You are on page 1of 66

DESSERTATION REPORT

ON
A STUDY OF DIVERSITY & ITS IMPACT ON WORK PERFORMANCE OF
EMPLOYEE WORKING IN PHARMA INDUSTRIES

SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AWARD
OF
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Under Institutional Guidance of:

Prepared And Submitted By:

Dr. D.S. CHAUBEY

Rajneesh Kumar

Director U.I.B.S.

M.B.A. 4th Sem

M.B.A.

2010-2012

UTTRANCHAL INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT DEHRADUN


(Affiliated to UTTARAKAHAND TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY)

1 | Page

DECLARATION
I declare that the dissertation A STUDY OF DIVERSITY & ITS IMPACT ON WORK
PERFORMANCE OF EMPLOYEE WORKING IN PHARMA INDUSTRIES
is a record of independent research work carried out by me during the academic year 2010-12
under the guidance of honorable director Dr. D.S.CHAUBEY of

Uttaranchal Institute of

Business studies.
I also declare that this dissertation is the result of my effort and has not been submitted to any
other University or Institution for the award of any degree, or personal favor whatsoever. All the
details and analysis provided in the report hold true to the best of my knowledge.

RAJNEESH KUMAR
M.B.A. (U.I.M. 4thsem)

2 | Page

PREFACE

This Research is a part of my PROJECT REPORT is an integral part of every M.B.A course. We
cant rely merely upon theoretical knowledge. It is to be complemented by practical know how
for it to be fulfill. A positive and correct result of the classroom learning needs realities of
practical situation.
The report submission enables the management students to themselves work in research by them
own for getting benefit in the future. It gives them real feel of research work, which helps them
to better equip themselves with the required skills. I got the opportunity to complete research
work on
A STUDY OF DIVERSITY & ITS IMPACT ON WORK PERFORMANCE OF
EMPLOYEE WORKING IN PHARMA INDUSTRIES
In particular I was lucky enough to be part of study. It has been a great learning experience for
me.
The study would not have been possible without the unconditional guidance
and support of my guide.

3 | Page

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I express my deepest sense of gratitude the GOD almighty for the abundant blessing without
which the study would have never been light of the day.
I hereby acknowledge my sincere gratitude to the U.K.TECH University and the Management
for giving me an opportunity to undergo MBA Degree Course and to undertake this project work
successfully.
I owe my reverential gratitude to honorable director sir Dr. D.S.CHAUBEY, for his valuable
guidance and suggestions rendered at each stage of the project.
Last, but not Least I would like to acknowledge the wholehearted support of my parents,
faculties, and friends who helped me at various stages in completing this work successfully .

RAJNEESH KUMAR
M.B.A. (U.I.M. 4thsem)

4 | Page

INTERNAL GUIDE CERTIFICATE

I have the pleasure in certifying that RAJNEESH KUMAR is a bonafide student of M.B.A. 4th
Semester of the Masters Degree in Business Administration of UTTRANCHAL INSTITUTE
OF MANAGEMENT DEHRADUN
He has completed his project work entitled Under my guidance.
I certify that this is his original effort & has not been copied from any other source. This project
has also not been submitted in a
A STUDY OF DIVERSITY & ITS IMPACT ON WORK PERFORMANCE OF
EMPLOYEE WORKING IN PHARMA INDUSTRIES
any other University for the purpose of award of any Degree.
This project fulfils the requirement of the curriculum prescribed by UTTRANCHAL
INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT DEHRADUN, for the said course. I recommend this project
work for evaluation & consideration for the award of Degree to the student.

Signature
Name of the Guide
Date

5 | Page

:
: Dr. D.S.CHAUBEY, Director UIBS
:

CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION
2. REVIEW OF LITERATURE
3. INDUSTRY AND COMPANY PROFILE
4.

OBJECTIVES OF STUDY

5. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
6. DATA PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS
7. FINDINGS
8. RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

9. BIBLIOGRAPHY

6 | Page

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT.

Machineries may be there, buildings may be there , but without people its all nothing
.people are the only real asset.
Organizations are not mere bricks, mortar or inventories, they are people .it is the people
who staff & manage organizations decisions made must influence the effectiveness of the
organization.
Effectiveness of an organization must result in the betterment of services to customers in
the form of high quality products provided at reasonable costs.
H/R is the management. Functions (planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling) of
the procurement, development, compensation, integration, maintenance & separation of H/R to
that individual, organizational & social objectives are fulfilled.
H/R functions are not confined to the business establishments only they are applicable to
non business organizations too. The scope of H/R is very fast .all major activities in the
working life of an individual from the time of his applying in the organization till or she leaves
comes under the preview of H.R.M.
Specifically the activities included are:- H.R.P, job analysis & design,
recruitment & selection ,placement & induction ,training & development ,performance appraisal
& job Evaluation ,employee & executive remuneration ,motivation & communication ,welfare ,
Safety & health & Industrial relation.

7 | Page

Human Resource Management: Defined

Human Resource Management has come to be recognized as an inherent part of management,


which is concerned with the human resources of an organization. Its objective is the maintenance
of better human relations in the organization by the development, application and evaluation of
policies, procedures and programmes relating to human resources to optimize their contribution
towards the realization of organizational objectives.

In other words, HRM is concerned with getting better results with the collaboration of people. It
is an integral but distinctive part of management, concerned with people at work and their
relationships within the enterprise. HRM helps in attaining maximum individual development,
desirable working relationship between employees and employers, employees and employees,
and effective modeling of human resources as contrasted with physical resources. It is the
recruitment, selection, development, utilization, compensation and motivation of human
resources by the organization.

HR -VISION

To attain organizational excellence by developing & inspiring the true potential of companys
human capital & providing opportunities for growth, well-being & enrichment.

HR MISSION.
8 | Page

To create a value & knowledge based organization by inculcating a culture of learning,


Innovation and team work & assigning business priorities with aspiration of employees
leading to a development of an empowered, responsive and competent human capital.
HR-OBJECTIVES.

To develop & sustain the core values.

To develop the business leaders of tomorrow.

To provide job content through empowerment, accountability & responsibility.

To build and upgrade competencies through vital learning opportunities for growth

& providing challenges in the job.

To foster a climate of creativity, innovation and enthusiasm.

To enhance the quality of life of employees and their family.

To inculcate higher understanding of service to a greater cause.

BACKGROUND SCENARIO

William James of Harvard University estimated that employees could retain their jobs by
working at a mere 20-30 percent of their potential. His research led him to believe that if these
same employees were properly motivated, they could work at 80-90% of their capabilities.
Behavioral science concepts like motivation and enhanced productivity could well be used for
such improvements in employee output. Training could be one of the means used to achieve such
improvements through the effective and efficient use of learning resources.

9 | Page

Training and development has been considered an integral part of any organization since the
industrial revolution era. From training imparted to improve mass production to now training
employees on soft skills and attitudinal change, training industry has come a long way today. In
fact most training companies are expecting the market to double by the year 2007, which just
means that the Indian training industry seems to have come of age.

