‘ARKHAM KNIGHT’

IS A GREAT GAME
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19

CHARLESTON, S.C.

STOCKS HAVE
MIXED FRIDAY

OBAMA DELIVERS UNVARNISHED RACE LECTURE
AT EULOGY
NATION PAGE 7

BUSINESS PAGE 10

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 270

Historic ruling
Supreme Court votes in favor of same-sex marriage nationwide
By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Above: The White House is illuminated
in rainbow colors after Friday’s historic
Supreme Court ruling legalizing gay
marriage. Right: Gay rights supporters
celebrate after the U.S. Supreme Court
ruled that the U.S. Constitution provides
same-sex couples the right to marry,
outside the Supreme Court building in
Washington, D.C.
Inside
• City leaders
celebrate Supreme
Court ruling
• Pride celebration
to draw thousands
See page 4

Locals show support for same-sex marriage
San Mateo equal rights advocates laud Supreme Court decision
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Under a 5-4 decision made public Friday,
June 26, same-sex marriage was judged to be
legal throughout the United States.

A groundbreaking decision by the U.S.
Supreme Court uniformly legalizing samesex marriage drew praise and acclaim from
local residents and officials who support
equal rights.

And though equal marriage rights have
been enforced in California since last being
challenged in 2013, advocates and supporters of the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender community in San Mateo County

U.S. DEFEATS CHINA

celebrated what they considered a national
victory.
“I’m absolutely thrilled for the decision,”
said Craig Wiesner, a Daly City resident
who owns Reach and Teach in San Mateo.
Wiesner, who married his husband Derrick

See LOCALS, Page 18

WASHINGTON — Same-sex couples won
the right to marry nationwide Friday as a
divided Supreme Court handed a crowning
victory to the gay rights movement, setting off a jubilant cascade of long-delayed
weddings in states where they had been forbidden.
“No longer may this liberty be denied,”
said Justice Anthony Kennedy.
The vote was narrow — 5-4 — but
Kennedy’s majority opinion was clear and
firm: “The court now holds that same-sex
couples may exercise the fundamental right
to marry.”
The ruling will put an end to same-sex
marriage bans in the 14 states that still
maintain them, and provide an exclamation
point for breathtaking changes in the
nation’s social norms in recent years. As
recently as last October, just over one-third
of the states permitted gay marriages.
Kennedy’s reading of the ruling elicited
tears in the courtroom, euphoria outside and
the immediate issuance of marriage licenses
to same-sex couples in at least eight states.
In Dallas, Kenneth Denson said he and
Gabriel Mendez had been legally married in
2013 in California but “we’re Texans; we
want to get married in Texas.”
In praise of the decision, President Barack
Obama called it “justice that arrives like a
thunderbolt.”
Four of the court’s justices weren’t cheering. The dissenters accused their colleagues
of usurping power that belongs to the states
and to voters, and short-circuiting a national debate about same-sex marriage.

See RULING, Page 18

New development kicking off
city’s affordable housing fund
Belmont to receive fees from new mixed-use
condominium complex on El Camino Real
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

MARC DESROSIERS

Aided by tweaks in the lineup, midfielder Carli Lloyd was able to roam more Friday night,
scoring for the United States in a 1-0 victory over China that sent the Americans to the
semifinals of the Women’s World Cup against Germany. SEE STORY PAGE 11

For the first time since Gov. Jerry Brown
dissolved redevelopment agencies and left
cities with few tools to help support affordable housing needs, Belmont will receive
funds from a new mixed-use development
that will directly assist with creating homes
for those who struggle to afford the area’s
high cost of living.
On Tuesday night, the City Council
approved an agreement for the developer of

an El Camino Real condominium complex
to pay $818,400 in lieu of providing belowmarket rate units on site.
“When [redevelopment agencies were]
ripped away from us, it sort of changed the
paradigm quite a bit. But this is the first
project since at least 2011 where we’ve had
an affordable housing component,” said
City Attorney Scott Rennie.
The development at 576 to 600 El Camino
Real will entail nearly 10,300 square feet of

See HOUSING, Page 23

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“The main dangers in this
life are the people who want
to change everything — or nothing.”
— Viscountess Nancy Astor, American-born British politician

This Day in History
Illinois enacted the nation’s first
automobile seat belt law. (The law did
not require cars to have seat belts, but
that they be made seat belt-ready.)
In 1 7 8 7 , English historian Edward Gibbon completed
work on his six-volume work, “The History of the Decline
and Fall of the Roman Empire.”
In 1 8 4 4 , Mormon leader Joseph Smith and his brother,
Hyrum, were killed by a mob in Carthage, Illinois.
In 1 8 6 4 , Confederate forces repelled a frontal assault by
Union troops in the Civil War Battle of Kennesaw Mountain
in Georgia.
In 1 9 0 5 , the Industrial Workers of the World was founded in
Chicago.
In 1 9 2 2 , the first Newberry Medal, recognizing excellence
in children’s literature, was awarded to “The Story of
Mankind” by Hendrik Willem van Loon.
In 1 9 4 4 , during World War II, American forces liberated the
French port of Cherbourg from the Germans.
In 1 9 5 7 , more than 500 people were killed when Hurricane
Audrey slammed through coastal Louisiana and Texas.
In 1 9 6 3 , President John F. Kennedy spent the first full day
of a visit to Ireland, the land of his ancestors, stopping by
the County Wexford home of his great-grandfather, Patrick
Kennedy, who’d emigrated to America in 1848.
In 1 9 7 4 , President Richard Nixon opened an official visit
to the Soviet Union.
In 1 9 8 5 , the legendary Route 66, which originally
stretched from Chicago to Santa Monica, California, passed
into history as officials decertified the road.
In 1 9 9 0 , NASA announced that a flaw in the orbiting
Hubble Space Telescope was preventing the instrument from
achieving optimum focus. (The problem was traced to a mirror that had not been ground to exact specifications; corrective optics were later installed to fix the problem.)

1955

Birthdays

Reality TV star
Writer, producer,
Khloe Kardashian
director J.J.
is 31.
Abrams is 49.
Former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt is 77. Singer-musician Bruce Johnston (The Beach Boys) is 73. Fashion designer Vera Wang is 66. Actress Julia Duffy is 64. Actress Isabelle
Adjani is 60. Country singer Lorrie Morgan is 56. Actor Brian
Drillinger is 55. Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., is 47. Olympic
gold and bronze medal figure skater Viktor Petrenko is 46.
Actor Edward “Grapevine” Fordham Jr. is 45. TV personality
Jo Frost is 45. Actor Yancey Arias is 44. Actor Christian Kane
is 41. Actor Tobey Maguire is 40. Rock singer Bernhoft is 39.
Gospel singer Leigh Nash is 39. Musician Chris Eldridge
(Punch Brothers) is 33. Actor Drake Bell is 29.

Business executive
Ross Perot is 85.

REUTERS

Athletes compete during the men’s cycling BMX Moto competition at the First European Games in Baku, Azerbaijan.
(1735-1818).

C

innamon, chili powder and
seasoned salt are the seasonings most frequently found in
American homes.
***
The actual length of a year is
365.242 days. That’s why leap years
are necessary. Leap years occur every
four years, in years that are evenly
divisible by four.
***
It takes about one minute for the
blood to complete its journey
through the body.
***
One out of three people can’t snap
their fingers.
***
The word sewer means seaward. The
word literally comes from the old
practice of open ditches in London
leading to the River Thames, and
then into the sea.
***
The only real people ever to be
depicted as Pez dispensers have been
Betsy Ross (1752-1836), Daniel
Boone (1734-1820) and Paul Revere

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

June 24 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

3

BROTO

VICTEA

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

12

32

22

7

33

50

47

3
Mega number

27

29

30

37

44

3

17

27

32

39

7

1

0

Daily Four
1

Daily three midday
4

8

4

3

Daily three evening

Mega number

5

3

7

The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic, No. 5, in first place; Hot Shot No. 3, in
second place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third
place. The race time was clocked at 1:42.83.

-

23

June 24 Super Lotto Plus

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

10

June 26 Mega Millions

MACYLM
Print your
answer here:

5

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: UDDER
TAUNT
UNCORK
CLIQUE
Answer: When the British noblemen got into an argument, they — DUKED IT OUT

The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com
twitter.com/smdailyjournal

Jules Leotard (1842-1870) invented
the flying trapeze in 1859. He also
invented the close-fitting costume
that still bears his name.
***
The raising of silkworms is called
sericulture and began in China about
2000 B.C.
***
There are at least two words that contain all the vowels in order: facetious
and abstemious. There are at least
four words that contain all the vowels in reverse order: uncomplimentary, unproprietary, unoriental and subcontinental.
***
Agatha Christie’s (1890-1976) character Miss Marple is one of the most
famous and copied detectives of all
time. Miss Marple’s first name is
Jane. The last Miss Marple book was
“Sleeping Murder, ” published in
1976.
***
Ans wer: The presidents carv ed into
Mount
Rushmore are George
Washington (1732-1799), Abraham
Lincoln (1809-1865), Theodore
Roosev elt (1858-1919) and Thomas
Jefferson (1743-1826).
Mount
Rushmore is in South Dak ota and is
often called “The Shrine of
Democracy.”

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of
the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
Powerball

STNEP

***
The names of some cities in the
United States are the names of other
U. S. states. There is Nevada in
Missouri, Wyoming in Ohio, Oregon
in Wisconsin, Kansas in Oklahoma,
Michigan in North Dakota.
***
Can you name the presidents on
Mount Rushmore? Do you know what
state the monument is in? See answer
at end.
***
“Popeye the Sailor” debuted in 1933.
Spinach consumption increased 33
percent that year.
***
The San Francisco cable cars are the
only mobile national monuments.
***
Subbookkeeper is the only word with
four pairs of double letters in a row.
***
The number of U.S. residents who are
of Irish ancestry is 34. 5 million.
This number is almost nine times the
population of Ireland itself, which is
4.6 million.
***
At birth, a panda is smaller than a
mouse and weighs about 4 ounces.
***
A baby bat is called a pup.
***
Hawaii is made up of 137 islands,
only seven of which are inhabited.
***
Kraft introduced Cheez Whiz, an all purpose cheese sauce, in 1952.
***

scribd.com/smdailyjournal
facebook.com/smdailyjournal

Saturday : Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog
in the morning. Highs in the 60s. South
winds 10 to 15 mph.
Saturday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Lows in the mid 50s. South winds 5 to 15
mph.
Sunday : Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 60s.
South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to
10 mph.
Mo nday : Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Highs in the lower to mid 60s.
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . distribution@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com

As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

Convicted deputy gets new trial
Ex-girlfriend discloses victim allegedly beat her up
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A former San Mateo County sheriff’s
deputy convicted of stalking his ex-girlfriend and severely beating up her new
boyfriend was granted a new trial based on
recent evidence that the male victim beat
up the girlfriend.
Prosecutors must now consider whether
to recharge Colin Troy Smith after Judge
Leland Davis ruled Friday that the new evidence could have impacted the jury’s decision, according to District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
“Judge Davis concluded this new evidence was admissible to the jury because it
would have been relevant to attack the victim’s credibility and if the jury heard it,
they may have convicted differently, ”
Wagstaffe said.
Smith, a 42-year-old San Carlos resident, was convicted last November on
three felonies counts of assault causing
great bodily injury, witness intimidation
and violating a restraining order from his
alleged crimes in late 2013.
Yet since his conviction, the ex-girlfriend went to Redwood City police and
disclosed that her new boyfriend had
attacked her after his run-in with Smith,
Wagstaffe said.
“After the trial, the woman went into the
police department and reported that in

August 2014, she had
been beaten up by the
victim of this case — a
year after the defendant
had beaten him up. She
showed officers photos
of the injuries of the
attack, but never said a
word about this previColin Smith
ously.
She said she didn’t
reveal it at the time out of concern for the
male victim because she just felt he was
emotionally distraught over everything,”
Wagstaffe said.
Prosecutors say that on Aug. 17, 2013,
Smith drove his patrol car through
Redwood City while in uniform looking
for his ex-girlfriend at bars. He eventually
saw her with another man, prosecutors
said.
Smith texted the woman demanding to
know if she’d had sex with the man and
warned her that “he better not be with her
when [Smith] got off duty,” according to
prosecutors.
After getting off work around 7 a.m.,
Smith forced his way into her home, found
the man hiding in her bathroom and
severely beat him. The victim suffered a
fractured nose and eye socket, according to
prosecutors.
While facing felony assault charges
from the incident, Smith allegedly

iSmile Implant Center
Implant Specialist

IMPLANT

DDS MSD PHD

One time payment
0% interest financing
available up to 3 times
All Procedures Included
(Implant Fixture+Custom
Abutment + Crown)

Dr. Kim

Founder of iSmile Dental.
U.C. Professor
20 years of prosthodontist experience
5000 Implants placed

$1,895

Reg $6,000

AVE

S
YOU

5

$4,10

iSmile Orthodontic Center
BRACES
$3,995

One Time Payment
0% interest financing
available up to 20 times
Dr. Chen, DDS PhD,
UCSF DDS, PhD
Professor, Board Certified
diplomat

Dr. Nguyen, DDS MS,
UCSF: Residency
Orthodontist

Dr. Navarrete, DDS MS
NYU: Residency
Orthodontist

Reg $6,000

YOU

SAVE

5

$2,00

Dr. Ikeda, DDS MS,
UCSF: Residency
Orthodontist

LIMITED TIME OFFER

Specialists
Dr Pang DMD
Board Certified pedodontist
Tufts University

Dr Quang DDS PhD

Board Certified Endodontist
UCSF-DDS PhD

Dr Lai DMD MS

Board Certified pedodontist
UCSF

please call to see if these
offers apply to you

650-282-5555

IMPLANTS & ORTHODONTICS

1702 Miramonte Ave Suite B
Mountain View CA 94040
www.i-smiledental.com

+++++99% STAR REVIEW RATING out of 1000+ Reviews

We Will Maximize Your Insurance Coverage & Make the Most of Your Insurance!

approached the woman on Dec. 4, 2013, in
defiance of a restraining order. Standing
outside the woman’s car around 11 p.m.,
Smith called her a whore, told her not to
call police and said she was going to lose
the other case against him, according to
prosecutors.
After a nine-day jury trial, Smith was
convicted on all three counts and was facing up to 10 years in prison, according to
prosecutors.
Before imposing a sentence in
December, Davis request Smith be evaluated for 90 days at the Department of
Corrections and Rehabilitation — the
results of which will not be disclosed
unless Smith is convicted and sentenced,
Wagstaffe said.
On April 17, 2015, the court granted
Smith’s request to be released from custody
so he could attend his brother’s funeral.
Smith, who no longer works for the
Sheriff’s Office, remains out of custody on
his own recognizance but the restraining
orders remain in place, Wagstaffe said.
Prosecutors have until July 16 to
announce whether they will refile the case,
Wagstaffe said.
Smith’s defense attorney did not return a
request for comment.

samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106

3

Police reports
Beach
A woman threw a large container of sand
at a front door in an attempt to break in
on Laurel Street in Redwood City before
6:44 p.m. Tuesday, June 23.

REDWOOD CITY
Fo und bi ke. A black and red bike with pink
and yellow wheels was found on Adams
Street before 10:06 p.m. Thursday, June 25.
Di s turbance. An intoxicated woman in a
long purple shirt was seen swinging her
purse at vehicles on East Bayshore Road
before 6:17 p.m. Thursday, June 25.
Petty theft. A man was seen stealing coffee beans on Broadway before 11:56 p.m.
Thursday, June 25.
Traffic hazard. A white Hyundai Elantra
was seen parked and blocking part of an
intersection on Madison Avenue before
11:17 a.m. Thursday, June 25.
Di s turbance. A woman was heard making
inappropriate comments and sexual
advances toward customers and pacing back
and forth on El Camino Real before 2:07
p.m. Wednesday, June 24.

SAN MATEO
Vandal i s m. Someone opened the gates to a
church then went to the back and yanked the
bulletin board off the wall on South
Claremont Street before 9:24 a.m. Monday,
June 22.
Arres t. A woman was arrested for stealing at
Macy’s at the Hillsdale Shopping Center
before Monday, June 22.
Arres t. A man seen swerving and losing
control of his truck was arrested for drunk
driving at Poplar Avenue and Highway 101
before 12:14 p.m. Friday, June 19.

4

LOCAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Pride celebration
to draw thousands
By Keith Burbank
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee told the throng at City Hall that the city has ‘always been proud in our role leading the nation,
perhaps the world’ in fighting for gay rights in general and same-sex marriage in particular.

City leaders celebrate Supreme Court ruling
By Hannah Albarazi
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Standing beneath a massive rainbow
flag on the steps of San Francisco City
Hall before hundreds of gay rights
activists, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom,
state Sen. Mark Leno and numerous
other public officials expressed their
deep pride is the U.S. Supreme Court’s
decision to legalize gay marriage in all
50 U.S. states.
Same-sex couples were among the
most celebratory members of the
crowd Friday morning outside City
Hall, with many waving rainbow flags
and others wearing the flags superhero-style.
Hugs were widely exchanged Friday
morning between members of the public, and with openly gay public officials such as Leno, San Francisco
Treasurer and Tax Collector Jose
Cisneros, as well as city supervisors
David Campos and Scott Wiener.
D’vora Tirschwell, a resident of the
North Bay, who stood outside City

Hall adorned in a rainbow outfit, said
today was a “profound” moment for
American families.
Tirschwell said although she has
been in a same-sex marriage since
2008, the court’s ruling “means families can be protected legally” and that
couples can establish families with
dignity.
“It tells me the constitution means
what it says it means, what I always
thought it meant,” Tirschwell said.
She said the ruling will change the
lives of thousands and make it possible for same-sex couples to have legal
rights, such as visiting privileges at
hospitals and guardianship over a
spouses’ children.
San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and
National Center for Lesbian Rights
executive director Kate Kendell
expressed their enthusiasm to be in
San Francisco Friday where gay rights
leaders such as Harvey Milk laid the
path to today’s victory.
Kendell said that with this ruling
“the ground has shifted” and that “justice and love won today.”

“Much of what we won today started
here,” Kendell said, acknowledging
the sacrifices made and the shame and
indignity that so many people have
endured prior to this decision.
Leno said he experienced firsthand
the indignity when he came out as an
openly gay man in 1969, at a time
when many people still thought of
homosexuality as a mental illness and
laws were unapologetically antihomosexual.
“We did it, ” Leno said, adding,
“Today San Francisco’s values become
America’s values.”
Newsom, a former San Francisco
mayor who gained national attention
in 2004 when he directed the San
Francisco city-county clerk to issue
marriage licenses to gay couples in
violation of state law, was among the
most celebrated public figures at the
celebration Friday.
Newsom thanked the gay community
for relentlessly standing up for what
they believed in and thanked all those
who stood with him in the fight for
gay marriage.

San Francisco’s 45th annual LGBT Pride parade and celebration this weekend is expected to be even more festive
than past years after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision
Friday to make same-sex marriage legal in the United
States, according to the San Francisco Travel Association.
President and CEO of the association Joe D’Alessandro
said hundreds of thousands will be in the city as it comes
alive with music, dancing and excitement.
“Today our city is filled with joy,” D’Alessandro said.
“This decision is the culmination of a struggle that began
in San Francisco on Feb. 12, 2004, when then-Mayor
Gavin Newsom began issuing same-sex marriage licenses at
City Hall. My husband and I will be celebrating this weekend with the thousands of people who will come to San
Francisco to share in this historic moment.”
This year’s Pride theme is Equality Without Exception.
The celebration begins Saturday at noon in Civic Center
Plaza in front of City Hall and goes to 6 p.m. Sunday’s
events begin with the parade at 10:30 a.m. along Market
Street from Beale Street to Eighth Street, according to SF
Pride.
More than 240 organizations will participate in the
parade.
Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. SF Pride is hosting a VIP
party at City Hall. Tickets can also be purchased at
sfpride.org.
Other events on Sunday start at 11 a.m. in Civic Center
Plaza and go to 6 p.m., organizers said.
The two-day Civic Center celebration will have more than
20 stages and venues and nearly almost 300 exhibitors,
organizers said.
“For 45 years the annual Pride event in San Francisco has
been a catalyst to build community, celebrate diversity and
unite to take on those who would deny us our freedoms
locally and abroad. Our theme Equality Without Exception
is timely; queers and allies alike need to vote and stay vigilant,” SF Pride board president Gary Virginia said in a statement.
SF Pride is a nonprofit responsible for producing the celebration and parade.
The celebration also includes speakers Alicia Garza, who
started The #BlackLivesMatter Movement and Kate
Kendall, who leads the National Center for Lesbian Rights,
organizers said.
Entertainment is planned too. Grammy-nominated
rock/electronica band Shiny Toy Guns will play on the
main stage Sunday, according to organizers.
BART officials said to help participants get to the parade
they will be running more trains Sunday, which will be the
length of weekday commuter trains.
Golden Gate Ferry is also offering more trips than usual
Saturday and Sunday from the Larkspur Ferry Terminal.
Ferry officials are asking travelers to purchase tickets in
advance.
Complete arrival and departure information can be found
at www.goldengate.org/news/ferry/prideferry.php.

Do You Want A Whiter, Brighter Smile?

“Don’t Wait!

3/30/15

Make an appointment today
You’ll never regret it.”

