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Republic of the Philippines

BATANGAS STATE UNIVERSITY


ARASOF-Nasugbu
Nasugbu, Batangas
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTING SCIENCES
COURSE SPECIFICATIONS
VISION
A leading University in the region which shapes a globally competent citizen imbued with moral
courage nurtured through values and quality education
MISSION
Batangas State University commits to develop productive citizens by providing the highest
standard of instruction, research, extension service and production through value-laden learning
experiences, community partnerships and internationalization initiatives.
CORE VALUES
Spirituality
Nationalism
Harmony and Teamwork
Commitment to Excellence
Human Dignity and Gender Equality
Transparency, Honesty, and Accountability
Concern for the Environment
PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES OF THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
1. Work as a computing professional, utilizing the knowledge acquired.
2. Engage in the computing profession and utilize professional skills to make a positive impact on society.
3. Participate in further professional development, employing the learning skills taught in the Information
Technology program.
4. Maintain high professionalism and ethical standards and work as part of teams on multidisciplinary projects.
5. Be provided with learning environmental awareness of the life-long learning needed for a successful
professional career.

COLLEGE GOAL
The College of Engineering and Computing Sciences continuously strive for holistic development of highly
dynamic and righteous pool of professionals by providing innovative education, multi-disciplinary research
collaborations, and community partnerships that foster a strong sense of commitment for nation building, for
sustainable development, and for meeting the global challenges of the modern world.
Its initiatives are guided by a strong faith in a Supreme Being, establishing equanimity, accountability,
patriotism and excellence of progressive minded professionals in the fields of Information Technology.
OBJECTIVES OF THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATIONN TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM
General Objectives:
Produce qualified dynamic, well-rounded, environment-concerned and socially aware IT professionals who
can develop systems, take care an organizations information technology infrastructure, assume responsibility in
selecting hardware and software products appropriate for an organization, install, customize and maintain information
systems, thereby providing a secure and effective environment that supports the activities of the organization.
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It also aims to produce new generation IT professionals who will undertake the search for advanced
knowledge and impart and expand these to the community and in the industry.
Specific Objectives:
1. To generate highly qualified, well-versed, morally upright and globally competitive professionals who will
serve the needs of Information Technology industries both locally and internationally.
2. Use the knowledge and skills in Information Technology to provide critical analysis of alternatives to help
organizations make substantial and accurate decisions.
3. To gain knowledge in Information Technology in software development, hardware and programming and
apply these knowledge through various researches.
4. Anticipate the changing direction of Information Technology and prepare IT graduates with these changes.
5. To participate in community outreach programs and extension services through integration of Information
Technology applications thus gain experiences relevant to.
6. To promote excellent leadership through practical situations exposure in the field of information Technology.
Course Title: Routing Protocols and Concepts
Pre-requisite: IT 205
Lecture Unit: 2 Units
Instructor: Djoanna Marie V. Salac
Email: dmtv_17@yahoo.com
Mobile No.: 09173256463
Revision No.: 1

Course Code: IT 307


Credit Units: 3
Laboratory Unit: 3 Units
Program & Year Level: BSIT III
Semester: 2nd Semester 2014-2015
Schedule: 7:00-9:30 -TF
Room: Cisco Lab

1.0 PHILOSOPHY
This course describes the architecture, component, and operation of routers and explains the principles of
routing protocols. Students analyze, configure, verify and troubleshoot the primary routing protocols like RIPv1,
RIPv2, EIGRP and OSPF. By the end of this course, students will be able to recognize and correct common routing
issues and problems. Students complete a basic procedural lab, followed by basic configuration, implementation, and
troubleshooting labs in each chapter. Packet Tracer activities reinforce new concepts and allow students to model
and analyze routing processes that may be difficult to visualize or understand.