Organization and individual should develop and progress simultaneously for their survival
and attainment of mutual goals. So, every modern management has to develop the organization
through human resource development. Employee training is the most important sub-system of
human resources development. Training is a specialized function and one of the fundamental
operative functions for human resources management.

The market is unofficially estimated to be anywhere between Rs 3000 corers and Rs 6000
corers. What is surprising is that the Indian companies. Perception regarding corporate training
seems to have undergone a sea-change in the past two years, with most companies realizing it to
be an integral part of enhancing productivity of its personnel. While MNC.s with their global
standards of training is the harbingers of corporate training culture in India, the bug seems to
have bitten most companies aiming at increasing their efficiency.

According to Ms Pallavi Jha, Managing Director, Walchand Capital and Dale Carnegi Training
India, "The Indian training industry is estimated at approximately Rs 3,000 crores per annum.
The NFO study states that over a third of this is in the area of behavior and soft skills
development. With the exponential boom in the services sector and the emergence of a fullfledged consumer-driven market, human resources have become the key assets, which
organizations cannot ignore. With soft skills training gaining so much momentum, it.s imperative
to understand if it serving the right purpose or not. With this background, I plan to research if
training indeed is proving to be effective in the behavioral area.

10 | P a g e

The following steps must form the basis of any training activity:

Determine the training needs and objectives.

Translate them into programs that meet the needs of the selected trainees.

Evaluate the results.

There are few generalizations about training that can help the practitioner. Training should be
seen as a long term investment in human resources using the equation given below:
Performance = ability (x) motivation
Training can have an impact on both these factors. It can heighten the skills and abilities of the
employees and their motivation by increasing their sense of commitment and encouraging them
to develop and use new skills. It is a powerful tool that can have a major impact on both
employee productivity and morale, if properly used.

11 | P a g e

Scope of Human Resource Management


The Scope of HRM is in deed fast. All major activities in the working life of
worker from time of his entry in an organization until he / she leaves, come under
the preview of HRM. Specifically, the activities included are Human Resource
planning, Job analysis and design, Recruitment, Selection, Orientation and
placement, Training and development, Performance appraisal and Job evaluation,
employee and executive remuneration and communication, employee welfare,
safety and health, industrial relations and the like.
HRM is becoming a specialized branch giving rise to a number of specialized areas
like:
Staffing
Welfare and Safety
Wages and Salary Administration
Training and Development
Labour Relations

12 | P a g e

LITERATURE REVIEW

13 | P a g e

Literature review
On
work diversity issue & challenges

This literature reviews the national literature on the business case for adopting work-life balance
policies with respect to work diversity issue and challenges. V k Mehata and S K DASS writer
the business case is established by weighing up the costs and benefits of introducing work-life
balance policies and impact of diversity in work culture and determining if the net impact is
positive. Trusts Work & Life M c Kuchhal awards highlight a number of strong case studies for
the business benefits of work diversity balance policies. Both the local and the international
literature identify the benefits of work diversity which are:
Improved recruitment and retention rates, with associated cost savings;
Reduced absenteeism and sick leave usage;
A reduction in worker stress and improvements in employee satisfaction .
Greater flexibility for business operating hours;
An improved corporate image the costs of implementing .
Direct costs, such as parental leave payments or providing equipment.
Indirect costs associated with temporarily filling the posts of absentees and
Temporary reductions in productivity arising from disruptions.
ACCORDING TO Brown et al .
Gender-based differences in each of these areas have a profound effect on economic
opportunities for men and women, the productivity of mens and womens labor, the performance
and potential of their businesses, and the incentives facing men and women as economic agents.
These in turn affect the nature, pace, and impact of economic growth and poverty reduction.
14 | P a g e

. ACCORDING TO Beverland et al
Womens participation in the labor force has progressed over the years, and
women are now estimated to comprise around 40 percent of the global labor force. Yet women
still predominate in the informal sector (ILO 2002), and,
despite improvements in education, women still earn less than men. Estimates
of wage differences show marked Regional variations: in the Middle East and North Africa,
women earn 93 percent of mens wages.
ACCORDING TO Raj,Morrison and Sinha(2007)
Morrison, Raju, and Sinha (2007) report striking findings from work undertaken by Klasen
(2002). Klasen estimates the effect of the gender gap in years of total schooling in the adult
population on per capita income growth, using
cross-country and panel regressions for the 196092 period for 109 industrial and developing
countries. He finds that the direct and indirect effects of gender inequality in educational
attainment account for 0.95 percentage points of the 2.5 percentage point gap in growth rates
between South Asia and
East Asia; 0.56 percentage points of the 3.3 percentage point gap between Sub-Saharan Africa
and East Asia; and 0.85 percentage points of the 1.9 percentage point gap between the Middle
East and North Africa and East Asia.
ACCORDING TO Blecker and Seguino(2002)
In contrast, Blecker and Seguino (2002) highlight a different mechanism, leading to contrasting
results. They suggest that high gender pay gaps and associated low female wages increase the
competitiveness of export-oriented industrializing economies and thus boost the growth
performance of
these countries. Again, as with education, womens greater labor force participation has
important intrahousehold and intergenerational effects.
For example, the development of the garment industry in Bangladesh has
increased womens access to a lucrative labor market and expanded their ability to influence
household choices. A comparative study of the Philippines,
Indonesia (Sumatra), and Ghana shows that changes in labor market opportunities for women
can influence increasing equality in patterns of land inheritance and investments in schooling An
increasing share of cash income in
womens hands is also shown to increase h ousehold food expenditure, controlling for average
per capita expenditure, household expenditure
and demographic characteristics, resulting in better nutrition and child health (Hoddinott and
Haddad 1994).
ACCORDING TO Beegle and Frankenberg(2003)

15 | P a g e

Thomas, Beegle, and Frankenberg (2003) have shown that greater incomes of mothers can have
up to 20 times the effect on the nutritional status of children than if the same income increment
goes to fathers. The importance of womens entrepreneurship, and of women in the corporate
sector, is increasingly recognized. Women own between 13 and 38 percent of enterprises
worldwide. In China, it is estimated that women own one-third of all small and medium-sized
businesses, with more than one in
five employing more than 1,000 workers.
ACCORDING TO Rees (2003)
Box B.1
The results indicated that the perceived dominance of home, school and social interaction
appears to be somewhat overshadowed by the young consumers, while developing an
'independence' trait, particularly during the adolescent years. The authors suggested that food
preferences are often of a 'fast food' type and consequently the food habits of many young
consumers may fuel the consumption of poorly nutritionally balanced meals. While young
consumers were aware of healthy eating, their food preference behavior did not always appear to
reflect such knowledge, particularly within the school and social environments.