Perfect for date night,
weddings, or
summer parties

Mention this ad

and receive free 20
minute upgrade up to $50
value. Exp: 6/30/15

Tue-Sat 10am to 6pm
Mon by appointment 

-BVSFM4USFFU 4BO$BSMPTt650-508-8669
www.mauiwhitening.com (Between Greenwood & Howard)

THE DAILY JOURNAL

24 Hour Non Medical In-Home Care Provider
Care On Call is Managed by a RN
1818 Gilbreth Road, Suite 127 Burlingame, CA 94010

650.276.0270

Live person always available
“We accept credit cards, Long Term Care Insurance”
Insured & Bonded
www.MyCareOnCall.com

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

5

Music Lessons for All Ages
25 Professional Teachers making learning fun!
Brass & WoodwinL[ŒVioliVŒGuitar
PianWŒDrum[ŒVoice

Bronstein Music

Since 1946

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco 650-588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

6

LOCAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

R

o b e r t
Gri ffiths II,
o
f
Burlingame, graduated
from
Cal i f o rn i a
Po l y techni c State
Un i v e rs i t y with a
Bachelor’s of Science
degree in forestry and
natural resources.
***
A
n
n
a
B e t h l ah my ,
of
Burlingame, graduated
from
Mi ami
Un i v e rs i t y
in
Ohi o n, with a Bachelor of Science in Business major in
marketing.
***
Mackenzi e Del Pape, of Burlingame, was recognized
as a member of the Dean’s List at Pro v i dence Co l l eg e for
the spring 2015 semester.
***
Juny o ung Park, of Redwood City, made the Dean’s List
at the Pratt Ins ti tute.
***
Chl o e Bo ri s o n, of Redwood City, made the President’s
List at the Pratt Ins ti tute.
***
Ni cho l as Dei Ro s s i , of San Carlos, was named to the
President’s Honor Roll at Okl aho ma Ci ty Uni v ers i ty .
***
Jes s e Cl ay , of San Carlos, was named to the Dean’s List
at Cl ems o n Uni v ers i ty .
***
Brendan Duebner, of Redwood City, was named to the
Dean’s List at Lo y o l a Uni v ers i ty Mary l and.
***
Derek Azzo pardi , of Redwood City, was named to the
Dean’s List at Ameri can Internati o nal Co l l eg e.
***
Kai ta Naray an, of Burlingame, was awarded a Gold Star
by the Ci tadel for earning a GPA of 3.7 or higher during
the spring semester of the 2014-15 academic year.
***
Al ex ander Freeman, of Portola Valley, was named to
the Dean’s List at the Ge o rg i a In s t i t ut e o f
Techno l o g y .
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by
education reporter Austin Walsh. You can contact him at (650) 3445200, ext. 105 or at austin@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

S.F. told to stop taking some water during drought
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Regulators on
Friday told San Francisco to stop taking some of the river water it routinely
stores in the Hetch Hetchy reservoir.
However, the city is far from having
its taps run dry during the drought.
Officials said the cutback orders
don’t apply to water already stored in
the reservoir system, which has
enough water to last through two more
dry years.

Strong-arm robber steals
deposit bag in bank lobby
Police are searching for a man who
stole deposit bags full of checks and
cash from a person waiting in the
lobby of the Bank of America in South
San Francisco Friday.
The victim was standing in line with
several deposit bags from a nearby
business when the man walked up
behind the victim around 3:04 p.m.
The suspect grabbed the bags and ran
to a car with a getaway driver who was
waiting in the bank parking lot at 955
El Camino Real, according to South
San Francisco police.
The man is described as black adult
with a thin build, approximately 6 feet

John Gary Joseph Stark
John Gary Joseph Stark died June
14, 2015, at the age of 45.
John is survived by his wife Carmen
Stark, his father
Bob Stark and his
sister
Megan
Singer.
Friends are invited
to attend a funeral
service 7 p. m.
Wednesday, July 1,
with visitation from

The State Water Resources Control
Board ordered the cutback in its latest
round of notices informing agencies,
corporations and individuals holding
water rights that waterways are too dry
to meet demand in the drought.
San Francisco depends on snow in
the Sierra Nevada melting into the
Tuolumne River to supply its drinking
water, but the snowpack has largely
vanished during the fourth year of the
drought.
The city has several century-old

claims to the river, including one
established when the mayor famously
nailed a notice on a tree in 1902. It’s
not clear how much water San
Francisco diverts from the river for
storage under the cuts ordered Friday.
“We’re very protective of our water
rights,” said Steven Ritchie, who manages water for San Francisco Public
Utilities Commission. “We’re going
to look very closely at what the state
water board does to determine the
appropriate course of action.”

Local briefs

the 2500 block of Westborough
Boulevard.
As the pair was walking on a trail
next to the park’s baseball field, a
man dressed in all black with a ski
mask and holding a semi-automatic
handgun confronted them, according
to police.
The suspect stole both of the victims’ cellphones and wallets and then
fled. He was described as a Filipino
man in his early to mid 20s who is
about 5 feet 5 inches tall with a slender
build, police said.
The suspect remains at large.
Anyone with information about the
robbery is encouraged to call South
San Francisco police at (650) 8778900.

tall and wearing a dark hooded sweatshirt and red cap. The suspect vehicle
was a charcoal gray compact, possibly
a Honda, with tinted windows, according to police.
Anyone with information is asked to
call police at (650) 877-8900.

Two elderly men
robbed at gunpoint in park
Two elderly men were robbed at gunpoint while walking in a park in South
San Francisco on Thursday morning,
police said.
The robbery occurred around 7:20
a.m. Thursday in Westborough Park in

Obituaries
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Crippen & Flynn
Carlmont Chapel, 1111 Alameda de las
Pulgas in Belmont.
Donations are preferred to the
PHS/SPCA, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame, CA 94010.

Sonny Martin
Sonny Martin, of Burlingame,
California, born Dec. 4, 1956, died
June 19, 2015, peacefully at home.

Sonny resided in Burlingame where
he raised his family, owned Sonny’s
Restaurant on Broadway, went to
University of San Francisco graduated with bachelor’s of arts in global
business management, enjoyed
restoring his Mustang and taking
trips to Reno.
Sonny is survived by his loving wife
Maryann;
children
Jeremey,
Christopher and Daniel; grandchildren
Anthony and Gianna; daughter-in-law
Jessica; father-in-law Elzo Grelli; as
well as other relatives.

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

7

Obama delivers unvarnished race lecture at eulogy
By Meg Kinnard,
Jeffery Collins and Jonathan Drew
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLESTON, S.C. — President Barack
Obama used his eulogy for a slain pastor to
deliver an unvarnished lecture on America’s
racial history Friday, and then boldly sang
“Amazing Grace,” a spiritual meant to summon hope in the darkest of times.
Obama also called for gun control and
efforts to eliminate poverty and job discrimination, and said the Confederate battle flag
— long a symbol of Southern pride — must
be removed from places of honor.
“For many — black and white — that flag
was a reminder of systemic oppression and
racial subjugation. We see that now,” he said.
The president came to eulogize the Rev.
Clemente Pinckney, a state senator whose
church was founded by the leader of a failed
slave revolt and burned to the ground by
angry whites in 1822. After the Civil War,
the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal
Church led efforts to expand equal rights in
the South, hosting Martin Luther King Jr.
during campaigns in South Carolina.
Pinckney himself came from a long line of
preachers and protesters, and the eight peo-

Pinckney and eight others knew all of this
history,” the president said. “But he surely
sensed the meaning of his violent act. It was
an act that drew on a long history of bombs
and arsons and shots fired at churches; not
random, but as a means of control, a way to
terrorize and oppress.”
“An act that he imagined would incite fear,
and incrimination, violence and suspicion.
An act he presumed would deepen divisions
that trace back to our nation’s original sin,”
Obama continued, his voice rising in the
cadence of the preachers who preceded him.
“Oh, but God works in mysterious ways!”
Obama said, and the crowd rose to give him a
standing ovation. “God has different ideas!”
Obama spoke plainly about the ugliness of
America’s racial history — from slavery to
the many ways minorities have been
deprived of equal rights in more recent times.
Taking down the Confederate flag is a righteous step, “but God doesn’t want us to stop
there,” he said.
Americans should want to fight poverty
with as much effort as they fight hate, and
REUTERS
realize that hate isn’t always obvious, he
Barack Obama delivers a eulogy behind the casket of the Rev. Clementa Pinckney during said, “so that we’re guarding against not just
funeral services for Pinckney in Charleston, S.C.
racial slurs, but we’re guarding against the
ple slain beside him drew no distinctions to improve society, Obama said.
subtle impulse to call Johnny back for a job
between their work in church and their efforts
“We do not know whether the killer of Rev. interview, but not Jamal.”

Bill to bar PG&E tax deductions

Around the nation
SpaceX capsule to deliver

Peninsula lawmakers seek limits after penalty for San Bruno explosion, fire new parking spot for space station
By Julia Cheever
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Two Peninsula lawmakers introduced
a bill in the California Legislature
Friday that would bar PG&E Co. from
taking state tax deductions on up to
$1.3 billion of a $1.6 billion penalty
levied on the utility in connection
with a fatal pipeline explosion in San
Bruno.
The record $1.6 billion package of
fines and penalties was imposed by the
California
Public
Utilities
Commission in San Francisco on
April 9 in three investigations stemming from the 2010 pipeline explosion and fire, in which eight people
died and 66 were injured.
PG&E has said it will not appeal the
penalty.
The bill, SB 681, was proposed by
state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, and
Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-South
San Francisco, in the wake of a letter
sent by Commission President
Michael Picker to federal and state tax
agencies.
In that letter, sent on April 30,
Picker told the agencies that the entire
package of $1.6 billion in fines and
penalties was “intended to be punitive” and not tax-deductible.
“It is unclear whether the tax agencies will prohibit PG&E from taking
deductions for these penalties,” Hill
said in a news release announcing the
proposed state law.
“SB 681 will remove this ambiguity” in regard to state deductions, Hill
said.
The penalty package includes a $300

Jerry Hill

million
fine
payable to the
state’s general fund,
$850 million for
pipeline
safety
improvements,
a
$400 million onetime credit to customers and $50 million for previously
identified improve-

ments.
Hill said in the announcement that
the $300 million fine was clearly not
deductible but the status of the other
$1.3 billion was unclear.
If the bill is made law, it would block
PG&E from obtaining up to $115 million in state tax deductions on the $1.3
billion.
PG&E spokesman Nick Stimmel said
Friday the company believes that part
of the penalty is tax-deductible.
“Respectfully, we acknowledge the
views expressed in the draft legislation as well as those of the commission. While we are not appealing the
CPUC decision, we continue to believe
that costs outlined in the decision are
deductible under tax laws,” Stimmel
said in a statement.
“Our focus moving forward is on
becoming the safest, most reliable
utility in the nation for our customers
and their families,” Stimmel said.
Picker, who took office as PUC president on Jan. 1, sent the letter to the
U.S. Internal Revenue Service, state
Board of Equalization and state
Franchise Tax Board.
In the letter, he noted that two
administrative law judges had original-

ly proposed a nondeductible fine of
$950 million, but
the
commission
chose to divert a
large part of that
amount
to
an
investment
in
pipeline
safety,
Kevin Mullin while at the same
time increasing the
total penalty from a proposed $1.4
billion to the $1.6 billion.
“It is critical that you understand the
commission’s intention with this
order — to penalize PG&E for its longstanding and egregious violations of
law,” Picker told the tax agencies.
“We fully intended and hope that any
effort by PG&E to deduct any of the
costs of complying with the commission’s decision be clearly and decisively disallowed on the basis of their
punitive nature,” Picker wrote.
The penalties were imposed in three
proceedings that investigated the San
Bruno explosion, PG&E record-keeping practices and its pipeline operations in locations with high population density. The commissioners concluded that PG&E committed 2,425
violations of regulations in the three
areas over a number of years.
The explosion and resulting fire
occurred when a high-pressure PG&E
natural gas transmission pipeline segment ruptured in San Bruno on Sept. 9,
2010. The pipeline segment, installed
in approximately 1956, had a defective seam weld and was incorrectly
listed in PG&E records as being seamless.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX stands ready to
launch a much-needed load of supplies to the
International Space Station this weekend on the heels of
a failed supply run by Russia.
Besides food and experiments, the Dragon cargo ship
ordered up by NASA holds a new docking port, or parking
place, for future commercial crew capsules.
Liftoff is scheduled for 10:21 a. m. Sunday. Good flying
weather is forecast for SpaceX’s unmanned Falcon rocket.
This shipment is especially critical because the space
station has lost two deliveries since fall.
A Russian supply ship spun out of control shortly after
liftoff in April and burned up on re-entry with all its contents. In October, an Orbital Sciences Corp. cargo carrier was destroyed in a Virginia launch explosion.
Once again, SpaceX is picking up the slack. This will
be the eighth station supply run for the California-based
company; the first was in 2012.

Affordable estate planning
to protect your family’s wealth.
Local San Mateo based firm with
trusts and estate plans
starting at $399.

Call us at

1.844.687.3782
1777 Borel Place, Suite 305, San Mateo
www.TrustandEstatePlan.com

8

WORLD

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Amid new IS offensive, scores die in Syrian town
By Hamza Hendawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Fighting raged into
the night Friday between Kurdish
fighters and Islamic State militants in the Syrian border town of
Kobani, as reports mounted that at
least 120 civilians, including
women and children, have been
killed by the extremist group
since it launched a new offensive
on the strategic town the previous
day.
The fighting came amid deadly
terror attacks across continents —
from shootings in a Tunisian
beach resort, to an attack on a
U.S.-owned factory in France and a
suicide bombing by an Islamic
State affiliate at a Shiite mosque in
Kuwait that killed at least 27 worshippers — all following the IS
group’s call for violence during
the Muslim holy month of
Ramadan.
Syria’s official SANA news
agency said some 120 civilians
were killed by IS fighters since
Thursday in Kobani, describing
the killings as a “massacre.” It
gave no details, but Kobani-based
activist Mustafa Bali told the
Associated Press that as many as
142 were killed, mostly civilians
shot dead in cold blood, and 183
were wounded. At least 40 IS militants were also killed, their bodies
left unclaimed on the town’s
streets, said Bali.
IS militants remained fortified
in buildings in several districts of
this northern Syrian town on the
Turkish-Syrian border, he added.
They were holding hostages in
three locations, he said. A fourth

REUTERS

Smoke rises in the Syrian town of Kobani.

Suicide car bombing kills 20 Syrian troops in Kurdish city
By Bassem Mroue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Syria’s official news
agency and activists say a suicide
bombing has targeted a security
building at the northeastern,
mostly Kurdish city of Hassakeh.
The agency says there are casualties from Friday’s attack, but
location, a restaurant, was
stormed by Kurdish fighters who
freed the hostages and killed sev-

gave no figures. The Britainbased Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights says at least 20
troops were killed and the
Criminal Security department
building was badly damaged.
No one immediately claimed
responsibility for the attack,
which bore the hallmarks of the
Islamic State group.

IS launched a surprise attack on
Hassakeh on Thursday, capturing
parts of the city.
The Observatory, which relies
on a network of activists across
Syria, says IS positions inside
and around the city have been
coming under intense airstrikes
by the U.S.-led coalition over the
past two days.

eral IS fighters earlier in the day,
Bali said.
Also Friday, a suicide car bomb-

ing targeted a security building in
the northeastern
town
of
Hassakeh, which also came under a

Advertisement

Can Marriage Exist Between

Science And Religion?
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE

Some
say
that
science and religion
don’t mix. Some
say that science is
the ultimate search
for God. Some say
religion supersedes
science, some say both have equal stature
and others say both are hogwash. Everyone
has their own personal assessment of the
correlation between science and religion.
The aspiration of religion along with the
aspiration of science is to explain the
universe and answer questions about life, in
addition to satisfying human psychological
needs when dealing with the realities of
death. Religion is based on faith, science is
based on observation, and both are based on
human curiosity and the need to find
answers. Whether a person is repetitively
reading religious scripture, or fascinated by
repeatable scientific experimentations, both
are searching for methods that answer
questions about the universe around us.
It can be debated that early humans
turned to religion as a way to alleviate their
fears and gain reassurance with the concept
of life after death. This helped to give them
a sense of order in a confusing world that
often seemed mysterious.
Eventually
scientific realization evolved along side
religion and the process of “trial and error”
established itself as a way to solve some of
these mysteries. Fire…the wheel…farming.
The more humans observed the world they
lived in, the more they leaned how the
natural world worked and how they could
manipulate it to their advantage. Over the
centuries religious power came at odds with
scientific discovery, which led to a period of

scientific stagnation: “The Dark Ages”.
Later at the dawn of “The Renaissance”
science was again embraced leading to great
advances in art, architecture, medicine,
astronomy and other natural sciences. Over
the ages science and religion have been
evolving together on a roller coaster ride of
acceptance, denial and equilibrium.
We now appear to be at a crossroads
where religion is not only viewing science
with an evaluative broadmindedness, but is
exploring hand in hand with scientific
processes.
One prime example is the
Vatican’s
“Pontifical
Academy
of
Sciences”. Quoting John Paul II: “...today
eminent scientists are members… a visible
sign… of the profound harmony that can
exist between the truths of science and the
truths of faith...”. Gregor Mendel, the father
of Genetics, was an Augustinian Friar.
Georges Lemaitre, who developed much of
the Big Bang Theory, was a Belgian priest.
Recently, Pope Francis, who has a Master’s
Degree in Chemistry, insisted that there is
no reason to believe that science and God
are incompatible.
With all this in mind, every human being
is unique as a fingerprint, and every human
brain has its own unique consciousness.
Whether you analyze with your religious cap
or your science cap, matrimony between the
two could be found by looking inward. So,
close your eyes, examine your deep
thoughts, and you may detect a rational
enlightenment finely attuned to both.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make preplanning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:

www.chapelofthehighlands.com.

surprise IS attack on Thursday. The
Syrian news agency said there
were casualties, without giving a
figure, while the Britain-based
Syrian Observatory for Human
Rights said at least 20 troops were
killed and the building was badly
damaged.
No one immediately claimed
responsibility for the Hassakeh
bombing, which bore the hallmark s o f t h e Is l ami c St at e
group.
The surprise twin attacks on
Kobani and Hassakeh came after
the Islamic State group suffered a
series of setbacks over the past
two weeks, including the loss of
the Syrian border town of Tal
Abyad — one of the group’s main
points for the transfer of foreign
fighters and supplies.
Kobani has become a symbol of
Kurdish resistance after the town.
Backed by U. S. -led coalition
airstrikes, the town’s defenders
endured a months-long siege by
the Islamic State before they
broke the siege and drove the IS
forces out.
Kurdish officials said IS militants wearing Syrian rebel uniforms and carrying the flags of the
Western-backed Free Syrian Army
sneaked into the town before dawn
on Thursday as everyone slept.
Just before sunrise, they set off
three car bombs and quickly took
up fortified positions inside buildings, they said.
“Honestly, their plan was very
smart, ” said Bali. “We believe
they came from the north and that
they had been inside the city for at
least two hours before the fighting
began. “

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

9

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

Pope to stay away from homeland
during his South American visit
By Debora Rey
and Peter Prengaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Police inspect the Imam Sadiq Mosque after a bomb
explosion, in the Al Sawaber area of Kuwait City.

Dozens killed in
attacks in Tunisia,
Kuwait and France

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Pope
Francis’ homeland of Argentina is not
on the itinerary for his South American
tour in July.
The pontiff hasn’t been back since
he became pope more than two years
ago, and the Vatican says he doesn’t
want to influence October’s presidential election by visiting now. Francis
has complained in recent months that
he has felt “used” by Argentine politicians who take their picture with him
in Rome.
Instead, the pontiff will tour Ecuador
and two countries that border
Argentina: Bolivia and Paraguay.
Although he will stay away, Francis
nevertheless intensely follows what
happens where he was born and spent
most of his life before becoming world
leader of the Roman Catholic Church,
according to local journalists who
have covered him for years, friends in
the country and Vatican officials.
“This is a pope who is very interested in politics and has considerable
political sensibility,” said Mariano De
Vedia, political editor for the
Argentine newspaper La Nacion and
author of “In the Name of the Father,” a
book that examines Francis’ rocky
relationship with President Cristina
Fernandez and her predecessor and late
husband, Nestor Kirchner.

REUTERS

Pope Francis waves as he arrives to lead the weekly audience in Saint Peter’s Square
at the Vatican.
“Mexicanization” of the country.
Many interpreted those comments as a
scathing critique of Fernandez and her
party, which has held power since
2003.
Earlier this month, he received
Fernandez at the Vatican for the fourth
time, drawing the ire of some opposition leaders.
“Don’t
disappointment
me,
Francisco!” Elisa Carrio, an opposition congresswoman and aspiring
presidential contender, posted to her
Facebook page during his last meeting
with Fernandez.

Much of what Francis says and does
has an impact in Argentina, a majority
Catholic nation of 41 million people
where the church wields great influence.
He has promised to open church files
from Argentina’s 1976-1983 military
dictatorship — a potential Pandora’s
box that could spark more lawsuits and
arrests related to the estimated 30,000
people killed or disappeared during the
“dirty war.”
Francis made headlines early this
year by lamenting that a growing drug
trade in Argentina could lead to a

By Ben Wiacek and Paul Schemm
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUSSE, Tunisia — A young man pulled a Kalashnikov
from a beach umbrella and sprayed gunfire at European
sunbathers at a Tunisian resort, killing at least 38 people
— one of three deadly attacks Friday from Europe to North
Africa to the Middle East that followed a call to violence
by Islamic State extremists.
The shootings in the Tunisian resort of Sousse happened
at about the same time as a bombing at a Shiite mosque in
Kuwait and an attack on a U.S.-owned factory in France
that included a beheading. It was unclear if the violence
was linked but it came days after the IS militants urged
their followers “to make Ramadan a month of calamities
for the nonbelievers.” In all, the assailants killed at least
65 people.
The SITE Intelligence Group reported later that the IS
claimed credit for the Tunisia attack on its Twitter account
and identified the gunman as Abu Yahya al-Qayrawani.
The attack in Tunisia, the country’s worst ever, comes
just months after the March 18 massacre at the national
Bardo museum in Tunis that killed 22 people, again mostly tourists, and has called into question the newly elected
government’s ability to protect the country.
“Once again, cowardly and traitorous hands have struck
Tunisia, targeting its security and that of its children and
visitors,” President Beji Caid Essebsi told reporters at the
RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel, near the beach rampage site.
Essebsi promised “painful but necessary” measures,
adding: “No country is safe from terrorism, and we need a
global strategy of all democratic countries.”
Rafik Chelli, the secretary of state of the Interior
Ministry, told the Associated Press that the attack was carried out by a young student not previously known to
authorities. At least 36 people were reported wounded in
the shooting spree, which ended when the gunman was
shot to death by police.
The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the
suicide bombing at the Shiite mosque in Kuwait City that
killed at least 27 people and wounded scores of other worshippers at midday prayers — the first such attack in the
mostly quiet and relatively secure Gulf Arab nation in
more than two decades.
In southeastern France, a man with ties to Islamic radicals rammed a car into a gas factory, touching off an
explosion that injured two people. Authorities arriving at
the site made a grisly discovery: the severed head of the
driver’s employer was found hanging at the plant
entrance.
The suspect, Yassine Salhi, was seized by an alert firefighter, authorities said, and French President Francois
Hollande said the attacker’s intention had been to cause an
explosion. A security alert for the southeast region was
raised to its highest level for the next three days, and the
U.S. Embassy in Paris warned American citizens to be vigilant.