2.0 AUDIENCE
This 3-unit course is intended for third year Bachelor of Science in Information Technology students
of Batangas State University ARASOF Nasugbu.
3.0 STUDENT OUTCOMES (SOs)
Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program are expected to have
acquired but not limited to the following competencies:
SO 1

An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics.

SO 2

An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to organize, analyze and interpret
data to produce meaningful conclusions and recommendations.

SO 3

An ability to design hardware and software systems, components, or processes to meet


desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social,
political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.

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SO 4

An ability to work individually or as a member with responsibility to function on multidisciplinary teams.

SO 5

An ability to identify, formulate, and solve hardware and software computing problems,
accounting for the interaction between hardware and software.

SO 6

An understanding of professional, legal, and ethical issues and responsibilities.

SO 7

An ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing, including documentation of


hardware and software systems.

SO 8

Able to show the understanding of impact of engineering solutions in a global on the


society, economic, environmental.

SO 9

Demonstrate an ability to acquire new knowledge in the computing discipline and to


engage in life-long learning.

SO 10 Knowledge of contemporary issues in the social sciences and the humanities using computational
tools.
SO 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for computer
engineering practice.
SO 12 An ability to apply engineering and management knowledge and techniques to estimate time and
resources needed to complete a computer engineering project.
SO 13 An ability to recognize the importance of professional development by pursuing postgraduate
studies or face competitive examinations that offer challenging and rewarding careers in
computing.
4.0 INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:

ILO 1 Describe the purpose, nature and operations of a router and routing tables
ILO 2

Explain and differentiate static routing and dynamic routing

ILO 3 Classify different routing protocols such as distance vector, link state, classless, classful, interior and
exterior
ILO 4

Explain the different routing protocols such as RIP, RIPv2, EIGRP and OSPF

ILO 5

Explain Variable Length Subnet Masks and Classless Inter Domain Routing

ILO 6

Configure, verify and troubleshoot static routes and dynamic routes

Mapped Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) with the Student Outcomes (SOs) for the Course:

Student
Outcomes

ILO 1

ILO 2

ILO 3

ILO 4

ILO 5

ILO 6

SO 1
SO 2
SO 3
SO 4
SO 5
SO 6

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SO 7
SO 8
SO 9
SO 10
SO 11
SO 12
SO 13
SO 14

5.0 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES


a. Introduction to Routing and Packet Forwarding
Students should be able to:
1. Compare a router and a computer
2. Configure Cisco devices and apply addresses
3. Describe the basic structure of routing table
4. Describe in detail how a router determines the best path and switches a packet
b. Static Routing
Students should be able to:
1. Explain the role of a router in the network
2. Describe CDP
3. Explain static routing
4. Configure, verify and troubleshoot static routes
c. Introduction to Dynamic Routing Protocols
Students should be able to:
1. Describe the role of dynamic routing protocols
2. Classify the different routing protocols
3. Explain the importance of administrative distance and metric
4. Describe the elements of a routing table
d. Distance Vector Routing Protocols
Students should be able to:
1. Identify the characteristics of distance vector routing protocols
2. Describe the processes for maintaining accurate routing table used by distance vector routing
protocols
3. Explain routing loops, its causes and effects on the router performance
4. Explain the types of distance vector routing protocols being used today
e. RIP Version 1 (RIPv1)
Students should be able to:
1. Explain the functions, characteristics and operations of RIPv1
2. Describe automatic summarization and propagating default route on a network using RIPv1
3. Configure, verify and troubleshoot RIPv1
f.

VLSM and CIDR


Students should be able to:
1. Differentiate classful and classless IP addressing
2. Explain VLSM and the benefits of classless IP addressing
3. Describe the role of Classless Inter Domain Routing (CIDR) standard

g. RIPv2
Students should be able to:
1. Describe the limitations of RIPv1
2. Analyze RIPv2 support for VLSM and CIDR
3. Configure, verify and troubleshoot RIPv2
h. The Routing Table: A Close Look
Students should be able to:
1. Explain the various types of routes found in the routing table structure
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2. Describe the route lookup process


3. Differentiate classful and classless routing behaviour
i.

EIGRP
Students should be able to:
1.
Discuss the background, history, features and operations of EIGRP
2.
Describe how EIGRP calculates its composite metric
3.
Explain the concepts and operations of the DUAL algorithm
4.
Configure, verify and troubleshoot EIGRP

j.