ACCORDING TO Bristow et al (2003)


Higher female labor force participation can be seen to have a positive impact on income growth.
Recent microsimulations for eight countries in Latin America addressed dimensions of gender
inequality in relation to four specific labor market issues: entry into the labor market;
occupational status of men and women; wage discrimination between men and women; and
differences in characteristic endowments of men and women. These simulations confirmed that
removing gender inequality in labor market participation would lead to a significant reduction in
poverty, growth in income and decline in inequality. This is especially relevant in the countries
concerned, as there is a marked gender gap in labor force participation; the average female
participation rate
is about 56 percent, whereas the male rate is greater than 80 percent .
ACCORDING TO RAMASSAMY (2009)
The importance of womens entrepreneurship, and of women in the corporate sector, is
increasingly recognized. Women own between 13 and 38 percent of enterprises worldwide. In
China, it is estimated that women own one-third of all small and medium-sized businesses.

16 | P a g e

the decision for purchasing branded fine rice was mostly made by the wives of the family. The
retailers were ranked as the prime source of information about branded fine rice. The monthly
purchase is the most preferred frequency of purchase, which might be due to the fact that most of
the respondents were of monthly salaried class and they would have planned their purchase
accordingly along with other provision items. The quality and the image of the brand were
ranked as the major factors for brand preference in the purchase of branded fine rice. ne. The
explicit factors identified were, the familiarity with brand name, the price of wine, quality or the
mouth feel of the liquid, taste with regards to its sweetness or dryness and the suitability for all
tastes. Some of the implicit factors identified through extensive questioning were, colour and
appearance. Most consumers seemed to prefer white wine to red. Packaging, appearance, colour,
ornateness, use of foreign language and graphics were taken as important clues for quality and
price. Consumers preferred French or German made wines to Spanish or Yugoslavian wines.
ACCORDING TO Katz and Chamorro 2003).
A global study of land policy addresses womens land rights(World Bank 2003c). The study
concludes that increasing womens control over land could have a strong and immediate effect
on the welfare of the next generation and on the level and pace at which physical and human
capital are accumulated.
Given the signific ant participation of women in agricultural production in Africa, gender
differences in security of tenureand access to inputs and technologyare likely to account for
much of the poor performance of the sector.
in Ghana, the greater precariousness of womens land rights has direct implications for
productivity and yields In Latin America, a study showed that the gender inequality in land
ownership in 12 countries is the combined
results of biases: male preference in inheritance, male privilege in marriage, male bias in state
programs of land distribution, and gender inequality in the land market (Deere and Leon2001).
Analysis of country-level data from Honduras and Nicaragua suggests a positive correlation
between womens land rights and their overall role in the household economy: women
gain greater control over agricultural income, gain higher shares of business and labor market
earnings, and more frequently receive credit (Katz and Chamorro 2003).
ACCORDING TO Goetz et al (2003)
Little appears in the governance literature that is deliberately gender disaggregated, and women
seem to get lumped with the poor or those who are more generally subordinate (Goetz2004).
This needs to be corrected, because the significance is clear: power and authority differentials
between women and men are not restricted to the private sphere of the family
and kinship network but also play out in the public sphere, in the process shaping the form of
governance that prevails. The gender literature is of greater use. Much of it dwells on the
question of the extent to which the public world of governance could provide an answer to
womens inferior position in the domestic sphere. Very often it seems to be assumed that the
17 | P a g e

local arena of governance is better suited to female participation than regional and national
levels(Evertzen 2001). However, if this were true, there would be more women
engaged in local governance than national level politics.
ms..

Rusan Pharma

18 | P a g e

INDUSTRY AND COMPANY PROFILE


Welcome to Rusan,
High-quality public health is vital for a functioning society and a countrys economic growth.
We, at Rusan Pharma Ltd, understand this and are committed to providing improved solutions.
Rusan Pharma Ltd. is a technology driven pharmaceutical company with interests in research and
development, manufacturing and marketing of formulations, APIs and their intermediates. We
specialize in opioid de-addiction, critical and acute pain management, anti-tuberculosis and
psychotropic drugs.
At Rusan, we are guided by professional leadership and experience, commitment towards quality
and delivery and a good understanding of business complexities. We work with exemplary
business practices and work ethics, and implement new ideas efficiently and effectively. Rusan
also believe that success is often achieved through close collaboration with partners who share a
common vision and possess complementary strengths. With the ever changing industry trends we
are ready to take on fresh challenges by embracing original technologies, novel drug delivery
systems, and biocatalysts. That is why we are confident that with strong leadership, motivated
partners and new technologies we can provide a better quality service to our customers.
PRODUCTS
male Erectile

Dysfunction

Ph.Eur./USP (41372-20-7) DMF Available

Bisoprolol Fumarate Anti-hypertensive


CEP
Buprenorphine

19 | P a g e

Analgesic

Ph.Eur./USP (104344-23-2 DMF Submitted for

Opiate de-addiction

Ph.Eur./ USP (52485-79-7) CEP Grade

Buprenorphine hydrochloride Analgesic


Opiate de-addiction

Ph.Eur./ USP (53152-21-9) CEP Grade

Eflornithine Hydrochloride
Sleeping Sickness

Ph.Eur./USP (67037-37-0) DMF Available

Fentanyl Base Analgesic


Fentanyl Citrate

Unwanted facial hair

Ph.Eur (437-38-7)

Analgesic

Methadone Hydrochloride

CEP Grade

Ph.Eur./USP (990-73-8)

Opiate de-addiction

DMF Available

Ph.Eur./USP (1095-90-5)

DMF

Submitted for CEP


Nalbuphine Hydrochloride

Analgesic

HPCL:Min 98.5%

(23277-43-2) DMF

Available
Nalmefene Hydrochloride

Narcotic antagonist

Ph.Eur./USP (58895-6410) DMF

Narcotic antagonist

Ph.Eur./USP (51481-60-8) DMF

Under

Preparation
Naloxone Hydrochloride
Submitted for CEP
Naltrexone Hydrochloride

Narcotic antagonist

In treatment of alcoholism

Ph.Eur./USP (16676-29-2) CEP Grade

Promedol Hydrochloride

Analgesic

USSRP

Tramadol hydrochloride

Analgesic

Ph.Eur./USP (36282-47-0) DMF

Preparation
Products Pipeline

APIs Under Development :20 | P a g e

(64-39-1)

DMF Available
Under

Oxycodone HCI USP


Dihydrocodeine tartrate BP/ USP
Oxymorphone HCL USP
Hydrocodone HCL UPS
Hydromorphone HCL USP
Detomidine HCL ph.Eur
Perindopril Erbumine Ph.Eur
Opiate Prodrugs
Clopidogrel Hydrogen Sulphate Form 1 & 2
Cetirizine Di-Hydrochloride
Es-Omeprazole Magnesium
Enalapril Maleate
Fluconazole
Itraconazole (Mesylate, Tosylate & Pharma)
Lansoprazole
Losartan Potassium
Lisinopril
Olanzapine
Pantaprazole Sodium Sesqui Hydrate
Phenyl Ephrine Hydrochloride
Sertraline Hydrochloride