Church of Christ

Non-Denominational

CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

Church of the
Highlands

Eckankar

ECKANKAR

Tools to help make God an
everyday reality in your life.
2009 Broadway
Redwood City, CA 94063
(650) 568-3209
www.eck-ca.org
Wednesdays Spiritual Explorations 7:30PM
Fridays - HU chant 7:30PM
Regardless of religion, singing
HU can bring happiness, comfort
& understanding.
2nd Sunday Worship Service 11:00AM

“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...

To know Christ and make him known.

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org

Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST

Baptist

Buddhist

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo

Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)

Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

www.pilgrimbcsm.org

Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM

LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM

(650) 342-2541

Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman

Worship Service
Sunday School

10:00 AM
11:00 AM

Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.

Call (650) 349-0100

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks lower as Greece deadline approaches
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,946.68
Nasdaq 5,080.51
S&P 500 2,101.49

+56.32
-31.68
-0.82

10-Yr Bond 2.48 +0.08
Oil (per barrel) 59.59
Gold
1,174.20

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Nike Inc., up $4.49 to $109.71
The maker of sneakers and athletic apparel reported that its profit and
revenue grew during its fiscal fourth quarter.
Synnex Corp., down $7.46 to $74.88
The high-tech contractor reported better-than-expected earnings in its
fiscal second quarter, but its revenue fell short of expectations.
Winnebago Industries Inc., up $1.89 to $24.46
Shares of the recreational vehicle maker rose again, a day after reporting
better-than-expected results for its third quarter.
Vince Holding Corp., down 89 cents to $12.11
The fashion company said that its chief financial officer resigned and it
named a CFO from an investment firm as an interim replacement.
Nasdaq
Micron Technology Inc., down $4.36 to $19.66
The chipmaker reported disappointing third-quarter results, as demand
for PCs continue to fall.
Finish Line Inc., up $1.25 to $28.25
The sneaker and athletic apparel retailer reported first-quarter earnings
and revenue that topped Wall Street expectations.
Celladon Corp., down 85 cents to $1.35
The drug developer said that it is looking to sell itself, and if it doesn’t
find a buyer, it may have to liquidate.
XO Group Inc., up 9 cents to $16.14
The owner of wedding website TheKnot.com may benefit after the U.S.
Supreme Court declared same sex marriage legal nationwide.

NEW YORK — Stocks had a mixed
day Friday, as investors waited for
negotiators to finish their work on a
solution to Greece’s debt problems.
Chinese stocks plunged 7 percent as
fears spread that a yearlong bull rally
there has become overheated.
China’s benchmark index is still up
more than double over the past year.
The Dow Jones industrial average
added 56. 32 points, or 0. 3 percent,
to 17, 946. 68. It was largely lifted by
Nike, which rose more than 4 percent
after posting strong quarterly
results.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
fell 0. 82 of a point, or 0. 04 percent,
to 2, 101. 49 and the Nasdaq composite lost 31. 68 points, or 0. 6 percent,
to 5, 080. 51. All three indexes ended
the week slightly lower.
As they have done all week, global
investors are watching closely as
Greek debt talks go down to the wire.
On Thursday, a key meeting of eurozone finance ministers broke up
without an agreement. The 19 ministers are due to meet again Saturday.
Greece needs a deal in order to make
a debt payment of 1. 6 billion euros
($1. 8 billion) to the International
Monetary Fund on Tuesday. Failing
to do so would put the country on a

path toward default and a possible
exit from the euro.
“While these deadlines can quite
often be taken with a pinch of salt,
Greece has literally run out of time
on this occasion, ” said Craig Erlam,
senior market analyst at OANDA.
Investors now turn to next week,
when the U. S. government will
release the June jobs report.
Economists forecast that U. S.
employers created 237, 500 jobs last
month, according to FactSet.
There’s been a lot of focus on when
the Federal Reserve will raise its key
interest rate. Recent economic data
seems to show that the U. S. economic recovery is holding steady, and
now many investors are expecting
the Fed to raise rates in September.
“There’s a premium on economic
data right now. Outside of Greece,
everyone will be focused on how the
U. S. economy is holding up, ” said
Quincy Krosby, a market strategist at
Prudential Financial.
While Greece has been the main
driver in financial markets recent
weeks, worries over China have risen
the list of concerns. On Friday,
Chinese stocks plunged more than 7
percent. The Shanghai composite
closed at 4, 391. 91. It reached 5, 300
just two weeks ago.
“Although I continue to be optimistic about the longer-term trend of

(China’s) markets, it’s clear that we
are in a sharp correction phase, ” said
Bernard Aw of IG Markets in
Singapore.
In energy trading, the price of oil
was nearly flat Friday. It finished the
week little changed, and remained in
a narrow range for the ninth straight
week. Benchmark U. S. crude fell 7
cents to close at $59. 63 a barrel in
New York.
Oil finished last week at $59. 61
and it has traded roughly between
$57 and $61 since late April. Brent
crude, a benchmark for international
oils used by many U. S. refineries,
rose 6 cents to close at $63. 26 a barrel in London.
In other futures trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange, wholesale gasoline rose 1. 2 cents to close
at $2. 049 a gallon. Heating oil rose
0. 1 cents to close at $1. 863 a gallon
and natural gas fell 7. 7 cents to close
at $2. 773 per 1, 000 cubic feet.
Gold rose $1. 40 to $1, 173. 20 an
ounce. Silver fell 7 cents to $15. 73
an ounce and copper rose 2 cents to
$2. 64 a pound.
U. S. government bond prices fell.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note rose to 2. 48 percent from 2. 39
percent late Thursday.
In currency trading, the euro fell to
$1. 1161 while the dollar rose to
123. 85 Japanese yen.

Stock pickers push back against the index-fund wave
By Stan Choe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Is it worth it to pay a stock
picker when index mutual funds are so
cheap?
More investors are saying no, and billions of dollars are jumping onto the indexfund bandwagon by the month. Billions are
leaving actively managed mutual funds at
the same time. It was against that backdrop
that several high-profile stock pickers
made their case at the Morningstar
Investment Conference in Chicago this
week. Two of the conference’s main discussion panels addressed whether stock picking is dead, as Morningstar released a report
showing that the majority of actively managed stock funds fall short of index-fund
peers.
“Active management has lost its voice a

little bit, and we want people to remember
what it’s about,” said Rob Lovelace, president of Capital Research and Management
and a portfolio manager at American Funds,
the industry’s third-largest fund family.
American Funds has been an exception
among actively managed funds and has
drawn new investment over the last year.
“The debate isn’t active versus passive,”
he said. “Our goals are all the same.”
Index funds and actively managed funds
can be potential complements, rather than
just an either/or proposition, stock pickers
say. The benefits of index stock funds are
widely appreciated: They charge an average
fee of $11 per $10,000, versus $86 for
actively managed stock funds, and lower
costs mean investors keep more of the
returns.
Stock pickers say the difficulty for them
is that they typically best demonstrate

their worth when the market tumbles -- a
rarity since the stock market has roughly
tripled since hitting its bottom in early
2009. In a downturn, active managers say
they can avoid the worst-performing
stocks and help cushion the blow of a bear
market.
Of course, actively managed funds didn’t
do so well in 2008. That’s because the
financial crisis brought down all sectors of
the stock market together, along with
economies around the world. That makes it
an exception, Lovelace said. In 10 of the
last 12 bear markets, he said American
Funds did better than index funds. In 2000,
for example, American Funds’ Growth Fund
of America returned 7.5 percent, when the
Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 9.1 percent.
The hope is that by blunting the pain of
down markets, actively managed funds can

help investors resist the temptation to
abandon stocks and sell low. That would
help them lock in better returns over the
long term.
To be sure, most actively managed funds
have produced lower returns over the last
decade than index funds. That may be
because many are built very similarly to
index funds, and the only difference
between these “closet indexers” and index
funds is their higher fees, said Diana
Strandberg, director of international equity
for Dodge & Cox, which runs actively managed funds
That’s why even stock pickers are
embracing the focus on low fees that’s
sweeping the mutual-fund industry.
Lovelace suggested investors look not only
for funds with low fees and strong track
records but also those in which the managers invest their own money in the fund.

Survey: Consumer sentiment up to highest level since January
By Paul Wiseman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Consumer sentiment
rose this month to the highest level since
January, suggesting that spending will
strengthen this year.
The University of Michigan says its
consumer sentiment index rose to 96.1
this month from 90.7 in May. The June
reading was the highest since January’s

98.1. The index is up from 82.5 a year ago.
For the first six months of 2015, consumer optimism improved at the fastest
pace since 2004, three years before the
Great Recession, said Richard Curtin,
chief economist for the Michigan survey.
“An improving economy was the most
important component,” Curtin said.
He said the readings are consistent with
a 3 percent increase in consumer spending
this year. That would be the fastest pace

since 2006. The Commerce Department
reported this week that consumer spending
rose at an annual pace of 2.1 percent from
January through March.
“Aft er a s o ft s t art t o t h e y ear, we
expect the economy to find its footing
in the coming months with stronger
consumer spending seen to be a key
dri v er o f accel erat i n g (eco n o mi c)
growth, ” Gregory Daco, head of U. S.
macroeconomics at Oxford Economics,

wrote in a research note.
Americans at all income levels registered improving optimism.
The optimism reflects a strong job market. Employers have been adding jobs —
nearly 3.1 million over the past year — at
a pace not seen since the boom years of
the late 1990s. Unemployment stood at
5.5 percent in May, down from 6.3 percent
a year earlier. Wages have been slower to
improve.

A ROYAL PAIN: KANSAS CITY SNAPS OAKLAND’S FIVE-GAME WIN STREAK >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 12, Giants can’t
erase big Colorado lead
Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

One is enough for U.S.
Lloyd’s second-half goal sends Americans into World Cup semis

Half Moon Bay
wins the 50/70
District 52 title
Hosts Sec. 3 tourney July 5-7

By Anne M. Peterson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

OTTAWA, Ontario — Carli Lloyd finally
was able to express her creativity on field.
Aided by tweaks in the lineup, the 32year-old midfielder was able to roam more
Friday night, scoring for the United States
in a 1-0 victory over China that sent the
Americans to the semifinals of the Women’s
World Cup against Germany.
“These are the moments I live for,” she
said of her goal on a 51st-minute header.
“Having the freedom to attack and do what I
do best enabled me to create some chances.
Just overall so happy we got the win — and
on to the semifinal.”
Hope Solo had her fourth straight shutout
for the second-ranked United States, which
has reached the final four of all seven
Women’s World Cups but has not won since
beating China on penalty kicks for the
1999 title at the Rose Bowl.
Seeking their third world championship,
the Americans have not allowed a goal in
423 minutes since this year’s tournament
opener against Australia. Solo set a record
for a U.S. goalkeeper with her 134th win,
passing Briana Scurry.
The U.S. plays top-ranked Germany, the
2003 and ’07 champion, on Tuesday in
Montreal.
Despite missing midfielders Megan
Rapinoe and Lauren Holiday, who were suspended for yellow card accumulation, the
U.S. managed a more attacking attitude and
extended its unbeaten streak against China
to 25 matches dating to 2003.
“I think it was a highly energized performance,” U.S. coach Jill Ellis said. “I
thought we took care of the ball well, still
created a lot of opportunities. So, yeah,
we’re really pleased.”
Morgan Brian replaced Holiday in the

See SOCCER, Page 14

MICHAEL CHOW/USA TODAY SPORTS

Americans Morgan Brian, right, and Julie Johnston, left, defend China’s Wang Shanshan
during a 1-0 U.S. win to advance to the semifinals of the Women’s World Cup.

Half Moon Bay Little League figured if it was
going to host the Little League Intermediate
Section 3 all-star tournament, it may as well
have its league represent District 52.
Half Moon Bay will be the host team as it
defeated Redwood City in the winner-take-all
finale of the District 52 Intermediate All-Star
tournament at Smith Field in Half Moon Bay
Wednesday.
The Section 3 tournament begins July 5,
running through July 7, also at Smith Field.
The intermediate category is a recent Little
League development, holding the inaugural
intermediate world series only two years ago
in Livermore. The intermediate category is
designed for ages 11 to 13 and is a step
between the smaller dimensions of the majors
field — which features 50-foot base paths and
a pitching distance of 43 feet — and the regulation fields used by the older players of 90foot base paths and 60 feet, 6 inches pitching
distance.
In the intermediate game, pitchers throw
from 50 feet and the base paths are 70 feet.
This is the first year District 52 held an intermediate tournament, which was created by a
number of factors, the biggest being Redwood
City deciding to forgo a juniors program this
year and instead fielding a six-team intermediate league.
Half Moon Bay followed suit, as did San
Mateo National and American, MenloAtherton, Palo Alto (for only part of the season) and Alpine.
The District 52 tournament featured Half
Moon Bay, Redwood City, Menlo-Atherton
and a combined San Mateo team. Half Moon
Bay won its first two games —  beating
Redwood City 13-3 in the winner’s bracket
final — to advance to the championship
round.

See HMB, Page 15

Allmendinger looking to pounce
on NASCAR’s first road course
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SONOMA — AJ Allmendinger
knows the stakes on Sunday: Win
on the road course at Sonoma
Raceway and he earns a spot in
NASCAR’s championship race.
The year-old qualifying format
almost guarantees a race winner a
spot in the Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship field, which
Allmendinger capitalized last season. His win at Watkins Glen
earned the driver and JTG
Daughtery Racing their first Chase
berth and was the crowning
achievement for one of NASCAR’s

A.J.
Allmendinger

smaller teams.
Allmendinger,
one of the top
road racers in
NASCAR,
is
hoping for the
same outcome
this year. His
first shot comes
Sunday on the
p i c t ur e s que
1.99-mile track

California track.
“I know the format — if you win,
you’re in the Chase,” Allmendinger
said Friday. “I know what the prize
is. I know if you win, you make the

Chase, and that’s so important. But
I try not to focus on putting the
pressure on that this race is do or
die, or Watkins Glen is do or die.”
Statistically, road courses are
Allmendinger’s best events.
His 13.6 average finish at
Sonoma and Watkins Glen is nearly
eight positions better than any
other style of track in the series,
and two of his seven career top-five
finishes are at Watkins Glen. His
Sonoma results aren’t as strong,
but he’s considered a driver capable
of winning by his competitors.

JEROME MIRON/USA TODAY SPORTS

See NASCAR, Page 14

A.J. Allmendinger, a Los Gatos native, is one of NASCAR’s best road-course
drivers, making him a favorite at the Savemart 350 in Sonoma Sunday.

12

SPORTS

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

Late Giants rally falls short
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Nolan Arenado hit a
pair of home runs and had four RBIs, Carlos
Gonzalez matched his career high with five
hits and the Colorado Rockies held on to
beat the San Francisco Giants 8-6 on Friday
night.
Ben Paulsen had three hits and added a
two-run single for the Rockies, who won
their fifth in six games after losing eight of
nine.
Chad Bettis (4-2) won his second start
despite giving up his fourth home run in his
past 17 1/3 innings. He did not give up a
homer in his first 38 1/3 innings. Bettis
allowed three runs and six hits over six
innings, and walked two and struck out
three.
Andrew Susac homered and Brandon Belt
and Brandon Crawford each drove in a run
for the Giants, who have lost three of their
last five.
Tim Hudson (5-7) took a shutout into the
sixth inning, but Arenado’s 21st home run
ended it. Arenado set a single-season career
high with 64 RBIs.
The Giants scored three times in the ninth
against Tommy Kahnle to make things
interesting. Three walks, a passed ball and
RBI singles by Gregor Blanco and Joe
Panik cut the deficit to two runs before
Kahnle struck out Matt Duffy and Buster
Posey, both on full counts.
Gonzalez, who was resting a sore hand,
doubled in a run in the seventh against
Javier Lopez, who replaced Hudson and
Paulsen singled home two runs. Gonzalez, a
home run shy of the cycle, recorded his 20th
career game of at least four hits.
Arenado (13), Troy Tulowitzki (10) and
Charlie Blackmon (10) each extended hitting streaks, the three longest active
streaks in the NL. Tulowitzki has hit safely
in 22 of 23 games and has reached base in
each of his last 25 games.

Trainer’s room
Ro cki es : Left-hander Jorge De La Rosa,
who left Thursday night’s game with a cut
on his left middle finger, said he should
make his next start. “His finger looks a lot
better than it did 24 hours ago,” Rockies

Rockies 8, Giants 6
Colorado ab
Blckmn cf 5
LeMahi 2b 5
Tlwtzk ss 4
CGnzlz rf 5
Arenad 3b 4
Paulsn 1b 5
Hundly c 5
BBarns lf 5
Bettis p
2
Descals ph 1
Betncrt p 0
WRosr ph 1
Oberg p 0
Logan p
0
Kahnle p 0
Totals

r
1
0
2
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

h
1
0
2
5
2
3
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

bi
0
0
0
1
4
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

42 8 17 7

Giants
GBlanc cf
Panik 2b
MDuffy 3b
Posey 1b
Belt lf
BCrwfr ss
Susac c
Maxwll rf
THudsn p
Lopez p
Kontos p
McGeh ph
Brodwy p
Machi p
Ishikaw ph
Totals

ab
5
4
5
4
4
3
4
3
2
0
0
1
0
0
0

r
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

h
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

bi
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

35 6 9 5

Colorado
000 003 302 — 8 17 0
San Francisco 000 012 003 — 6 9 0
DP—Colorado 1, San Francisco 1. LOB—Colorado
9, San Francisco 7. 2B—Ca.Gonzalez (11), Panik (20).
3B—Ca.Gonzalez (1). HR—Arenado 2 (22), Susac (2).
CS—Hundley (5).
Colorado
Bettis W,4-2
Betancourt H,7
Oberg H,7 2-3
Logan H,13 1-3
Kahnle
San Francisco
T.Hudson L,5-7
Lopez
Kontos
Broadway
Machi

IP H
6
6
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
IP H
6 2-3 10
0
2
1-3 0
1 2-3 4
1-3 1

R
3
0
0
0
3
R
5
1
0
2
0

ER
3
0
0
0
3
ER
5
1
0
2
0

BB
2
0
0
0
3
BB
1
1
0
0
0

SO
3
2
2
SO
6
0
0
0
0

Lopez pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.

manager Walt Weiss said. “The next few
days will tell.” ... Gonzalez (mild hand
sprain) made his first start since Sunday.
Gi ants : Outfielder Angel Pagan bruised
his left knee running into the outfield wall.
He was not available for the game and was
scheduled for an MRI. ... Left-hander Jeremy
Affeldt went on the disabled list with a left
shoulder sprain. ... Right-hander Matt Cain
threw his final rehab start and will likely
take his spot in the rotation next week.

Up next
Ro cki es : Left-hander Chris Rusin (3-2,
5.03) threw seven shutout innings last year
in his only career start against the Giants.
He’s 4-7 with a 5.10 ERA in 19 games on
the road.
Gi ants : Right-hander Tim Lincecum (74, 3.86) is coming off the shortest outing
of his career, 1 1/3 innings against the Los
Angeles Dodgers last Sunday. He’s 11-10
with a 3.96 ERA in 29 starts against the
Rockies.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Baseball briefs
Mets moving to six-man
rotation for ’foreseeable future’
NEW YORK — Highly touted Steven Matz
is set to join the New York Mets this weekend as part of their plan to return to a sixman rotation for the “foreseeable future.”
General manager Sandy Alderson made the
announcement before the Mets hosted
Cincinnati on Friday night. He said he
expected the shift to six starters “will continue for a period of time.”
Matz will join a talented rotation that
includes Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom,
Bartolo Colon, Noah Syndergaard and Jon
Niese. Alderson said the Mets want to avoid
overworking their mostly young staff and
manage their innings.
Matz is ready to make his major league
debut Sunday against the Reds. The 24-yearold lefty from Long Island leads the TripleA Pacific Coast League in ERA, strikeouts
and innings, and is tied for the most wins.
In each of the two previous seasons in the
minors, Matz won the clinching game of
league championships.
Earlier this month, the Mets abandoned
their try at a six-man rotation after just one
turn through starters and wound up sending
Dillon Gee to the minors.
Alderson said the move back to six
starters was no secret to the staff.
“This arrangement has been discussed
with the other five pitchers,” he said. “I
think they understand it’s in their interest.”
Alderson said off-days would not factor
into when pitchers worked, and that keeping to a six-man rotation would be “as strict
as we can make it, in the near term.”

