UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

WESTERN DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA 
ASHVILLE DIVISION 
 
Docket No. 1:06CR160 
 
 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 
 
v.  

 
  

NORMAN WILFRED VIGUE, 
Defendant 
 
SENTENCING MEMORANDUM 
 
 
Now comes the defendant, Norman Wilfred Vigue, through counsel and 
submits this Sentencing Memorandum in support of his position, specifically, 
that this Court sentence Mr. Vigue to the mandatory minimum sentence of 60 
months incarceration.    
A sentence greater than 60 months would be unjust and would be far greater 
than necessary to comply with the purposes of 18 U.S.C. §3553. 
 
I.

Facts 
Mr. Vigue spends most of his free time making sure that house bound 

senior citizens receive a nutritious meal.  By chairing the volunteer program 
for his church to assist in the delivery of Friendship Trays1, Norm Vigue 

1

Friendship Trays is Charlotte’s Meals on Wheels affiliate.

1
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 1 of 11

ensures over 1600 nutritious meals a month will be delivered to the elderly 
and infirm who would otherwise not receive anything to eat. 
In 2004, Norman Vigue found his faith.  Like many people, it was in his 
darkest hour.  Mr. Vigue’s loneliness following his divorce led to an addiction 
to pornography.  Before Norman truly hit bottom, he ordered a video 
purporting to contain young teens having sex that was solicited to him as part 
of an undercover government investigation.  The receipt of this video is the 
conduct that Mr. Vigue is to be sentenced for before this Court. 
Immediately after the video was delivered to his house, the government 
agents identified themselves, and Mr. Vigue spoke freely with them.  They 
found no other illegal or even pornographic videos.   He was not arrested. 
Norm went to his church.  He began counseling with a doctor as well as 
spiritual counseling to address his problem with pornography and to find the 
root.  His pastor required that he install anti‐porn software on his computer 
that would notify others if he were to venture down this dark road.  Norm 
did so and set up both his son‐in‐law and a staff member of the church to 
receive reports from the software.  Pretrial services have also received 
reports. 
Norm began to thrive in church.  He was no longer lonely, he began to feel 
that his life had new meaning and that he was making a difference in others 

2
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 2 of 11

lives.  His faith has brought him friendship, peace, and strength to overcome 
his addiction to pornography.    
A year and a half after the video was delivered to his home; he was 
arrested on the instant charges.  
The Sunday before Norman entered his guilty plea, he spoke to a crowd of 
almost two thousand.  His minister asked him to tell the congregation his 
story of failure and faith. 2  He told the congregation the path he had gone 
down, that his faith has saved him from a life of both sin and crime, and that 
it is his faith that continues to carry him and will give him strength as he 
spends the next five years of his life in prison. It is his faith that reminds him 
he can still make a difference, that he can do good. 
 

 
Summary of the Argument 
A sentence of 60 months, the statutory minimum, is appropriate.   Any 

greater sentence would be far greater than necessary to reflect the seriousness 
of the offense, promote respect for the law, provide just punishment, afford 
adequate deterrence to criminal conduct, protect the public from further 
crimes committed by the defendant, and provide the defendant with 
correctional treatment.  The appropriate guideline sentence is a sentence 
2

Letters from members of the congregation are attached as Appendix A to demonstrate the impact Mr.
Vigue has had on their lives.

3
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 3 of 11

below the statutory minimum of sixty months.  Therefore, the appropriate 
sentence is a sentence of sixty months.   
 
Sentencing objections 
1. 

A 4‐level enhancement under USSG §2G2.2(b)(4) should not apply. 

(Pre Sentence Report, Paragraph 34). 
Both the Government and defense agree that this enhancement for 
sadomasochistic conduct, should not apply. 
The enhancement was applied based on conduct in the video that was 
actually delivered by the Government to Mr. Vigue’s home.  This video was 
never ordered by Mr. Vigue and had no similarities to the one he requested 
except that it contained child pornography.  The description of the video Mr. 
Vigue ordered was a video of young teens having sex.  The advertisement, which 
was generated by the Government, did not purport to contain sadomasochistic 
conduct. 
The video delivered by the Government contained very young children and 
sadomasochistic conduct.  The Government needed to deliver a video with child 
pornography on it to satisfy the elements of the offense in their undercover 
investigation.  It is the understanding of the defense that this video was 
randomly chosen simply to meet the requirement of containing child 

4
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 4 of 11

pornography, not for the purpose of satisfying a request my Mr. Vigue to receive 
sadomasochistic images.   
While the circuits disagree on whether intent of the defendant is relevant 
(See: United States v. Saylor, 959 F.2d 198 (11th Cir. 1992) and United States v. 
Cole, 61 F.3d 24 (11th Cir. 1995), which held that the court erred in enhancing 
defendants sentence when evidence did not support defendant’s intent to receive 
material involving children under the age of twelve), even the courts that apply 
strict liability to the viewer except enhancements on cases involving sentencing 
entrapment.  United States v. Richardson, 238, F.3d 837, 840 (7th Cir. 2001).    
Cases that involve sadomasochistic material sent by the government without 
evidence of intent by the defendant are not held to a strict liability standard.  The 
defendant does not allege that the government was intending to entrap him by 
including sadomasochistic conduct on the video because the government agrees 
this enhancement should not apply.  The defense presents this to the Court in the 
event that this Court takes a different view than both parties.   
The specific nature of whatever was on the delivered video should have no 
bearing on specific guideline enhancements.  This enhancement should not 
apply. 
 