21 | P a g e

S-Citalopram Oxalate
Salbutamol Sulphate
Sotalol Hydrochloride
Tramadol Hydrochloride
Zidovudine
Pioglitazone Hydrochloride
Respiridone

22 | P a g e

WORK DIVERSITY

23 | P a g e

WORK DIVERSITY
Dealing with diversity in the workplace means understanding and relating effectively with
people who are different than you. The ability for a diverse group of people to build strength
and unity through their diversity is the power that propels organizations into new dimensions
of performance. Discussions of workplace diversity in the United States tend to start with the
topics of race,ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and disability. Indeed, organizations that
want to thrive in the future will need to have employees and managers who are aware of and
skilled in dealing with differences along these identity lines. Another slice of diversity that is
not always included in typical diversity discussions, however, is generational diversity. In
any large organization, you are bound to find divisions, units, or work teams where at least
four distinct generations are working side by side. Sociologists, psychologists, and everyday
managers have identified important differences between these generations in the way they
approach work, work/life balance, employee loyalty, authority, and other important issues.
This document seeks to uncover some of the basic characteristics of the generations in
todays workforce and discuss the relevance of these differences to organizational
performance.
Effective communication strategies enable employees and managers to avoid the whirlpools
of bad morale and lost productivity that accompanies the use of negative stereotypes. There
are simple processes and frameworks for having difficult conversations that allow people
from all generations to effectively explore the assumptions and behaviors that underlie
negative stereotypes. Communication skills are also the foundation of effective conflict
resolution skills. While negotiation skills enhance ones ability to understand the root
causes of conflict and generate creative solutions, they all rely on the ability of the individuals
involved to communicate clearly around difficult, often emotionally charged subjects.

FACTORS AFFECTING DIVERSITY OF EMPLOYEE


Religions

Languages

24 | P a g e

Dance, Music and Art

Scientist

The Food We eat

Festivals
Indian Culture Report

India has one of the richest and most exciting cultural tradition in the world our culture goes
back several thousands year. That is why ours is known as one of the oldest civilization in the
world. India is a land of festivals. There is hardly any month of the year without any festival.
Therefore the festivals also play an important in our life & they remains our culture evergreen
similarly there are many states in our India, all having their own traditional dress& food also
because of all this about India it has be said that India has unity in diversity. In this project will
learn about the varieties of our India & I will try to attract you towards the Indian culture or a
great culture.
Religions in India

India, being a secular country does not have any state religion. The state of India allows for
freedom of faith, worship & religion. People of many different religions live in our country. They
are free to follow & preach the religion of their choice. Among the major religion in India,
Hinduism is the largest, followed by Islam, Christianity, Sikhism, Buddism, Jainism &
Zoroastrianism.
Hinduism

Hinduism is among the most ancient religions of India. The followers of Hinduism account for
over 80% of India's total population. The holy books & scriptures of Hinduism include the
Vedas, the Upanishads, the Puranas, the Bhagavad Gita & the epics like the Ramayana & the
Mahabharata.
25 | P a g e

Hindus believe in one supreme God but they worship God in different avatars or forms.
Hinduism has a rich & varied philosophy. They have been many well-known Hindu thinkers &
reformers like Adi Shanker, Dayanand Saraswati, & Swami Vivekananda. They all have tried to
teach us how to be better human beings.
Islam

The followers of Islam are known as Muslim. They are second largest religions community in
India accounting for over 11% of her total population. Muslims believe in only one God of or
Allah. Prophet Mohammad is believed to be the last & the greatest of the Prophets. He was born
in 570 A.D in Mecca. He preached & spread Islam. The Koran is a holy book of the Muslims.
The devout Muslim has five duties belief in one God; prayers five time a day; the giving of alms;
a months fast every year; and a pilgrimage to Mecca atleast once in life time. The Muslims do
not allow idol worship. Neither do they allow any picture of Allah.
Christianity

Christians comprise about two & a half % of Indias population. Christianity was founded by
Lord Jesus Christ. He was born at Bethlehem in Israel near two thousand year ago. Jesus taught
the people the importance of peace, love & compassion. The teachings of Jesus Christ are
contained in the holy book, Bible Christians worship in a Church. The symbol of a Church is
cross signifies the crucifixion of Lord Jesus Christ.
Sikhism

The Sikhs constitute a little the 2% of Indias population. Sikhism, which emerged in the15th
century, was founded by Guru Nanak Dev. Sikhism tried to bridge the gap between Hinduism &
Islam. Guru Nanak Dev said that the God for Hindus & Muslims was the same. Sikhs worship in
a Gurudwara. Their holy book is called the Guru Nanak Dev & the nine Guru who came after
him.
Buddhism

Buddhism originated in India and its followers formless then 1% of Indias population. The
founder of Buddhism was Lord Gautam Buddha. He was the son of an India, King. Who lived
26 | P a g e

2500 years ago. His childhood name Siddharatha. He gave up his princely life & went out for
true knowledge. At last he become enlightened under the Bodhi tree in Gaya. From that day he
become known as the Buddha or the enlightened one. Buddha believed in non- violence. He
thought that every human being must follow the middle path & adopt good behaviour & simple
habits. Buddism spread to China, Sri Lanka, Japan &many other countries in Asia.
Jainism

The Jains form about half of a percent of Indias population Jainism was founded by Mahavira.
He lived about 2,500 years ago. He preached Ahimsa, right conduct, right faith and tolerance.
The followers of Jainism are strict vegetarians & do not hurt living things.
Zoroastrianism

The followers of Zoroastrianism are called Parsis. Zoroastrianism was founded by the great
Persian. Prophet Zoroaster or Zarathushtra. He preached that there is a continuous battle going
on between the forces of good and evil. And in the end God always triumphs or wins over evils.
The parsis worship in a fire Temple. The holy book of parsis is Zend Avesta.
Languages in India

There are as many as 1,652 languages & dialects spoken in different parts of India. It is said that
in India a dialect changes every thirty or 40km.

The constitution of India recognizes 18 major languages they are: -

(1) Assamese

(2) Bangla

(3) Gujrati

(4) Hindi

(5) Kannada

(6) Konkani

27 | P a g e

(7) Malayalam

(8) Manipuri

(9) Marathi

(10) Nepali

(11) Punjabi

(12) Tamil

(13) Sindhi

(14) Kasmiri

(15) Sanskrit

(16) Oriya

(17) Telgu

(18) Urdu

Of these Sanskrit & Tamil are the oldest languages. The scripts of all these languages except
Kasmiri, Sindhi & Urdu are written from left to right. The script of Kasmiri, Sindhi & Urdu are
written from right to left.

Hindi is the official language of India. Before Independence English was the official language of
India.

28 | P a g e

DIVERSITY LEAD TO
INNOVATION ?

29 | P a g e

Does Employee Diversity Lead to Innovation?