Ryne Sandberg resigns as
Philadelphia Phillies manager
PHILADELPHIA — Ryne Sandberg has

resigned as Phillies manager in his third
season as Philadelphia struggles with the
worst record in the major leagues.
Sandberg quit Friday with a 119-159
career record over parts of three seasons
leading Philadelphia. His only full season
was in 2014, when the Phillies finished
with a 73-89 record.
Third base coach Pete Mackanin will take
over as interim manager.
The Phillies have a 26-48 record going
into a game Friday against first-place
Washington.
Philadelphia
trails
Washington by 14 1/2 games in the NL
East.
The 55-year-old is a Hall of Fame second
baseman, having played 15 seasons with
the Cubs and one with the Phillies.
Philadelphia was his first management job.
Philadelphia had low expectations this
season, with little to no chance of contending and big challenges surrounding moving
high priced players like pitcher Cole
Hamels and first baseman Ryan Howard.

Fielder hits 300th career home run
TORONTO — Texas slugger Prince Fielder
has joined his dad Cecil in the 300-homer
club, making them the second father-son
duo to reach the plateau along with Barry
and Bobby Bonds.
Prince Fielder homered in the first inning
of the Rangers game at the Toronto Blue
Jays on Friday night.
Cecil Fielder hit 319 home runs in a 13year career with Toronto, Detroit, New
York, Anaheim and Cleveland.
Barry Bonds is the career home run leader
with 762. Bobby Bonds connected 332
times in a 14-year career that ended in 1981.
With Friday’s homer, Prince Fielder
moved into a tie with Chuck Klein for 137th
on the career list.

Track brief
Gay, Bowie capture 100 titles at nationals
EUGENE, Ore. — Tyson Gay was going so fast through the
finish line that he nearly ran out of track to apply the brakes,
sidestepping cameramen to avoid a nasty collision.
That kind of closing speed was necessary to catch the kid
in the lane next to him.
Gay fell behind early only to make up ground in a hurry on
Baylor standout Trayvon Bromell to win the 100 meters at
the U.S. championships on a scorching Friday night.
“Man, that kid is tough,” Gay said about the 19-year-old
Bromell. “He got out good and I had one of those 10-yearsof-experience, dig-down moments.”
The 32-year-old Gay finished in 9.87 seconds to secure a
spot at the world championships in Beijing this summer.
Michael Rodgers was third to also make the world team
along with Justin Gatlin, who didn’t compete because he had
an automatic bye courtesy of his Diamond League title.
In the women’s 100, Tori Bowie used a late surge to sneak
by English Gardner, taking the crown in 10.81. Oregon star
Jasmine Todd wound up third. Carmelita Jeter, who’s working her way back from a quadriceps injury, was seventh.
Gay hasn’t competed at worlds since 2009. He missed the
2011 competition with a hip injury and qualified in 2013,
but withdrew after failing a drug test that resulted in a oneyear suspension.
He returned last summer and has been making changes ever
since, switching coaches and coasts as he moved from
Florida to California. He wears his hair longer and has a new
sponsor in Nike.
The one thing he can’t change? His perception after his
doping suspension.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Royals snap A’s win streak
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Kendrys Morales and Alex
Gordon homered to back Edinson Volquez,
and the Kansas City Royals beat the
Oakland Athletics 5-2 on Friday night.
Unlike when these two teams met in
April, when there were bench-clearing scuffles in all three games, there were no signs
of lingering animosity. A few players from
both clubs exchanged hugs and handshakes
before the game, and both managers downplayed talk of any carry-over effect.
Instead the Royals rode the power of
Morales and Gordon, and got another
strong outing from Volquez.
Pitching against the A’s for the first time
since 2007, Volquez (8-4) gave up three hits
and one run in seven innings. Volquez also
reached 1,000 strikeouts for his career when
he fanned Brett Lawrie in the sixth.
Sam Fuld had an RBI double for Oakland,
which had its five-game win streak
snapped.
Greg Holland retired two batters for his
15th save.
It was these teams’ first meeting since

that wild series in April.
Lawrie was at the center of much of it
when the teams played in Kansas City. His
hard slide into second base knocked Royals
shortstop Alcides Escobar out of the first
game. Two days later, Kansas City reliever
Kelvin Herrera was ejected after throwing a
100-mph fastball behind Lawrie.
Herrera was booed heavily when he
entered Friday’s game but pitched the eighth
without incident.
Franklin Morales hit Oakland catcher
Stephen Vogt with a pitch in the ninth.
Beyond that, there was nothing to suggest
there was any animosity left between the
teams. Oakland slugger Billy Butler hugged
former teammate Eric Hosmer behind home
plate during batting practice, and both managers were reluctant to even discuss the incident.
“Nobody on my team has even mentioned
it or thought about it, and I doubt very seriously anybody over there has,” Royals
manager Ned Yost said before the game.
“There’s been a lot of time since that series
and a lot of water under the bridge.”
Morales homered off A’s starter Jesse
Hahn in the second, his ninth of the season.

Lorenzo Cain’s two-out single in the third
made it 2-0, and Hosmer followed with an
infield single to drive in Escobar. Oakland
first baseman Ike Davis fielded Hosmer’s
grounder but made a botched flip to Hahn (56) covering first base for an error, allowing
Cain to score from second.
Fuld doubled in Marcus Semien in the
third. Ben Zobrist added an RBI double for
Oakland off Franklin Morales in the ninth.
Gordon hit his ninth homer with two outs
in the sixth.
Hahn allowed five runs and nine hits in
six innings. He struck out five and walked
one.

Up next
Ro y al s : RHP Chris Young (6-3) starts
the middle game of the series and is coming
off his worst outing of the season, when he
gave up seven runs in 4 2-3 innings against
Boston.
Athl eti cs : LHP Scott Kazmir (4-4) has a
1.27 ERA in six starts at the Coliseum this
season, the lowest mark at home in the
majors.

13

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

Royals 5, A’s 2
Kansas City abr
Escobar ss 5 1
Moustakas 3b4 0
L.Cain cf 4 1
Hosmer 1b 5 0
Morales dh 3 1
A.Gordon lf 3 1
S.Perez c 4 0
Rios rf
4 1
Infante 2b 4 0

Totals

h
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1

bi
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0

Oakland
Sogard 2b
Lawrie 3b
Vogt c
Phegley pr
Zobrist lf
Reddick rf
B.Butler dh
I.Davis 1b
Semien ss
Fuld cf

36 5 11 4

Kansas City
Oakland

Totals

ab
4
4
3
0
3
4
4
3
3
3

r
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0

h
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1

bi
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1

31 2 4 2

013 001 000 — 5 11 1
001 000 001 — 2 4 1

E—Infante (4), I.Davis (4). DP—Oakland 2. LOB—
Kansas City 8, Oakland 4. 2B—S.Perez (12), Zobrist
(13), Fuld (10). HR—K.Morales (9), A.Gordon (9). SB—
Infante (1).
Kansas City
IP H
Volquez W,8-4 7
3
K.Herrera
1
0
F.Morales
1-3 1
G.Holland S,15-16 2-3 0
Oakland
IP H
Hahn L,5-6
6
9
Scribner
1
1
O’Flaherty
1-3 1
Fe.Rodriguez
1 2-3 0

R
1
0
1
0
R
5
0
0
0

ER
1
0
1
0
ER
3
0
0
0

BB
1
0
0
0
BB
1
0
1
2

SO
3
1
0
1
SO
5
2
0
0

HBP—by F.Morales (Vogt). PB—Vogt.
Umpires—Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Fieldin Culbreth;
Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Manny Gonzalez.
T—2:51. A—27,365 (35,067).

Three tied for lead at U.S. Senior Open
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Tom Watson still gets
quite a thrill seeing his name atop the leaderboard.
Maybe even more at age 65.
Watson withstood the scorching heat to
shoot a 1-under 69 on Friday, finishing in a
three-way tie atop the bunched leaderboard after
the second round of the U.S. Senior Open.
“The illusion that I can still do it,” Watson
said when asked what keeps him playing competitive golf. “I don’t have the tools in the toolbox I used to have. They’re missing. Some of
the tools are missing. And so it’s getting more
and more difficult for me to compete, but I still
feel as if I can somehow get it done.”
Sure seems that way so far in Sacramento.
Watson was joined at 5 under for the championship by Jeff Maggert and Peter Fowler.
Maggert shot a 65, and Fowler a 66 in their
morning rounds.
But all the attention turned to the Hall of
Famer heating up in the sizzling sunshine.
Watson made four birdies and three bogeys to
provide the drama at sun-drenched Del Paso
Country Club, where the temperature soared

above 100 degrees again. Watson is trying to
become the oldest winner of the event, the oldest to win a senior major and the oldest to win
on the Champions Tour.
“To hit a shot under pressure that’s really a
good golf shot is why I’m out here,” Watson
said. “That’s what I like to do. And when I get to
the point where I can’t do it or I can’t do it often
enough to really satisfy myself, then I won’t be
out here.”
It’s the fourth time Watson has held or shared
the lead through 36 holes at the U.S. Senior
Open. He has never won the event, which is in
its 36th year.
A victory would be the exclamation point to
his storied career.
Watson will play in his final British Open
next month at St. Andrews. He’s the only man to
claim the claret jug on five courses — but never
at St. Andrews — and suddenly seems ready to be
more than a feel-good story at the Old Course.
If he can sweat out the competition at Del
Paso, Watson would be the oldest player to ever
win such an event.
Allen Doyle was 57 when he won the U.S.
Senior Open in 2006. Jock Hutchison was 62
when he won the Senior PGA Championship in

1947, and Mike Fetchick was 63 when he captured the Hilton Head Seniors Invitational in
1985.
“Not surprising. I don’t know what else to say
about it,” said Rocco Mediate, who is at 2 under
after a second-round 66. “He’s got very much
control of his golf ball.”
Watson will have plenty of competition this
weekend. Defending champion Colin
Montgomerie (68), Bart Bryan (65) and Jim
Carter (69) are all at 4 under, and several others

are within striking distance.
The forecast highs are in the low 90s for
Saturday and Sunday, with increasing wind. But
neither the course nor the conditions have
caused Watson much trouble.
In his opening round Thursday, Watson took
advantage of the cooler morning conditions to
shoot a 66. When he teed off Friday afternoon,
the temperature was about 25 degrees warmer
with almost no wind and climbed to 102 degrees
in the afternoon.

14

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

SPORTS

Germany beats France in SOCCER
PKs to advance to semis
Continued from page 11

By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MONTREAL — Germany coach Silvia Neid
needed five volunteers for the shootout that
could beat France and put the two-time
Women’s World Cup champions into the semifinals.
She got four.
Some of her players were looking down at
their shoes. Others were on the bench, nursing
the wounds they picked up during 120 minutes
of physical play on artificial turf that left
France’s Kheira Hamraoui on the sideline, her
face soaked in blood, begging to get back into
the game.
Midfielder Dzsenifer Marozsan, who had
twisted an ankle, said she would try.
“I don’t know how she did it, to walk up to the
spot,” Neid recalled with amazement. “I said,
‘Oh, my goodness. If we have to continue,
somebody has to go.”’
All five Germans converted, then Nadine
Angerer stopped Claire Lavogez on the final
shootout attempt and Germany beat France 5-4
on penalty kicks after a 1-1 tie Friday.
“France is an extremely good team. We all
saw it,” said Neid, whose team will play the
United States in the semifinals on Tuesday.
“We had to play for 120 minutes today, and
we will have to rest. We have some injured players,” she said. “But we are among the best four
teams in the world, and maybe there is some
more life left in us.”
Celia Sasic tied the score in the 84th minute,
and Angerer stopped the one shootout attempt
top-ranked Germany needed for its first World
Cup win on penalty kicks. The 2003 and ’07
champions have a chance to add another trophy
after their win over No. 3 France in a match that
was seen as an “early final.”
Louisa Necib put France ahead in the 64th
minute as Les Bleues controlled the first half
and more. But Sasic scored the equalizer — her
tournament-leading sixth goal — on a penalty
kick after a hand ball, and then converted in the
shootout as well to give Germany the edge.
“I think our team has proven its character.
Because you have to flip that switch in the second half, and we did that extremely well,” Neid
said. “And then we had Nadine Angerer, who can
hold a penalty kick.”
The match remained scoreless until French
defender Jessica Hourara lofted the ball in from
midfield to the penalty area, where Germany’s
Babett Peter was waiting. She headed it away
from the goal but right to Necib, whose shot
from just outside the area was deflected to the

ERIC BOLTE/USA TODAY SPORTS

Germany goalkeeper Nadine Angerer makes
a save on the final penalty kick to defeat
France during a quarterfinal shootout.
right of Angerer’s outstretched hand and into
the net.
Germany tried to respond with physical play,
and Lena Goessling and Dzsenifer Morozsan
were given yellow cards in the 68th minute. But
it could not muster an attack until the 84th, after
Leonie Maier kicked the ball off defender Amel
Majri’s raised arm just inside the penalty area.
Sasic booted the spot kick to Sarah
Bouhaddi’s right when the keeper guessed left.
The Germans have been awarded 12 penalty
kicks in World Cup play and converted them all.
And the Germans made it 17 for 17 in the
shootout.
With Germany shooting first, Melanie
Behringer, Simone Laudehr, Peter and
Marozsan all converted kicks for the Germans,
and Gaetane Thiney, Camille Abily, Necib and
Wendie Renard tied the score for France.
Sasic put the Germans back ahead and
Lavogez, at 21 France’s third-youngest player,
ran up to the spot and kicked the ball to the
Angerer’s left. The 2013 FIFA Women’s Player
of the Year — the first goalkeeper, male or
female, to win the honor — dove and blocked
the ball with her left knee, setting off a German
celebration in this French-speaking city.
“We sang a few songs; we were happy to have
made it one match further,” Angerer said. “We
didn’t go overboard. We weren’t dancing on the
chairs or tables. But, yes, we were happy. It was
a very intense game, and I was extremely elated
along with the rest of the team.”
Germany will be back for a semifinal at
Montreal’s Olympic Stadium, where the East
German men won the 1976 gold medal.

middle with Lloyd, with Tobin Heath and
Kelley O’Hara — making her first start since
March — the flanks. Amy Rodriguez started
up top with Alex Morgan, injecting more
pace, while 35-year-old Abby Wambach, the
record-holder for goals in women’s international soccer, did not enter until the 86th
minute.
The move to put Morgan in the middle
allowed Lloyd to move up, giving her more
room to roam and be creative.
Wearing the captain’s armband, Lloyd got
the breakthrough with her 65th goal in 200
international appearances. Julie Johnston
lofted a long ball into the penalty area and
Lloyd met it with her head 10 yards from the
goal line and bounced the ball off the artificial turf and past goalkeeper Fei Wang.
That brought cheers from the overwhelmingly pro-American crowd of 24,141 at
Lansdowne Stadium.
“I don’t just want to be a participant in the
World Cup,” Lloyd said. “I want to have a
legacy. I want to have people remember me,
and let my play do the talking.”
Morgan, who started in her third straight
match after recovering from a bone bruise,
said Lloyd’s play helped spark the whole
team.
“I really liked getting a central midfielder
up on the field,” Morgan said. “She took
that opportunity and ran with it.”
Lloyd scored the winning goal in overtime to beat Brazil for the gold medal in the
2008 Beijing Olympics and scored both
U.S. goals in the 2012 London final over
Japan.
In the opening half, the best American
chance was by Johnston in the 26th minute
that was cleared in front of an open net by
defender Li Dongna. Johnston also had a
header off a corner kick in the 31st minute

THE DAILY JOURNAL
that popped over the crossbar.
Wambach was impassioned in her plea for
a goal as the United States came out of the
break.
“One of my teammates had to move away
from me because I’m obnoxious on the
bench, screaming and yelling for my teammates,” she said. “Super proud of Carli and
Hope today. For some reason, I knew today
was going to be a day for Carli to show up.”
Brian had a chance to double the lead in
the 73rd, but her long strike hit a post, and
Lloyd missed high on the rebound.
The U.S. had a 17-6 advantage in shots
and 56 percent possession, creating more
chances than in the 2-0 round-of-16 win
over Colombia.
China coach Hao Wei took responsibility
for the team’s loss, saying through a translator he could have used better tactics.
“They did an excellent in in Canada,” he
said about his team, which failed to qualify
for the 2011 tournament and has not
advanced past the quarterfinals since 1999.
“I hope that they can carry on the good work
and make a greater contribution to soccer in
China.”
In Saturday’s quarterfinals, host Canada
faces England and Australia plays defending
champion Japan.
The Americans face a considerable challenge in Germany, which lost to Japan in
overtime in the 2011 quarter. Germany
advanced earlier by beating France 5-4 on
penalty kicks after a 1-1 tie. The United
States has an 18-4-7 overall record against
the Germans, including a 3-2 advantage in
World Cup matches.
“We’re going back to the drawing board,
because for every stage as this tournament
goes on, it’s a new tournament,” Wambach
said. “In order to get to the final, we’re
going to have to play impeccable soccer.”

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

HMB
Continued from page 11
Redwood City, which knocked off MenloAtherton in the consolation bracket final to
move into the championship series, beat Half
Moon Bay in Game 1, 11-5.
Half Moon Bay, which needed to be defeated
twice to be denied the title, rebounded to beat
Redwood City in the tournament finale, 14-8, to
punch its ticket to the Section 3 tournament.
Making Half Moon Bay’s accomplishment
even more surprising is the fact it did it without
manager Patrick Murphy, who was called away
to Austria on an emergency business trip the day
before the championship round.
Instead, it was assistant coach Demetrius
Nogara who led Half Moon Bay to its tournament-clinching win.
Well, Luca Padua had a hand in it too with a
pair of monster games against Redwood City. In
the two championship games, Padua combined
to go 6 for 8 at the plate, with six RBIs, five
runs scored, three singles, two stolen bases, a
double and a home run.
In the championship series opener, Padua
scored three of Half Moon Bay’s five runs,

going 3 for 4 with three singles, two stolen
bases and an RBI.
In the winner-take-all finale, Padua was even
better. He gave Half Moon Bay a quick 2-0 lead
with a two-run homer in the bottom of the first
inning. He stroked a two-run double during Half
Moon Bay’s eight-run fourth and capped his day
with a RBI double in the sixth.
Spencer Ladd also hit a homer in Half Moon
Bay’s 14-8 victory.
The Redwood City combination of Eric
Anchartechahar and Kevin Alarcon was almost
enough to offset Padua’s performance.
Anchartechahar, Redwood City’s leadoff hitter, was on base in six of his nine plate appearances, scoring three runs.
Alarcon reached base in six of his eight plate
appearances over the two-game championship
series. He was officially 3 for 3, but also walked
three times in two games. He blasted a home run
in each.
“It was a good tournament,” said Half Moon
Bay president Steve Stack. “All the teams were
evenly matched.”
For Section 3 Intermediate All-Star
Tournament bracket information, go to
http://cadistrict.52.org, click on the
“tournament brackets” button on the left side of
the page and click on the “Section” button.

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

NASCAR
Continued from page 11
Jeff Gordon, the all-time wins leader at
Sonoma with five, cited Allmendinger’s
impressive victory over Marcos Ambrose at
Watkins Glen last August as evidence that
Allmendinger is one of the best in the field.
“He outran Marcos at Watkins Glen last year,
which I thought was extremely impressive
because I had been racing with Marcos that
weekend ... and he was strong, he was really
tough and I didn’t think anybody was able to
beat him,” Gordon said. “The fact that AJ did
shows what his talents are on a road course.”
But Gordon believes that Allmendinger will
have to adjust his driving style to grab the win
on Sunday. Allmendinger is considered an
aggressive driver, and that style doesn’t always
work at Sonoma.
“Nobody drives in the corners deeper than AJ
does,” Gordon said. “I think that at Watkins
Glen that way of attacking the racetrack is very
beneficial and definitely puts good lap times
together and is tough to beat. Here I think there
is a fine line and balance between that. I think
AJ has the skills to be the fastest and the best

here this weekend, certainly in qualifying. Then
it’s going to come down to executing that in the
race. I would say he is the guy to beat.”
Allmendinger needs it: He comes into
Sonoma in a four-race slump with finishes
between 23rd and 29th since the Coca-Cola 600
in May. When he qualified for the Chase a year
ago, he admitted JTG needed to get much better
if they had any shot of competing in the 16driver championship field.
He still believes that, even though the singlecar team has made gains over the last year.
“I think we’ve improved,” Allmendinger said,
“and everybody else improved more. That’s
kind of the nature with a smaller team is you’re
always trying to play catch-up a little bit.”
Allmendinger opened the season strong and
was as high as fifth in the standings, but a lack
of consistency and chasing NASCAR’s powerhouse teams has him in a hole that he’d like to
climb from more than grab a win in a wild-card
race.
“We had a couple of DNF’s and we blew some
motors a couple of weeks in a row. We crashed at
Bristol running inside the top 10,” he said. “I
wouldn’t say panic set it, but we started trying
different things. We know where we have to
improve. We have the steps in place and the
ideas in place, but it’s not an overnight process,
either.”