Link State Routing Protocols


Students should be able to:
1.
Describe the basic features and concepts of link state routing protocols
2.
Explain the benefits and requirements of implementing link state routing protocols

k. OSPF
Students should be able to:
1.
Discuss the history , background and features of OSPF
2.
Describe the metric used by OSPF
3.
Explain the election on a multi access network of DR and BDR
4.
Configure, verify and troubleshoot OSPF

6.0

COURSE OUTLINE
Topics

I. Introduction to WANs
1.1.The Router as a Specialized Computer
1.2. CLI Configuration and Addressing
1.3. Building the Routing Table
1.4.Path Determination and Switching
2. Static Routing
2.1. Routers and the Network
2.2.Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP)
2.3 Configuring, verifying and troubleshooting
static routes
2.4 Summary Route and Default Route
3. Introduction to Dynamic Routing
Protocols
3.1. Classification of Dynamic Routing
Protocols
3.2. Metric
3.3. Administrative Distance
4. Distance Vector Routing Protocols
4.1. Characteristics of Distance Vector
Routing Protocols
4.2. Network Discovery
4.3 Routing Protocol Maintenance
4.4 Routing Loops
5. RIP Version 1
5.1.RIPv1 Characteristics
5.2. Configuring, verifying and
troubleshooting RIPv1
5.3Automatic Summarization
6. VLSM and CIDR
6.1. The Need for Advanced IP addressing
6.2. Classless Inter Domain Routing
6.3 Variable Length Subnet Masks

ILO 1

ILO 2

ILO 3

ILO 4

ILO 5

ILO 6

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7. RIP Version 2
7.1 RIPv1 Limitations
7.2. Configuring, verifying and
troubleshooting RIPv2
8. The Routing Table: A Closer Look
8.1 Routing Table Structure
8.2 Route Lookup Process
8.3 Routing Behavior
9. EIGRP
9.1 Introduction to EIGRP
9. 2 EIGRP Metric Calculation
9.3 DUAL Algorithm
9.4 Configuring, verifying and
troubleshooting EIGRP
10. Link State Routing Protocols
10.1 The Link State Process
10. 2 Advantages of Link State Routing
Protocols
10.3 Implementing Link State Routing
Protocols
11. OSPF
11.1 Introduction to OSPF
11.2 OSPF Metric Calculation
11.3 DR and BDR Election on Multi Access
Networks
11.4 Configuring, verifying and
troubleshooting OSPF

7.0 TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES, METHODS AND ASSESSMENT METHODS/TOOLS


Teaching Strategies Used: Active Learning, Critical Thinking, Collaborative learning, peer to-peer
teaching, Learner-Centered Teaching, Lecture Strategy, Problem-Based Learning, Social Networking Tools,
Learning Management Systems, and Laboratory Activities using Packet Tracer
Teaching Methods: Informal Instruction, Video Clips, Presentation Slides, Cooperative Leaning,
Information Processing, Formal Lecture, Interactive Lecture, Reading, Individual and Group Research,
Group Dynamics, Brainstorming, Synthesis, Projects,
Assessment Methods/Tools: Socratic Method of Assessment (Question and Answer), Rubrics,
Quizzes, Seatwork, Written Examinations, Assignments, Graded Recitation and Skills based assessment
8.0 COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Requirements of the Course: Written and Oral Examinations, Individual/Group Projects, Group
Activities, and Portfolio of Laboratory activities (Packet Tracer)
9.0 COURSE POLICIES
The following items are given as a guide in the conduct of the course:
8.1 Grading System
Note: Please refer to the latest approved BatStateU Grading System.
Major Examinations (Prelims, Midterms, Semi-finals, Finals)
Laboratory
Class Standing
Quizzes
40%