INTRODUCTION
One of the most important challenges and opportunities for firms today is the increasing diversity
in society. The knowledge base becomes more diverse and so does the cultural and ethnic
background among employees. This increasing diversity in the knowledge base increases the
need for interaction and communication within the firms, while increased cultural diversity
might lead to conflict. However, employee diversity might create a broader search space and
make the firm more open tow ards new ideas and more creative. Ideally, diversity should
increase a firms knowledge base and increase the interaction between different types of
competences and knowledge. This creates possibilities for new combinations of knowledge and
innovation.
The relation between a diverse composition of the workforce and the performance of firms was
addressed in Penroses work from 1959 where she states that:It is the heterogeneity of the
productive
services available or potentially available from its resources that gives each firm its unique
character
An important part of these resources is the firms human capital resources.These resources have a
cognitive dimension, such as vocational training and experience and a
demographic dimension, such as gender, age and cultural background, which affect the
application
and combination of existing knowledge and the communication and interaction between different
parts
of the firm.
A growing literature is analysing the relation between diversity among top managers and the
performance of firms. The characteristics of the top managers appear to influence growth,
productivity
and revenues Others have
studied the effect of diverse top management teams on innovation based on indicators such as
age or
tenure, with mixed results .
However, innovation is an interactive process that often involves communication and interaction
among employees in a firm and draws on their different qualities from all levels of the
organization. In addition the composition of the top management team does not necessarily

30 | P a g e

reflect the composition of the larger pool of human capital in the company herefore it is not
sufficient to look at the top management team when analysing the effect of
diversity on innovation. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of employee diversity
on the
innovative performance of firms, based on the characteristics of all employees in the firm, using
several indicators such as age, education, nationality and gender.
The empirical analysis will be based on two types of datasets: The first is a questionnaire based
innovation survey (DISKO4) collected in focusing on organizational and technical change in
more than firms in the period 2003-2005. This database is merged with register data
from the second dataset the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research (IDA) that contains
detailed information on all Danish firms and all individuals on the labour market. Therefore it is
possible to link the diverse composition of firms in terms of gender, age, education, and
nationality
with the organisational form, strategy and innovative behaviour of these firms. The analysis
shows that
employee diversity has an effect on the innovative performance of firms. We find that employee
diversity with respect to gender, education and nationality has a significant positive effect on
firms
likelihood to innovate, while diversity in age has a significant negative effect. We control for
factors like
size, industry, competition, organizational change and external cooperation.
The remainder of the paper is structured as follows. Section 2 contains the theoretical discussion
on
diversity and innovation. Section 3 describes the questionnaire, data, variables and estimation
technique used in the analysis
Diversity and innovation
A growing literature is addressing the relation between diversity and performance. The argument
is
that the firms knowledge, in the form of human capital, is very important in explaining its
performance
and that this human capital is affected by diversity in the composition of and interaction between
employees . Employee diversity is often measured by individuals demographic
attributes that are used as a proxy for different attitudes, knowledge bases and cognitive models.
The
individual employees knowledge structures are also affected by group membership, social
interactions, and organisation of the firm
In their review of 40 years of research on demography and diversity in organizations diversity
has both direct and indirect effects on processes and performance of groups, however, some
results points towards a positive effect of diversity, while others stress the negative effect of
increased diversity, thus diversity has two potential effects. They argue that the difficulties of
finding significant positive effects of diversity might stem from differences defining performance
indicators and the lack of separating the creativity (invention) phase from the implementation
(innovation) phase.

31 | P a g e

Whenever services are the input, it is also the combination of services that influence the
performance of a firm. This combination can also occur within human capital resources where
the
services (e.g. knowledge, skills and attitude) contribute to a firms performance. A combination
of
services can only occur when services are different from each other. Diversity among services is
thus
required for combination to take place. This has already been recognized by previous research on
the
effect of diversity on firm performance.
Previous studies have focused on the effect of the top management on firm performance. The
upper-echelon framework analyses factors that affect the executive leaderships strategy
formation
and subsequently organisational behaviour and performance.
that functional background and demographic characteristics influence the managers
interpretation of
problems and tenure is related to strategic inertia, however, they find that the characteristics of
the full
management team has greater predicting power of firm performance than the top person. Murray
(1989) analysed how heterogeneity in the top management team influence firm performance. As
measures of the heterogeneous composition of top management team he looked at difference in
age,
tenure, and occupational and educational background based on different educational levels (i.e.
graduates, undergraduates, doctorates) in several disciplines (e.g. liberal arts, engineering,
science,
business, law, etc.). Murray found a positive effect of diversity on firm performance. Kildfuff et
al.
(2000)analysed the demographic component of top management team diversity by gender, age
and
race. They found that these characteristics gave a more accurate reflection of how much the team
differs in attitude, values and norms. Pitcher and Smith (2001) also analysed the effect of top
management team heterogeneity on firm performance. As proxies for heterogeneity they used
team
tenure, functional background, industry experience, age and education. Pitcher and Smith found
that
heterogeneity was positive for long-term performance, however, it had some limits if the
managers
receive orders from the company headquarter.
There have only been a few studies of diversity of top management and innovation performance.
Bantel and Jackson (1989) analysed how the composition of top management teams in the
finance
sector affects innovation defined as the number of products, programs and services that firms had
adopted or developed. They analysed diversity by age, tenure, education and functional
background
and found a positive relation between educational level, functional background and innovation.
32 | P a g e

Many studies only look at the diversity in management team. However, innovation is an
interactive
process (Lundvall 1985, 1992) and would thus suggest that more employees rather than only the
top
management team are involved. Van der Vegt and Janssen (2003)apply a broader perspective and
analyses the effect of task interdependence and heterogeneity in groups on innovative behaviour.
They also argue that innovation is an interactive process, where employees interact in groups and
develop, discuss, modify and realise new ideas, thus diversity in groups should promote
innovation
behaviour. However, they find no direct link between group diversity and innovative behaviour
when
they controlled for size and organisation of work (flexibility and task non-routineness). Van de
Vegt
and Janssen (2003) conclude that diversity in groups is important, but the characteristics of work
organisation are more important. Laursen et al. (2005) takes a broader perspective and analyses
the
composition of all the engineers in Danish engineering consulting firms rather than only the top
management team to see how employee diversity affects firm performance. They argue that firm
performance is not only related to levels of human resources, but also to the composition of these
resources. However, too little and too much diversity should have a negative effect, which
implies an
inverted curve linear relationship between diversity and performance. They discovered that
combining
fundamental different skills leads to a better competitive advantage, besides, they also find some
support of a curve linear relationship between diversity and performance i.e. a low level of
diversity
and a high level of diversity is positive.