OPEN
Store Closing 
8]k\i*)p\Xij#fliJf%JXe=iXeZ`jZf
cfZXk`fe`jZcfj`e^%
('#'''Jh%=k%J_fniffdXe[)'#'''Jh%=k%fe$j`k\nXi\$
_flj\gXZb\[n`k_]lie`kli\Xe[dXkki\jj\j%
8ccdljkY\jfc[%9\[iffdJ\kj#GcXk]fid9\[j#9leb$9\[j#
JkfiX^\9\[j#Jf]Xˇj#J\Zk`feXcj#8ZZ\ekjXe[dfi\%

Saturday / Sunday
1 - 4 PM

1587 Roberta Drive, San Mateo
t/FX%FTJHOFE)PNFt/FX3PPGt/FX,JUDIFO
t(SBOJUF5PQTt4UBJOMFTT"QQMJBODFTt/FX#BUIT
t/FX'MPPSTt8JOF$PPMFSt/FX-BOETDBQF
t/FX'VSOBODFt(BT'JSFQMBDFt/FX%PPST
t6OCFMJFWBCMF#S#BUIt/FX1BJOU*O0VU

<M<IPK?@E>DLJK9<JFC;

t#SBOE/FX:S.BTUFSQJFDF

$1,099,000
Bill Mott

9<;IFFD<OGI<JJ
(/+<c:Xd`efI\Xc#Jf%JXe=iXeZ`jZf

Realtor/Mentor

-,'%,/*%)))(

ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE

O: 650.489.0027
C: 650.888.9906

650-322-9288

FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®

SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS

FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED

LIGHTING / POWER

LOCALLY TRAINED

FIRE ALARM / DATA

EXPERIENCED

GREEN ENERGY

ON CALL 24/7

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

15

#00344774

16

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

Exhibitor space and sponsorships available!
Call 650-344-5200

+VMZ BNQN
8BTIJOHUPO1BSL 
#VSMJOHBNF"WFOVF #VSMJOHBNF
t.BHJD4IPX
t.BSUJBM"SUTEFNPOTUSBUJPO 
CZ(PME.FEBM.BSUJBM"SUT

t.BSJPOFUUF1VQQFU4IPX
t*OnBUBCMF0CTUBDMF$PVSTF
t+VHHMJOH4IPXBOE-FTTPOT
t&MFNFOUT#PPU$BNQBOE 
&YFSDJTF4UBUJPOT 
(FUUIFXIPMFGBNJMZNPWJOH

t'PPE7FOEPST

For information call the Daily Journal (650) 344-5200
$PNQMFUFTDIFEVMFBUTNEBJMZKPVSOBMDPNGBNJMZGVOt&WFOUTTVCKFDUUPDIBOHF
Family. Fitness. Fun! is in collaboration with BCE, supporting Burlingame schools.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

McDavid goes No. 1 in NHL draft

AL GLANCE

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SUNRISE, Fla. — Connor
McDavid’s favorite hockey player
is Sidney Crosby. His favorite
non-skating athlete is LeBron
James.
He’s now in their club, forever
to be known as a No. 1 pick.
McDavid’s journey toward widely expected NHL superstardom
officially began Friday night when
the Edmonton Oilers grabbed him
with the top overall selection in
the draft. No player has entered the
league with such hype since
Crosby a decade ago, and
McDavid’s level of celebrity within the game already may rival what
James was dealing with when he
joined the NBA in 2003.
“It was even better than I expected,” McDavid said. “It’s so exciting to hear your name called. It
was unbelievable.”
Buffalo took Hobey Baker winner Jack Eichel of Boston

Local Sports Briefs
Randle to join Warriors’
summer league team
OAKLAND — Former Stanford
guard Chasson Randle has agreed
to join the Golden State Warriors
for the NBA’s Las Vegas summer
league.
Randle was a two-time All-Pac12 first-team selection in four
years at Stanford. He scored a
school-record 2,375 points, help-

University with the No. 2 pick,
another no-surprise move. Eichel
had 26 goals and 45 assists in 40
games this past season.
Arizona used the No. 3 pick on
center Dylan Strome — McDavid’s
teammate with the Ontario Hockey
League’s Erie Otters, finishing
this season with nine more points
but in 21 more games. Toronto
took Mitch Marner at No. 4, making it four straight centers to lead
off.
Defenseman Noah Hanifin went
No. 5 to Carolina, so with Eichel
that meant two U.S. players were
top-five picks for the first time
since 2007. Center Pavel Zacha
went sixth to New Jersey, defenseman Ivan Provorov seventh to
Philadelphia
and Columbus
grabbed
defenseman
Jack
Werenski with the eighth pick.
A pair of right wings rounded out
the top 10, Timo Meier to San
Jose and Mikko Rantanen to
Colorado.
ing the Cardinal win two NIT
championships and reach the
NCAA Tournament’s Sweet 16 in
2014.
Randle was not taken in
Thursday night’s draft, and his
chance of making the roster for
the newly crowned NBA champions is slim. But he could be a candidate to join the franchise’s NBA
Development League affiliate in
Santa Cruz next season.
The Las Vegas summer league
runs from July 10 to July 20.

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

W
Tampa Bay 41
New York
40
Baltimore
39
Toronto
40
Boston
33
Central Division
W
Kansas City 42
Minnesota 39
Detroit
38
Cleveland
33
Chicago
32
West Division
W
Houston
43
Los Angeles 37
Texas
37
Seattle
34
A’s
34

WOMEN’S WORLD CUP

NL GLANCE
East Division

East Division
L
34
34
34
35
42

Pct
.547
.541
.534
.533
.440

GB

1/2
1
1
8

L
28
34
36
39
41

Pct
.600
.534
.514
.458
.438

GB

4 1/2
6
10
11 1/2

L
33
37
37
40
42

Pct
.566
.500
.500
.459
.447

GB

5
5
8
9

Friday’s Games
Baltimore 4, Cleveland 3
Toronto 12, Texas 2
Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 4
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3, 10 innings
Milwaukee 10, Minnesota 4
N.Y. Yankees 3, Houston 2
Kansas City 5, Oakland 2
Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 1
Saturday’s Games
Texas (Gallardo 6-6) at Toronto (Undecided), 10:07
a.m.
Minnesota (Gibson 4-6) at Milwaukee (Garza 4-9),
11:10 a.m.
Kansas City (C.Young 6-3) at Oakland (Kazmir 4-4),
1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks 3-8) at Detroit (K.Ryan
1-1), 1:08 p.m.
Boston (Miley 7-6) at Tampa Bay (Andriese 2-2), 1:10
p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Tanaka 4-3) at Houston (Oberholtzer
2-1), 1:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Co.Anderson 0-0) at Baltimore (Tillman
5-7), 4:15 p.m.
Seattle (Happ 3-4) at L.A. Angels (Richards 7-5), 4:15
p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Texas at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 10:08 a.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 10:10 a.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Houston, 11:10 a.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Texas at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.

W
Washington 41
New York
38
Atlanta
35
Miami
30
Philadelphia 26
Central Division
W
St. Louis
49
Pittsburgh 41
Chicago
39
Cincinnati 34
Milwaukee 28
West Division
W
Los Angeles 42
Giants
40
Arizona
35
San Diego 36
Colorado
33

17

L
33
37
39
45
49

Pct
.554
.507
.473
.400
.347

GB

3 1/2
6
11 1/2
15 1/2

L
24
32
33
38
47

Pct
.671
.562
.542
.472
.373

GB

8
9 1/2
14 1/2
22

L
33
35
38
40
40

Pct
.560
.533
.479
.474
.452

GB

2
6
6 1/2
8

Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 2, 10 innings
Washington 5, Philadelphia 2
N.Y. Mets 2, Cincinnati 1
L.A. Dodgers 7, Miami 1
Milwaukee 10, Minnesota 4
St. Louis 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 10 innings
San Diego 4, Arizona 2
Colorado 8, San Francisco 6
Saturday’s Games
Minnesota (Gibson 4-6) at Milwaukee (Garza 4-9),
11:10 a.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 5-4) at Philadelphia (Morgan 1-0), 12:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 5-3) at Pittsburgh (Morton 5-1),
1:05 p.m.
Colorado (Rusin 3-2) at San Francisco (Lincecum 74), 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Lorenzen 3-2) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 7-5),
1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-5) at Miami (Koehler 5-4),
1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Roach 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 9-3),
4:15 p.m.
Arizona (Hellickson 5-4) at San Diego (Cashner 2-9),
7:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Cincinnati at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 10:10 a.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.

QUARTERFINALS
Friday, June 26
At Montreal
Germany 1, France 1, Germany won 5-4 on PKs
At Ottawa, Ontario
United States 1, China 0
Saturday, June 27
At Edmonton, Alberta
Australia vs. Japan, 1 p.m.
At Vancouver, British Columbia
England vs. Canada, 4:30 p.m.
SEMIFINALS
Tuesday, June 30
At Montreal
China-United States winner vs. Germany-France
winner, 4 p.m.
Wednesday, July 1
At Edmonton, Alberta
Australia-Japan winner vs. England-Canada winner, 4 p.m.

MLS GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
D.C. United
10 5 4 34 23 17
New England
6 6 6 24 24 24
Orlando City
6 6 5 23 22 21
Toronto FC
7 6 1 22 22 19
Columbus
5 6 5 20 23 23
New York
5 5 5 20 19 19
Philadelphia
5 10 3 18 20 30
Montreal
5 6 2 17 17 21
New York City FC 4 7 5 17 17 19
Chicago
4 9 2 14 17 23
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Seattle
9 6 2 29 23 14
Vancouver
9 6 2 29 20 16
Los Angeles
7 5 7 28 26 20
Portland
7 6 4 25 17 19
Sporting K.C.
6 3 6 24 23 17
FC Dallas
6 5 5 23 19 23
Earthquakes
6 5 4 22 16 15
Real Salt Lake
5 6 6 21 15 20
Houston
5 6 5 20 21 21
Colorado
2 5 9 15 12 15
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturday’s Games
D.C. United at Toronto FC, 2 p.m.
Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Vancouver at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.
Columbus at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
New York at New York City FC, 2 p.m.
Seattle at Portland, 4 p.m.

18

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

RULING
Continued from page 1
“This court is not a legislature. Whether
same-sex marriage is a good idea should be
of no concern to us,” Chief Justice John
Roberts wrote in dissent. Roberts read a
summary of his dissent from the bench, the
first time he has done so in nearly 10 years
as chief justice.
“If you are among the many Americans —
of whatever sexual orientation — who favor
expanding same-sex marriage, by all means
celebrate today’s decision,” Roberts said.
“But do not celebrate the Constitution. It
had nothing to do with it.”
Justice Antonin Scalia said he was not
concerned so much about same-sex marriage
as “this court’s threat to American democracy. ” He termed the decision a “judicial
putsch.” Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence
Thomas also dissented.
Several religious organizations criticized
the decision.
The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops
said it was “profoundly immoral and unjust
for the government to declare that two people of the same sex can constitute a marriage.”
Kennedy said nothing in the court’s ruling
would force religions to condone, much less
perform, weddings to which they object.
And he said the couples seeking the right to

LOCALS
Continued from page 1
Kikuchi in 2008, said the impact of the
court’s decision was far reaching.
“It means for us, we can travel around the
country without wondering whether the
state will recognize we are married,” he said.
“From a spiritual standpoint, it makes us
feel totally accepted as full American citizens with full rights.”
Wiesner said at times it has been an arduous journey to arrive at the point where
same-sex marriage could be legally recognized.
“For so long, it felt like it would never
happen,” he said.
But as tides have begun to shift nationally, Wiesner said he has been awed with the
speed of the momentum that the movement
gained.
“So many people have been swayed
toward equality, it has just been wonderful,”
he said.
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-Menlo
Park, echoed those sentiments.
“There has been a long journey toward

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

marry should not have to wait for the political branches of government to act.
The 14th Amendment to the Constitution
requires states to allow same-sex couples to
marry on the same basis as heterosexuals,
he said
“The dynamic of our constitutional system is that individuals need not await legislative action before asserting a fundamental right. The nation’s courts are open to
injured individuals who come to them to
vindicate their own direct, personal stake in
our basic charter,” Kennedy wrote in his
fourth major opinion in support of gay
rights since 1996. It came on the anniversary of two of those earlier decisions.
“No union is more profound than marriage,” Kennedy wrote, joined by the court’s
four more liberal justices.
The stories of the people asking for the
right to marry “reveal that they seek not to
denigrate marriage but rather to live their
lives, or honor their spouses’ memory,
joined by its bond,” Kennedy said.
As he read his opinion, spectators in the
courtroom wiped away tears when the
import of the decision became clear. One of
those in the audience was James Obergefell,
the lead plaintiff in the Supreme Court
fight.
Outside, Obergefell held up a photo of his
late spouse, John Arthur, and said the ruling
establishes that “our love is equal.” He
added, “This is for you, John.”
Obama placed a congratulatory phone call

to Obergefell, which he took amid a throng
of reporters outside the courthouse.
Speaking a few minutes later at the White
House, Obama praised the decision as an
affirmation of the principle that “all
Americans are created equal.”
The crowd in front of the courthouse at the
top of Capitol Hill grew in the minutes following the ruling. The Gay Men’s Chorus of
Washington, D.C., sang the “Star-Spangled
Banner.” Motorists honked their horns in
support as they passed by the crowd, which
included a smattering of same-sex marriage
opponents.
The ruling will not take effect immediately because the court gives the losing side
roughly three weeks to ask for reconsideration. But county clerks in Alabama,
Georgia, Mississippi, Ohio, North Dakota,
South Dakota, Tennessee and Texas began
issuing licenses to same-sex couples within
hours of the decision.
The cases before the court involved laws
from Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and
Tennessee that define marriage as the union
of a man and a woman. Those states have
not allowed same-sex couples to marry
within their borders, and they also have
refused to recognize valid marriages from
elsewhere.
Just two years ago, the Supreme Court
struck down part of the federal anti-gay marriage law that denied a range of government
benefits to legally married same-sex couples.

Justices Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader
Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Sonia
Sotomayor formed the majority with
Kennedy on Friday, the same lineup as two
years ago.
The earlier decision in United States v.
Windsor did not address the validity of state
marriage bans, but courts across the country, with few exceptions, said its logic compelled them to invalidate state laws that
prohibited gay and lesbian couples from
marrying.
There are an estimated 390,000 married
same-sex couples in the United States,
according to UCLA’s Williams Institute,
which tracks the demographics of gay and
lesbian Americans. Another 70,000 couples
living in states that do not currently permit
them to wed would get married in the next
three years, the institute says. Roughly 1
million same-sex couples, married and
unmarried, live together in the United
States, the institute says.
The Obama administration backed the
right of same-sex couples to marry. The
Justice Department’s decision to stop
defending the federal anti-marriage law in
2011 was an important moment for gay
rights, and Obama declared his support for
same-sex marriage in 2012.
The states affected by Friday’s ruling are
Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, most of
Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio,
South Dakota, Tennessee and Texas.

equality and recognition,” he said. “This is
a milestone in that march. There are many in
our county and in our region who will now
feel a sense of pride and a sense of acceptance that will allow them to more fully participate in our community.”
Gordon, who married his husband Dennis
McShane in 2008, said the decision is not
just a victory for supporters of same-sex
marriage, but for everyone who favors equal
rights.
“At some level, this brings us all together,” he said. “Equality is something that
doesn’t happen unless it is there for everybody.”
County Supervisor Dave Pine also
expressed support for the decision, in a prepared statement.
“This historic ruling by the U.S. Supreme
Court is a significant and welcome milestone in our collective pursuit of a more perfect union,” he said.
Pine has championed the San Mateo
County LGBTQ Commission, which is an
advisory body to the Board of Supervisors
advocating for policies that benefit the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer
community.
Jason Galisatus, who serves as the cochair of the commission, echoed those sen-

timents in a prepared statement.
“Today’s momentous decision marks the
day in America’s history when we at long
last have enshrined such relationships in
the letter of the law,” he said.  
But the court’s decision was not unanimously hailed.
Bill May, president of Catholics for
Common Good in Daly City, said he
opposed the impact legalized same-sex marriage would have on society.
“The court made its decision based on a lot
of false premises and sentimentality and, in
the process, unwittingly eliminated from
the law the only civil institution that is
uniquely geared toward uniting children
with their mothers and fathers,” he said.
May, whose organization aims to educate
on the values espoused by the Catholic
Church, said legalized same-sex marriage
will have a variety of unintended and harmful consequences.
“It is going to threaten all kinds of institutions that are committed to teaching and
promoting traditional marriage,” he said.
“The real threat is to children who will have
to be taught a distorted understanding of
love.”
Yet despite the adversarial perspective of
some, many same-sex marriage supporters

are ramping up for a big weekend of celebrating among like-minded members of
their community.
Revelers in San Francisco got an early
start on the annual Pride celebration Friday,
June 26, and are expected to continue partying throughout the weekend.
Wiesner said a patron had volunteered to
run his store over the weekend to allow him
and his husband the freedom to enjoy the
festivities in San Francisco.
Though he declined the offer, he did note
the convenient timing of the ruling.
“I’m so glad they did not wait until
Monday, and gave us this little gift on
Friday,” he said.
Gordon also said he appreciated the ruling
being announced when it was, but noted that
there are still a variety of challenges that
members of the LGBT community face,
including fighting for those who fear discrimination for coming out of the closet,
and the need for greater acceptance of the
transgender community, among other concerns.
“Today is a day to celebrate, knowing we
have achieved a milestone. It’s a glorious
day” he said. “But we need to be prepared to
continue the work that still needs to be
done.”

Meet Carlos
Unknown canine star
of military drama ‘Max’

SEE PAGE 21

‘Knight’ satisfying conclusion
to the groundbreaking series The power of
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

responsibility

Rocksteady Studios proved with
2009’s “Batman: Arkham Asylum”
that a video game inspired by superhero mythology could be an impeccably cerebral affair, not just another
name association money grab.
The company affirmed that with the
2011 follow-up, “Batman: Arkham
City,” by increasing the Dark Knight’s
wingspan in a larger landscape with
more fluid movement.
In Rocksteady’s final take on the
Caped Crusader, “Batman: Arkham
Knight” ($59. 99, for PlayStation 4,
Xbox One and PC), the developer has
again expanded its virtual Gotham, injected a playable Batmobile and raised the
stakes for billionaire superhero Bruce
Wayne. As a character ominously notes at
the beginning of the adventure, this one is
all about “how the Batman died.”
Following years of peace and quiet from
Gotham’s supervillain population after the
Joker perished at the end of “Arkham City,” the
mind-bending baddie Scarecrow has returned on
Halloween night to threaten Gotham with a citywide chemical attack, forcing a mandatory evacuation of citizens — except the rioters, maniacs
and militia members who stayed behind.
That militia is reporting to Scarecrow’s
cohort, a masked Batman lookalike calling himself the Arkham Knight. He has a
very mysterious — and very personal —
vendetta against Batman. Scarecrow is
also coordinating chaos with other
members of Batman’s rouges’ gallery,
including repeat offenders Riddler,
Two-Face and Penguin and newbies
like Man-Bat and Firefly.
In response, Batman is bringing
more superfriends to the fight.
Rocksteady has smartly woven
such allies as Alfred, Oracle,
Robin, Catwoman and Nightwing
into a plot that features more
twists and turns than a roller
coaster at an amusement park.
He’s also coming equipped with
new gadgets like a voice modulator and weapon disruptor. Oh,
and that tanklike Batmobile,
too.
While much has been made of
the introduction of the first
interactive Batmobile in the

ith great power
comes great
responsibility.”
I never fully understood the true
meaning of this quote until I
explored the field of journalism
throughout high school.
Lessons in journalism
During my first few days of my
journalism class, it was stressed
to all of us how
big of a
responsibility
journalists had.
If we wrote
something
libelous, we
could get sued.
If we misquoted someone, we could
get sued.
If we ran a story with incorrect
facts, we could get sued.
Journalists have the responsibility to inform the public the
truth in a fair and unbiased manner. But with that comes with a
lot of room for error.
My journalism advisor, Justin
Raisner, explained to us that
when we did make mistakes, they
were magnified for the 2,000 students and the hundreds of faculty
and staff of my school, Carlmont
High School, to see. This scared
me; I felt like I couldn’t afford to
make any mistakes.
I took this mentality to heart
while I was writing my stories. I
would spend hours trying to get
the perfect quotes from my interviews, proofreading every sentence and rearranging the structure
of my stories.
I had the same experience with
the Daily Journal on my first day.
As a former intern was training
me, I immediately tried to absorb
all the information I needed to
know for the job. She told me I
had to be extra careful while
doing the birth announcement

See KNIGHT, Page 22

See STUDENT, Page 22

By Arianna Bayangos

The fetish fables of
‘Little Death’ score
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

I come to praise the portmanteau.
Anthologies, omnibuses, whatever you
want to call them: Those cinematic conglomerations of disconnected or slightly
interwoven stories are what I’m talking
about. As a storytelling tradition, it stretches back beyond “The Canterbury Tales,” and
runs through “Pulp Fiction.” The latest is
“The Little Death,” an Australian series of
sex fetish fables.
The portmanteau is often good fun
because it’s happily free of conventional

structure. Many great directors have tried
their hand in them, from Francis Ford
Coppola (“New York Stories”) to Robert
Altman (“Short Cuts,” “Nashville”), and
Roberto Rossellini (“L’Amore”) to Eric
Rohmer (“Six in Paris”).
When portmanteaus work, they have an
internal rhythm of their own, like the time
zone-skipping clocks of Jim Jarmusch’s
“Night on Earth.” Hopscotching from tale
to tale, they can feel like dreams (Powell
and Pressburger’s mesmerizing “Tales of
Hoffman”) or mimic day-dreamed night-

See DEATH, Page 22

‘The Little Death’ is an Australian series of sex fetish fables.

