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February 2013

Idaho Air Guard Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho First Class or Not at All www.idaho.ang.af.mil

124th Civil Engineering Squadron completes


six-month OEF support in Afghanistan
Lt. Col. Heuring was quick to
point out that as commander of the
deployments lead unit he valued the
contributions of civil engineering
professionals from Wisconsin, Texas, Maine, Puerto Rico, and Maryland.
124CES worked with the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers and support staff of the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing as over $100 million
in military construction was in
progress to sustain future Air Force
operations.
Lt. Col. James Heuring, 124th Civil Engineering Squadron Commander--Base Civil Engeer, right,
124CES professionals were the
and Senior Enlisted Advisor Chief Master Sgt. Mark Nelson, left, lower the American and unit
consulting
engineers to local Afflags on January 14, the last day of the squadrons six-month deployment to Bagram Air Base,
ghan contractors, ensuring quality
Afghanistan, supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. Photo courtesy Lt Col James Heuring.
control and compliance to USAF
By Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel
ally two minutes apart, Heuring building code standards for numersaid. The sorties had to fly!
ous buildings critical to continued
124th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
Over half of the engineers were operations in Operation Enduring
BOISE, Idaho, The last of over 50
th
traditional
Idaho Air Guards- Freedom.
members of the 124 Civil EngineerDuring his transfer of authoring Squadron from Gowen Field, man from every specialty that the
124CES
brings
to
the
combat
zone.
ity
ceremony with the incoming
Idaho returned in mid January after
To
prepare
for
the
change
of
venue
Vermont Air National Guard civil
six months service supporting Opand shift from civilian life for many, engineering unit, Heuring summaeration Enduring Freedom.
the squadron completed two drills rized the deployment. He told his
Lt. Col. James Heuring led the per month for six months leading
squadron, You are the heart of the
124th CES while deployed to Ba- up to their deployment.
spear, you served your country well,
gram AB, Afghanistan for six
According to Heuring, this was and you didnt leave anything on the
months. 124th CES maintained
table.
existing facilities and constructed the first deployment for roughly
one-third of the squadron. 124CES
Upon returning to Idaho, Heuring
some new ones on the vast base.
workdays ranged from 12 to 16 reflected on the experience, I got to
They were the primary movers hoursseven days per week.
go with my home squadron to a deand fixers of U.S. Air Force facilities,
It was like a six-month ORI, ployed location and serve with them
an-around-the-clock operation that
every day and return home with
supported 700 to 900 flight opera- Heuring said. Every one in every
them when it was done. (It was) by
shop
showed
up
early
and
wanted
to
tions each day.
work hard. The days were long and far the most rewarding thing Ive
Take-offs and landings were usu- the weeks were short.
ever done in my life.
http://bit.ly/124Beacon t February 2013t1

THE BEACON is the official newslet-

ter of the 124th Fighter Wing, Idaho Air


National Guard. It is published monthly
by the wing public affairs office. Views
expressed may not be those of the U.S. Air
Force, Air National Guard, Department of
Defense or U.S. government.

COMMANDERS

CALL

CCAF Requirements:

T H E B E A C O N S TA F F

WING COMMANDER
Col. Michael Nolan
PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER
Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel
PUBLIC AFFAIRS NCOIC
Master Sgt. Tom Gloeckle
PUBLIC AFFAIRS STAFF
Tech. Sgt. Sarah Pokorney
Tech. Sgt. Becky Vanshur
Tech. Sgt. Heather Walsh
Staff Sgt. Robert Barney

Con tribu t e !
We welcome articles and captioned photos relevant to members of the 124th Fighter Wing.
Submissions must be accurate in fact, and
will be edited for clarity and length. Articles will be published as space permits.
They are due on Sunday of the UTA prior to
the month the article will be published.
Submit articles as e-mail attachments
on Microsoft Word. Photographs must
be non-copyrighted prints of 300 dpi or
higher TIF or JPG images. Articles and
images can be sent to:

124TH FIGHTER WING


PUBLIC AFFAIRS
4474 S. DeHavilland St.
Boise, ID 83705-8103
Voice (208) 422-5398/5358
Fax (208) 422-6161

E-MAIL US

124fw.pa-publicaffairs@ang.af.mil

MORE NEWS. FEATURES. EASY


MAILING ADDRESS UPDATES &
MORE ONLINE AT:

www.idaho.ang.af.mil;
http://bit.ly/124Beacon
FACEBOOK:

www.facebook.com/124FWOfficial

Col. Mike Nolan, 124th Wing Commander, met with all enlisted members
of the wing in December. Several in attendence wanted to know more about
new CCAF requirements in future years that affect senior NCO promotions.
Over December drill, I had the opportunity to meet with our wing enlisted
members. One topic that deserves further discussion is the new requirement to have a Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) degree for promotion to Senior Master Sergeant and Chief Master Sergeant in the ANG.
Lets start by discussing how this requirement evolved. Chief Master Sgt.
Fenicottero and I met with Chief Master Sgt. Glick to gain a deeper understanding of this policy. According to Chief Master Sgt. Glick, education of
the enlisted force has been an agenda item of the ANG Enlisted Field Advisory Council (EFAC) for the past several years. The EFAC felt that it is now
critical for our Airmen to maintain parity with Active Duty (AD) and Reserve
Airmen, as the ANG has become an integral part of the total force.
On active duty and in the Air Force Reserves, a CCAF degree is a determinate
for promotion to SMSgt and CMSgt. Currently, 99.5% of AD E-8s and E-9s
have a CCAF degree compared to 33.2% in the ANG.
Further, AFI 36-2618, THE ENLISTED FORCE STRUCTURE, identifies the pursuit of a CCAF degree as a primary responsibility of every Senior NCO. After
polling the enlisted forces across the ANG, the EFAC voted unanimously to
pursue the requirement of the CCAF degree as a condition for promotion to
E-8 and E-9. This is not intended to be immediate, but is planned for a Jan
2015 effective date.
Two frequently asked questions I have received regarding this requirement
are: 1) why do I need a CCAF degree if I already have an associate degree (or
higher); and 2) AD Airmen have educational benefits that I am not entitled
to, how am I supposed to cover this financial burden?
Regarding the first question, the EFAC referenced parity with AD as the
primary factor. When dealing with AD and Reserve Airmen, ANG senior
guardsmen must have a common point of reference. The EFAC believes the
CCAF provides that reference through its core courses: Oral Communication, Written Communication, Mathematics, Social Science and Humani-

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CCAF:
ties.
If you have a civilian
degree that includes these five core
courses you will receive full credit
toward a CCAF degree. If not, you
will have to earn those credits.
Regarding the second question,
it is true that there are greater
educa-tional benefits for the
active com-ponent.
The good
news for AGRs is they receive
those same benefits.
For
Technicians
and
Traditional
Guardsmen, you will have to pay
for the five core courses.
Unfortunately, there are no State
educational ben-efits available this
year to help defer those costs.
One option that will reduce
your out-of-pocket expense is to
CLEP out of the core courses
through
the
College
Level
Examination
program.
Additionally, if you have served
in a Title-10 status for at least 90
ag-gregate days after September
10, 2001, you are entitled to some
Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits. Again,
if you have already taken the core
classes at an accredited institution
you will receive full credit toward
the CCAF degree. Interested
Airmen
should
make an
appointment with the Base
Education and Training office to
find out where they stand and
make a plan to fill the gaps.
I understand that the time and
fi-nancial commitment required
to earn a CCAF degree will be an
ad-ditional stressor for many of
you. I do believe in the value of
education for our enlisted Airmen.
Personally, I believe that any
associate degree should suffice
and have provided that feedback
to our leadership.
Historically,
the
EFAC
has
provided outstanding advice and
guidance. They have given this
topic due con-sideration and
believe a CCAF de-gree for our
senior enlisted will im-prove the

(Published
Anonymously
Below)

Gowen Broadcaster completes


solemn special-duty assignment
After completing a special-duty assignment that few qualify for and that
the general public is largely unaware
of, the 124th Fighter Wings multimedia manager witnessed the pride and
pain of our nations highest calling.
Master Sgt. Tom Gloeckle practiced
his craft as an Air Force broadcasting
specialist at the Air Force Mortuary
Affairs Operations, Dover, AFB, Delaware, in direct support of Operation
Enduring Freedom. He joined a staff
of just five PA professionals who continually document the return of all
U.S. service personnel remains as they
arrive from across the world. Without
prejudice to circumstances of death
the families of the fallen are offered a
documentary movie of the Dignified
Transfer ceremony.

guard, he said.
During his 150-day tour (which is
considered a deployment because
of the assignments rigor) Gloeckle
described his duties as unique. He
briefed the Chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Martin Dempsey,
and the Air Force Chief of Staff, Gen.
Mark A. Welsh during separate official
visits.
Sometimes high visibility events required him to take his skills on the
road. He shot video, edited and produced media for repatriated U.S. Air
Force pilots remains from Vietnam
(that now rest in Arlington National
Cemetery). When tragedy struck in
Libya, he served in a similar role a few
days later at Andrews AFB, MD.