33 | P a g e

DIVERSITY AND EMOTION


we turn our attention to recent developments in the study of emotions in organizations. We
identify four major topics: mood theory, emotional labor, affective events theory, and emotional
intelligence, and argue that developments in the four domains have significant implications for
organizational research, and the progression of the study of organizational behavior. As with the
study of diversity, the topic of emotions in the workplace is shaping up as one of the principal
areas
of development in management thought and practice for the next decade. Finally, we discuss in
our
conclusion how these two areas are being conceptually integrated, and the implications for
management scholarship and research in the contemporary world.
we canvass two issues that we believe are both topical and important in
organizational behavior: diversity and emotions. We present an analytical review of recent
theoretical and empirical developments in these fields, and suggest that integration of these two
issues has exciting theoretical and research implications. The first part of our paper deals with
diversity. In common with the study of emotions, this area of organizational study underscores
how
the cognitive-rational paradigms of organizational behavior (e.g. Simon, 1976) are today being
challenged. In the first section of our paper, therefore, we trace the history of diversity research,
explore the definitions and paradigms used in treatments of it, and signal new areas of interest. In
the second section, we direct our attention to discussion of the current and growing interest in the
study of emotions in organizational settings. Although interest in emotions in work settings is
spread across a broad range of topics, our reading of the trends in this area leads us to the
conclusion
that four domains areas are especially worthy of attention:
mood effects,
emotional labor,
affective events theory,
emotional intelligence.

34 | P a g e

DIVERSITY AND
EMOTION

35 | P a g e

Why diversity and emotion?


I identify four trends that, along with their implications, guided our choice to integrate diversity
issues and emotions in this article. These are:
The trend to globalization.
As organizations geographically diversify, and the free movement of
labor across national boundaries intensifies, the necessity to interact effectively with broader
constituencies becomes critical Diversity issues directly address this trend, and
emotional issues indirectly address it through the mediating variable of communication.
Communicating effectively by understanding, reading, and responding to the emotional nuances
in
different cultures and environments underscores the importance of the linkage between diversity
and
emotion in the new millennium.
The trend of the service economy.
Service is becoming a greater part of nations economies, with
higher levels of international and national tourism and increasing competition Competencies in
emotional and cross-cultural management are crucial for
organizations to understand how to serve and to retain a customer base that is much more diverse
and demanding than in years past.
The trend of increased technology, especially within the communications arena.
Technologicaladvances aim to increase efficiency, often with an emphasis on decreasing time to
production or service. These advances significantly alter the working environment.
.
For example, technological changes can heighten interaction between individuals in terms of
time,
intensity, and emotions . Abilities to understand diverse
and multiple perspectives (cultural and emotional) quickly, as well as the potential impact of
these
perspectives in the interaction can contribute to efficiency, while the lack of such abilities can
detract from it. technological advances also offer the possibility to work with persons one may
never
meet and from different culturalbackgrounds. Again, such changes have implications for emotion
36 | P a g e

and diversity alike.


The trend of knowledge work.
With organizational viability depending more and more upon the
knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes of employees, management practices that encourage
innovation and a high performance and learning culture that embraces all workers are essential.
Diversity and emotional management hold the potential of contributing to such
goals.
With only a few exceptions (discussed later in this article), diversity issues and emotions in the
workplace have not been extensively linked, either theoretically or empirically. Indeed because
of
the relatively recent nature of research interest in both areas, their study has followed parallel
paths
that often began with isolated, individual investigations. Yet, over time, they have evolved and
emerged to overarching paradigms and models which are conceptually integrative and
sophisticated,
and which offer pragmatic implications for the study and practice of management. We hope that
our article will offer guidance that will enable scholars to move farther along this path.
Emotional Intelligence and Leadership
Current dominant theories of leadership today are based on the ideas of charismatic or
transformational leadership. Transformational leaders project a vision
that their followers accept and believe in; inspire and motivate their followers; stimulate their
followers intellectually; and at the same time provide individual consideration and succor to their
followers In this respect, the components of transformational
leadership clearly resemble the key components of emotional intelligence. Thus, to engage in
transformational leadership, leaders need to have clear emotional self-awareness, similar to the
emotional intelligence concept of emotional self-understanding (see Bass, 1998).
Transformational
leaders must also be sensitive to followers emotional needs; they also need to display empathy
towards their followers, and to understand how their followers feel, especially subsequent to
followers experiences of negative events. Most importantly, transformational leaders need to
have
the ability to inspire and to arouse their followers emotionally. This ultimately leads to
commitment
to the organization and the leaders vision.
On the one hand, charismatic leadership may be seen as a potentially exploitative technique to
gain
follower compliance. Indeed, criticism has been leveled at charismatic leadership
when it is used in a manipulative and emotionally demanding manner, especially when followers
are
open to such exploitation. Yet, emotionally intelligent leaders, on the other hand,it
37 | P a g e

should be able positively to utilize charismatic leadership skills to regulate their own and others
emotions, and to use emotional information in decision making to achieve creative and positive
outcomes. Such leaders are able to empathize with their followers. They can communicate their
vision and enthusiasm, and also form positive and constructive relationships with their followers
have recently posited that emotional intelligence is an important catalyst of In their leadership.
view, emotional intelligence helps leaders to articulate team goals and objectives; to instill
enthusiasm in members; to empathize with members; to establish cooperation, trust, and identity;
and to encourage
flexibility.

SWOT ANALYSIS IN RUSAN PHARMA Dehradun


STRENGTHS:

We can get an indication of strengths while considering questions such as;-

What does the person likes to do?

What areas of the roles does the person well do?

In what areas of the role do the person actually get into more detail?

What unusual skill does| the person brings to the job ?

What unique resources does the person draw on ?


each individual is unique and has his/her own strengths.

Studies have shown repeatedly that those employees who enjoy doing what they do, are
more

Likely to be working in business units with lower employee turnover.

WEAKNESS.

Similar personal areas of weakness or can be deduced by asking questions such as :


38 | P a g e

What does the person dislikes?

What areas of the role does the person performs poorly?

Where does the person have fewer resources than others?

What are others likely to see as weaknesses?

Weaknesses like: fear can result in a self fulfilling prophecy; it can result in a poor

self image negative attitude and consequently poor performance.

OPPURTUNITIES:

Considering the strengths what areas of the current role, and other related roles can the
person
pay well?

Are there other processes in the business model where the individuals strengths be
leveraged?

What trends can the individual help the organization take advantage of

THREATS:

What areas of the current role are likely to be compromised if the individual is put under
stress?

What skills is the employee lacking?

What are the impediments to gaining more skills?

What trends could cause harm?

ANALYSIS OF SWOT FINDINGS.

39 | P a g e

A SWOT Analysis is always done with regard to an object and is never obscure therefore the
gathering of the strengths, weakness, opportunity ,threat is only half the job done. the next step
is to analyze the gathered details & create strategies for the success both for the current and
future Situation. This can be done by analyzing the four quadrants of the SWOT matrix.

RESEARCH
OBJECTIVE

40 | P a g e

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES
To study about DIVERSITY and its impact on work performance
To study of challenging of DIVERSITY in the workplace
To study about required tools for adapting and managing the DIVERSITY
To study about employee working in pharmaceutical industries in the context of impact
of DIVERSITY.
To suggest measures for making the system more effective by exploring the area of
improvement.