“W

20

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

FLORIDA HIS TORY THROUGH
PAINTERS’ EYES: THE CICI AND
HYATT BROWN MUSEUM OF ART IN
DAYTONA BEACH. Florida remembered.
Holding the most extensive collection of
Florida art in the world, the newly opened
(February 2015) Cici and Hyatt Brown
Museum of Art in Daytona Beach features a
collection of 2,600 Florida themed oil and
watercolor paintings, some dating back to
the early 1800s, which recount the state’s
cultural, geographic and natural history. A
large gallery space, including a mezzanine,
showcases the collection’s signature
pieces, as varied as John James Audubon’s
Purple Heron, 1835, a hand-colored 25.5” x
37. 5” etching resulting from one of
Audubon’s several trips to Florida; N.C.
Wyeth’s “Dance of the Whooping Crane,”
tempura on panel, 1940, completed to
illustrate Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings’ classic Florida-based novel The Yearling; and
Milton Avery’s Brahma Bull and Palms, oil
on canvas, 1952. Museum Director Andrew
Sandall said, “The Cici and Hyatt Brown
Museum of Art is a uniquely Florida building housing an unprecedented collection of
Florida art. Artists from all over the world
came to Florida and found its weather, landscapes, animals, people and communities
to be compelling subjects for their work
and took the paintings and drawings they
created home to sell to an equally enthralled
audience. There are two pieces in the collection that I always make a special mention
of when I give tours of the Museum. Both
are my favorites for very different reasons.
I always enjoy looking at “Blind Man,
Eatonville”, by Jules André Smith, not just
for its style, but because he shows us a resident of a very important Central Florida

community; that of Eatonville, one of the
first self-governing all African-American
towns in the United States. Whenever I
walk past “Houses and Architecture of St.
Augustine”, by Anthony M. Vedovelli, I
think back to seeing that painting hanging
in the Browns’ house where we had so many
of our early planning meetings as we began
the project. To see it displayed in the
Museum barely two years later makes me
feel very proud of what we have achieved.”
A B UILDING FOR HURRICANE
COUNTRY. RLF Architects of Orlando and
Bomar Construction, Inc. of Ormond Beach
kept the look of the museum natural to
Florida, while building it to withstand the
extreme weather conditions possible in
Central Florida. Architect Tom DeSimone,
who served as RLF’s Project Architect for
the museum, said, “The Browns’ art collection was absolutely the inspiration for the
design of the building; utilizing covered
porches with ceiling fans and gabled metal
roofs to recall the simple, yet elegant
architecture of early Florida, while balancing this with a modern sensibility, safety
and sustainability for the art collection
itself. The building also has state of the art
lighting controls to maintain optimal
lighting levels (footcandles) for viewing
while preserving the art from damage, so
this unique collection will continue to
serve to educate our community about
Florida’s history for future generations.” In
the event of a hurricane or other sustained
loss of power, the museum has been
designed to remain operational for several
days, powered by its own dedicated generator, and in case of a complete power outage
artwork can be transferred for storage inside
the museum to prevent damage from
changes in humidity or temperature.
A VISUAL VISIT TO FLORIDA’S
PAS T: THE COLLECTORS S HARE

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

The Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art in Daytona Beach, Florida, features oil and watercolor
paintings that tell of the cultural, geographic and natural history of Florida. The
26,000- square-foot agricultural vernacular building, which opened in February 2015, replicates
the lines of a Florida tobacco-drying barn.
THEIR THOUGHTS . Commenting on
their collection, the Browns said, “It is a
thrill for us to be able to share what we have
developed with others who will make their
own bonds to these works. We know that
the paintings are a visual treat, but for
many who have visited or lived in the state,
the subjects will renew wonderful associations
with
the places
depicted.
Additionally, since many of the images
presented in the collection are 19th-century
paintings of places and things that no
longer exist – viewing and contemplating
them is a visual visit to Florida’s historical
and colorful past.”
MUSEUM PARTICULARS: The Cici

and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art is located
at 352 S. Nova Road, Daytona Beach, FL
32114. The museum is set within native
grasses, magnolias, oaks and cypress trees
which complement heritage trees that were
preserved throughout the construction
process and incorporated into the site’s
design. More information about the museum may be found at www.moas.org/ciciandhyattbrownmuseum.html.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine &
Travel Writers Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com. More of her features
may be found at ifwtwa.org/author/susan-cohn.

Common, Oyelowo diversify film academy membership
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — After widespread criticism of the film academy’s overwhelmingly
white slate of Oscar nominees this year, the
organization has announced a roster of new

members that skews younger and more
diverse.
Kevin Hart, Common, Emma Stone, Dev
Patel and “Whiplash” writer-director
Damien Chazelle are among the 322 new
academy members announced Friday.
“It’s really gratifying to see the big
increases in genre, people
of color, age and national
origin,” academy President
Cheryl Boone Isaacs said in
an interview.
Other new inductees
include
Benedict
Cumberbatch,
David

Oyelowo, Sergio Mendes, Elizabeth Banks,
John Legend, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Tom
Hardy and “Dope” director Rick Famuyiwa.
Membership in the Academy of Motion
Picture Arts and Sciences is by invitation
only. Oscar nominees are automatically
considered; others must be sponsored by
two members of their branch of filmmaking.
“We’ve stressed very much that our
members in each branch, it’s their duty to
really pay attention to a diverse talent
pool, to those coming up, to those that
may have been overlooked for membership, ” Boone Isaacs said. “I think that

effort has paid off well this year. ”
The nearly 6,000-member international
group has long been criticized for its largely white, male membership.
All 20 of the acting nominees at the most
recent Academy Awards were white, which
inspired the hashtag (hash)OscarsSoWhite
on social media and increased scrutiny of
the lack of diversity in the ranks of the
organization.
The criticism was “part of the conversation” that drove existing academy members
to actively seek new talent in places they
may not have ordinarily looked, Boone
Isaacs said.

Expires 7/31/15

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

21

‘Max,’ about a kid, his dog
and those gun smugglers
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

It’s officially summer. What better time for
a heartwarming caper movie about a troubled
but noble Texas teen, his troubled but noble
dog, and those crazy mean gun smugglers
they tangle with?
Yes, we said crazy mean gun smugglers.
Mexican cartels, too. If that doesn’t sound
like normal PG-rated fare to you, well, you’re
right, there’s nothing too normal about
“Max.” Billed as a family adventure, this
movie is probably best described as a mix of
“Lassie” and “No Country for Old Men.” It’s
‘Max’is the story of a PTSD-afflicted military dog that moves in with his deceased handler’s family. like they invited the Coen brothers — or
maybe Quentin Tarantino — to script a few
scenes of a “Dora the Explorer” episode.
We could go on with the analogies, but
let’s just say that there are still some people
who’ll appreciate “Max,” directed and cowritten by Boaz Yakin, because they love
tinctive eyes were going to be essential for dogs, and thus any film about a good dog is a
By Lindsey Bahr
worthwhile endeavor. And the dog IS good.
telling the emotional story about Max’s
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
But beware: This is No Movie for Little Kids.
return from Afghanistan.
We begin in Afghanistan, where Max (a
So Yakin challenged the Hollywood critBEVERLY HILLS — When it comes to
Belgian Malinois, actually played by four
canine stars, like their human counter- ter company Birds and Animals Unlimited pooches) is a highly trained military dog,
(whose credits include “Marley and Me,” performing risky searches alongside his
parts, sometimes it’s all about the look.
Before he’d even conceived of what ‘’The Shaggy Dog” and “Hotel for Dogs”) devoted handler, U.S. Marine Kyle Wincott.
would eventually become “Max,” director to find a Belgian Malinois with lighter fur We see Max singlehandedly locate a Taliban
Boaz Yakin knew what he didn’t want: on its face.
weapons cache in a secret compartment in a
After an extensive worldwide search, home. But then tragedy strikes, and Kyle is
Something cute.
“It’d been a long time since anyone made they found exactly what they were looking killed.
a movie where the dog was just treated as a for in Kentucky: A spirited, untrained 2Back in Texas, the Wincott family —
hero, as the protagonist, without any cute- year-old Belgian Malinois named Carlos.
Mom Pamela (Lauren Graham, totally
“He’s got the most beautiful face and he’s underused), Dad Ray (Thomas Haden
ness or cloying the way Rin Tin Tin was
back in the 20s, or the way Old Yeller was really smart,” said Mathilde DeCagny, a Church) and teenager Justin (Josh Wiggins)
trainer on the film.
in the 50s,” said Yakin.
— are grieving at the funeral when they
DeCagny worked with Carlos five days a meet Max, who, heartbreakingly, knows
His friend and eventual co-writer Sheldon
Lettich, a Marine and Vietnam veteran, week for three months to prepare him for his boss is in the coffin. Max, understandsuggested basing it around a military work- his role, which would require the dog to ably, is suffering from trauma, and is hard to
ing dog (MWD), and the narrative started to squirm, fight, bite, and emote on com- handle. He only seems calm around Justin;
mand.
he senses the boy is Kyle’s brother. The
take shape.
But following in the tradition of all great
Casting the eponymous hero of “Max,”
the story of a PTSD-afflicted military dog movie mutts, Carlos wasn’t the only Max
that moves in with his deceased handler’s in “Max.”
“We didn’t want to use him for stunts and
family, in theaters Friday, was its own
beast. Yakin decided the breed should be things where he could potentially get
Belgian Malinois, a staple in the military injured and tired,” explained DeCagny.
In total, there were five Belgian
and law enforcement agencies in the United
States. But he wasn’t looking for just any Malinois on set, all of whom had to get
Belgian Malinois; he needed a one-in-a- their faces professionally dyed to match
Carlos’s unique look.
million pup.
If Carlos is the star, Jagger is the pinchThe breed typically sport a black snout
that extends to the eyes like a mask. Yet hitting understudy. Decidedly mellower
that was going to present a major problem than the “eccentric” lead, Jagger was called
to bat when the scene required more emoon camera.
“It’s very hard to read their eyes on film,” tion. Still, Yakin said, when Max has a
said Yakin, who knew that expressive, dis- close-up, it’s probably Carlos.

Meet Carlos, unknown canine
star of military drama ‘Max’

family brings the dog home.
At first, Justin, sensitively portrayed by
the sweet-faced, soulful Wiggins, wants no
part of training a dog. He’s obsessed with
video games, and resentful of his father, who
he feels has always favored hero Kyle. He’d
rather stay in his room than manage a growling canine. But the movie dispenses with all
that pretty quickly. Soon, Justin and Max are
fast friends, nursing each other through
tough times. Spicing things up a bit is a
love interest for Justin, the plucky Carmen
(Mia Xitlali), cousin of Justin’s buddy Chuy
(Dejon LaQuake), a typical movie best bud
whose every line is, like, yo, more clichéd
than the next.
And then things get really strange.
Trouble comes in the form of Tyler Harne
(Luke Kleintank), Kyle’s childhood buddy
and fellow Marine, back from Afghanistan.
We already knew that Tyler was up to some
nefarious activity in the war zone, involving disappearing guns, but we learn the true
nature of his troublesome dealings when he’s
back home, and hitting up Ray for a job. As
in many kid movies, the kid understands
what’s going on a lot quicker than the parents. Ray thinks Tyler’s a good guy. Justin
knows otherwise.
Soon, Justin, Max, Carmen and Chuy are
off on a mystery-solving adventure in the
woods — just three kids, a couple bikes, and
a dog. It’s just that a bunch of guys with serious firepower are after them — and, as the
Wicked Witch of the West would say, their
little dog, too (actually he’s not so little, but
still.) It’s indeed heartwarming to watch
Max’s heroics, and Wiggins is appealing.
Still, as you’re saying “Aw,” and even tearing up a few times — a heroic military dog?
How could you not? — you may also be saying something else out loud, too, as this
plot goes haywire:
“Really? What were they thinking?”

22

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

DEATH
Continued from page 19
mares (Preston Sturges’ hysterical
“Unfaithfully Yours”). In others, the poetic brevity of their tales (Wayne Wong and
Paul Auster’s “Smoke”) take on the feeling
of a good short story collection.
Lately, anthologies have seemingly
grown in popularity on all kinds of
screens, including TV’s “True Detective”
and “Black Mirror,” and the Argentinian,
Oscar-nominated movie of extreme
revenge vignettes, “Wild Tales.” The current appeal probably owes something to
our digitally scrambled minds; author
Alissa Quart dubbed multi-linear movies
“hyperlink cinema.”
One of the most remarkable recent
entries was Leos Carax’s electrically zany
romp “Holy Motors.” Carax said his tale of
an actor who reinvents himself scene to

STUDENT
Continued from page 19
section of the paper to make sure I got all
the names of the parents, dates of birth and
the hospital locations right. While I did
those sections throughout the year, I would
triple check to make sure that I got every
piece of information correct.
While it is important to be meticulous
about these details when writing stories

KNIGHT
Continued from page 19
“Arkham” series, it’s hardly the game’s
most enthralling feature. In fact, it might be
the least. At first, remotely calling on it

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL
under the helpless sway of some very peculiar tastes. When a registered sex offender
(Kim Gyngell) visits each couple (connected, it would seem, by the same Sydney
neighborhood) to make his legally obliged
introduction, he usually appears the less
disturbed one.
And it ends with an unexpectedly sweet
and largely uninterrupted tale about a video
phone translating service for the deaf. A
translator (Erin James) takes a call from a
young deaf man (T. J. Power), who,
through sign language, asks her to enable
his phone-sex call. The scene is funny,
raunchy and improbably tender — the combination that Lawson has been striving
for.
Connection is illusive in the portmanteau. But in the last vignette of “The Little
Death,” the film finally scores.
“The Little Death,” a Magnolia Pictures
release, is unrated by the MPAA. The film’s
language, violence and sex would likely
merit an R-rating. Running time: 97 minutes. Three stars out of four.

scene throughout a day in Paris was really
about human relationships in the age of
the Internet.
“The Little Death, ” while frequently
funny and sometimes perhaps offensive in
the darkness of its humor, has the misfortune of following the recent release of Roy
Andersson’s “A Pigeon Sat on a Branch
Reflecting on Existence. ” The deadpan
existentialism of Anderson’s Scandinavian
humor, spread out across dozens of absurdist short scenes, makes “The Little Death”
look downright sitcomish.
That’s not such a bad thing. Australian
writer-director Josh Lawson’s slickly made
debut is a collection of stories about Aussie
suburbanite couples and the trouble that
comes from either pursuing or hiding an
unusual sexual desire.
One woman (Kate box) gets off on her
husband (Patrick Brammall) crying, and
goes to great lengths to get him weepy,
including fake kidnapping his dog. At his
father’s funeral, she can barely contain
herself.
The role-playing recommended by a ther-

apist to a couple (Kate Mulvany and
Damon Herriman of “Justified”) brings on
an unlikely epiphany for the boyfriend:
He’s an actor. Soon, he’s dressing as a
Southern Civil War general and criticizing
his girlfriend for breaking character.
Another woman (Bojana Novakovic)
wants her boyfriend (Lawson) to rape her.
He initially misunderstands, thinking she
asked him to “rate her.” ‘’Babe, you’re a
10!” he responds.
This story line, along with another
chapter dealing with a husband aroused by
his sleeping wife, will surely lose some
viewers who would rather not see even pretend rape made a punchline.
But the light, comic tone of “The Little
Death,” which takes its name from a nickname for orgasm, is generally free of judgment. Here is rueful empathy for those

and doing journalistic work, I realized
throughout my experience in journalism
that the exciting part of it was taking risks
regardless of the fear of making mistakes.
The exciting parts of journalism are
going for that sensational story or publishing that controversial spread for all of
the school to see. There are so many possibilities and stories in journalism that take
a substantial amount of responsibility and
courage to pursue. In these situations, you
cannot have one without the other.
Sure, I’ve made mistakes here and there,
but I will always remember the risks I took
when it came to journalism, whether it was

nearly running a one page spread about the
toilet for my school publication, asking
questions to the anonymous administrator
of the Carlmont’s confessions page and
even interviewing for the editorial intern
position for the Daily Journal.
Everyone has a great responsibility of
their own in their lives. The next years of
high schoolers’ lives are about responsibilities such as finishing an educational
degree, excelling in school or working
their first jobs, but the fear of making mistakes while carrying out responsibilities
shouldn’t stop students from taking risks. I
would urge students to be responsible, but

also to be bold in their lives.
I would like to thank my journalism advisor, Justin Raisner, Jon Mays and the
Daily Journal for entrusting me with the
great responsibility that journalism
entails. It’s been such an amazing learning
experience for me and it has prepared me
for the responsibilities that I will have to
come.

while gliding through the air to battle
Arkham Knight’s army is a thrilling addition. After taking out a few dozen drones, it
becomes a bit of a monotonous chore.

“Arkham Knight” is at its best when
Batman must systematically alternate
among solving crimes, zipping around and
punching thugs. Batman’s more interconnected missions make for a richer experience overall.

through the air in the Batsuit that
Rocksteady has been building to this
moment. “Arkham Knight” is an epic and
satisfying conclusion to a groundbreaking
series that proved a pop-culture icon could
be thrillingly brought to life in a virtual
world. Superman should be jealous. Four
stars out of four.

As with the previous “Arkham” games,
including 2013’s “Batman: Arkham
Origins,” which was developed by Warner
Bros. Montreal instead of Rocksteady,

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

It’s evident when charging through
Gotham in the Batmobile and soaring

Arianna Bayangos is a recent graduate of Carlmont
High School in Belmont. Student News appears in
the weekend edition. You can email Student News
at news@smdailyjournal.com

WEEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, JUNE 27
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Break fast.
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. $8 per person, $5
for each child under 10. There will
be an omelet bar, pancakes, bacon,
French toast, juice, coffee and tea.
Bring your family and support our
veterans.
Coastal Water Conservation: How
to Do Your Part. 10 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. New Leaf Community Market,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon
Bay. Join Cyril Barmore, certified
water and energy inspector, and
gain a deeper understanding of
California water, the current
drought and creative, practical
ways to conserve our precious
resource.
Pre-register
at
www.newleafhalfmoonbay.eventbr
ite.com. For more information
email patti@bondmarcom.com.
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. Gellert
Park, 50 Wemberly Drive, Daly City.
Free program of the San Mateo
County Medical Association’s
Community Service Foundation
that encourages physical activity.
For more information and to sign
up visit smcma.org/walkwithadoc
or call 312-1663.
San Carlos Airport Day. 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. San Carlos Airport, San
Carlos. Take a tour of the airport,
learn about general aviation, see
interesting airplanes up close and
more. This free event will feature
aircraft displays, exhibitors and
vendors, an aviation-themed scavenger hunt, barbecue lunch, ice
cream, helicopter rides and free airplane rides for children.
Tech Drop in. 11 a.m. South San
Francisco Main Public Library, 840
W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Get help with e-books,
Kindles, NOOKs, laptops or any
other device. All questions are welcome. Free. For more information
email valle@plsinfo.org.
Pets in Need Celebrate 50th
Anniversary with Open House,
‘Canines on the Catwalk ’ Dog
Fashion Show and More. Noon to
4 p.m. 871 Fifth Ave., Redwood City.
There will be treats for animals and
humans, dog-training demonstrations, an awards ceremony and
more. The fashion show and program is from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Free
and open to the public. For more
information or to RSVP contact
info@petsinneed.org.
Embodied K ir tan: A Yoga
Workshop. 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Ocean Yoga, 90 C Eureka Square
Shopping, Pacifica. Join yoga
instructor Lauri Black and Kirtan
leader Peter Alexander for a vibrant
workshop joining pranayama,
Kirtan and asana with live music.
$30 in advance, $35 at the door. For
more information or to reserve
your seat call 355-9642 or go to
www.oceanyoga.com.
Blood drive in honor of Vanessa
Morales. 1:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Terrabay Recreation Center, 1121
South San Francisco Drive, South
San Francisco.
Movie for Children: ‘Alexander
and the Terrible, Horrible, No
Good, Very Bad Day.’ 2 p.m. Oak
Room, San Mateo Public Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Rated PG.
Runtime is 81 minutes. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Class of 2k15 YA Author Event. 3
p.m. Burlingame Public Library 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. The
Class of 2k15 is a cross-genre group
of YA and MG authors whose books
debut in 2015. Author panel with
informal signing. For more information email John Piche at
piche@plsinfo.org.
San Mateo Buddhist Temple’s
Annual Bazaar. 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. 2 S.
Claremont St., San Mateo. Enjoy traditional Japanese and American
foods, bingo, children’s games and
a performance by San Mateo Taiko.
Continues on Sunday at 11 a.m.
Free. For more information call 3422541.
SUNDAY, JUNE 28
Super Family Sunday. 10 a.m. to
Noon. Palo Alto Junior Museum
and Zoo, 1451 Middlefield Road,
Palo Alto. An appreciation day for
families who have children with
disabilities. There will be animals
and a hands-on science activity.
For more information contact
tina.keegan@cityofpaloalto.org.
Sunday B allroom Tea Dance
with the B ob Gutierrez B and.
San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road. $5. For more
information call 616-7150.

and Fall of Pacific City — The
Coney Island of the West.’ 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Burlingame Ave. Railroad
Station, 290 California Drive,
Burlingame. There will be a photo
presentation as well as ‘Duck and
Cover,’ artifacts and photos related
to Burlingame’s Civil Defense
Program, 1940s-1950s and our
ongoing ‘Then and Now’ photo
show plus more. Free, but donations appreciated.
‘Transformations’ by photographer John Csongradi reception. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. Peninsula Art
Institute, 1777 California Drive,
Burlingame. Runs through June 28.
Free. For more information call 6922101.
Peace Action of San Mateo
County presents Money in
Politics: What We Can Do About
It. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Unitarian
Universalists of San Mateo, 300 E.
Santa Inez Ave., San Mateo. Nancy
Neff of the California Clean Money
Campaign will talk about the DISCLOSE Act, what is being done to
move it along and how people can
help. Free. Contributions welcome.
For more information visit
http://www.sanmateopeaceaction.org or call 286-0332 or email
smpa@sanmateopeaceaction.org.
MONDAY, JUNE 29
Spiritual Wellness. 9:30 a.m. to
12:30
p.m.
Silicon
Valley
Community Foundation, large
Conference Room No. 114, 1300 S.
El Camino Real, San Mateo. For
more information call 349-0100.
Cooking Bootcamp: 30 Day Paleo
Challenge. 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
KitchenTown, 1007 Howard Ave.,
San Mateo. For more information
email
Katie
Kulter
at
katiekulter@gmail.com.
Bay Area Bigfoot Meeting. 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. Round Table Pizza, 61 43rd
Ave., San Mateo. Discuss the latest
news about bigfoot/sasquatch.
Free admission. For more information call 504-1782.
‘In Plain Sight.’ 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Congregational Church of San
Mateo, 225 Tilton Ave., San Mateo.
On National Human Trafficking
Awareness Day, this sex-trafficking
documentary will be shown as part
of a community event sponsored
by the Anti-Trafficking Faith Leader
Coalition of San Mateo County.
Childcare will be provided and a
reception will follow. For more
information call 343-3694.
LipSync Showdown. 4 p.m.
Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Bring
your favorite song (device should
have an audio out jack), best lipsync skills and be ready to battle it
out Jimmy Fallon style. For more
information email John Piche at
piche@plsinfo.org.
Musicians of the San Francisco
Opera Orchestra. 7 p.m. Kohl
Mansion, 2750 Adeline Drive,
Burlingame. $15. For more information email info@musicatkohl.org.
Fatherhood Collaborative presents Dad and Me at the Library. 7
p.m. San Bruno Library, 701 W.
Angus Ave., San Bruno. Spend quality time with children while learning about the value of reading.
Features an interactive puppet
show. For more information go to
www.fatherhoodcollaborative.org.
TUESDAY, JUNE 30
Bats! 2 p.m. Oak Room, San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Northern California Bats
presents live bats up-close and on
the big screen. Learn about bats
and how bats help us. Free. For
more information call 522-7838.
Ballroom Dance Social with Gary
Chetcuti and D.J. Jimmy Lee. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road. $2 for San Bruno residents and $2 for non-residents. For
more information call 616-7150.
Coventr y and K aluza: Comedy
and Clown Act. First showing at 5
p.m., second showing at 7 p.m.
Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Tickets
required. For more information
email John Piche at piche@plsinfo.org.
Adult Cooking Class: Guys in the
Kitchen. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Fabulous cooking
class with Chef Laura Stec. Signups
required by calling the library or
asking at the reference desk. Free.
For more information email belmont@smcl.org.