60%
30%
10%

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Assignments/Recitation/Attendance
Projects

30%
30%

TOTAL

_____
100%

Passing final grade is 75%. The numerical equivalent of the final grade will be determined from
the following rating scale.
Numerical Grade
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.0
2.25

Equivalent
98-100
94-97
90-93
88-89
85-87
83-84

Numerical Grade
2.50
2.75
3.00
4.00
5.00
Drp.

Equivalent
80-82
78-79
75-77
70-74
Below 70
Dropped

8.2 Attendance
Attendance will be checked regularly. A student with more than 9 hours of absence will be
dropped from the subject. 3 occurrences of tardiness are equivalent to 1 absence. A student
arriving in class after the first 15 minutes is considered absent.
8.3 Missed Exams
Make-up examination will be conducted provided an admission slip from the Guidance
Office is presented to the instructor.
8.4 Class Participation
Students are encouraged to participate actively during classroom discussion to develop
confidence and test retention.
8.5 Academic Misconduct
Academic misconduct will be subject to disciplinary action. Any act of dishonesty in
academic work constitutes academic misconduct. This includes plagiarism, the changing or
falsifying of any academic documents or materials, cheating, and the giving or receiving of
unauthorized aid in tests, examinations, or other assigned school work. Always protect your own
work from wandering eyes, since it is often not possible to determine who the originator and copier
were. Penalties for academic misconduct will vary with the seriousness of the offence. Punishment
for such offenses includes expulsion, suspension, and non-credit of examination among others.
8.6 Dropping
Dropping from the course is the responsibility of the student. If you decide to stop
attending the class, submit a copy of duly signed dropping form not later than the date set by the
university registrar. Failure to comply with this requirement would mean a grade of 5.00 in the
course. Please be guided accordingly.
8.7 Regulations and Restrictions in the Classroom
Inside the classroom, the student should behave properly so that lectures/discussions will
not be interrupted. The following will be strictly observed during the conduct of the class.
1. All cell phones and other electronic gadgets must be turned off.
2. Eating, drinking and smoking are not allowed.
3.Chatting, talking with seatmates (except when in group/cell discussion is required by the
instructor) is prohibited.
4. Reading newspapers, magazines, pocketbooks and the like are not allowed.
5. Going in and out of the room without permission from the instructor.
6. Being excused by friends or peers from outside just for any reason is not allowed except
for emergency cases concerning family problems or administrative reasons.
7. Playing games, cards or any form of gambling is strictly prohibited.
9.0 ACADEMIC STRUCTURE
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Textbooks:
Johnson A. & Graziani R.,(2008). Routing Protocols and Concepts, CCNA Exploration Companion Guide.
Cisco Press, Indianapolis, USA
Johnson A. (2008). Routing Protocols and Concepts, CCNA Exploration and Study Guide. Cisco Press.
Indianapolis, USA

References:
CCNA 4: WAN Technologies Student Lab Manual by Cisco Systems, Inc. 2003
CCNA Exploration 4.0:Accessing the WAN Student Lab Manual by Cisco Systems Inc.,2007
Website: cisco.netacad.net, www. classjump.com/dvasquez

10.0 COURSE CALENDAR


The following is the tentative course calendar which includes the list of topics for the course. The
instructor has the right to alter the outline at any time due to time constraints, unexpected scheduling
conflicts, unexpected activities in the university, or overall benefit to class effectiveness.
Teaching and Learning
Assessment
Week
Unit/Module/Topic Title
References
Strategies/Methods
Methods/ Tools
Teaching Strategies Used: Active
Learning, Critical Thinking,
Games, Peer to-Peer teaching,
Learner-Centered Teaching,
Lecture Strategy, Collaborative
learning, Problem-Based
Learning, Social Networking
Tools, Learning Management
Systems, and Laboratory
Activities using Packet Tracer