41 | P a g e

RESEARCH
METHODOLOGY

42 | P a g e

- RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
The methodology followed for conducting the study includes the specification of research
design, sample design, questionnaire design, data collection and statistical tools used for
analyzing the collected data.

Research Design: The type of research design used in the project was Descriptive research,
because

it

helps

to

describe

particular

situation

prevailing

within

RUSAN

PHARMA,Dehradun. Careful design of the descriptive studies was necessary to ensure the
complete interpretation of the situation and to ensure minimum bias in the collection of data.
Sample Size: All the items consideration in any field of inquiry constitutes a universe of
population. In this research only a few items can be selected form the population for our study
purpose. The items selected constitute what is technically called a sample. Here out sample size
is 60 employees from the total population in the delivery peoples. The samples are selected on
the basis of convenient.

Data Collection: For any study there must be data for analysis purpose. Without data there is no
means of study. Data collection plays an important role in any study. It can be collected from
various sources. I have collected the data from two sources which are given below:
1. Primary Data

Personal Investigation

43 | P a g e

Observation Method

Information from correspondents

Information from superiors of the organization

2. Secondary Data

Published Sources such as Journals, Government Reports, Newspapers and Magazines


etc.

Unpublished Sources such as Company Internal reports prepare by them given to their
analyst & trainees for investigation.

Official site, some other sites are also searched to find data.

Questionnaire Schedule: Questions are framed in such a way that the answers reflect the
ideas and thoughts of the respondents with regard to level of satisfaction of various factors of job
satisfaction & employee retention. The questionnaire has total 10 questions. The likert scaling
techniques has been used for each question in the interview schedule.
1. Strongly agree
2. Agree
3. Neutral
4. Disagree
5. Strongly disagree

TOOLS OF ANALYSIS
Chi-Square Test:
Chi-square test is applied to test the goodness of fit, to verify the distribution of observed
data with assumed theoretical distribution. Therefore it is a measure to study the

44 | P a g e

divergence of actual and expected frequencies; Karl Pearsons has developed a method to
test the difference between the theoretical (hypothesis) & the observed value.
Chi square test (X2) = (O E) 2 / E
Degrees Of Freedom = V = (R 1) (C -1)
Were,
O = Observed Frequency
E = Expected Frequency
R = Number of Rows
C = Number of Columns
For all the chi-square test the table value has taken @ 5% level of significance.

Areas of Study
The area of study is confined to employees of RUSAN PHARMA ,Selaqui,Dehradun.

45 | P a g e

DATA ANALYSIS
INTERPRETATION

46 | P a g e

AND

DATA ANALYSIS &


INTERPRETATION

1. GENDER PERSPECTIVE
Gender of the employee
Frequency
Percentage
55
91.666667
5
8.3333333
60
100

Gender
Male
Female
Total

Gender
100

91.67

80
60
Percentage

40
20

8.33

0
Male

Female

INTERPRETATION:
The above table indicates that
91.666667% of the employees in Rusan pharma Dehradun are male.
8.3333333% of the employees in Rusan pharma Dehradun are female.

47 | P a g e

2. MARITAL STATUS
The marital status may influence the Work performance in an organisation as a personal factor.
Because the married people has some unavoidable responsibility.

Marital status of the employees


Frequency
Percentage
55
91.66667
5
8.333333
60
100

Marital Status
Married
Unmarried
Total

Marital status
100

91.67

80
60
Percentage

40
20

8.33

0
Married

INTERPRETATION:
The above table indicates that
91.66% of the employees are married.
8.33% of the employees are unmarried

3. AGE Factor
48 | P a g e

Unmarried

Age is an important factor that has an influence of Employee performance . Hence according to
age levels the respondents are classified into three categories.

Age of the employees


Age
Frequency
Less than or equal to 25 yrs
2
26-50
50
More than or equal to 51 yrs
8
Total
60

Percentage
3.34
83.34
13.34
100

Age
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

83.33

3.33

16.67

Percentage

INTERPRETATION:
The above table indicates that
Majority of the respondents i.e. 83.33% are in 26 to 50 years age group.
16.66% of the respondents are above 50 years age group.
3.33% of the respondents are below 26 years age group.

49 | P a g e

4. GEOGRAPHICAL FACTOR
Geographical factor of the respondents may affect the perception of job satisfaction.

Region
Southern
Northern
Eastern
Total

Geographical origin of the employees


Frequency
Percentage
18
30
30
50
12
20
60
100

Geographical origin of the Employees


60
50
40
30
20
10
0

INTERPRETATION:
The above table reveals that
30% studied up to school level.
50% of the respondents are Graduate.
20% of the respondents are Post graduate.

50 | P a g e

5. Monthly salary
Man work to earn every employee in the organization will expect adequate pay to be paid for the
job done by him. The reasonable pay for each job which is performed in the organization. This
scale of pay may help for the job satisfaction to a greater extent.

Monthly Salary of the employees


Monthly Salary
Frequency
Less than or equal to Rs 10000
7
Rs. 10001 15000
18
More than or equal to Rs. 15001 35
Total
60

Percentage
11.66666667
30
58.33333333
100

Monthly salary
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

58.33
11.67

30

Percentage

INTERPRETATION:
The above table reveals that
58.33% of the employees have their monthly salary above Rs.15001.
30% of the employees have their monthly salary between Rs.10001 Rs.15000.
11.66% of the employees have their monthly salary below Rs 10000.

51 | P a g e

6. Which of the factor influence an employee to stay the organization?


Description

Frequency

Percentage

External Rewards

8.34

Co-operation and
trust

15

communication

16

26.67

Home life

18

30

Workplace

12

20

Total

60

100

Inference:

It is seen from the table that 8% external reward factor stay the organization, 15% Cooperation and trust factor stay the organization, 26.67 Communication stay the organization, 30%
Home life factor stay the organization, and 20% Workplace factor stay the organization.

factor influence an employee to stay the organization


External Rewards
Home life

Co-operation and trust


Workplace

20%

30%

52 | P a g e

8%
15%

27%

Company direction

7. In your opinion, the diversity primarily affect on


Description

Frequency

Percentage

Employee performance

19

31.67

Business performance

32

53.34

Both a & b

15

Total

60

100

Inference:
It is seen from the table that 31.67% employees performance, 53.34% Business performance, 15% both a
& b affected by diversity.

The Diversity primarily affect on


15%
32%

53%

53 | P a g e

employee performanc
Business performance
Both a & b

8. In your opinion, what are the reasons lies for an employee to leave the organization?
Description

Frequency

Percentage

Quality of compensation package

15

Opportunities for growth and development

20

33.34

individual contributions

14

23.34

Company responsiveness to need and request

8.34

Amount of recognition for work

12

20

Total

60

100

Inference:
It is seen from the table that 15% Quality of compensation package, 33.34% Opportunities for
growth and development, 23.34% individual contributions, 8.34% Company responsiveness to
need and request, and 20% Amount of recognition for work the reason lie for an employee to
leave the organization.