Concer ts in the Park : ‘ The Fred
McCar ty Band.’ 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Twin Pines Meadow, Belmont.
Free.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 1
Independence Day Par ty. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road. Tickets avaliable at
the reception desk. For more information call 616-7150.

The
B ur lingame
Historical
Society’s New Exhibit: ‘The Rise

For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

23

‘Pong’ and ‘Tetris’ make Video
Game Hall of Fame’s first class
By Carolyn Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROCHESTER, N. Y. — The first
inductees into the new World Video
Game Hall of Fame include “Pong,” the
game that introduced millions to electronic play, “Doom,” which triggered a
debate over the role of games and violence in society, and “Super Mario
Bros.,” whose mustachioed hero has
migrated to everything from fruit
snacks to sneakers.
The first six games to enter the hall
of fame cross decades and platforms,
but all have impacted the video game
industry, popular culture and society at
large, according to the new hall at The
Strong museum in Rochester, where
the games were enshrined Thursday.
Joining “Pong,” launched in 1972,
“Doom, ” from 1993, and 1985’s
“Super Mario Bros.” are arcade draw
“Pac-Man” (1980); Russian import
“Tetris” (1984); and “World of
Warcraft” (2004), which has swallowed millions of players into its
online virtual universe.
The newly created World Video Game
Hall of Fame pays homage to an indus-

HOUSING
Continued from page 1
ground-floor retail and 32 one-, twoand three-bedroom condominiums.
Instead of providing inclusionary
below-market rate units, the developer
opted to contribute in-lieu fees
instead, according to city planners.
While the less than $1 million won’t
be able to fund the production of much,
the pot of money solely dedicated to
affordable housing will increase as
future development projects come
through the pipeline, said Rennie and
Councilman Charles Stone.
With the area’s well-known high
cost of living and affordable housing
crisis, Stone said he’s glad to see
Belmont starting to plan.
Earlier this year, Stone suggested the
city consider possible means to create
workforce housing at Belmont’s El
Camino Real and Hill Street properties, sites it was able to retain that
were purchased by its former redevelopment agency.
“This is the beginning of something
special is how I think about it. Because
with a couple more projects coming
along and in the pipeline, we’ll be able
to hopefully get some money set aside
to do something exciting, maybe

try that rivals Hollywood in the entertainment pecking order. The Strong,
which bills itself as the national museum of play and also houses the
National Toy Hall of Fame, has been
preserving and collecting games and
artifacts for years through its
International Center for the History of
Electronic Games.
“Electronic game play is increasingly influential and important,” Strong
President and Chief Executive G.
Rollie Adams said. “It’s changing how
we play, how we learn and how we connect with each other across boundaries
of geography and culture.”
The inaugural hall of fame class was
recommended by a panel of judges
made up of journalists, scholars and
other experts on the history and
impact of video games. They chose
from among 15 finalists that also
included: “Angry Birds, ” ‘’FIFA, ”
‘’The Legend of Zelda,” ‘’Minecraft,”
‘’The Oregon Trail, ” ‘’Pokemon, ”
‘’The Sims,” ‘’Sonic the Hedgehog”
and “Space Invaders.”
Nominations for the hall can come
from anyone and be from any platform
— arcade, console, computer, hand-

held or mobile. But they must have had
a long stretch of popularity and left a
mark on the video game industry or
pop culture.
“Doom,” for example, introduced the
idea of a game “engine” that separated
the game’s basic functions from its artwork and other aspects, but even more
significantly was one of the early
games cited in the debate that continues today over whether violent games
inspire real-life aggression.
“World of Warcraft,” is the largest
MMORPG — “massively multiplayer
online role-playing game” — ever created. As of February, it had more than
10 million subscribers, represented by
avatars they create, according to The
Strong.
Sixteen-year-old gamer Shaun
Corbett, of Rochester, said after the
induction ceremony that he was
expecting “Doom, ” ‘’Super Mario
Bros.” and “Pac-Man” to get in.
“’Tetris’ I wasn’t expecting but I can
see where they’re coming from. It
made puzzle games popular,” Corbett
said.
He said his fascination with video
games started with Pokemon.

along the lines of the workforce housing idea,” Stone said.
With the county and 21 cities currently in the midst of participating in
an affordable housing nexus study that
seeks to outline the impacts of new
developments and offers suggestions
on how much developers could pay
toward creating below-market rate
units, Rennie said the council will
likely have a broader policy discussion once Belmont’s results from the
study are released later in the year.
While the El Camino Real developer
agreed to pay an affordable housing
fee, the nexus study would help further
inform and justify future policies the
city may consider implementing for
new developments.
Councilman Warren Lieberman said
these types of fees would provide the
city with greater flexibility to address
affordable housing needs and while not
necessarily opposed to Stone’s suggestion, it hasn’t been formally considered, Lieberman said.
“I would welcome a council discussion on that topic. We have not had
one at this point so I think it’s premature for us to say what I think should be
done. I think a lot still has to be
worked out though in terms of what
exactly that kind of project will be,”
Lieberman said.
As the city proceeds with updating
its General Plan and recently solidified

its Housing Element, a state-mandated
document requiring cities to show how
they plan to prepare for future growth,
Senior Planner Damon DiDonato said
these documents along with the nexus
study could help guide future planning.
But finding means to support belowmarket-rate units remains a challenge,
DiDonato said.
“When the [redevelopment agency]
went away, we no longer had that at our
disposal. So this fee provides that
mechanism to provide affordable housing since that tool was taken away,”
DiDonato said.
Although it could take time to collect enough from new developments to
make a dent in the funds needed to support affordable housing projects,
Stone said it’s a problem that’s not
likely to subside.
“With average rents for a one bedroom hovering for over $2, 000 a
month and home prices in the millions
of dollars, it’s getting to be impossible for the middle class to live in
Belmont, ” Stone said. “And that’s
something that concerns me. It’s even
more difficult for folks like teachers to
work here. Even if it takes us a year,
hopefully we can give these people
some hope of remaining in the community.”

samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106

24

COMICS/GAMES

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL
CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Obscene material
5 Deadly snake
8 Thin fog
12 Big hurry
13 Thai language
14 Desktop symbol
15 Wedding-cake part
16 Careless
18 Quiver item
20 CAT scan relative
21 Slalom run
22 Large monkeys
25 — — tree falls ...
28 Air duct
29 Prefix for trillion
33 Grabbed a cookie
35 Make copies
36 Work, as clay
37 Cat or rat
38 Luminary
39 Gator kin
41 Live
42 Guides
45 Breakfast grain

GET FUZZY®

48
49
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Trouser part
Moved like lava
Exactly (hyph.)
Far-flung
Branch
Grandson, maybe
Long-active volcano
Works by Shelley
Explosive letters
Gauge

DOWN
1 Baja Ms.
2 — Woods
3 Consumer
4 Pulsate
5 Pacino and Hirt
6 Pink shade
7 Christie sleuth
8 Not hers
9 Liniment target
10 Where tigers pace
11 Finishes up
17 ATM code
19 Greeted the crowd

23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
34
35
37
39
40
43
44
45
46
47
50
51
52
54
55

Furniture buy
Stalk
Pen refills
Typesetter’s option
Cruising
Ms. Bombeck
Jet engine noise
Grease gun target
Like some cider
Hobby knife (hyph.)
Beaded shoe
Kind of union
Get back
Genre
Put in crops
Fjord port
In the thick of
Domesticated
Pasta choice
Millay or Ferber
What’s the big —?
“Mom” network
Nipped

6-27-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, JUNE 27, 2015
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Socialize with the
people you enjoy most. Idle time will lead to worry.
Workplace commitments will result in you neglecting
the most important people in your life. Make it up to
the ones you love.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — A change is as good as a
rest. Update your living quarters and make your home
more inviting. Host a gathering so that you can display
your accomplishment.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Don’t fall for empty
promises. Get a commitment in writing before you
embark on a partnership. You don’t want to be left in a

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

compromising position if your associate reneges.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — The progress may be
slow, but you will find a backer for your plan. Your
intelligence and resilience will be rewarded. You have
what it takes to make your dreams come true.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Domestic tension can
be reduced if you tackle a home improvement project.
Utilize your organizational skills to delegate the work
that needs to be done.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Lady Luck is
smiling on you. Moneymaking opportunities are
present, but that doesn’t mean you should gamble
or take unnecessary risks. Consider your financial
limitations before you make a costly purchase.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Your take-charge

6-27-15
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

attitude and willingness to pitch in will gain you favors
necessary for success. If you take part in activities
you enjoy, you will receive high praise for your efforts.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Conferences,
seminars and networking events are great places to
look for a new partner. You can obtain professional
advice regarding your concepts. Invest in yourself
and your ideas.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — A revised approach
can turn the tables in your favor. Look into unorthodox
ways to present your ideas. Be proactive when it
comes to showcasing your talents.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Property and real
estate investments will prove to be lucrative. Choose
your words carefully. A casual remark to a friend or

acquaintance will be misinterpreted, causing regret.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Keep the lines of
communication open in both personal and professional
relationships. Keeping quiet about troubling issues will
result in anxiety and stress. Express your feelings in a
rational, unemotional manner.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Working as part of a
team will be rewarding. You will begin new friendships
and develop intimacy with someone who shares your
vision. Paperwork delays can be expected.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

AEGIS LIVING is one of the country's
leaders in senior living, specializing in
Assisted Living and Dementia.

FREE

We have open positions for: Care Giver,
Host/Server, Maintenance Asst./Driver &
Housekeeper.
Please visit Aegis of San Francisco to fill
out an application at 2280 Gellert Blvd,
South San Francisco, CA, Phone (650)
952-6100.

CAREGIVER
TRAINING

Employment Opportunity for
Successful Candidates

110 Employment

CAREGIVER -

Assisted Living positions. 1733 California Dr., Burl. 650-692-0600.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

25

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
SERVER ENGINEER: Help build out &
scale co. data collection & pricing engine
as co. grows. 2 yrs exp req. Jobsite:
Redwood City, CA 94063. Mail resume
to: Scientific Revenue c/o NestGSV – 12
Murphy Place, San Mateo, CA 94402.

Call for Appointment for
Next Infomation Session

650-458-2200

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

www.homebridgeca.org
MIANTENANCE -

STUDENT UNION, INC. SJSU

MAINTENANCE
ENGINEER
$4500-$6250 mo.
FT/Non-Exempt

Resp. for operation and maintenance of
all equipment within S.U. and Bowling
Center facilities. 3 years experience as
Building Engineer. Some computer experience desired. Excellent benefits. AA/
EOE employer. For job description and
online
application
go
to:
Applitrack.com/sjsu.

Now Hiring
Full Time, Part Time, Seven Days a Week

Care Associates
Dining Room Servers
Brookdale Redwood City
485 Woodside Road
Please Apply in Person
Monday to Friday, 9 AM to 4 PM
Or call 650-366-3900 to schedule an immediate appointment
Employment Benefits Start at 30 Hours per Week
Experience is preferred but qualified applicants will be trained
All applicants must have no criminal background and be drug-free

DRIVERS
WANTED
San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Routes

Early mornings, six days per week,
Monday through Saturday
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.
and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.
Pay dependent on route size.
Apply in person 800 S. Claremont
Street #210 in San Mateo

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015
Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

110 Employment

868 Cowan Road - Burlingame, CA

NOW HIRING!
DRIVERS - CLASS A and B
DRIVER HELPER
COOK - HALAL & ARABIC FOODS and WESTERN
FOOD PREPARER
ASSEMBLY - BEVERAGE & EQUIPMENT
UTILITY WORKER/PORTER

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
• Customer Service
• Presser
Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good communication skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

110 Employment

110 Employment

DRIVER Looking for Part time Local Driver, must
have DOT medical card and experience.
Please respond with resume at
Helena.mills@amerifleet.com
HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.
OFFICE Brisbane pest control company needs FT
office worker M-F, 8am-5pm. Salary.
Call Jose 415-467-2500
SMOG TECHNICIAN - REDWOOD CITY
FPR SCORE 0.4 OR NONE. PAY $21
HR,
INCLUDING
OVERTIME.
CALL/TEXT SID (408)315-9195. PT/FT.

Please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978

RETENTION BONUS AVAILABLE!
Contact Info: Phone: 650-259-3100 Fax: 650-692-2318
Email: stephane.ako@lsgskychefs.com

Now Accepting Applications

Assistant Candy
Maker Trainees

Seasonal
Quality Assurance Inspector

Qualifications for Assistant
Candy Maker Trainees
include, but are not limited to:
follow formulas, be able to
work day and night shifts,
read, speak and write English
and regularly lift up to 50 lbs.
Entry level rate of pay is
$14.00/hour.

Qualifications for the Seasonal
Quality Assurance Inspector include,
but are not limited to: check the
weight, appearance and overall
quality of our product at various
steps of manufacturing; read, speak
and write English. Must pass a
written math test. Entry level rate of
pay is $13.00/hour.

Applicants must be available for day or night shift and overtime, as required.

Both are Union positions. If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at
(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

110 Employment

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

124 Caregivers

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.

127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

27

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

CASE# CIV 533595
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Selester J. Love
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Selester J. Love filed a petition with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Selester Jessica Love
Proposed Name: Seleste Jessica Love
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 23,
2015 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 05/11/2015
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 05/07/2015
(Published 06/06/15, 06/13/15,
06/20/15, 06/27/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265522
The following person is doing business
as: Legion Air, 883 Santa Cruz Ave,
Suite 200, MENLO PARK, CA 94025.
Registered Owner: Alta Collis LLC. The
business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Alex Bucur/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/01/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/15, 06/13/15, 06/20/15, 06/27/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265497
The following person is doing business
as: Oral Solutions Group, 663B Old
County Rd., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070.
Registered Owner: 1) Joseph Hirsch,
2554 27th Ave, San Francisco, CA
94116. 2) Karrie Duke Sikes, 3507 Daybreak Ct., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. The
business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Joseph Hirsch, Karrie Duke-Sikes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/28/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/15, 06/20/15, 06/27/15, 07/04/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265831
The following person is doing business
as: Bella Salon, 7 North Kingston St,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Nhung Le, 3806 Evangelho Cir,
SAN JOSE, CA 95148. The business is
conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s//Nhung Le/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/26/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265554
The following person is doing business
as: Artis School of Music, 2033 Ralston
Ave, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered
Owner: Jui Wen Ho, Po Box 7021, San
Mateo, CA 94403. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/Jui Wen Ho/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/15, 06/13/15, 06/20/15, 06/27/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265449
The following person is doing business
as: Concrete Plus, 1900 Newbridge Ave,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Tevita Lata, same address. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Tevita Lata/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 05/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/15, 06/13/15, 06/20/15, 06/27/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265581
The following person is doing business
as: Compass Capital Management
Group LLC, 303 Twin Dolphin Drive, 6th
Floor, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065.
Registered Owner: Compass Capital
Management Group LLC, CA. The business is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Nathan Dingler/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/04/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/15, 06/20/15, 06/27/15, 07/04/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265666
The following person is doing business
as: Small Haul SF, 2047 Monroe Ave,
BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered Owner: Julian Bradford, same address. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Julian Bradford/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/12/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/15, 06/20/15, 06/27/15, 07/04/15)

Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

NOTICE OF ORDINANCE ADOPTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN On Tuesday, June 23, 2015, at
its regular meeting, at the San Bruno Senior Center, at 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, the City Council voted unanimously to waive the second reading and adopt a new ordinance of the City Council of the City of San Bruno, regulating
massage businesses.
The following is a summary of the ordinance. The ordinance would do the following:
• Require all individuals who practice massage therapy as
defined to be certified by the California Massage Therapy
Council (CAMTC) and to display such certification while
performing massage therapy
• Require all businesses that provide massage services to
obtain a City Certificate of Registration and to employ only
individuals who are CAMTC-certified to perform massage
therapy
• Prohibit outcall massage services
• Require massage businesses to be open no earlier than
7:00 a.m. or later than 9:00 p.m. and to keep records of
massage services for two years
• Require massage businesses to comply with specified
operational requirements to ensure sanitary conditions
• Allow inspections by City officials from time to time
• Exempt certain classes of individuals such as physicians
and other health care professionals and establishments,
barbers and beauticians, high schools and colleges, and
athletic trainers
• Provide for fines, suspension and revocation of City Certificates of Registration for defined violations of state law
or the ordinance, following an appeals process
This ordinance goes into effect on July 23, 2015. A full copy of
the ordinance is available during business hours in the City
Clerk's Office, 567 El Camino, San Bruno, Ca 94066 (650)
616-7058,
or
on
the
City's
website
at:
http://www.sanbruno.ca.gov in the agenda packets from the
June 9th and June 23rd 2015 City Council meetings.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
June 26, 2015
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, June 27, 2015.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265667
The following person is doing business
as: Professional Planner, 110 Winchester St., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404. Registered Owner: Michael Cardona, same
address. The business is conducted by a
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Michael Cardona/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/12/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/15, 06/20/15, 06/27/15, 07/04/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265728
The following person is doing business
as: Pinnacle Imaging Systems, 288 Harbor Blvd, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered Owners: Pinnacle Imaging Corporation, DE. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on11/25/2014
/s/ Alfred Zee/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/15, 06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265738
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Dental Implant Center,
1201 Saint Francis Way, SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070. Registered Owner: Shirani
Gupta, DDS, CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s// Shivani Gupta/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265
The following person is doing business
as: ABC Language Center, 458 San Mateo Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owner: Vinh Thai, 464 Linden
Ave, #6, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s// Vinh Thai/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/23/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-265690
The following person is doing business
as: Boho Family Wellness, 155 Birch
Street Suite 1, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062. Registered Owner: Mia Blomquist, 339 Oxford St, SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94134. The business is conducted by
an individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s//Mia Blomquist/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265599
The following person is doing business
as: Varza Games, 24 Devonshire Blvd,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered
Owner: Alexander Nicholai Sorensen,
same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s//Alexander Sorensen/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/05/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265726
The following person is doing business
as: Young Anatomy, 311 Cedar St, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner: Estephania Morales Maupome,
same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s//Estephania Morales Maupome/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT M-258283
Name of the person abandoning the use
of the Fictitious Business Name: Martin
Rojo. Name of Business: Agilimpex. Date
of original filing: 10/24/13. Address of
Principal Place of Business: 2319 Alamedia de las Pulgas, San Mateo, CA 94403.
The business was conducted by an Individual.
/s/ Martin Rojo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 6/23/15. (Published in the San
Mateo
Daily
Journal,
6/27/2015,
7/04/2015, 7/11/2015, 7/18/2015).

210 Lost & Found
FOUND-LARGE SIZED Diamond Ring in
San Carlos Bank Parking Lot on 5/21.
(650)888-2662.
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.
LOST DOG, 14 year old Bichon, white
and Fluffy. Reward $500 cash. Her name
is Pumpkin. Lost in Redwood City.
(650) 281-4331.
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015
Books

302 Antiques

304 Furniture

308 Tools

309 Office Equipment

310 Misc. For Sale

JOHN GRISHAM H.B. books 3 @ $3
each. Call 650-341-1861

1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045

BROTHER P-TOUCH Labeler LCD display organize files, unused (2) for$ 20.00

MIRROR, NOT framed41" x 34" $ 15.
(650)366-8168

CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

STAND WITH shelves, 29" high. Can be
used for TV, computer, printer. $10. Pacifica (650)355-0266

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595
TAMI HOAG H.B. books. 6 @ $3 each.
650-341-1861

294 Baby Stuff
STROLLER W/tray, infant carseat, base,
GRACO pastel green, never used, perfect $65 . 650-878-9511
TRAVEL PORTABLE baby chair, Chicco with hook-on padded sides, hippo
grips. perfect. $35 - 650-878-9511

295 Art
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
DECORATIVE
SCULPTURE.
Solid
brass “Eagle on Branch”. 15” x 10” x 8”.
$35. 650-794-0839.

296 Appliances
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.
MAYTAG STOVE, 4 burner, gas, 30”
wide, $300. (650)344-9783
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RANGE HOOD - 36” Stainless Steal.
Good Condition. $55. (650) 222-4109.
WHIRLPOOL REAR tub assembly for a
front
loading
washing
machine,
$200/obo. (650)591-2227
WHIRLPOOL shock absorber for front
loading washing machine, $30/obo.
(650)591-2227

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898

303 Electronics

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

27 INCH Sony TV (not flat screen) Excellent condition $75.00. 650-347-6875.

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

36” TELEVISION with stand. Three
glass shelves; wood frame. $50 (650)
571-8103.

OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461

4 CAR speaker Pioneer 5/1/4" unused in
box 130wtts.$30.00 all. (650)992-4544

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

304 Furniture

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414
CABINET, ENTERTAINMENT, Wood.
49W x 40H x 21D.Good Condition.
$75/Offer. (650)591-2393

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

306 Housewares

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB

CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

FLATWARE - Stanley Roberts stainless
flatware service for 8, plus assorted
pieces. $65 obo (650)591-6842

299 Computers
DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

300 Toys
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142
5 RARE purple card Star Wars figures
mint unopened. $75. Steve, 650-5186614.
COMPLETE 1999 UD1&2 set of 525
baseball cards - mint. $50. Steve, 650518-6614.
PLAY KITCHEN Dora Explorer, talks
Spanish, English sink oven shelves toddler, accessories $60. 650-878-951
PLAY KITCHEN Step 2, accessories,
sink, shelves, oven, fridge, extendable,
perfect , $50. 650-878-9511
STAR WARS Battle Droid figures mint
unopened. 4 for $40. Steve, 650-5186614.
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

SKILL SAW 7/1/4" CRAFTMAN profesional unused $ 45. (650)992-4544
TOYOTA, SMALL hidraulic Jack like
new $20.00 (650)992-4544

TV STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

LANDRIDER
AUTO-SHIFT.
Never
Used. Paid $320. Asking $75.(650)4588280

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

POWER INVERTER - STATPOWER
PROWATT 2500. modified, Sine wave
phase corrected. $245.
650-591-8062

PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266

RECORD PLAYER - BIC Model #940.
Excellent Condition. $30. Call
(650) 368-7537.

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

TALL BOOKCASE (71" x 31") w/ 5 adjust. shelves. Ikea birch color. $25.
650-861-0088.

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

made in Spain

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING TABLE - Round 41”. Leaf & 3
chairs. $65. (650) 222-4109.
DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. 40” x
35.5” x 17.5” . $65. (207)329-2853.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151
EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151
FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324
GARDEN UMBRELLA, 9-foot green ,
push-button tilting,with base. Like new.
$60. (650) 697-8481
GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
HOME MADE Banquet/Picnic Table 3' X
8' $10. (650)368-0748

ITALIAN TABLE 34 X 34 X 29Hm Beautiful Oak inlaid $90 OBO In RC (650)3630360

NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324
SCALE. 25 lb. capacity counter top model. Very good condition. $15. San Bruno.
650-794-0839
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
WROUGHT IRON wine rack, 24 bottle,
black, pristine $29 650-595-3933

307 Jewelry & Clothing
NEW IN box, quarts wristwatch stainless
case/strap $19 650-595-3933

NEW STORE

COSTUME JEWELRY $2

Friditas

132 Hazelwood Dr, SSF
(415)828-2997
www.friditas.com
VAN GOGH “Vase of White Roses”
wood and glass frame. 24” x 30”. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please

308 Tools
1-1/2 GAL. Stainless Steel Spray Can,
all Brass Fittings. $5. (650)368-0748
12 FOOT Heavy Duty Jumper Cables
$20 (650)368-0748
14 FT Extension Ladder. Extends to 26
FT. $125. Good Condition. (650)3687537
4 WHEEL movers dolly cost $40 asking
$25 obo 650 591 6842
AIR COMPRESSOR - All trade. 125psi.
25 gallon. $99. (650)591-8062

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483

CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

OXYGEN AND acetylene welding tanks,
small size, $95.00. 650-341-0282.

PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280

COOKING MAGAZINES. 48 issues
“Taste of Home” series. Hundreds of color recipes. $10. 650-794-0839.

KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037

TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

BASE BOARD 110v heaters (2). 6'
white, 1500 watts. New. $25 each.
(650)342-7933

HEDGE TRIMMER, battery operated
with charger. $90. (650)344-9783

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587

BRIDGESTONE MOUNTAIN Bike. $95.
27" tires. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260

$10.

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

AB CIRCLE machine. $55. 310-8894850. Text Only. Will send pictures upon
request.

NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260

Mattock/Pick

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063

MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345

HAND EDGER $3. (650)368-0748
HEAVY DUTY,
(650)368-0748

310 Misc. For Sale
10 VIDEOTAPES (3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

FREE 36" COLOR TV (not a flat
screen). Great condition. Ph. 650 6302329.

PIONNER PAIRS car speakers ,in box
never used 5/1/4" 130 wtts. $15.
(650)992-4544

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

297 Bicycles

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274

2 KIDS Bikes for $60. 310-889-4850.
Text Only. Will send pictures upon request.

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

CRAFTSMAN HEAVY duty 10 inch saw
1 hp, blades/accessories, $90 (650)3455224 before 8:00 p.m.

ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

298 Collectibles

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.
WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310
WORKLIGHTS WITH adjustable tripod
stand - (2) 500 Watt halogen lights -1000
Watts. $40. 650-654-9252

WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER MELODICA Piano 27 w/soft
case $100. (650)367-8146

OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858

KIMBALL PIANO with bench. Artists
console. Walnut finish. Good condition.
$600 obo (650)712-9731

PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.

LEXICON LAMDA desktop recording
studio used, open box $75. Call
(650)367-8146

PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am

UPARIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals

TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393

ADOPTION IS THE ONLY OPTION

TRIPOD : Oak and brass construction.
Used in 1930"s Hollywood In RC $90
OBO (650)363-0360

We offer adoptions 7 days a week
noon - 6 PM
871 5th Ave. Redwood City

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

www.petsineed.org
Proudly saving lives for 50 years.

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

PETS IN NEED
650.367.1405

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 NASA program
for aspiring
explorers
10 Subject of a 1964
Time article
subtitled
“Pictures That
Attack the Eye”
15 Crowded locale
16 Nikon competitor
17 Empty entirely
18 Western
formation
19 Furniture wood
20 Clergyman’s deg.
22 Building __
23 “Peer Gynt”
widow
24 Runner-up before
RMN
26 Short-tailed
weasel
28 Singer with the
2002 debut hit
“Complicated”
31 Dow 30 company
34 Focus of many a
botanical festival
35 Ottoman bigwig
36 Farm newborn
37 When many
retire
38 Great
39 Hogwarts
redhead
40 1979 sci-fi classic
41 Gibson’s “Lethal
Weapon” role
42 Constitution
nickname
45 Sign of anxiety
46 Allowance
holder, perhaps
47 Place to see sea
monsters, once
50 “¿Quién __?”
51 Announcer Hall
53 Dead Sea
stronghold
55 Pay
57 Cepheus
neighbor
59 Floor in the
Louvre
60 Quiet break
61 Corning creation
62 Hog support?

DOWN
1 1978 Toyota
debut
2 Looks closely
3 Tot’s song starter
4 Decorator’s
target
5 Lesotho, for
instance
6 Comparatively
still
7 Exist
8 Essence
9 Like the ancient
Olympic Games
10 Blake’s eye
11 15th-century
pope
12 Drive on the way
to Hollywood?
13 Stinker, in more
ways than one
14 Old Testament
pronoun
21 Backup site
25 One who’s easy
to take
27 NBA honor
28 Tide alternative
29 Tambur relatives
30 Most spiders
have eight

31 High style
32 Place to make a
splash
33 Sichuan native
37 Separate
38 __ Honor
40 Name from the
Hebrew for “lion”
41 Alters on a
desktop, maybe
43 2002 film with a
mammoth co-star

44 Table linen
fabric
47 Fanaticism
48 Dress
49 Cut off
50 Short distance
52 Square root of
neun
54 Recipe direction
56 ’60s-’70s soul
singer Joe
58 Ink __

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

xwordeditor@aol.com

By Daniel Nierenberg
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

06/27/15

06/27/15

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

312 Pets & Animals

318 Sports Equipment

340 Camera & Photo Equip.

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

"DAISY POWERLINE, model 881, pump
bb or pellet gun, excellent condition, $40,
650-591-9769 San Carlos

CAMERA. MINOLTA 35 mm Maxxum
7000 with accessories and Tamrac Bag.
$75. 650-794-0839. San Bruno

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$10.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

315 Wanted to Buy

GOLF SET for $95. 310-889-4850. Text
Only. Will send pictures upon request.

WE BUY

HJC MOTORCYCLE helmet, black, DOT
certified, size L/XL, $29, 650-595-3933

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

316 Clothes

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

USMC TACTICAL folding knife, stainless
steel, boxed $25 650-595-3933

XXL HARLEY Davidson Racing Team
Shirt. $90. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

20 STEEL construction building spikes
3/4" x 24" $40.00 for all. 650-347-6875

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno

321 Hunting/Fishing

BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
FREE, 3 interior solid core paneled doors
with hardware. Reply
tmckay1@sbcglobal.net
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
SCREEN DOOR, (650)678-5133
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $49
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

HUNTING
CLUB
Membership
$2,600.Camanche Hills Hunting Preserve, Ione CA. Pheasants, Ducks, Chukar and sporting clay range. Excludes
annual dues and bird card. Call 209-3041975.

345 Medical Equipment
AUDLT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.
BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149
PATIENT LIFT - People Lift $400.00
(650)364-8960
WHEEL CHAIR $60. Plastic Restroom
Shower Chair $50. (650)364-8960

Garage Sales

Church Thrift
Shop Yearend
Sale

Thurs. 6/25
Fri 6/26 & Sat. 6/27
11 am - 2 pm
Many items half price
Sat: $5 Bag Sale
St. Matthews Episcopal
El Camino & Baldwin Ave.
SAN MATEO

335 Rugs

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505
CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

335 Garden Equipment
GREAT STATES brand push lawn mower, 14" blade, good condition, $20, 650561-9769 San Carlos
LAWNMOWER, GAS powered with rear
bag. Almost new. $100 (650)766-4858

1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929
2010 CHEVY HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

470 Rooms

HONDA ‘93 LX SD, 244K miles, all
power, complete, runs. $1,400 cash only,
(650)481-5296

CHETNER CONCRETE

LEMUS CONSTRUCTION

Driveways - Walkways - Pool Decks Patios - Stairs - Exposed Aggregate Masonry - Retaining Walls - Drainage
Foundaton/ Slabs

Dryrot & Termite Repair
Decks, Doors/Windows, Siding
Bath Remodels, Painting
General Home Improvements

Lic #935122

‘’10 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Limited,
black, very clean, 167K miles, $7,800.
Call (415)265-3322

FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.

NORTHWEST
ASPHALT PAVING

Free Estimates
(650) 271-1442 Mike

620 Automobiles

BELMONT-LARGE RENOVATED 1BD
& 2BD’s quiet building in prime area. No
smoking, no pets, no housing assistance
phone (650) 591-4046.

Concrete

Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimates
(650)213-2648

625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

Asphalt/Paving

Lic. #706952

Construction

515 Office Space
LARGE PROFESSIONAL OFFICE Quiet building. Atherton/Redwood City.
Ideal for start up. Second floor, 333 sq ft.
$1,200. Avail 6/1. Call Tom
(650)208-8624

440 Apartments

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

318 Sports Equipment
BB GUN. $39 (650)678-5133

Garage Sales

Construction

Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596a

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Cleaning

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Construction

AIM CONSTUCTION

JOHN PETERSON
*Paving *Grading *Slurry Sealing
*Paving Stovnes *Concrete
*Patching
WE AIM TO PLEASE!

(408) 422-7695
LIC.# 916680

CALL NOW FOR
SUMMER LAWN
MAINTENANCE

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

670 Auto Parts
1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, ‘92
to ‘96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted

Housecleaning

J.B GARDENING

HOUSE CLEANING
SERVICES
Vacancy, Janitorial,
Post Construction Cleaning.
Commercial & Residential
Cleaning

Maintenance • New Lawns
Clean Ups • Sprinklers
Fences • Tree Trim
Concrete & Brick Work
Driveway Pavers
Retaining Walls

(650)400-5604
Flooring

Flamingo’s Flooring

SHOP
AT HOME

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

650.918.0354

www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

PENINSULA
CLEANING

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771
Gutters

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

(650)556-9780

SPECIALS
AS LOW AS $2.50/sf.

Handy Help

Mention this ad for
Free Delivery
See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119

AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE

Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed

Housecleaning

(650) 453-3002

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)278-0157

Gardening

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

Gardening

Lic. #913461

• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION

Cabinetry

630 Trucks & SUV’s
CADILLAC ‘07 ESCALADE, black on
black, excellent condition. 1 owner, always garaged, have all service records.
122K miles. 4 new tires, and all the
amenities. Runs and drives great, clean
interior, good leather & carpets, amazing
sound system. $19,995. (650)619-0370

Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

(650)271-3955

Free Estimates

29

Lic#1211534

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

FRAN’S
HOUSE CLEANING

Service-Apartments/Homes:
one time service/bi-weekly.
References Available.
FREE ESTIMATES
10 years Exp. Honest. Reliable

(650)458-1965

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)296-0568

Free Estimates

Lic.#834170

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015
Handy Help

Hauling

HONEST HANDYMAN

CHEAP
HAULING!

Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

(650)740-8602

Hauling

Painting

CRAIG’S

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

PA I N T I N G
* Specializing in Ranch
Style Homes

PAYLESS

* All Residentials
* Interior/Exterior

HANDYMAN SERVICE
Kitchen & bath remodeling
Tile work, roofing and more!

FREE ESTIMATES
(650)771-2432

650-201-6854

Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
The Garden Doctor
Landscaping & Demolition
Fences • Interlocking Pavers
Clean-Ups • Hauling
Retaining Walls
(650)771-2276
sarrellin14@yahoo.com

The Village
Contractor

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

Call Joe

(650)701-6072
Lic# 979435

Lic# 36267

Hauling

SUMMER LAWN
MAINTENANCE

AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482
Painting

CHAINEY HAULING

SOS PAINTING

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Interior/Exterior
Wall Paper Installation/Removal

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

Free Estimates • Senior discounts

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000

JON LA MOTTE

• Trimming

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

• Large

Lic #514269

Free
Estimates

LEMUS PAINTING
(650)271-3955

SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA Lic 982576
(415)828-9484

Plumbing

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

(650)368-8861

Interior & Exterior
Residential & Commercial
Carpentry & Sheetrock Repairs
Lead safe certified
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461

Pruning

• Shaping

Mention

Roofing

REED
ROOFERS

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial
License #931457

Call for Free Estimate

(650) 591-8291

$20 OFF

Clear Any
Clogged Drain
24 Hour Service

Divorce

Food

Financial

DIVORCE

FATTORIA E MARE
Locally Sourced
Fresh Italian Food.
Join us for
Happy Hour 4-6:30 M-F
1095 Rollins Road
Burlingame
(650) 342-4922

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

portraits by HADI

$5 CHARLEY'S

Valerie de Leon, DDS

Beautiful portraits by experienced sketch artist. Pen & ink on
the 18” X 24” sketch paper.
Singles, couples, families.
Makes a wonderful gift. Can create a sketch from any photo.
Starting at $199. (650) 283-6836

Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

(650)771-6564

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

CENTERS OF
OF CALIFORNIA

Attorneys

Computer

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

• Low Cost
• Non Attorney Service
• Uncontested Divorce

Law Office of Jason Honaker

HP DESKTOP computer upgrade vista
Intel processor perfect condition tower
only $99 (650) 520-7045

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

www.cypresslawn.com

Service

(415) 361-3798

Dental Services

Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580

Hillside Tree

Lic# 526818

Clothing

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY

Tree Service

(650)738-9295
(415)269-0446
www.sospainting.com

Art

Cemetery

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Lic # 857741

Retrired Licensed Contractor

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

Lic.# 983312

650.553.9653

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Call us for a consultation

(650)461-0326 or
(650)226-3762

CraigsPainting.com

SENIOR HANDYMAN

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13

CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY CLOGGED
DRAINS! with proper access
Installation of: Water Heaters •
Faucets •Toilets • Sinks • Gas • Water
& Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

* 10 Years Experience

“Specializing in any size project”

Roofing

Plumbing

Dental Services
Do you want a White,Brighter
Smile?
Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

Maui Whitening
650.508.8669

1217 Laurel St., San Carlos
(Between Greenwood & Howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

I - SMILE

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Ross Meyers LDA #2
Divorce Centers
of California

650.347.2500

www.divorcecenters.com
We are not a law firm.
We can only provide
self help services at your
specific direction.

Food

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

Furniture

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

31

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

Senior Iranian official
reports that progress
is slow at nuclear talks
By George Jahn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VIENNA — U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry arrived in Vienna
Friday to launch a top-level push
to meet next week’s deadline for
talks on Iran’s nuclear program,
which aim to curb Teheran’s
nuclear activities in exchange for
sanction relief.
But a senior Iranian official
warned that negotiations are hampered by differences not only
between Tehran and the six other
countries it is bargaining with but
internally among the six as well.
Kerry was the first to arrive
Friday evening, with diplomats
from Iran, Britain, Germany,
Russia, France and China expected
in the Austrian capital over the
coming days.
Negotiations could spill over
into early July, despite the extra
diplomatic muscle packed by the
senior diplomats. Ahead of Kerry’s
arrival, Iranian Deputy Foreign
Minister Abbas Araghchi, Iran’s

top negotiator, told Iran’s IRNA
news agency that — while “on the
whole we are making headway” —
progress was slow and hard.
Iran and the six countries at the
negotiating table agreed in April
on the outlines of a deal that would
crimp Tehran’s nuclear activities
for at least 10 years in return for
sanctions relief for Tehran. But
negotiators are finding it difficult
to fine tune which sanctions
should be lifted when and how
open Iran must be to outside monitoring.
Complicating issues, said
Araghchi, was the fact that the
nations Iran is negotiating with
also differ in their approach to certain topics, “which may not be
harmonized easily.” He did not
offer details.
Signs that Iran is toughening its
stance add to the likelihood that
the talks could go past the target
date. In a speech this week, Iran’s
supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei, rejected a long-term
freeze on nuclear research and

REUTERS

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry talks to reporters in preparation to leave for Vienna, Austria at Andrews Air
Force Base.
insisted that Iran will only sign a
deal if international sanctions are
lifted first.
He also insisted that military
sites and Iranian nuclear scientists
will be off-limits to U.N. experts,
who would monitor Iranian compliance to any deal while trying to
kick-start a moribund probe of suspicions that Tehran worked on
atomic arms — allegations that
Iran denies.

Kerry subsequently suggested
Khamenei was speaking to a
domestic audience appreciative of
a hard-line stance and said that a
deal would be out of reach if Tehran
also reneges on its commitments
at the negotiating table. Still,
Khamenei’s comments added to
skepticism among some U.S. legislators who already believe the
Obama administration has grossly
backslid on its positions in efforts

to achieve an agreement.
Democratic
Senator
Bob
Menendez, a key critic of the
negotiations, called Khamenei’s
demands “unacceptable,” in a letter
to Kerry on Friday.
“If Iranian negotiators intend to
adhere to the provisions demanded
by Ayatollah Khamenei and Iran’s
parliament, I urge you to suspend
the current negotiations with
Iran,” he said.

Chinese stocks drop, but impact in U.S. is seen as limited
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — After a sizzling
rally that more than doubled the
value of China’s main stock market over the past year, investors
are now heading for the exit.
China’s Shanghai Composite
plunged more than 7 percent
Friday, one of its biggest drops in
the last 10 years. The index is
down 19 percent since its recent

Health & Medical

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

EYE EXAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

KAY'S HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381 El Camino Real
Millbrae

(650)697-6868

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

high reached June 12.
Chinese investors may be
scrambling, but investors in the
U. S. , Europe and elsewhere
shouldn’t be overly worried.
Here’s what has happened and why
investors shouldn’t react rashly:
There have been signs of overheating in China for a while.
Shares in Shanghai more than doubled over the past year, despite
evidence the Chinese economy is
slowing. Chinese economic

growth fell to 7 percent from
January through March, the slowest quarter since 2009. At the same
time, state-owned media has
encouraged ordinary Chinese for
months to load up on shares.
Many borrowed heavily to buy
stocks, taking out so-called margin loans.
Rising stocks encouraged companies to raise money by issuing
shares and to use the proceeds to
pay down debt. In the first half of

the year, the Shanghai stock market led the world in initial public
offerings: 78 companies issued
shares in Shanghai, raising $16.6
billion, according to a study by
the accounting firm EY. Hong
Kong was No. 2 with 31 deals that
raised $16 billion. Shenzhen was
No. 5 with 112 deals that raised $7
billion.
Now analysts say the flood of
new shares is overwhelming the
market and helping to push prices

down. Moreover, the government
began to worry the market had
reached dangerous levels, and
Chinese regulators have started
to tighten rules on margin lending.
China’s economy is huge, but
the country’s stock market is
largely isolated. Outside investors
have only been able to access the
Chinese stock market since
October, and that required purchasing stock in Hong Kong.

Insurance

Marketing

Massage Therapy

Real Estate Loans

Travel

NEW YORK LIFE

GROW

GRAND
OPENING

We Fund Bank Turndowns!

REAL ESTATE LOANS

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Legal Services

LEGAL

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr

L & R WELLNESS
CENTER
Relaxing & healing massage
$50 per hour
$5 off with this ad!
39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1
San Mateo

(650)557-2286
Open 7 days
10am - 9pm

10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

HEALING TOUCH IN...

ACUHEALTH

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$48

Belbien Day Spa

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

HEALING MASSAGE

Best Asian Body Massage

$35/hr

(with this ad for first time visitors)

Free Parking

(650)692-1989

1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame

Music

10 am to 9 pm

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

2305-A Carlos St.

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

New Masseuses
every two weeks
Alongside Highway 1

Moss Beach
(Cash Only)

Bronstein Music
(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

32

Weekend • June 27-28, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL