from the Navy List 26 February
1931. She was sold for scrapping 28 November 1933.

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US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS H 9
USS H-9, a 358-ton H-4 class submarine, was originally built for the Russian Navy. That country's
revolution prevented delivery to her intended owners, and in May 1918 the US Navy purchased her in
disassembled condition. Construction was completed at the Puget Sound Navy Yard and the submarine
was placed in commission in late November 1918. For more than three years H-9 served along the West
Coast, primarily operating out of San Pedro, California. She transited from the Pacific to the Atlantic in
July-September 1922 and was decommissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, in early November of that year. After
being laid up for the rest of the 1920s, and into the next decade, USS H-9 was stricken from the Navy list
in February 1921. She was sold for scrapping in late November 1933.

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Underway, circa 1922. She is wearing a Submarine Division Six insignia on her conning tower. US Naval Historical Center
Photograph.

US Naval Historical Center Photograph.

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