The movie has no narration, nor editorial agenda. This is known as the
media option among the public affairs team at Dover. The movie is only
for the family, as is everything we do
during that assignment, said Master
Sgt. Gloeckle.

Most of the Port Mortuary mission is


completed on short notice. There was
nothing that resembled a routine. This
rotating cast of public affairs specialists has served in this role since 2009
to bring greater overall transparency
to the Dignified Transfer process.

Gloeckle explained even if a family


opts to allow the news media to cover
the solemn movement of the service
members remains, photos of the
families during that sensitive time are
strictly forbidden. Still the emotional
impact of the family can catch you off-

(It was an) incredible honor to do


what we doto video the transfer,
edit, and produce the tribute video for
the families, he said. It is documented evidence that the fallen family
member returned home to America.

--Beacon Staff Report

http://bit.ly/124Beacon t February 2013t3

124th Civil Engin


Operation End
June 2012-Ja
Bagram Air Bas

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neering Squadron
during Freedom
anuary 2013
se, Afghanistan

You are the


heart of the spear,
you served your
country well, and
you didnt leave
anything on the
table. -Lt Col Jim
Heuring

http://bit.ly/124Beacon t February 2013t5

December 2011

Idaho Air Guard Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho First Class or Not at All www.idaho.ang.af.mil

USAF Weapons School chooses 190th


Fighter Squadron as A-10C
advanced tactics test-bed

Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel


124th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

BOISE, ID. The universally recognized masters of A-10 combat flying


visited Gowen Field in November
and integrated with numerous 124th
Fighter Wing units throughout
their two-week stay. After dozens
of combat training sorties, mutual
respect and common dedication to
excellence in the A-10 community
abounded as the most noted postdeployment sentiment from 190th
Fighter Squadron and 66th Weapons School (Nellis AFB) leaders.
Nine instructor pilots and four upgrade students from the prestigious
USAF Fighter Weapons School at
Nellis AFB journeyed to Boise for
two weeks of flying in Southern
Idaho military flying ranges. The
66th Weapons School Squadron also
brought over 60 maintenance specialists to ready six of the squadrons
A-10C aircraft that joined the Warthogs of the 190th for low to medium
threat flying while operating with
Joint Terminal Attack Controllers
(JTAC) of the 124th Air Support
Operations Squadron.

A student enrolled in the United States Air Force Weapons School prepares to take off on a night
mission in his A-10 Thunderbolt IIs from Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho on November 10. Instructors
from the 66th Weapons Squadron, stationed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, are conducting
USAF Weapons School training from Gowen Field, in conjunction with A-10s from the 190FS,
and other agencies and units, providing realistic training opportunities in nearby ranges. (U.S.
Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Barney)

Its good doing business with the


Weapons School, because we know
were doing business the right way,
its nice to validate our tactics and
procedures, good to have another
set of eyeballs (on squadron training
sorties), Odneal said.

bination of a fully combat capable


190FS and the airspace in Southern
Idaho dedicated to military flying,
the combat flying assets at nearby Mountain Home AFB, and the
Army Aviation just across Gowen
Field allowed for Interaction with
multiple combat platforms and assets to achieve timely ordinance in

They are the Top-Gun program of According to 66th Weapons Squadthe Air Force, said Lt. Col. Ryan ron (A-10) Director of Operations,
Major Colin Donnelly, the comContinued on page 4
Odneal, commander of the 190th.
www.thebeaconlive.com t December 2011t1

THE BEACON is the official newslet-

ter of the 124th Fighter Wing, Idaho Air


National Guard. It is published monthly
by the wing public affairs office. Views
expressed may not be those of the U.S. Air
Force, Air National Guard, Department of
Defense or U.S. government.

T H E B E A C O N S TA F F

WING COMMANDER
Col. James R. Compton
PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER / EDITOR
Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel
Capt. Tony Vincelli (Deployed)
PUBLIC AFFAIRS NCOIC
Master Sgt. Tom Gloeckle
PUBLIC AFFAIRS STAFF
Tech. Sgt. Sarah Pokorney
Tech. Sgt. Becky Vanshur
Tech. Sgt. Heather Walsh
Staff Sgt. Robert Barney
Staff Sgt. Joshua Breckon

Con tribu t e !
We welcome articles and captioned photos relevant to members of the 124th Fighter Wing.
Submissions must be accurate in fact, and
will be edited for clarity and length. Articles will be published as space permits.
They are due on Sunday of the UTA prior to
the month the article will be published.
Submit articles as e-mail attachments
on Microsoft Word. Photographs must
be non-copyrighted prints of 300 dpi or
higher TIF or JPG images. Articles and
images can be sent to:

124TH FIGHTER WING


PUBLIC AFFAIRS
4474 S. DeHavilland St.
Boise, ID 83705-8103
Voice (208) 422-5398/5358
Fax (208) 422-6161

E-MAIL US

124fw.pa-publicaffairs@ang.af.mil

MORE NEWS. FEATURES. EASY


MAILING ADDRESS UPDATES &
MORE ONLINE AT:

www.idaho.ang.af.mil;
www.thebeaconlive.com
Photography this issue

Master Sgt. Tom Gloeckle,


Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel,
Staff Sgt. Robert Barney

COMMANDERS

CALL

Take some time to renew...


Adversaries and opportunities; have you noticed how opposition promotes growth? As kids, if mom said no, you cant have that, we wanted
it more. Tell someone not to look in the closet, they do; its more like a
challenge--not a warning. Adversarial aggression defined the formation of
our country. The U.S. Constitution has forged through years of adversaries,
the opportunity, the risk; freedom. You continue to support our freedom
through countless hours of dedication and training to remain constantly
ready to support our nation and state. This past year has been a hallmark of
adversaries, providing numerous opportunities of growth. I thank you for
your determination and for being superior wingmen.
There are numerous adversaries on our horizon; Im asking you not to be
distracted by noise and rhetoric but remain focused on contributing your
skill sets and knowledge as required to gain the advantage and seize the opportunity to place the Idaho Air Guard on the success podium. One Team,
All In; we have accepted the IG challenge, the contest is afoot, be prepared,
we will be tested.
Your community is hurting, it needs your support. If you are able to contribute to Combined Federal Campaign, please dont delay. Informational
packages are in every squadron. You can contribute through online connection at www.intermountaincfc.org If you are hurting, call a wingman,
send up a signal, call me 208-863-3022, you are unique, special and a critical part of our team. Call me, anytime.
On earth peace, goodwill toward men, (Luke 2:14). These are wonderful words spoken by Gods angel at Christs birth as an offer of praise and
prayer. These simple words are packed with incredible meaning and unimaginable potential, take a quiet moment and consider; peace on earth.
For some of us just finding peace at home, peace at work or even some
peace and quiet would be acceptable. Peace takes work and goodwill toward men (and women) is a great start towards creating that peaceful place.
The cornerstone of goodwill begins with each one of us; our internal core
thoughts and intentions. How we outwardly respond speaks loudly of our
goodwill toward men. You are our core strength, I depend upon you,
your Air Guard depends upon you, your family depends upon you the
internal you - to show externally your goodwill. Similar to our core value
of integrity, goodwill begins inside. Take time this Christmas to renew
yourself, relax, laugh, unite with family and friends. Spread goodwill to all,
and who knows? With some heavenly help we may all find Peace on Earth.
JR

2 twww.thebeaconlive.com t December 2011

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FEATURE FROM PAGE ONE

supporting the ground commander.


The Purpose of 66th WPS traveling to A-10 units
and mixing their training with that of operational squadrons like the 190th is directly from
lessons learned by operational combatant commanders in the current CENTCOM fight. They
have clarified the A-10C mission as Close Air
Support, Combat Search and Rescue, and Forward Air ControlAirborne.
Weve realigned our syllabus and this is the first
time executing this new draft syllabus (of combat mission flying), said Major Donnelly. This
is our first forward air control deployment. We
chose Boise. We like the challenges of going to
a new location. The ranges here provide us new
challenges with unfamiliar targets, new combat
scenarios; it is awesome for our instructor pilots
and student upgrade pilots, he said.
As part of that upgrade process the Weapons
School students proved their leadership mettle
in realistic training sorties alongside 190th aviators of all experience levels.

Maj. Colin Donnelly, an instructor and director of operations


with the 66th Weapons Squadron, speaks about his role in the
United States Air Force Weapons School, and his experience in
training students to be subject matter experts with the A-10
Thunderbolt II, during training operations from Gowen Field,
Boise, Idaho on November 10. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt.
Robert Barney)

Our WPS students are learning the skill of taking on-scene command of the stack of combat
aircraft to meet the ground commanders objectives, Donnelly said.
The 190th Fighter Squadron has been flying the
A-10 Charlie variant for the past 30 months.
In October the Air Combat Command Inspector General recognized them as the best A-10
unit seen to date and awarded them the of highest possible overall grade of outstanding. Major
Donnelly assessed the 190th participation as a
class act.
Its nice to be validated by who you consider to
be the best of the best in the A-10 business, said
Lt. Col. Odneal.
124th Intel Flight shouldered a considerable
additional workload providing weapons, threat
response, and tactics research and training according to Major Steve McHargue, 124 IFTU
Chief of Intelligence.
66WPS is a Class Act, he said, Their crews
participated in some world-class training of
our 124 IFTU (Intelligence Formal Training
Unit) students.
The 66WPS may be bringing students back
4 twww.thebeaconlive.com t December 2011

Instructors from the 66th Weapons Squadron (WS), along


with students enrolled in the United States Air Force Weapons
School, and pilots with the 190th Fighter Squadron (FS) prepare to take off on a night mission in their A-10 Thunderbolt IIs
from Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho, on November 10. The 66th WS,
stationed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, is conducting USAF
Weapons School training from Gowen Field, in conjunction
with A-10s from the 190 FS, and other agencies and units, providing realistic training opportunities in nearby ranges. (U.S.
Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Barney)
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through Idaho to train with the 124th Fighter


Wing every six months according to 190FS Director of Operations Lt. Col. Shannon Smith.
This was a win-win. We accomplished the kind
of training that we usually need to travel for right
here at our home drome. It doesnt get better
than that, Lt. Col. Smith said.
Weve got a history of sending successful students to graduate from the Weapons School program.
Whats key is: to stay relevant in your (aircraft)
community, you need to engage the other squadronseveryone recognizes the weapons school
Pilots are ready to roll at their pre-step brief--for demanding in being the leaders in weapons and tactics. They
USAF Weapons School training at Gowen Field, in conjunction with A- also have a goal to maintain in constant contact
10s from the 190th FS .(U.S. Air Force Photo by Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel) with the CAF (Combat Air Forces) to make sure
their graduates are what the flying squadrons
want.
Another huge benefit was our participating in
weapons school style preparation briefs and debriefs that we dont get to see all the time. Short
of getting a new weapons officer out of the experiencewe experienced a class act Smith said.
And the 66WPS experienced some combat flying training that even an elite Weapons School
instructor like Major Donnelly found worth noting as the 266th Range Squadron and the flying
ranges in Southern Idaho offer us smoky SAMS,
good target sets realistic targets and interaction
with the Rotary Wing aircraft that operate here.
The U.S. Air Force Weapons School provides
the worlds most advanced training in weapons and tactics employment, and every six
months, produces a new class of graduates who
are expert instructors on weapons, weapons systems and air and space integration. Upon completing the course, graduates return to their
home stations, taking the latest tactics, techniques and procedures for air-to-air and airto-ground combat to their respective units.
The Weapons School traces its roots to the Aircraft Gunnery School established in 1949 at Las
Vegas Air Force Base, which became Nellis Air
Force Base in 1950. This organization brought
together a cadre of World War II combat veterans dedicated to teaching the next generation of
pilots. The Gunnery School converted to combat
crew training to meet the needs of the Korean War.
Todays Weapons School encompasses 17 squadrons, teaching 22 combat specialties at eight locations.
www.thebeaconlive.com t December 2011t5

Veterans Day HonorsBrig. Gen. William Shawver addresses the Gowen Field Memorial Park Veterans Day Ceremony. During the ceremony the 124th Security Forces Squadron dedicated a new bench to former squadron First
Sergeant Dennis Wallace. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel)

Out with a splash124th Operations Group Commander, Colonel Mike Nolan accepts a traditional
dousing from fellow fighter pilots at his finis-flight
reception last month on the aircraft parking ramp
at Gowen Field. Colonel Nolan moves on to become
director of staffIdaho National Guard. (US Air
Force Photo by MSgt Tom Gloeckle)

Retroactive Traumatic
Injury Benefits No Longer
Just For OEF/OIF
Injuries

Former Reservists and National Guard


members who were injured during the
retroactive period and suffered a qualifying
loss are eligible for a TSGLI payment even if
the cause was not related to service, such as
a civilian automobile accident or severe
injury which occurred while working around
their home. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Eric
K. Shinseki stated, We at VA appreciate the
Presidents and Congress efforts to improve
benefits to our troops.
Now all of our nations Servicemembers
who suffered severe traumatic injuries
while serving their country can receive the
same traumatic injury benefits, regardless
of where their injury occurred. For more
information or to apply for a TSGLI
payment,
Servicemembers
and
Veterans should go to http://www.
insurance.va.gov/sgliSite/TSGLI/
TSGLI.htm. They can also contact
their branch of service TSGLI Office
(contact information available at
above link).

6 twww.thebeaconlive.com t December 2011

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Idaho ANG

Always online at http://bit.ly/124Beacon

twitter & instagram @124fighterwing

Operation Pathfinder Minuteman


124th Medical Group and Chaplin Corps joint tsunami-recovery exercise, Warrenton, Ore.
The Med Group had entered a
joint tsunami-recovery exercise
hosted by the Oregon Air National Guard and allied civilian agenIdaho Guardsmen from the 124th
Medical Group (124MDG) boarded cies who are breaking new ground
in combining civil and military
a bus on the Sunday morning of
assets to effectively respond to
their otherwise mundane August
as-yet unknown but potentially
UTA to disembark in a completely
different landscape many hours later. disastrous events if the Cascadia
Subduction Zone fault line ever
This environment included alarmingly realistic mannequins washed jolts the Pacific Northwest with
ashore in both a rural coastal brush another major earthquake.
area and a small simulated coastal
town.

official newsletter of the Idaho ANG

By Lt. Col. Gary Daniel


124th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

The time from a major earthquake to the arrival of a destructive tsunami wave roiling
ashore could be as little as
five minutes according to the
Oregon Office of Emergency
management.
More than two-dozen medical full-time and Drill-Status
Guardsman (DSG) profession-

als from the 124MDG journeyed


to the northern Oregon coast to
participate in a complex interagency disaster response exercise.
Operation Pathfinder Minuteman
2014 was the first such exercise
to combine the efforts of over 120
personnel from Army and Air
National Guard medical units
from Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, Para-rescue forces from the
Air Force Reserve, civilian first
responders from the Oregon Disaster Medical Team and associated professionals from municipal
agencies.

I was impressed with the planning and logistics to successfully


execute such a large-scale exercise, said (Col.) Dr. Ralph Sutherlin, Director of Aerospace Medicine for the state of Idaho. In my
25 years in medicine, this was the
first time I have been involved in a
mass casualty exercise with military and civilian members.

The Beacon

124MDG professionals participated


as both responders and patients during various phases of the exercise. The
rural response and treatment challenges gave way to later challenges that
included rescuing trapped victims from
the second and third stories of coastal
buildings.

We really need a playbook for accomplishing this kind of operation, and get
Operation Pathfinder Minutethe playbook out while were still in the
man transformed portions of
training environment, said Dr. JonaCamp Rilea, Warrington, Oregon, than Jui, leader of the Oregon Disaster
into a post-tsunami apocalypse.
(continued on page 8)

Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Sarah Pokorney


The Beacon September 2014 www.idaho.ang.af.mil

facebook.com/124FWOfficial

Idaho ANG

Always online at http://bit.ly/124Beacon

twitter & instagram @124fighterwing

Air National Guard photo

The Beacon

by Lt. Col. Gary Daniel

Operation
Pathfinder
Minuteman
124th Medical Group and Chaplin Corps joint
tsunami-recovery exercise, Warrenton, Ore.

Air National Guard photo by Lt. Col. Gary Daniel

official newsletter of the Idaho ANG

(from page 7)
Medical Team, who coordinated the survivers and save lives. Lessons
exercise.
learned included the importance of
contingency planning and training
Communication is ultimately the
with local, state and regional disaskey component said Tech. Sgt.
ter involvement, Sutherlin said.
Maria Wilson, Aerospace Medicine and Public Health Technician Learning to communicate effecfor the 124MDG. This was eastively with the primary responders
ily noticeable during the hot wash
(who are usually civilians) during a
where it was quickly revealed that
domestic operations disaster reeach agency identified the same
sponse scenario is always the bigdeficiencies and had the same colgest hurdle. This exercise allowed
lective resolutions. All of which we our Idaho Army and Air Guard
can expect to see at the next annual medics to gain valuable experience
exercise.
with this, said Chief Master Sgt.
Jerod Taylor, superintendent of the
All the different medical and sup- 124MDG.
port members, including chaplains,
ASOS and PJs, worked closely toIdaho Air National Guard medigether for the common goal, to find cal personnel are working hard to
The Beacon September 2014 www.idaho.ang.af.mil

increase their domestic operations


training opportunities according to
Taylor.
Disaster Response is the primary
area where Guard medical personnel
fill a unique role that active military
medical cannot, said Taylor. Disaster Response in domestic operations
is all about interagency training and
building relationships with those
other agencies, understanding our
different capabilities and shortfalls,
and working on communication to
ensure our joint goal is accomplished
during the disaster scenario.
The Oregon State Air Surgeon stated
that bordering states will be vital to
assisting Oregon with any significant

natural disaster; that the 124th Medical Group can be the tip of the spear in
medical support to the Oregon Guard,
said Sutherlin. The hands-on training created team building and morale
boosting for our medics. I am looking
forward to working with our neighboring state Air Guard units in the future.
Just a couple of days after studying,
preparing, executing, and evaluating the
scenario, the 124MDG boarded their
bus for the return drive back to Gowen
Field. In the future, the entire trip could
be much less scripted and much more
urgent as teams from surrounding states
like Idaho may be the primary caregivers responding to a real-world disaster
to the west.
Air National Guard photos above by Tech. Sgt. Sarah Pokorney

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Idaho ANG

Always online at http://bit.ly/124Beacon

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The Beacon

Operation Combined Resolve II


Unaffected by the spotlight from U.S. Army Europe, NATO, and European-Partner nations, the
Idaho Air National Guard successfully provided crucial Close Air Support (CAS) during last months
Combined Resolve II exercise.
By Lt. Col. Gary Daniel
124th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

official newsletter of the Idaho ANG

Over 100 Idaho Air National Guard


pilots, aircraft maintenance professionals, and support personnel
participated in the multi-national
training exercise. Seven A-10C
Thunderbolt II fighters from the
124th Fighter Wing flew CAS missions to support the more than
4,000 forces on the ground in
Germany. The U.S. Army-Europe
led fourteen other participating
European nations military forces
through six weeks of training using
their most advanced equipment
that they have stationed in the
European Theater.

For more than half of that time,


the Hawgs of the 124th Fighter
Wing provided close air cover
to maneuvering troops in the
German countryside. This meant
mastering flying in German airspace under rules different than
the Skull bangers of the 190th
Fighter Squadron routinely comply with stateside.
We werent allowed to use our
full (instrument flying) capabilities found with SADL (Situational
Awareness Data Link), so we

Combined Resolve II photos


courtesy of Senior Airman
Jeremy Johnson, 124th Aircraft Maintenence Squadron
crewchief.

turned off our SADL for about


a month before deploying and
used older time-proven techniques, said Maj. Brian Digger Daigle. Daigle planned
and coordinated the expedition and served as detachment
commander in Germany.
In his first overseas duty,
1st Lt. Bud Munns echoed
Daigles sentiment. You have
to increase your cockpit cross-

checks and maintain higher


situational awareness. Overall,
this experience helps your pilot
skills, he said.
In previous European exercises
on this scale, the Army could
count on support from A-10
units permanently stationed
forward in Europe. The Skull
bangers operated from Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany-- the
previous home to the 81st
Fighter Squadron.

We had quite a bit of clean up


before we could store the aircraft,
in Protected Aircraft Structures
(PAS). It was our wings first
fighter operations out of Europe
since the mid 1990s, said Chief
Master Sgt. Steven Lewis.
According to Lewis and Daigle,
the Idahoans overcame many unexpected operating constraints.
We had a tougher commute
than we planned for from off
base, but better weather than anticipatedeven some sunburns
on the flight line, said Lewis.

The people who deployed (to Combined Resolve) got very good training
and Im hopeful they will pass this
on to others, said Lewis I was really
proud of everyone.
That wingtip clearance taxiing out
(of a PAS) was very slight, said Daigle,
the cover also restricted our GPS
reception during preflight.
Despite some weather cancellations
over some target areas, 124th Operations Group Commander Col. Paul
Kingsley called the effort overall a
success. The best measure is theyve
(the US Army Europe) asked us to
come back, he said.

May 2014
Spangdahlem Air Base
Germany

Photo courtesy of Senior Airman Jeremy Johnson


The Beacon June 2014 www.idaho.ang.af.mil

facebook.com/124FWOfficial

Idaho ANG

10

Always online at http://bit.ly/124Beacon

Operation Combined Resolve II

twitter & instagram @124fighterwing

The Beacon

11

official newsletter of the Idaho ANG

Air National Guard photos


courtesy of Senior Airman
Jeremy Johnson, 124th Fighter
Wing Air craft Maintenence

Operation Combined Resolve


II photos provided courtesy of
Senior Airman Jeremy Johnson a crewchief for the 124th
Aircraft Maintenance Squadron.

Master Sgt. James McGregor of 124th Aircraft Maintenence Squadron, repositions


an A-10 Thunderbolt II during operation
Combined Resolve II at Spangdahlem Air
Base, Germany. (Photo courtesy of Senior
Airman Jeremy Johnson)
The Beacon June 2014 www.idaho.ang.af.mil

facebook.com/124FWOfficial

Idaho ANG

12

Always online at http://bit.ly/124Beacon

twitter & instagram @124fighterwing

Operation Combined Resolve II


Senior Airman Ryan Keith of
the 124th Maintenence Squadron, connects liquid oxgen service carts to provide oxygen to
the A-10 Thunderbolt II pilots
in flight during Operation
Combined Resolve II.

The Beacon

Crew chief Senior Airman Matt Mills and his


team prepare to pull
the engine of the A-10
Thunderbolt II during
Operation Combined
Resolve II

124th Fighter Wing Finance Tech Sgt. Gianini


Edwards and 190th
Fighter Squadron Senior
Airman Edward Landis,
combined efforts to process orders and travel
vouchers.

official newsletter of the Idaho ANG

Senior Airman Matt Mills services an A-10 Thunderbolt II during


Operation Combined Resolve II

Staff Sgt Benny Wells


services an A-10
Thunderbolt II during
Operation Combined
Resolve II

Captain Eric Johnson and Chief Steve Lewis coordinate munitions handling.

Photos courtesy of Senior Airman Jeremy Johnson


The Beacon June 2014 www.idaho.ang.af.mil

facebook.com/124FWOfficial

13

Idaho Air Guard Combat Arms Instructors develop


new motivational program

Lt Col Gary A. Daniel


124th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Once a USAF airman scores high enough on a qualification shoot with an Air Force pistol or rifle they
receive a ribbon for expert marksmanship. Airmen can
only receive the ribbon once during their career. The

Combat Arms Instructor cadre at Gowen Field


has implemented a program to keep shooters
motivated to perform at the expert level during
every trip to the firing range.
Now every time a 124th Fighter Wing member meets the demands of shooting at the

expert level they receive a personalized 30mm


round casing with wing insignia and recognition carved into the casing. Shooters training
with the M-9 Berretta must lodge 41 of their 45
rounds on the target, six must line up with the
head of the silhouette, and 25 on the silhouette
body. Just over 10 percent of Gowen Field airmen score high enough for expert qualification.
After airmen shoot expert, we want to make
sure their fundamentals are clear cut, and they

are safe and serious about the training, said Tech. Sgt.
Michael Leone, CATMS instructor. We award the successful shooter the painted 30MM shell to recognize
the performance and insure that every trip to the range
has meaning.
The benefits of the new program may ripple out to
combat arms instructors as well. Our instructors care
that our shooters are well prepared for shooting, if
necessary, in a combat situation, Leone said.

On opposite page--clockwise from upper left


Second Lt. Randall Schmidt from the 124th Air Support Operation Squadron (ASOS) loads a magazine
with bullets before loading his weapon for another
round; Airman 1st Class Steven Longfellow from the
124th Air Support Operation Squadron (ASOS) loads
a magazine with bullets; Staff Sgt. Scott Johnson
from the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance
(CATM) team of the 124th Security Forces Squadron counts the number of hits; Second Lt. Randall
Schmidt from the 124th Air Support Operation
Squadron (ASOS) reviews the number of hits during
his Combat Arms Training and Maintenance (CATM)
qualification on Sept. 11 at the shooting range outside Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho. His goal is to qualify
in CATM and he was awarded the expert score as
well. (U.S. Air Force photos by Tech. Sgt. Becky Vanshur). Right: Airman 1st Class Steven Longfellow
fires his weapon.