Orientation of the University


VMGO
Discussion of the Course
Specification
Weeks
1-5

Week

1. Introduction to WANs

V: pp 1-47

2. PPP

V: pp 55-119

Unit/Module/Topic Title

References

Weeks
6-9
3. Frame Relay

V:127-179
4. Network Security

V: 189-300

Teaching Methods:
Informal Instruction, Video Clips,
Presentation Slides, Cooperative
Leaning, Information Processing,
Formal Lecture, Interactive
Lecture, Reading, Individual and
Group Research, Group
Dynamics, Brainstorming,
Synthesis, Projects,

Teaching and Learning


Strategies/Methods
Teaching Strategies Used: Active
Learning, Critical Thinking, Games,
Peer to-Peer teaching, LearnerCentered Teaching, Lecture
Strategy, Collaborative learning,
Problem-Based Learning, Social
Networking Tools, Learning
Management Systems, and
Laboratory Activities using Packet
Tracer
Teaching Methods:
Informal Instruction, Video Clips,
Presentation Slides, Cooperative
Leaning, Information Processing,
Formal Lecture, Interactive
Lecture, Reading, Individual and
Group Research, Group Dynamics,

Assessment
Methods/Tools:
Socratic Method of
Assessment
(Question and
Answer), Quizzes,
Seatwork, Written
Examinations,
Assignments,
Graded Recitation
and Skills based
assessment

Assessment
Methods/ Tools
Assessment
Methods/Tools:
Socratic Method of
Assessment
(Question and
Answer), Quizzes,
Seatwork, Written
Examinations,
Assignments,
Graded Recitation
and Skills based
assessment

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Brainstorming, Synthesis, Projects,

5. ACLs
V:309-367
Weeks
10-13

6. Teleworker Services
V: 377-419

V: 429-512

7. IP Addressing Services
V:525-594
Weeks
14-18
8. Network
Troubleshooting

Teaching Strategies Used: Active


Learning, Critical Thinking, Games,
Peer to-Peer teaching, LearnerCentered Teaching, Lecture
Strategy, Collaborative learning,
Problem-Based Learning, Social
Networking Tools, Learning
Management Systems, and
Laboratory Activities using Packet
Tracer
Teaching Methods:
Informal Instruction, Video Clips,
Presentation Slides, Cooperative
Leaning, Information Processing,
Formal Lecture, Interactive
Lecture, Reading, Individual and
Group Research, Group Dynamics,
Brainstorming, Synthesis, Projects,
Teaching Strategies Used: Active
Learning, Critical Thinking, Games,
Peer to-Peer teaching, LearnerCentered Teaching, Lecture
Strategy, Collaborative learning,
Problem-Based Learning, Social
Networking Tools, Learning
Management Systems, and
Laboratory Activities using Packet
Tracer
Teaching Methods:
Informal Instruction, Video Clips,
Presentation Slides, Cooperative
Leaning, Information Processing,
Formal Lecture, Interactive
Lecture, Reading, Individual and
Group Research, Group Dynamics,
Brainstorming, Synthesis, Projects,

Assessment
Methods/Tools:
Socratic Method of
Assessment
(Question and
Answer), Quizzes,
Seatwork, Written
Examinations,
Assignments,
Graded Recitation
and Skills based
assessment

Assessment
Methods/Tools:
Socratic Method of
Assessment
(Question and
Answer), Quizzes,
Seatwork, Written
Examinations,
Assignments,
Graded Recitation
and Skills based
assessment

Prepared by:
DJOANNA MARIE T. VASQUEZ
Faculty Member, College of Engineering and Computing Sciences
Noted:
LORENJANE E. BALAN
Program Chair, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology
Approved:
Asst. Prof. LORISSA JOANA E. BUENAS
Associate Dean, College of Engineering and Computing Sciences

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