9) Do you accept the challenges due to diversity

Hypothesis testing:
CHI SQUARE TEST/ TEST OF INDEPENDENCE is used for analysis.
Null Hypothesis (Ho): No one can accept the challenges due to diversity.
Alternative Hypothesis (Ha); some one accept the challenges due to diversity.
Description
Frequency
Percentage
Level
of
Strongly agree
23
38.34
= 5%
of freedom

Agree

12

20

=4

Neutral

8.34

Disagree

15

25

8.34

60

100

54 | P a g e Strongly
disagree
Total

significance
Degree
= n-1 = 5-1

Total number of respondents = 23+12+5+15+5= 60


Expected frequency (Ei) = (Total no of respondents)/ no of opinions = 60/5 = 12
CHI SQUARE (x2) = [(Oi-Ei)2/ Ei]
Where Oi = Observed frequency
Ei = Expected frequency

TABLE calculation of

Observed
frequency
(Oi)

Expected
frequency
(Ei)

(Oi-Ei)

(Oi-Ei)2

(Oi-Ei)2/Ei

23

12

11

121

10.08

Agree

12

12

Neutral

12

-7

49

4.08

Disagree

15

12

0.75

Strongly
Disagagree

12

-7

49

4.08

Opinion

Strongle agree

[(Oi-Ei)2/Ei]=18.99
CHI SQUARE (

) = [(Oi-Ei)2/Ei]

The calculated value of


The table value of

value is 18.99

for degree of freedom 4, at 5% level of significance is 18.99

computed value = 18.99

table value = 9.49

Graphical Representation:

55 | P a g e

8%
38%

25%

Strongly agree
Agree

8%

Neutral
Disagree

20%

Strongly disagree

INTERPRETATION
Since

(computed value) >

(table value), Null hypothesis is rejected. So, improvement in

direct superior focuses on result is not independent to the time I am at my desk with the belief that the
numbers of respondents agree. When the question is asked 35 out of 60 employees feel that my direct
superior focuses on results, rather than the time I am at my desk is effective.
10. Cultural diversity can affect your performances

Hypothesis
CHI
TEST/

Description

Frequency

Percentage

Strongly agree

25

41.67

Agree

15

25

Neutral

Disagree

12

20

Strongly
disagree

13.34

Total

60

100

INDEPENDENCE is used for analysis.

56 | P a g e

testing:
SQUARE
TEST OF

Null Hypothesis (Ho): cultural diversity is independent to employee performance


Alternative Hypothesis (Ha): cultural diversity is dependent to employee performance.
Level of significance = 5%
Degree of freedom = n-1 = 5-1 = 4
Total number of respondents = 25+15+0+12+8= 60
Expected frequency (Ei) = (Total no of respondents)/ no of opinions = 60/5 = 12
CHI SQUARE (x2) = [(Oi-Ei)2/ Ei]
Where Oi = Observed frequency
Ei = Expected frequency

TABLE calculation of

Observed
frequency
(Oi)

Expected
frequency
(Ei)

(Oi-Ei)

(Oi-Ei)2

(Oi-Ei)2/Ei

Strongle
agree

25

12

13

169

14.08

Agree

15

12

0.75

Neutral

12

-12

144

12

Disagree

12

12

Strongly
Disagagree

12

-4

16

1.34

Opinion

[(Oi-Ei)2/Ei]=28.17
CHI SQUARE (

) = [(Oi-Ei)2/Ei]

The calculated value of


The table value of

value is 28.17

for degree of freedom 4, at 5% level of significance is 9.49

computed value = 28.17

table value = 9.49

Graphical Representation:

57 | P a g e

13%
42%

20%

Strongly agree
Agree
Neutral

25%

Disagree
Strongly disagree

INTERPRETATION
Since

(computed value) >

(table value), Null hypothesis is rejected. Cultural diversity can

affect the employee performance. When the question is asked 40 out of 60 employees feel that cultural
diversity is dependent on employee performances.

58 | P a g e

FINDINGS

FINDINGS

From the study


The number of male employees in the company is more with the percentage of 91.67%;
whereas female employees are only 8.33%.
Majority of the employees belongs to the age group of 26years-50years.
Data collected to know the monthly salary of the employees depict that majority of the
employee got monthly salary more than Rs. 15001 with 58.33%.
59 | P a g e

Workplace, Home life factor influence an employee to stay the organization.


Language ,aesthetics cultural gap may affect the actual performance of the employee.

CONCLUSION

60 | P a g e

&
RECOMMENDATION

CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS


. If employees are committed with their organization they are reluctant to exit from their
current job. Increased commitment will also increase their efficiency. employee working
in pharmaceutical industries in the context of impact of DIVERSITY.

EMPLOYEE

DIVERSITY is one of the most accurate means in identifying ther

correlation between working condition and behavioral aspects of an individual in an


organization. Discrimination should not be seen as just another means to apportion and
61 | P a g e

dispense rewards. All the stakeholders must see in the exercise an opportunity for longterm growth. The key is to look at competency mapping as going beyond mere processes.
And to see in it an exercise that has a significant and lasting value to individuals as well
as to the organization.

62 | P a g e

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

REFERENCES:

1. C.R. Kothari, Research Methodology, New Delhi; New Age International


Publication, second edition.
63 | P a g e

2. K. Ashwathapa, Human Resource Management (third edition), Tata Mc Graw Hill


Publication Company Ltd.

3. T.N. Chhabra, Human Resource Management, Dhanpat Rai $Co (P) Ltd. India,
ninth edition.

4. Arun Monnapa, Human Resource Management, Tata Mc Graw Hill Publication


Company Ltd.

SEARCH ENGINES:

www.google.com

www.indianmba.com
www.scribd.com

QUESTIONNAIRES
Name of the employee

__________________________________

Employee code

__________________________________

Designation

Name of the department


Please tick (
64 | P a g e

__________________________________
:

__________________________________

) at the appropriate place.

1. Gender

Male

Female

2. Marital status

Married

Single

3. Age.

25 years. 26-50 years. 50years.

4. Geographical origin
southern northern..eastern..
5. Monthly salary.
Rs. 10000 Rs.1001-Rs.15000... Rs.15001.
6. Which of the factor influence an employee to stay the organization?
a) External Rewards
b) Co-operation and trust
d) communication

e) Home life

f) Workplace

7. In your opinion, the diversity primarily affect on.

a) Employees performance b) business performance c) Both a and b


S
8. In your opinion, what are the reasons lies for an employee to leave the organization?
a) Quality of compensation package
b) Opportunities for growth and development
c) Individual contributions
d) Company responsiveness to need and request
e) Amount of recognition for work
9. . employee accept the challenges due to diversity

Strongly Agree (

Agree (

Neither Agree nor Disagree (

Disagree (

Strongly Disagree (

65 | P a g e

)
)
)

)
)

10. Cultural diversity affect the employee performance.

Strongly Agree (

Agree (

Neither Agree nor Disagree (

Disagree (

Strongly Disagree (

66 | P a g e

)
)
)

)
)