10 twww.thebeaconlive.com t November 2011

ON THE WEB:thebeaconlive.com & WWW.IDAHO.ANG.AF.MIL

www.thebeaconlive.com t November 2011t11

October 2011 Idaho Air Guard Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho First Class or Not at All www.idaho.ang.af.mil

10th Anniversary of 9-11


A Testimony to Our American Spirit
By Lt. Col. Gary Daniel
124th Fighter Wing
Public Affairs Officer

BOISE, Idaho
How we remember this day is a
testimony to our American Spirit, said
Major General Gary L. Sayler, Idaho
Adjutant General, as he addressed
the hundreds of 124th fighter wing
members assembled to honor the
10th anniversary of the attacks on
September 11, 2001.
Major Gen. Sayler mentioned the
purpose of the ceremony and the
honor that all wing members feel
toward the more than six thousand Members of the 124th Fighter Wing take a moment of silence to honor those lost on Sept. 11,
American military men and women 2001. Members of the 124th FW gathered on Sept. 11 at Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho to remember
who have given their lives in military that tragic day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Becky Vanshur)
service since the attacks. We espeWe honor and recognize those lost Never before has our nation asked
cially remember the 55 Idahoans, but we also recognized that on that so much of an all volunteer force as
including members of the Idaho Na- day in our country a generation of you the post 9-11 generation, said
tional Guard, who have paid the ulti- Americans were changed, Major Gen. Major Gen. Sayler. He listed recent
mate sacrifice to their nation since the Sayler said. Afghanistan and Iraq successes in the conflicts in Afghanimorning of 9-11, he said.
mark the first time since the (Ameri- stan and Iraq as evidence of the vast
124th Fighter Wing Honor Guard can) Revolutionary War that our na- contributions of the post 9-11 generamembers conducted a 21-gun salute tion has depended on an all-volun- tion.
to break the otherwise hushed tone teer force to fight.
As the formal ceremony closed,
of the remembrance.
124th Fighter Wing Commander Colonel James R. Compton thanked Command Chief Robert Bailey his committee of for their coordination of the
tasteful ceremony and the appearance of the band Pilot Error while
wing members enjoyed a picnic dinner to conclude their drill.
More on this, check

Members of the 124th Fighter Wing ( FW) Honor Guard present a 21 gun salute in honor of the
memory of Sept. 11, 2001. Members of the 124th FW gathered on Sept. 11 at Gowen Field,
Boise, Idaho to remember that tragic day. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Becky Vanshur)

thebeaconlive.com
Video & slideshows

www.thebeaconlive.com t October 2011t1

Fifth Chief of
the Air Force
Chief Master
Sgt. Robert
Gaylor (Ret.)

Opportunity, Aptitude, Attitude three words to live by,


said the fifth Chief of the Air
Force Chief Master Sgt. Robert
Gaylor (Ret.). Chief Gaylor was
the guest speaker at the 2014
Outstanding Airmen of the
Year Banquet, showcasing nominees from 2013, on Jan. 4 held
at the Riverside Hotel in Boise,
Idaho.
Chief Gaylor shared his wisdom about the three key words
to live by, Attitude being the
most important in his opinion. He pointed out that it also
numerically adds up to 100 in
numerical value with the Alphabet. Chief Gaylor also had
the large crowd, more than 300
people, laughing out loud with
his inspirational speech.

To see more photos and watch a video of his speach go to:


https://www.facebook.com/124FWOfficial and

http://bit.ly/124Beacon

Portrait photos available to


download at:
http://bit.ly/124Beacon
4 thttp://bit.ly/124Beacon t January 2014

www.idaho.ang.af.mil

2014 Selectees for Outstanding Airmen of the Year 2013

Tonight we recognize the good work of all Airmen in


the Idaho Air National Guard and we acknowledge,
particularly this past years, efforts of some of our best
Airmen in the organization, as the 2014 Outstanding
Airmen of the Year, said Master of Ceremonies, Staff
Sgt. Cora Shambaugh.
We will honor the accomplishments of these amazing Airmen selected to represent you as they go on to
compete at the Air National Guard level and hopefully
continue on to be one of the 12 Outstanding Airmen of
the Year for the United States Air Force, she said.
The selectees pictured are Senior Airman Bradley Ford,
top left, from the 124th Security Forces Squadron, was
the 2013 selectee for the Airmen category. Staff Sgt.
Christina Rohrenbach, below Ford, from the 124th
Logistics Readiness Squadron, was the 2013 selectee for
the NCO category. Master Sgt. Shallan Prickett, below
Rohrenbach, from the 212th Command and Control
Squadron, was the 2013 selectee for the Senior NCO
category.
Master Sgt. Mathew Johnston, bottom left, from the
124th Fighter Wing Staff, was the 2013 selectee for the
First Sergeant category.
Senior Airman Edward Landis, top right, from the
190th Fighter Squadron, was the 2013 selectee for the
Honor Guard category. He was unable to attend, Lt.
Col. Shannon Smith, right, is receiving his award in his
honor. Awards given by Brig. Gen. Richard Turner at
the 2014 Outstanding Airmen of the Year Banquet on
Jan. 4 held at the Riverside Hotel in Boise, Idaho. (Air
National Guard photos by Senior Airman David Anderson)
To see more photos and watch the video of the speach given
by Chief Gaylor (Ret.) go to:
https://www.facebook.com/124FWOfficial and

http://bit.ly/124Beacon
http://bit.ly/124Beacon t January 2014t5

Largest Outstanding Airmen

By Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel


Photos by Tech. Sgt. Sarah Pokorney
and Senior Airman David Anderson
124th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Tonight, were recognizing winners,


you work with them, said Chief Master
Sgt. of the Air Force (retired), Robert Gaylor, and they were nominated because
they embrace the words that Ive shared
with you tonight (opportunity, aptitude,
and attitude). They are a demonstration
of what success is all about.
Gaylor delivered the keynote address to
a capacity crowd of over 340 at the 2014
Outstanding Airmen of the Year Banquet
held in Boise in early January. He served
as the fifth Chief Master Sgt. of the Air
Force in the late 1970s. He spoke prior to
the awards ceremony.
This year the Idaho Air National Guard
honored Master Sgt. Shallan Prickett,
from the 212th Command and Control
Squadron, Staff Sgt. Christina Rohrenbach from the 124th Logistics Readiness
Squadron, and Senior Airman Bradley Ford from the 124th Security Forces
Squadron for the Senior NCO, NCO, and
airmen categories.
Master Sgt. Mathew Johnston, from the
124th Fighter Wing Staff, won the First
Sergeant category. He serves as the 124th
Fighter Wing First Sergeant during Unit
Training Assembly (UTA) periods.
Senior Airman Edward Landis, from
the 190th Fighter Squadron, was the 2013
selectee for the Honor Guard category.
Gaylor exhorted everyone in attendance
to seek continuous improvement in life.
He challenged all trailblazers in the room,
Leaders inspire, stimulate, and motivate-they help develop attitudes. They wont
put up with anything less, he said.

6 thttp://bit.ly/124Beacon t January 2014

Col. Chris Rood, Commander of the 124th


Fighter Wing talks with
Chief Gaylor and represents him with the Wing
coin.

Chief Master Sgt. Jim


McMonigal, from the
124th ASOS, gives Chief
Gaylor a Boise State tshirt as a gift for speaking at the 2014 Banquet.

www.idaho.ang.af.mil

Banquet celebrates success

The 124th Fighter Wing Base Honor Guard post the colors and
paid tribute to those past and present Missing In Action (MIA)
and Prisoners of War (POW).

A special thanks to Middleton


High School Choir for singing the National Anthem and
many heart-felt songs honoring military members.