 

 

5
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 5 of 11

 

2. 

A 2‐level enhancement under USSG §2G2.2(b)(6) should not 

apply. (Pre Sentence Report, Paragraph 35). 
Both the Government and defense agree that this enhancement for use of a 
computer during the offense, should not apply.  Mr. Vigue did not use the 
internet to commit any portion of this offense. 
In United States v. Dotson, 324 F.3d 256 (4th Cir. 2003), the Court held that a 
computer enhancement applied when the defendant initially contacted the postal 
inspector via the internet, even though all correspondence concerning the 
specific material of the offense was done through the mail.  United States 
v.Dotson 324 F.3d 256, 257.   
This case is different.  All conduct that led to the commission of this crime 
transpired through the United States Mail.  No computer was used for the 
possession, transmission, receipt, or distribution of this offense.  
While the government received Mr. Vigue’s name and address from website 
customer databases, there is no evidence that Mr. Vigue possessed, transmitted, 
received, or distributed illegal images from those websites.  Further, the 
government sua sponte retrieved Mr. Vigue’s physical address from a computer 
server, Mr. Vigue made no contact with the government via computer. 
 

6
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 6 of 11

 

3. 

A 2‐level enhancement under USSG §2G2.2(b)(7)(C) should apply. 

(Pre Sentence Report, Paragraph 36). 
Both the Government and defense agree that Mr. Vigue should be sentenced 
based on 75 images, the number of images attributed to one video. 
Mr. Vigue should only be sentenced based on the video that he received 
through the mail.  
The evidence does not support the pre‐sentence investigators 
recommendation that Mr. Vigue possessed additional illegal images on his 
computer.  
There is no evidence that the images relied on for the additional one point 
enhancement were images of minors.  No evidence exists to demonstrate their 
age or show that they are not computer generated images. 
Further, Mr. Vigue did not possess these images.  He did not intentionally 
download them nor was he aware that they were saved in any location on his 
computer.  Most likely, these images were automatically saved to his computer 
without his knowledge. 
The images that were found on his computer were thumbnail images and 
found on his temporary internet file.   Images are automatically saved to your 
temporarily internet file, without a users knowledge or intent.  Images in a 
temporary internet file are not intentionally downloaded.   

7
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 7 of 11

Thumbnail images are approximately ½ inch by ½ inch and have a very low 
resolution.  If the size of the image was enlarged, the low resolution would not 
allow the image to be visible.  Thumbnails are typically used when a large 
number of images are displayed on a single page.   
Evidence that the images came from Mr. Vigue’s temporary internet file and 
that the images were thumbnail images support the conclusion that Mr. Vigue 
did not possess these images.  
 
4. 

A 2‐level enhancement under USSG §2G2.2(b)(2) should not apply. 

(Pre Sentence Report, Paragraph 33). 
Mr. Vigue should not receive a two‐point enhancement for material that 
involved a minor who had not attained the age of twelve when the video that 
was solicited by the Government and ordered by Mr. Vigue clearly advertised 
minors over the age of 12. 
In United States v. Cole, 61 F.3d 24 (11th Cir. 1995), the Court held the 
district court’s application of the two level enhancement was clear error when 
the defendant requested one video that specifically described minors over the 
age of twelve and only sent money for one video. 
The instant case is similar to Cole  as Mr. Vigue specifically requested 
material that contained minors over the age of twelve.  Further, no evidence 

8
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 8 of 11

exists that Mr. Vigue had any intent to receive material of minors under the age 
of twelve. 
The video ordered by Mr. Vigue was described as follows: ”This video has 
two young cheerleaders and two young football players, all about 12 or 13 years 
old”.  
There is no indication that Mr. Vigue intended to possess materials that 
involved a minor under the age of 12.    Therefore, this enhancement should not 
apply. 
 
CONCLUSION 
Based on the above objections, this Court should find a guideline range of 
30‐37 months.  Because the sentencing range is below the statutory minimum of 
five years, the defense asks the Court to impose a sentence of five years. 
This the 18th day of June, 2007. 
 
 
 
Respectfully submitted,
s/ C. Melissa Owen
Bar No. 29803
Attorney for Norman Vigue
Tin Fulton Greene & Owen, PLLC
212 South Tryon Street, Suite 1700
Phone: 704-338-1220
Fax: 704-338-1312
E-mail: cmowen@tfgolaw.com

9
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 9 of 11

 
 

 

10
10
Case
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT
1:O6—cr—OO160—LHT Document
Document 17
17 Filed
Filed 06/18/07
06/18/07 Page
Page 10
10 of
of 11
11

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I certify that I have served the foregoing SENTENCING MEMORANDUM on
opposing counsel by submitting a copy through the Electronic Case Filing System, to be
sent to:
Kimlani Ford
Assistant United States Attorney
227 West Trade Street
Suite 1700
Charlotte, NC 28202
Robert.gleason@usdoj.gov
This the 18th day of June, 2007.
s/ C.Melissa Owen
Bar No. 29803
Attorney for Antonio Briggs
Tin Fulton Greene & Owen, PLLC
212 South Tryon Street, Suite 1700
Phone: 704-338-1220
Fax: 704-338-1312
E-mail: cmowen@tfgolaw.com
 

11
Case 1:06-cr-00160-LHT Document 17 Filed 06/18/07 Page 11 of 11