Opportunity, Aptitude, Attitude three words to live by,


said Fifth Chief of the Air Force, Chief Master Sgt. of the
Air Force (retired), Robert Gaylor to a large crowd. Gaylor
is a nationally recognized public speaker and motivator.

http://bit.ly/124Beacon t January 2014t7

faces & places

Promotions
CMSgt Sidney Brown
124 MOF
SMSgt Deborah Borley
124 FW
TSgt Seth Rothenbuhler
212 CACS
TSgt William Blyth
124 MSG
TSgt Dwayne Patterson
266 RANS

Congratulations!
Wing Fire Department, March 6.
During the two-day Fill the Boot
event in July, the fire department
was not initially satisfied with the
$6000 raised because they were
accustomed to raising up to $20,000,
so they requested an additional day
in August to raise more money.
It was the opening day of the fair and
we were located at the intersection of
Chinden Blvd. and Veterans Memorial
Parkway, in Boise. We raised almost
$10,000 just that day, said Sgt. Hunt.
The funds raised will be used locally
by Muscular Dystrophy Association
to support Idaho families of children
with muscular dystrophy and send the
children to MDA Summer Camp in
McCall this June. A portion of the funds
also go to the main chapter for research.
In May, the fire department will
be supporting a one-day kids camp
here for the families, children, and
counselors that will be attending MDA
camp in McCall. They expect nearly 150
people, including families, children, and
counselors, to attend the one day event.
The day camp will allow the children
and families to meet the counselors
before they go to camp, said Sgt. Hunt.
Hu n t s a i d t h at t h e y u s u a l l y
support the MDA Summer Camp in
McCall but they are unable to this
year because of the ORE schedule so
thats why they planned the one-day
camp. They are also sending dollars
to support the McCall MDA camp.

Base Energy Use Down--Brainpower Up


By Lt. Col. Gary A. Daniel
124FW Public Affairs

The 124th Civil Engineering Squadron is half way through a


decade-long energy program that will affect every workplace, every
guardsman and civilian, and how they operate at Gowen Field. Huge
sums of energy, (measured in British Thermal Units) money, and brain
power (in the form of extensive re-engineering and energy auditing)
are in motion to insure Gowens compliance with federal guidelines.
According to MSgt Travis Jones (124CES/CEO) Gowen Field has
exceeded all federal goals, remains ahead of many other bases in
innovation, and saved 19.7 percent in energy usage last year compared
to 2003. This number must drop furtherto below 30 percent (of
2003 energy usage) by 2015. Closing this last gap could prove the
most challenging. As we complete the big building projects that affect
our largest structures, we begin to run out of low-hanging fruit, MSgt
Jones said.
The goals of the base energy plan may have seemed distant to most
124th Fighter Wing members outside of CE. That is likely to change.
Weve emphasized larger spaces (where its easier to save big), but
the scrutiny is coming to our smaller workspaces, said Mr. Scott
Bussman, 124CES Facility Manager.
Bussman believes that educating the base populace is the single most
valuable energy saving tool at our collective disposal. And that as our
buildings and their engineers become more technologically advanced,
the end users of energy will have to have the basics on their minds.
Weve got to encourage a sense of ownership from now on so that it
feels routine to shut off the lights, Mr. Busmann said.
Dont try to trick our thermostats, said MSgt Jones, we have
(software) programs that can detect cheatersand pay you a quick
visit. We can detect the in-rush (energy flow) to our total demand in
each building. Translation: CEs building management computers
can tell when you fire-up your (authorized) laser printer, and your
(unauthorized) personal space heater or mini-fridge.
The Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 drives the base energy
plan. That plan changes with the overall square footage that the Air
National Guard authorizes the 124FW to operate with. In essence,
the Base Realignment and Closure proceedings that decommissioned
the 189th Airlift Squadron and Aerial Port Flight made the arithmetic
harder, not easier. Were authorized less space to accomplish our
mission, MSgt Jones said.
In the future, more appliances on Gowen Field will fall under the
Energy Star purchasing polices that began in 2004. The Air Force
has already successfully met Energy Star certification for over 90
percent of the computers it has fielded since then. The AF Information
Technology Commodity Council estimates annual savings of over $15
million. Locally the 124FW can expect to reap a smaller scale savings
on more efficient lighting fixtures, heating systems, appliances as well
as computers.
To do this Mr. Busmann believes that everyone on base will need
to adapt the same attitude they have at home and act as though the
energy bill is a monthly reality. Busmann explained We need to
spread the word more widely that some personal actions help us (like
turning off the coffee pot), and some actions hurt us (like opening up
squadron entry doors to get a breeze going).
When our workforce here tries to outsmart an already smart
building, they usually confuse it and make the overall conditions
inside much worse, said MSgt Jones.
The Beacon May 2011 5

DVIDS - News - Col. Sherrie McCandless, first woman


selected to command the 124th Fighter Wing

McCandless became the 15th wing commander of the 1241h F1gh1erWing.

Sherrie l. McCandless

"Any time you are moving into a position of leadership like this, you are always standing
on the shoulders of those commanders that stood before you," she said.
Opti ons
"I would like to extend a personal thank you to Col. Chris Rood (outgoing wing
commander) for all his support during this transition. Thank you, Gen. Nolan, (a previous
wing commander) I know ii lakes everything that you've go1 to lead an organization at
this level," she said .

.!,

Brig. Gen. Michael Nolan, assistant adjutant general, air, commande r Idaho Air National
Guard, presided over the ceremony.

JiliPrintable Version

As he began to address t he histor ic wing change of command he remarked upon the


s1a1icA-10 Thunderbolt II Just to right of the ceremony stage, "She Is a workhorse, and
the hundreds of combat hours she has flown is a fine representation (of t he 124th
Fighter Wing)."
He thanked Col. Chris Rood for his service as 1241h Fighter Wing commander and as vice
commander and for his leadership through !he process of a successful outcome to !he
2013 Consolidated Unit Inspection.
"The success of those inspections was in large part due to your efforts and the efforts of
those you led," he sald.
He proceeded 10 address the future of the Idaho Air National Guard.
"Today we find ourselves navigating a bit of roug h air facing a potential dlvesture of the
A-10 mission. Despite our confidence that has come with years of success, we find
ourselves anxious about an uncertain futu re. But we are navigating, we are not adrift, we
are flying a charted course. Our mission is clear: it is 10 fly, fighl, and win.
'We are not in uncharted waters; the uncertai nty we face is mission change. We have
successfully navigated mission change on several occasions. As always we will succeed.
Lei's not focus on uncertainty, but on opportunities thal come with certain change. T hey
are numerous ," he said.
As he summarized the resume of incomi ng fighter wing commander McCandless, Nolan
said, 'We will capitalize on your unique experience and qualifications. I anticipate that
you'll be a collaborative, articulate, well informed , and experienced leader capable of
moving the wing forward.
As she addressed 124th FWairmen McCandless said, we've accomplished nine aircraft
conversions here, our airman have retra ined and quickly regained their combat mission
readiness as rapidly as possible each time and they have continued to serve with
distinction."
McCandless thanked her husband, LI. Col. Chris Sheppard, of the District of Columbia Air
National Guard. Sheppard, a traditional guardsman, is commander of the 12lst
Operations Support Squadron.

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"I'm extremely proud of his deployment record to Iraq twice and to Afghanistan. I'm not
only a deployer myself, but I'm also a spouse. I wait and worry Just as other spouses do
for their spouse to come home from combat," McCandless said.
"I pledge my personal best 10 you all. I Intend 10 uphold the promise of 'first class or not
at all,"' she said.

https://www.dvidshub.net/news/121533/colsherrie-mccandless-first-woman-selectedcommand-124th-fighter-wing#.VZB-52DkzC4
DVIDS - News - Col. Sherrie McCandless,
first woman selected to command the
124th Fighter Wing

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sole A-10 support for Combined Resolve II

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GERMANY- Unaffected by the spotlight fro m U.S.Army Europe, NATO, and EuropeanPartner nations, the Idaho Air National Guard successfully provided crucial Close Air
Support (CAS) during last mo nth's Combined Resolve II exercise.
over 100 Idaho Air National Guard pilots, aircraft maintenance professionals, and
support personnel participated in t he multi-national training exercise. Seven A-lOC
Thunderbolt II fighters fro m t he 124th Fighter Wing flew CAS missions to support the
more than 4,000 forces on the ground in Germany. The U.S. Army-Europe led fourteen
other participating European nations' military forces through six weeks of training usi ng
their most advanced equipment t hat they have stationed In the European Theater.

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For more than half of that time , the "'Hawgs of the 124th Fighter Wing provided close air
cover to maneuvering troops in the German countryside. This meant masteri ng flying in
German airspace under rules different than t he "Skull bangers of t he 190th Fighter
Squadron rou t inely comply with stateside.

JIN 1'81

,IGUII'

OTHERAREAS

"We weren't allowed to use our full (instrument flying) capabilities found with SADL
(Situational Awareness Data Link), so we turned off our SADL for about a month before
deploying and used older time-proven techniques ," said Maj . Brian "Digger'" Daigle.
Daigle planned and coordinated the expedition and served as detachment commander in
Germany.
In his first overseas duty, 1st Lt. Bud Munns echoed Daigle's sentiment. vou have to
increase your cockpit crosschecks and maintain higher situational awareness. overall,
this experience helps your pilot skills,"" he said.

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A-lOC X Thunderbolt II X
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In previous European exercises on this scale, the Army could count on support from A10 unit s permanently stationed forward in Europe . The Skullbangers operated from
Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany-the previous home to t he 8lst
Fighter Squadron.

news, Idaho ANG X

"We had quite a bit of clean up befo re we could store the aircraft, in Protected Aircraft
Structures (PAS). It was our wing's fi rst fighte r operations out of Europe since the mid
1990s,"" said Chief Master Sgt. Steven Lewis.

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According to Lewis and Daigle, the Idahoans overcame many unexpected operating
constraints. "We had a tougher commute than we planned for from off base, but better
weather than anticipated-even some sunburns on the flight line; said Lewis.
"The people who deployed (to Combined Resolve) got very good training and I'm hopeful
they will pass this on to others," said Lewis "I was really proud of everyone."
"That wingtip clearance taxiing out (of a PAS)was very slight ; said Daigle, "the cover also
restricted our GPSreception during preflight. "
Despite some weather cancellations over some target areas, !24th Operations Group
Commander Col. Paul Kingsley called the effort overall a success. "The best measure is
they've (the USArmy Europe) asked us to come back," he said.

History

A MONUMENT BEFORE THE WORLD

After 15 years of construction, ten decades of


use, and additional centuries of life (thanks to a
comprehensive restoration), the Idaho State Capitol
stands as the Gem States
monument before the world. Vast
timber tracts were sold to complete
its center section (10,000 acres) and
its east and west wings (15,000 acres).

Chief architect John Everett


Tourtellotte, who along with partner
Charles F. Hummel, conceived of a
monumental local sandstone edice
whose interior imported marble
nishes would shine the light of
conscience to make clear the path of
duty for its tenants.

Boise Central School and the Idaho


Territorial Capitol previously sat on the buildings two
downtown blockswhich can be seen
for over a mile as motorists approach
northbound on Boises Capitol
Boulevard. In July of 1905, the Idaho
Capitol Commission directed
construction superintendent Herbert
E. Quigley, fresh from successful
completion of the beautiful sandstone
Boise Federal Building, a block south,
to proceed with construction.

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CLIENT
IDAHO CAPITOL COMMISSION
CONTACT
GARY DANIEL
PROJECT
CAPITOL BANNERSHISTORY
JOB #
DATE

01.08.09

DESIGNER
YUKIE DUNCAN
ACCT. EXEC.
JIM GUY
COORDINATOR
MARY JOHNSON
Your signature constitutes approval of
this layout/design as it appears here
and is considered authorization to start
production.

X
DATE
NO PART OF THIS WORK MAY BE COPIED,
MODIFIED, DISTRIBUTED, REPRODUCED OR
OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT EXPRESS WRITTEN
PERMISSION. ANY AND ALL ARTWORK THAT IS
PROVIDED BY CLIENT IS ASSUMED TO BE
AUTHORIZED AND APPROVED BY ALL PARTIES
INVOLVED IN CREATION OF SAID ARTWORK.
CATAPULT 3, INC. IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
UNAUTHORIZED USE AND/OR ALTERATION OF
POSSIBLE COPYRIGHTED ARTWORK.

PROOF

Facts

A BEACON FOR NOBLE IDEALS

Chief architect John E. Tourtellotte boldly compared


the majesty and simplicity of the building to St. Peters in
Rome, St. Pauls in London, and the U.S. Capitol in
Washington less than a year after the structures center
section was operational. The sandstone
exterior, quarried from nearby Table Rock,
spans over 300 feet wide on the north and
south facades. The rst oor stones are
carved to resemble logs that pay tribute to
the frontier character of the 43rd state. Rising
above the logs and a Beaux Arts assembly of
neoclassical inuence is a gold leaf-covered
eagle perched 208 feet above street level.

5017 GAGE STREET


BOISE IDAHO 83706
P. 208.375.2500
P. 1.800.657.7422
F. 208.375.2535
WWW.CATAPULT3.COM

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CLIENT
IDAHO CAPITOL COMMISSION
CONTACT

Luminous surfaces of marble and scagliola dominate


the interior public areasrealizing Tourtellotte and
Hummels desire for continuous light
upon Gem State government. The now
priceless veneer of scagliolaa plaster
also known as faux marble covers
every load-bearing column within the
Capitol rotunda. Over 50,000 square feet
of marble from Alaska, Georgia, Italy,
and Vermont dominate the rotunda and
the public corridors.

GARY DANIEL

The south-facing building that


generations of Idahoans know as a sentinel
to the southern Boise Front of the Rocky
Mountains sits on just under ve acres.
The buildings oldest component, a handcarved statue of General George
Washington from
1869, moved indoors to grace the
second oor rotunda in 1934.

JIM GUY

PROJECT
CAPITOL BANNERSFACTS
JOB #
DATE

01.08.09

DESIGNER
YUKIE DUNCAN
ACCT. EXEC.

COORDINATOR
MARY JOHNSON
Your signature constitutes approval of
this layout/design as it appears here
and is considered authorization to start
production.

X
DATE
NO PART OF THIS WORK MAY BE COPIED,
MODIFIED, DISTRIBUTED, REPRODUCED OR
OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT EXPRESS WRITTEN
PERMISSION. ANY AND ALL ARTWORK THAT IS
PROVIDED BY CLIENT IS ASSUMED TO BE
AUTHORIZED AND APPROVED BY ALL PARTIES
INVOLVED IN CREATION OF SAID ARTWORK.
CATAPULT 3, INC. IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
UNAUTHORIZED USE AND/OR ALTERATION OF
POSSIBLE COPYRIGHTED ARTWORK.

PROOF

Expansion

THE PEOPLE S HOUSE

Fondly referred to as the peoples house, the


name reminds Idaho citizen legislators of who they
serve. Designed for a 1905 statewide population of
160,000, Idahos Capitol served 1.5
IDAHO'S RESIDENT POPULATION
1870 2000
million residents at the end of the
20th century. By then the blessings of
working in a compact governmental
hub where legislators were easy to
nd had given way to cramped
conditions. Signicant House or
Senate hearings began to routinely include participating
citizens lling every seat, standing in the aisles, and
overowing into the hallways.

5017 GAGE STREET


BOISE IDAHO 83706
P. 208.375.2500
P. 1.800.657.7422
F. 208.375.2535
WWW.CATAPULT3.COM

2009 Catapult3, Inc.

All rights reserved.

1,400,000
1,200,000
1,000,000

800,000
600,000
400,000
200,000
15,000

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70
18
80
18
90
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00
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10
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00

The thirty-month renovation,


restoration, and rehabilitation of the
Capitol are a culmination of over eight
years of study and deliberation by the
Capitol Commission. During this process, the
Commission, the Idaho Division of Public Works, and
the state Legislature determined
underground expansion wings
could preserve the buildings
iconic prole at the base of
Boises foothills. The new
Capitol design allows state
government to operate in a
working Capitol building,
and permits greater citizen participation in the
legislative process.

CLIENT
IDAHO CAPITOL COMMISSION
CONTACT
GARY DANIEL
PROJECT
CAPITOL BANNERSEXPANSION
JOB #
DATE

01.08.09

DESIGNER
YUKIE DUNCAN
ACCT. EXEC.
JIM GUY
COORDINATOR
MARY JOHNSON
Your signature constitutes approval of
this layout/design as it appears here
and is considered authorization to start
production.

X
DATE
NO PART OF THIS WORK MAY BE COPIED,
MODIFIED, DISTRIBUTED, REPRODUCED OR
OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT EXPRESS WRITTEN
PERMISSION. ANY AND ALL ARTWORK THAT IS
PROVIDED BY CLIENT IS ASSUMED TO BE
AUTHORIZED AND APPROVED BY ALL PARTIES
INVOLVED IN CREATION OF SAID ARTWORK.
CATAPULT 3, INC. IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
UNAUTHORIZED USE AND/OR ALTERATION OF
POSSIBLE COPYRIGHTED ARTWORK.

PROOF

Restoration
PROTECTING THE PRICELESS

The sublime results of interior restoration will


often go unnoticed by the casual visitor when the
project is complete. Most Capitol tenants
were born after remodel crews had to
hide the majestic barrel vault ceiling in
the fourth floor's Statuary Hall to add
heating ducts. Even fewer Idahoans can
remember seeing sunlight cascade down
from the central roof skylights through
the south staircases. Once, plush
draperies hugged the
colonnades of the House
and Senate chambers. These
restorations are underway.

Most of the Capitol rehabilitation


(to efficient contemporary use) of the
building's busiest areas are intended
to balance the traditions and customs
of the seasonal citizen legislature with
the practical needs of year-round
tenants who rely on
evolving technology
to accomplish the
people's business. Idaho's public
works staff has the on-going task of
preserving the Capitol's marble
staircases and fully marble-covered
public corridors.

5017 GAGE STREET


BOISE IDAHO 83706
P. 208.375.2500
P. 1.800.657.7422
F. 208.375.2535
WWW.CATAPULT3.COM

2009 Catapult3, Inc.

All rights reserved.

CLIENT
IDAHO CAPITOL COMMISSION
CONTACT
GARY DANIEL
PROJECT
CAPITOL BANNERSRESTORATON
JOB #
DATE

01.08.09

DESIGNER
YUKIE DUNCAN
ACCT. EXEC.
JIM GUY
COORDINATOR
MARY JOHNSON
Your signature constitutes approval of
this layout/design as it appears here
and is considered authorization to start
production.

X
DATE
NO PART OF THIS WORK MAY BE COPIED,
MODIFIED, DISTRIBUTED, REPRODUCED OR
OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT EXPRESS WRITTEN
PERMISSION. ANY AND ALL ARTWORK THAT IS
PROVIDED BY CLIENT IS ASSUMED TO BE
AUTHORIZED AND APPROVED BY ALL PARTIES
INVOLVED IN CREATION OF SAID ARTWORK.
CATAPULT 3, INC. IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
UNAUTHORIZED USE AND/OR ALTERATION OF
POSSIBLE COPYRIGHTED ARTWORK.

PROOF

Reopening
ANOTHER HUNDRED YEARS

The Capitol of Idaho will reopen larger, safer, easier


to protect, more accessible, and with greater beauty
than anytime in its history. It is still the
nations only state Capitol served by
geothermal artesian wells for heating.
That earth-friendly design will now be
augmented by 339 new double-glazed
energy efficient windows
which seamlessly blend
with classic Roman ogee patterned
window frames of fully-preserved
Honduran mahogany.

Seats for participants attending


legislative committee hearings will
increase fourfold, and re exits double.
Little of the Statehouse contained any
type of re suppression such as smoke detectors and
sprinklers. The restored buildings re protection
system will be modern and
comprehensive. Its lighting
will feature the look of
opulent custom glass lamps
from the 1920s to insure it
remains as a whole nearer
perfect in this respect than
any building of its kind
perhaps in the world.*
*John E. Tourtellotte, The Capitol of Idaho

5017 GAGE STREET


BOISE IDAHO 83706
P. 208.375.2500
P. 1.800.657.7422
F. 208.375.2535
WWW.CATAPULT3.COM

2009 Catapult3, Inc.

All rights reserved.

CLIENT
IDAHO CAPITOL COMMISSION
CONTACT
GARY DANIEL
PROJECT
CAPITOL BANNERSREOPENING
JOB #
DATE

01.08.09

DESIGNER
YUKIE DUNCAN
ACCT. EXEC.
JIM GUY
COORDINATOR
MARY JOHNSON
Your signature constitutes approval of
this layout/design as it appears here
and is considered authorization to start
production.

X
DATE
NO PART OF THIS WORK MAY BE COPIED,
MODIFIED, DISTRIBUTED, REPRODUCED OR
OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT EXPRESS WRITTEN
PERMISSION. ANY AND ALL ARTWORK THAT IS
PROVIDED BY CLIENT IS ASSUMED TO BE
AUTHORIZED AND APPROVED BY ALL PARTIES
INVOLVED IN CREATION OF SAID ARTWORK.
CATAPULT 3, INC. IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
UNAUTHORIZED USE AND/OR ALTERATION OF
POSSIBLE COPYRIGHTED ARTWORK.

PROOF

Commission
THE IDAHO CAPITOL COMMISSION

TB

5017 GAGE STREET


BOISE IDAHO 83706
P. 208.375.2500
P. 1.800.657.7422
F. 208.375.2535

The rst Idaho Capitol Commission supervised


the1885 construction of the Territorial Capitol in Boise.

By 1905, demands to replace the


territorial Capitol and provide Gem
state citizens with a proper state
Capitol led to the ofcial creation
of the second Idaho Capitol
Commission. The Commissioners
examined numerous other state
Capitol buildings rsthand, decided
upon a proper Capitol site, and chose
an architect with accordant vision,
Boise based Tourtellotte & Company.

As the Capitol approached a century of service, the


Idaho legislature proposed the creation of a leadership
body to review all proposals to
reconstruct, redecorate, or restore
the structure.* Governor Phil Batt
signed legislation in 1998 that
recreated the Capitol Commission
with a specic charge to keep the
building a working seat of Idaho government. All
Idahoans can contribute to the restoration efforts by
purchasing a limited edition
license plate. Receipts now
surpass $400,000.
*Idaho Statutes, 67-1608
http://capitolcommission.idaho.gov

WWW.CATAPULT3.COM

2009 Catapult3, Inc.

All rights reserved.

CLIENT
IDAHO CAPITOL COMMISSION
CONTACT
GARY DANIEL
PROJECT
CAPITOL BANNERSCOMMISSION
JOB #
DATE

01.08.09

DESIGNER
YUKIE DUNCAN
ACCT. EXEC.
JIM GUY
COORDINATOR
MARY JOHNSON
Your signature constitutes approval of
this layout/design as it appears here
and is considered authorization to start
production.

X
DATE
NO PART OF THIS WORK MAY BE COPIED,
MODIFIED, DISTRIBUTED, REPRODUCED OR
OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT EXPRESS WRITTEN
PERMISSION. ANY AND ALL ARTWORK THAT IS
PROVIDED BY CLIENT IS ASSUMED TO BE
AUTHORIZED AND APPROVED BY ALL PARTIES
INVOLVED IN CREATION OF SAID ARTWORK.
CATAPULT 3, INC. IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
UNAUTHORIZED USE AND/OR ALTERATION OF
POSSIBLE COPYRIGHTED ARTWORK.

PROOF

About our Restoration and Addition Project

O Capitol Commission
Department of Administrat ion
Commission

Project Log: June 2008


Educatio n
About
Restorat ion
Inside Look!

The Capitol'sUndergroundStudio
Just a small part of the massive redecorating efforts underway at the Idaho
State Capitol are proceeding in the building's basement studio. Here, craftsman
from Evergreene Painting Studios fabricate ornate cornices and decorative
rosettes for Capitol rotunda light fixtures.

Rededicatio n
Celebration

At this table, the craftsman drag


Bogdan Chemetskiy and Terry VanderWell
the guide (pictured at the right)
of Evergreene Painting Studios are at one
of cornice mold construction tables in the across the top of their mold
garden-level ornamentation studio located making material before it sets .
in the Idaho State Capitol.

Cons1

When dry, the material is ready to conform plaster into attractive shapes for
the public areas of the Idaho Statehouse. Every light fixture in the Capitol
rotunda will be ensconced by a decorative custom cast rosette. Evergreene
Painting Studio's process is similar to those used 200 years ago to constnJct
decorative moldin s in laster casts.

Bogdan Chemetskiy and Roman Cherstylq proceed with crafting a decorative


cornice for one of the floors of the Idaho State Capitol while Ricardo Ochoa of
Idaho Public Television documents the progress.
Terry VanderWell, Restoration Director for
Evergreene Painting Studios, inspects
some of the completed cornice molding
bound for the upper floors of the restored
Idaho State Capitol.
The Idaho State Capitol will reopen when
restoration is complete in 2010.

Postedby Gary Oaniel

Comments

ExhibitDebutsat the Boise Airport

The Idaho Capitol Commission's new exhibit tells Boise Airport travelers about
the past history, current restoration and expansion, and the promising future
for Idaho's Statehouse.

"Another Hundred Years" conveys


new features of the building that
the public will enjoy when the
Caoitol reooens earlv next decade.

The display residesjust inside the TSA


security checkpoint near the food court.

The Capitol Commission'spanel


publicizesthe IdahoCapitol
license plate program.

"A Beaconfor Noble Ideals"


providesa 30second general
overviewof Idaho's workingseat of
government.

"The People'sHouse" discussesthe


enhanced access for all citizens to
participate in governmentafter the
Capitolis reconfiguredfor Idaho's growing
populace.

CapitolArchitect John E. Tourtellotte's


dream of Idaho'sCapitol standing as a
"monument before the world" has
survivedfor over 100years.

"Protecting the Priceless"


discussesPreservation,
Rehabilitation,and Restorationof
the IdahoState Ca itol.

Over three millionpassengers annuallywill pass the prominent location of the


IdahoCapitol Commission'sinterpretive display in the BoiseAirportMain
Concourse.
Posted by Gary Daniel

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