FileMaker Train i n g

FileMaker Server8 & Network Configurations

©2006 FileMaker, Inc. All rights reserved. FileMaker is a registered trademark of FileMaker, Inc., in the U.S. and other countries. The file folder logo is a trademark of FileMaker, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. The example companies, organization, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places and events depicted are purely fictitious, and any resemblance to existing persons and companies is purely coincidental. Product specifications and availability subject to change without notice. Special credit to Bob Bowers, Steve Lane, and Scott Love of Soliant Consulting (www. soliantconsulting.com) for assisting FileMaker, Inc. with the development of this document. This document may not be reproduced or otherwise redistributed without consent of FileMaker, Inc.

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FileMaker Server 8 & Network Configurations

Table of Contents Getting Started with FileMaker Server ...................................................................... 4 Objectives ..................................................................................................................... 4 FileMaker Server 8 as a Hosting Option ................................................................... 4 FileMaker Server 8 vs. FileMaker Server 8 Advanced ............................................. 5 FileMaker Server 8 Features and Benefits ................................................................ 6 Choosing Your Hardware ............................................................................................ 8 Mixing FileMaker 7 and FileMaker 8 .......................................................................11 About the Server Migration Tools ............................................................................12 Installing and Configuring FileMaker Server 8.......................................................13 Exercise 1: Configuring FileMaker Server 8 ...........................................................24 Scheduling Backups ..................................................................................................25 Server Administration ................................................................................................27 Exercise 2: Creating a Backup Schedule ................................................................26 Maintenance and Troubleshooting .........................................................................29 Administering FileMaker Server 8 with the Command Line ................................31 Review Questions ......................................................................................................39 Review Answers .........................................................................................................41

FileMaker Server 8 & Network Configurations

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FileMaker Server 8 & Network Configurations
Getting Started with FileMaker Server 8
Thus far you’ve learned how to work with FileMaker® Pro 8 as a user, in order to build databases. In this module, you’ll begin to learn ways to share the databases you’ve built with others. The FileMaker Pro 8 client software can share databases with up to five other users in a peer-topeer configuration. In cases where you need to support a larger group—up to 250 simultaneous connections—you’ll need FileMaker Server 8. FileMaker Server 8 is high performance server software that allows you to share and manage your database solutions. Its primary function is to share FileMaker databases with FileMaker clients, whether those clients are FileMaker Pro 8 or FileMaker Pro 8 Advanced, on a Macintosh or Windows operating system. In addition, FileMaker Server 8 provides functionality that can fine-tune the performance of your solutions, and allows for administration locally or remotely. Using FileMaker Server 8 and local or domain authentication services, you can also leverage existing network security standards to customize and protect your solutions.

Objectives
This module is an introduction to the functions and features of FileMaker Server 8 as well as sharing your FileMaker Pro databases. By the end of this module, you’ll learn: • The benefits of using FileMaker Server 8 • The advantages of using FileMaker Server 8 instead of peer-to-peer hosting • How to determine optimal FileMaker Server 8 configuration settings • How to determine optimal FileMaker Server 8 hardware configurations • How to install and configure FileMaker Server 8 • How to host files in FileMaker Server 8 • How to schedule and manage backups • How to use the command line to administer FileMaker Server 8

FileMaker Server 8 as a Hosting Option
Before considering administration and configuration topics, it’s important to understand how FileMaker Server 8 compares to FileMaker Pro 8 as a hosting option.

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Up to this point, you may have only worked with files as a single user, and have only created applications used by one client at a time. While some database solutions may only need to be accessed by one user at a time, most of your databases will need to be available to many users at the same time. FileMaker Server 8 is designed to share your FileMaker Pro solutions across a local workgroup or a wide area network.
Server vs. Single-User and Peer-to-Peer

The FileMaker Pro 8 (and FileMaker Pro 8 Advanced) applications can share up to 10 databases, in a peer-to-peer manner, with up to 5 users at a time by simply enabling network sharing (choose Sharing, FileMaker Network, under the Edit menu on Windows, or the FileMaker Pro 8/Pro 8 Advanced menu on Mac OS X). By contrast, FileMaker Server 8 installed on a server with enough RAM and a fast processor can allow up to 250 simultaneous connections to a maximum of 125 database files, and an additional 100 Instant Web Publishing connections. Also in contrast to peer-to-peer sharing, FileMaker Server 8 allows you to disconnect idle users (users who have not had any interaction with their connected database for a predefined period of time). The ability to automatically disconnect idle users at pre-designated intervals allows FileMaker Server 8 to support workgroups of more than 250 users by freeing up unused connections for new users. It also provides an added measure of security by disconnecting users who may have left their workstation. A third benefit of FileMaker Server 8 is its ability to improve the performance of shared databases. It allows databases to run faster by using sophisticated caching to take advantage of server architecture: high-performance hard disk storage systems; multi-CPU servers; and large amounts of RAM. Finally, FileMaker Server 8 has built in capabilities for creating backups. In a peer-to-peer environment, you will need to manually make backups of your database files when they’re not in use.

FileMaker Server 8 vs. FileMaker Server 8 Advanced
FileMaker Server 8 allows you to share your database solution with users who have the FileMaker Pro client software installed on their local workstation. FileMaker Server 8 Advanced provides you with two additional connectivity options. The first is ODBC/JDBC connectivity: databases hosted by FileMaker Server Advanced can be a data source for ODBC and JDBC transactions. For instance, you could use Microsoft® Excel to pull data directly from FileMaker Server. You are allowed a maximum of 50 ODBC/JDBC connections, which count toward the 250 concurrent user limit. More information on using ODBC/JDBC access can be found in the Connectivity module.

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The other type of access provided by FileMaker Server 8 Advanced is web access. When you purchase or upgrade to FileMaker Server 8 Advanced, you get an application called the Web Publishing Engine (WPE) which works in conjunction with a Web server (IIS on Windows, Apache on Mac OS X) and FileMaker Server to provide browser access to your hosted databases. You need the WPE to do both Instant Web Publishing and Custom Web Publishing. FileMaker Server Advanced can host a maximum of 100 concurrent web sessions (this is above and beyond the 250 client limit). Instant Web Publishing and Custom Web Publishing are covered in detail in other modules.

FileMaker Server Features and Benefits
In addition to its ability to share FileMaker Pro databases with a large number of users, FileMaker Server 8 has a number of other features and benefits.
Indexes and Calculations on the server

FileMaker Server 8 manages the indexing for all hosted database files, and some searches and calculations are performed by the server instead of the client. This results in improved performance and less network traffic.
Remote Administration

FileMaker Server 8 can be administered locally or remotely using the FileMaker Server Admin application, which is included on the FileMaker Server 8 CD. The FileMaker Server Admin application can be installed on the FileMaker Server 8 machine itself, as well as on additional machines. Using the FileMaker Server Admin application, FileMaker Server 8 can be administered remotely without the use of the FileMaker Pro client or any plug-in, as was necessary with earlier versions of FileMaker Server.
Scheduled Tasks

FileMaker Server 8 also allows you to perform “live” backups while the files are in use. A live backup is one in which the backup process is performed while users are still working with the files. With the use of FileMaker Server’s automated tasks, you can protect your database while it is in use by scheduling backups to run at specific times. You can also set FileMaker Server 8 to run a batch script at a scheduled time, or you can use FileMaker Server 8 to send a message at a scheduled time to alert users about scheduled maintenance, backup reminders, or anything else you may want to notify connected users about.
Consistency Checks

As FileMaker Server 8 opens files, it performs a consistency check on files that were not closed properly or have not yet been opened using FileMaker Server 8. If a file is found to be corrupt, FileMaker Server logs an entry into the Event Log and refuses to open the file. The consistency

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check verifies the low level consistency of the file, but does not check things like the index being correct for the data or pictures that are internally corrupted. If a file does not pass the consistency check, as a first step, Save a Compressed Copy of the file and try again. If it still doesn’t pass, perform a recovery of the file. A recovered file should always pass the consistency check and be considered safe to use.
Event Logging

FileMaker Server 8 creates and identifies its own unique set of event log entries. These event log entries include events and activities such as users connecting to the server, what events occurred while specific users were connected, when the server was started, and when the last known server error occurred and how severe it was. The event logging in FileMaker Server 8 is more extensive than earlier versions and includes more specific error messages.
Automatic Plug-in Updates

If your solution requires the use of plug-ins, you can use FileMaker Server to automate the distribution of plug-ins to clients. As a user opens a file, you can have a script check to see if the user has the required plug-in installed, and if not, the script can download it from the server and install it transparently.
Security Benefits

You can configure FileMaker Server 8 to authenticate users against your network’s built-in users and groups. This reduces the overhead of managing user accounts and passwords by using external authentication through centralized authentication management servers. With such a scheme in place, users can log into FileMaker databases with the same account and password they use to access their desktop in a networked environment, potentially automatically without prompting. In addition to the advanced security system included in FileMaker Pro 8, FileMaker Server 8 provides additional data protection. You may encrypt the network traffic between FileMaker Server 8 and FileMaker Pro 8 desktop clients using SSL encryption. (This may impose some performance penalty due to the overhead of encrypting the communication).
Solution Partitioning

FileMaker Server 8 can register with directory services such as Open Directory and Windows Active Directory so that users and administrators can locate it using directory services. Users’ display of hosted database names can also be filtered based on the users’ privileges. If your server hosts files for various departments, you can use this FileMaker Server 8 setting in combination with FileMaker Pro 8 user accounts to allow users to see only the databases specific to their group.

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Choosing Your Hardware
Your server hardware, network, and configuration will help determine the success of your FileMaker Server deployment. Insuring the use of a reliable, certified, dedicated machine is the best path to a successful server deployment, and will dramatically impact the usefulness of a database for an organization. Even the most carefully developed database in the world will still be considered a failure if access is unreliable.
The Server Machine

FileMaker Server 8 should be installed on a dedicated computer. Avoid using other applications on the machine that will compete with FileMaker Server 8 for use of the server resources, especially the hard drive. This will help to prevent conflicts, performance slowdowns, and other unexpected behaviors that will be detrimental to a deployment of your FileMaker databases. Installation of the basic operating system is recommended with FileMaker Server 8. The best way to be sure your hardware works properly is to make sure you only use hardware and components that are certified for your operating system. By using hardware that is certified for your operating system you are using hardware that has been tested and approved to work as expected. Get a name brand machine intended to be a server. Often, it is important to use a system that server administrators are comfortable with. This is to your advantage when it comes to configuring the hardware and the operating system. Since FileMaker Server 8 works on both Windows and Mac OS X, this should not be a difficult task. The fundamental job for FileMaker Server 8 is to move data between the hard drive, memory, and the network for consumption by the clients. As with any database server, fast hard drive I/O and network is critical to overall performance. Processor speed and memory are also important.

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Below are the minimum recommended hardware specifications for FileMaker Server 8:
No. of Clients 1 to 50 Mac • Mac OS X v10.3.9 or v10.4 or • Mac OS X Server v10.3.9 or v10.4 • Processor: G4 500 MHz • RAM: 256 MB • Hard Disk: 1 GB of available disk space Windows • Windows 2003 Server Standard Edition (with Service Pack 1) or • Windows 2000 Server (with Service Pack 4) or • Windows XP Professional SP 2* • Processor: Pentium III 1GHz or Xeon • RAM: 256 MB • Hard Disk: 1 GB of available disk space * Subject to Windows XP license terms More than 50 • Mac OS X Server v10.3.9 or v10.4 • Processor: G4 1 GHz • RAM: 512 MB (1GB or more recommended) • Hard Disk: 1 GB of available disk space • Windows 2003 Server Standard Edition (with Service Pack 1) or • Windows 2000 Server (with Service Pack 4) • Processor: Pentium 4 or Xeon • RAM: 512 MB (1GB or more recommended) • Hard Disk: 1 GB of available disk space

On current operating systems, 256M RAM is the minimum, but for systems with more than 50 users, 1GB RAM or more is recommended. FileMaker Server improves performance of your application by caching data in memory, which can be read and written much faster than disk. The maximum amount of memory that can be addressed by FileMaker Server is 2GB, and the maximum size of the cache is 800MB. Large files and larger numbers of users require more RAM. You want to make sure that your server has enough memory for FileMaker Server and still has plenty left for other operating system functions. Your server’s disk drives are another important component to consider when optimizing performance. Drive speed and quality are more important than drive size. You’ll need a large enough drive to contain your data and some number of backups, but a larger hard drive won’t have an impact on performance. Rather, you’ll want to get the fastest hard drive/controller combination possible. For a high-performance hard drive you can look at a SCSI UltraWide hard drive or, even better, a hardware-based SCSI RAID system. The SCSI architecture is more scalable than ATA and IDE systems. ATA and IDE only allow for two drives to be connected to a channel, and there are commonly only two channels available, making a total of four drives, once of which is generally a CD-ROM drive. In contrast, the asynchronous I/O of SCSI devices has intelligence to allow multiple devices to be “working” simultaneously, returning data to the controller in the most efficient manner.

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On the other hand, SCSI drives are typically significantly more expensive than ATA and IDE drives and normally require additional hardware. For the price of a single SCSI drive, you may be able to purchase two ATA/IDE drives of comparable capacity and pair them in a fast RAID configuration. It is not recommended that you use USB or Firewire based drives for FileMaker Server. If many large files are being used, a cache controller can be added to further speed the connection. This piece of hardware will act as a cache to the disks, working much more quickly than physically accessing the disks. Configure the hard drive subsystem to work as efficiently as possible. For example, if you have two hard drives and two controllers, install each drive on separate controllers rather than both on one. If you have a RAID array and a hardware RAID controller, build one container and partition it rather than having two containers, so that the controller only has to deal with one set of parity data. Deciding which processor you need depends upon the operating system used and its requirements. Remember to treat this as a server machine and keep in mind that ODBC/JDBC connections, server-side plug-ins, and encryption will place additional demands on the server. On the Windows platform, an Intel Pentium processor is preferred over the less expensive Celeron processor. Again, check the documentation for the chosen operating system for recommendations. FileMaker Server 8 is a multi-threaded application. This means that the system can perform many functions at once, and can distribute its “threads” across multiple processors. Since FileMaker Server 8 performs more of the search and calculation routines than its predecessors, you will want a system with enough processing power to keep your databases performing well. Buying a machine with more than one processor could be an effective way to increase the speed and responsiveness of your solution. While FileMaker Server 8 is multi-threaded, it will not work across multiple “clustered” CPUs. FileMaker Server 8 cannot share a single file across multiple machines. You can, however, distribute multiple files from the same solution across multiple machines.
The Network Infrastructure

An important factor on the performance of your solution is the network infrastructure. It is important to have a high-bandwidth connection from server to network. It’s also important to organize your network to minimize collisions.

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When two systems send information across a TCP/IP network at exactly the same time, there is a “collision” of data. When this occurs, the information must be re-sent from both systems. Collisions are a normal part of an Ethernet network, but excessive collisions will hinder the network throughput. Because FileMaker makes use of a client/server architecture, network throughput is crucial to database performance. You will want a network with high bandwidth and few collisions. Start first with a reliable, name-brand network card that is certified to work with your operating system in a server environment. Not all cards are created equal. Many of the less expensive cards force the computer’s CPU to perform a majority of its instructions rather than having an on-board processor. Invest in a network card that is designed to work on servers. A network card is just one component in your overall network design. You don’t need a top of the line card for a low-end network. If the network uses standard CAT5 cabling and uses bottom of the line hubs, then it is a waste of hardware to get a network card designed for a Gigabit network. Many network hubs and switches also have an “Auto Sensing” option to change between slower 10baseT and 100baseT connections. Auto sensing network cards have been reported to cause problems with certain brands of switches. Be aware of this and configure the network card and the switch appropriately after testing in your environment. You may also want to invest in high performance switches instead of generic network hubs. High performance switches monitor and direct network traffic to minimize collisions. With fewer collisions, FileMaker Server 8 and its connected clients will need to transmit fewer network packets, which will increase overall network throughput. Another consideration is to have multiple networks set up on the server. FileMaker Server 8 will make use of all network cards installed in the computer. This may be valuable in a multisubnetted network because each subnet could connect directly to the FileMaker Server without needing to cross a router. It is possible also to block FileMaker traffic on an interface at the operating system level in order to devote that interface to such things as file sharing for backup of offline files, etc.

Mixing FileMaker 7 and FileMaker 8
FileMaker 7 represented a completely new file format from previous versions. As such, it’s not possible for users with FileMaker Pro 6 to access files hosted under FileMaker Server 7, nor is it possible for users with FileMaker Pro 7 to access files hosted under FileMaker Server 6.

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In contrast, FileMaker 7 and FileMaker 8 share a common file format, different only to the extent necessary to support features that are new to FileMaker 8. So it’s possible for users with the FileMaker Pro 7 client to access files hosted on FileMaker Server 8, and vice versa. There are a few potential issues to be aware of, though. Clearly, features of FileMaker Pro 8 will not be available to users who access FileMaker Pro 8 files using the FileMaker Pro 7 client. Being used in this way will not damage files, but the results may look strange. Objects placed on the panels of a FileMaker Pro 8 Tab Control, for instance, will all appear on top of one another when the file is opened in FileMaker Pro 7. There are also security concerns to be aware of. If you are using Custom Menus to restrict access to certain functionality, a user opening the file with FileMaker Pro 7 will not experience these restrictions. They’ll have their standard menu set instead. So just bear in mind that FileMaker Server 8 can work with both FileMaker Pro 7 and FileMaker Pro 8 clients, as long as you pay appropriate attention to feature differences between the two versions. Another configuration that has limitations is using FileMaker Pro 8 clients with FileMaker Server 7. Most features of FileMaker Pro 8 will function as expected for FileMaker Pro 8 clients in this configuration. Finds using the new date and time range search syntax and many of the new calculation functions need to be evaluated on the server in certain situations, and therefore may not always return the expected result. The calculation functions, for instance, work properly in situations where they are evaluated by the client, such as during scripts and unstored calculations, but not when they need to be evaluated at the server, such as during schema modifications involving stored calculations and finds on unstored fields. One final compatibility issue pertains to server administration. The FileMaker Server 8 Admin application can only be used to administer FileMaker Server 8. Similarly, you need the FileMaker Server 7 Admin application to administer FileMaker Server 7.

About the Server Migration Tools
FileMaker Server 8 ships with a package known as the Migration Tools. The Migration Tools are intended to assist you in preserving your configuration settings when moving from FileMaker Server or Server 7 Advanced to FileMaker Server or Server 8 Advanced. They are meant to be used during the migration process. The following are the steps that you should take when migrating from FileMaker Server 7 to FileMaker Server 8:

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1. Stop the FileMaker 7 service 2. Copy any FileMaker 7 Server hosted files, plug-ins, and scripts to a safe location 3. Use the Back Up Settings tool (part of the Migration Tools) to save your FileMaker Server 7 settings. 4. Uninstall FileMaker Server 7 5. Install FileMaker Server 8 6. Use the Restore Settings tool to recreate your server settings in FileMaker Server 8 7. Move any files saved in step 2 to the appropriate FileMaker Server 8 folders

Installing and Configuring FileMaker Server 8
Installing FileMaker Server 8 is very easy. Just insert the CD and follow the step-by-step instructions. When you choose the location for your FileMaker Server 8 installation, choose a partition with plenty of room, or if you have multiple drives, select the location that best meets the hardware considerations discussed earlier. Ideally, you should install FileMaker Server 8 in a directory or drive that is not shared. Allowing shared access to files hosted by FileMaker Server 8 can lead to unpredictable results, degraded performance, security concerns, and possible file corruption. In a default installation, the installer creates a FileMaker Server 8 folder in the applications directory on your system hard drive. This is the Applications folder on the Macintosh (with a symbolic link to the bulk of the installation, which resides in the Library folder), and the Program Files FileMaker folder on Windows. Within this folder is the Server application (on Windows) and the FileMaker Server Admin application. Also within this folder, on Windows you will find an Extension folder to store Plug-ins and on both platforms, you will find the Data directory. The Data directory is where your FileMaker databases, backups, logs, and scripts are stored by default.
Installing the FileMaker Server Admin application

All administration and configuration of FileMaker Server 8 is performed using the Server Admin application. The Server Admin application is installed as part of the default installation of FileMaker Server, but you can also install just the Server Admin tool as part of a custom install. Installing this component will allow you to remotely administer FileMaker Servers that have been enabled for remote access. To connect to a server, launch FileMaker Server Admin and enter the server address or browse your local network to find your FileMaker Server.

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Figure 1 One copy of the FileMaker Server Admin application can administer many instances of FileMaker Server 8. For example, an administrator can install the admin application on her laptop and administer multiple remote servers. The admin application has slightly different functionality on Windows and Mac OS X platforms. On Windows, the FileMaker Server Admin application can only have a connection to one FileMaker Server open at one time. On Mac OS X, the FileMaker Server Admin application can have connections to multiple FileMaker Servers open simultaneously, but only if the Allow Multiple Open Servers option is checked in the Preferences dialog. If you are planning to do remote administration, you’ll need to open up port 5006 in your firewall. This is the port through which the Server Admin tool talks to FileMaker Server. (FileMaker Pro clients communicate with the server over port 5003.)
Configuration options

There are a number of configuration options that can be specified for FileMaker Server. When you launch the Server Admin application and establish a connection to a FileMaker Server, you will be presented with various configuration options. The configuration menu for Windows and Mac are shown in Figure 2.

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Figure 2 The configuration options available are the same regardless of what platform you run the Server Admin application on, but the interface and location of options are slightly different. Also, on Windows, most options can be configured either via the 6 “wizards” shown in Figure 2, or via the FileMaker Server Properties dialog. You can get to the properties dialog by right clicking on the server in the left hand panel and selecting properties. There are a few options on Windows that are only configurable via this dialog; it’s also faster and easier to find the options you need than it is to click through the wizards. The discussion of configurations below follows the organization of the properties dialog.

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Clients

The Client tab (Figure 3) allows you to configure the number of simultaneous connections FileMaker Server will accept. Although the maximum it can be set to is 250 FileMaker Pro connections and 100 Web Publishing Engine sessions (remember that you need FileMaker Server 8 Advanced to allow Web access), you should specify a number that’s slightly higher than the number of concurrent users you expect. This will free up memory for other purposes and may result in better performance. Another configuration option in the Client Connections area is the idle disconnect time. This feature gives you the ability to disconnect idle users – those who have not had any interaction with a database for a predefined period of time. With this setting enabled, FileMaker Server 8 automatically disconnects these users after the designated interval, thus freeing up unused connections for new users. If some users need the ability to keep a file open indefinitely, you can configure their Privilege Set in that file to prevent automatic disconnection. You do this by unchecking the “Disconnect users from FileMaker Server when idle” option. The final option, allow FileMaker Pro clients to download updates automatically, must be enabled if you intend to use FileMaker Server to distribute plug-ins to client machines.

Figure 3

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Databases

Within the Database tab (Figure 4), you may configure the number of databases that can be hosted, and specify the database cache size and flush time. Also, a feature new to FileMaker Server 8 is the option to have the server perform a consistency check when files are hosted for the first time or if they have been closed improperly. You should leave this feature enabled at all times. • Database Files. FileMaker Server 8 can host a maximum of 125 files, but if you have fewer than this, you should specify a smaller number to free up resources. • Database Cache. FileMaker Server uses a RAM-based database cache to speed up the rate at which it can send and receive data to the network. Increasing the cache size will allow more of your database information to be served from RAM, improving performance and reducing the amount of disk activity. The Server Admin application will provide an initial guess as to what the best cache size is for your setup, based on the RAM it finds available. The maximum cache size allowed in FileMaker Server 8 is 800MB. In order to establish the optimal cache setting for your configuration, you’ll need to keep an eye on the “cache hit percentage”, reported on the Statistics screen of the Server Admin application. This indicates the number of requests that have been able to be fulfilled by data from the RAM cache. In general, you’d like this number to be above 90%. If it falls much below that, consider raising the amount of RAM dedicated to the cache. • Flushing the Database Cache. FileMaker Server 8 has a cache-flushing algorithm that attempts to flush the entire database cache in the time specified on this screen. For instance, if the cache interval is set to the default of one minute, 1/60th of the cache will be scanned and flushed every second. Any changed information will be written to disk and then another 1/60th of the cache will be scanned. A longer interval means better server performance, but greater risk of data loss if the server crashes with a large unsaved cache. A shorter interval means lower risk, but increased hard drive and processor user and therefore potentially decreased database performance. It is recommended that you leave this setting as the default one minute. • Consistency checking. As FileMaker Server 8 opens files that were not closed properly or have not been opened yet with FileMaker Server 8, it performs a consistency check on each file and logs an error in the event log if the file doesn’t pass the check. FileMaker Server 7 did not perform this check. For this reason, you may encounter more corruption than anticipated when first opening previously used files. It is recommended that you let the Server perform consistency checks, as it’s better to know about file consistency errors as quickly as possible.

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If it does encounter file corruption, FileMaker Server 8 will refuse to open the file. Slightly damaged files may be recoverable by creating a compressed file using the Save A Copy As function. Do not use the File Maintenance tool to Compact or Optimize possibly damaged files. If a file still does not pass the consistency check, perform a recovery of the file. Recovered files should always pass the consistency check and are considered safe to use in FileMaker 8.

Figure 4
Runtime Solutions

Enabling this option allows solutions bound with the Database Utilities tool of FileMaker Pro 8 Advanced to be shared in the same manner as standard FileMaker Pro databases. You also specify here the extensions associated with your solution, so that FileMaker Server 8 can identify which files to share. This is the only option for sharing bound database solutions over a network. Unless used in conjunction with FileMaker Server, bound solutions are single-user only. The process for creating runtime solutions is discussed in the FileMaker Pro 8 Advanced module.

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Figure 5
Default Folders

When FileMaker Server is started, it will open all database files stored in the default database folder and those stored one level deep in folders in that directory. You can change the default directory and/or specify an additional database folder. Similarly, there’s a default directory for backups, which can be modified on this screen.

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Figure 6
Administration

The Administration tab allows you to configure settings for administering FileMaker Server. • FileMaker Server Host Name. When a FileMaker Pro client views the list of available FileMaker Servers in the Open Remote File dialog, they will see the name that it has been given. You can choose via this dialog to specify whether to use the system name for the server machine or to your own custom name, which may be more intelligible and meaningful to your users. • Administrator Authentication. This screen allows you to specify how administrators of the server will be authenticated. You have the option to require no password, to specify a password, or to require that administrators are members of an “fmsadmin” group on the machine where FileMaker Server is running. • Remote Administration. By checking “Allow remote users to administer FileMaker Server”, you enable connections from remote installations of the FileMaker Server Admin application. You can always do local administration, but remote administration isn’t available until this option has been enabled.

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Figure 7
Logging

Usage statistics and logging provide a means for monitoring server performance and usage. The time specified in the dialog is the frequency at which FileMaker Server takes a snapshot of memory, processor, and network usage. The default value of 15 seconds is probably fine in most cases. You can view the usage statistics in real time by clicking on the Statistics tool in the Server Admin application. You can also choose to have the usage statistics written out to a file called Stats.log to be reviewed later. By setting a maximum log size, you limit the length of time you can review these statistics. In FileMaker Server 8 on Mac OS X, the log is now tabdelimited and includes two new fields: Event ID and level of security. The Mac OS X log file can be opened and viewed while events continue to be captured in the log.

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Figure 8
Directory Service

FileMaker Server can be registered with an LDAP-compliant Directory Service. This is typically only going to be of interest to organizations that have many FileMaker Servers to manage. One benefit of using a Directory Service is that users don’t need to know the address or location of the server. When they use the Open Remote dialog to open files, they’ll authenticate to the directory service, which will respond with a list of servers that the user has access to. If the address or location of the server changes, the system administrator can repoint the directory service to the new address; it’s transparent to the end user. Using a directory service also provides additional security, in that a user won’t even be able to see the server or lists of hosted files without authenticating to the directory service. The Directory Service settings have nothing whatsoever to do with using an external server to authenticate user accounts.

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Figure 9
Security

There are three configuration options available on the Security tab. • Client Authentication. If you want to use an External Server to authenticate access to databases hosted by the server, you need to choose the “FileMaker and External Server accounts” option. A database file must always have at least one account with the [Full Access] privilege set that is authenticated by FileMaker. If you choose to allow External Server authentication, your server should be a member of a domain that uses Active Directory. When a user attempts to log into a database, FileMaker Server will send the account name and password to the external server; it will receive back a list of groups to which that user belongs. If one of those groups is allowed access to the file, then the user will be granted access and given the privilege set specified for that group. See the Security module for information on setting up Accounts and Privilege Sets. • Filter the Display of Files. This option controls what a user will see when they click on the host name from the Open Remote dialog. If it is set to “Display all databases”, then the user will see all databases that are open on FileMaker Server (that is, they have a status of “Normal”) and which have at least one privilege set with the FileMaker

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Network extended privilege. The other option, “Display only the databases each user is authorized to access”, causes users to be prompted for an account name and password. They will then see only a list of databases to which they have access, rather than all databases hosted on the server. • Secure connections to FileMaker Server. Enabling this option causes all data sent between FileMaker Server and FileMaker Pro clients to be encrypted using SSL. This will result in reduced performance, as data must be encrypted and decrypted as it sent back and forth.

Figure 10

Exercise 1: Configuring FileMaker Server
Using the Server Admin application, make the following configuration changes to FileMaker Server. 1. Configure FileMaker Server to record usage statistics every 5 seconds and to write the statistics out to a log. Examine the log to see how these statistics are reported. 2. Set the maximum number of databases to host to 25.

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3. Set the idle disconnect time to 1 hour. 4. Set the maximum number of client connections to 10. 5. Turn on remote administration. 6. Turn on file list filtering.

Scheduling Backups
You can configure FileMaker Server to perform three types of scheduled tasks: running batch scripts, creating backups, and sending messages to users. By far, the most frequent task you’ll need the server to perform is scheduled backups. It’s important that you follow the proper procedures, outlined below, for backing up your hosted database files. Failure to do so may result in backups that are corrupted and unusable. Backups are important because they help prevent loss of time, data, and productivity. By having accessible backups you can recover from a situation where someone changes and then accidentally or willfully removes scripts, layouts, or data in a database file. It cannot be stressed enough how important it is to completely establish your backup routines. Databases that are hosted by FileMaker Server are always in an “open” state. If you simply make a copy of the database files or use a backup system to create copies of open files, the resulting copies won’t necessarily be complete or stable. There are tasks that take place when a file is closed, including flushing the cache to disk. When FileMaker Server backs up your files, it performs what’s known as a live backup. The process begins with the creation of a copy of the live file to the directory specified by the task. Then, FileMaker Server pauses user activity, flushes the cache, and a synchronization process writes any additional information to the backup files that is necessary to make them stable, complete copies of the live files. Finally, FileMaker Server resumes communication with clients again. During the entire process, users never lose connection with FileMaker Server. At most, they will be paused from their work for the time it takes to do the synchronization process, which is typically a short time. One indicator of the paused state in FileMaker Pro is a coffee cup icon. It is recommended that when selecting a location to back up your files, you always choose a local drive. This allows FileMaker Server to perform its scheduled backups faster and results in less down time for users. Additionally, if backing up to a shared drive, if that drive isn’t available when the backup is run, the backup will fail rather than be written to a secondary location.

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In cases where you need more storage space or want your files backed up on different, redundant hardware, you should “backup the backup” rather than the live files. Let FileMaker Server create a backup to a local drive, and then have a scheduled task push the backup to a remote location, or have a tape backup process make copies of the backup directory. While you will want to create a set of backup routines to meet your own needs, a common backup strategy is to make local backups several times during the day to different directories. For example, you might decide that 2 hours of data is the maximum tolerable loss for your organization. In that case, you would create folders in the backup directory to house a 10am, 12pm, 2pm, 4pm, and 6pm backup. Then you’d create five separate schedules that backed up your files at the appropriate time to the appropriate directory. Since this strategy would result in backups getting overwritten on a daily basis, it would also be a good idea either to have daily backups created in the middle of the night to separate directories (i.e., one each for Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday) or to have a tape backup process create an archive of the backups. Tailor your backup schedules to meet the needs of your organization, but keep in mind a few things: • It is easier and faster to restore from local backups than having to restore from tape backups. • Your backup strategy should involve having off-site backups created on regular basis, to protect against catastrophic failure. • It’s beneficial to have many backups of varying ages to choose from. Sometimes data loss or corruption isn’t noticed right away, so your recent backups may have the same problems as the production files. In such cases, you may need to go back days or weeks to diagnose and/or fix problems.

Exercise 2: Creating a Backup Schedule
Using the Server Admin application, create a schedule called “Daily Backup” that backs up all databases to a directory named “Daily Backup”. You’ll need first to create this directory in the FileMaker Server 8\Data\Backups directory. Set the schedule to perform the backup every night at 8:00 pm. After creating the new backup schedule, view the list of scheduled tasks and confirm that you see the new task. Run the task by selecting it from the list and choosing Action>Run Now. (If on Mac OS X, select Action>Schedule>Run Schedule Now.)

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Server Administration
Once set, the configuration options described in the preceding sections are not likely to need frequent adjustment. You may of course adjust the settings any time the need arises, but typically the day-to-day tasks involving FileMaker Server are focused on file administration. This includes opening and closing files, monitoring users, and watching the server performance statistics. Opening and Closing Files As mentioned previously, if you have a file that you want to host via FileMaker Server, you need to enable the “Access via FileMaker Network” extended privilege for one or more privilege sets, and then you need to place the file in the database directory (by default, this is ../FileMaker Server 8/Data/Datbases). When FileMaker Server starts up, any databases in this directory or one subdirectory deep will be “opened” and available for immediate use. If FileMaker Server is already running, you will need to use the Server Admin application to start the database. After connecting to the server, you can see a list of database files hosted by FileMaker server by clicking on the databases link, as shown in Figure 11.

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Figure 11 Databases will have a status of Normal, which means they’re open and available for use, or Closed. When you put new files into the database directory, you should initially see them here as having a status of Closed. You can open a file by selecting it and choosing Action>Open, or by right clicking and using the contextual pop-up menu. If you ever need to close a database, you can use the Server Admin application for this as well. You can leave the FileMaker service itself running and close just those files you need to. Be sure that if you ever want to manually create a backup or take a copy of a file that you close it first. Similarly, to replace a file with an updated version, close the file using the Server Admin application, remove the old file and put the new one into the databases directory, then open the file using the admin tool again.

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You can also see the number of clients connected to each file, and you can send messages to connected guests from this screen as well.
Monitoring Clients

Clicking on the Clients link shown in Figure 11 brings up a list of all connected users, including those connected via the Server Admin application itself. You can see how long clients have been idle, send messages to selected users, and forcefully disconnect users via this screen.
Statistics

The Statistics screen shows you real time information about how the server is performing. You can see the number of hosted files, the number of clients, the network and disk traffic, and, importantly, the cache hit percentage. As mentioned earlier, you want the cache hit percentage to be high, ideally something in the 90-95% range during normal usage. Anything less than this is a possible indication that you need to increase the amount of RAM allocated as database cache. The statistics refresh at the rate specified on the Logging configuration screen; the default is every 15 seconds.

Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Performance Issues

Three main areas affect FileMaker Server 8 performance. These areas are disk usage, network performance, and caching. Disk usage was described in the hardware section of this module. An important factor for the performance of FileMaker will be a fast and clean I/O to the disk files. The faster FileMaker can write cached data to the hard drive, or write files as part of a scheduled task, the better your performance will be. For performance reasons, it’s also important to keep the FileMaker database files local on the Server and not elsewhere on the network. Reading data and writing updates to a local disk is a cornerstone of your basic FileMaker Server performance. As seen in the section on FileMaker Server 8 hardware requirements, its use of network bandwidth is its second greatest use of resources. Your solution architecture can affect this. Be sure that the server’s network resources are devoted to sharing only FileMaker. Start by turning off any file sharing and other unused services. What FileMaker Server does is not file sharing: it is data sharing. Any type of file sharing will reduce performance of the FileMaker Server. Except for development purposes, it’s unwise to allow files to be shared though means other than FileMaker. If there were a way for a user to directly access the FileMaker (.fp7) files via a shared file directory, then that user could make separate copies of the files for use offline,

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compromising the accuracy and security of the shared database. Users should access the data only through FileMaker Server, by using the “Open Remote…” dialog. This is an issue to keep in mind if you choose to share your backup directory as well.
Avoiding Trouble

You should always try to reduce a computer’s extraneous workload, especially a server’s. Even if you optimize a system for proper caching, network traffic, etc, if a server runs a processor-intensive screen-saver or virus scanner, you will ultimately hurt your server performance. Checking for viruses is important, but don’t steal valuable processor cycles with constant virus scans. Schedule regular scans during off-peak hours. Also avoid using energy saving software. Since this is a server, requests by users can be made at almost any time. You never want the hard drive to go to sleep. At most, let the screen power down. Another important factor is operating system service packs. Often software will have patches and updates. Many of these can affect performance, security, and basic functionality. Be sure to watch basic system alerts for security issues and updates. Also, be aware of all security updates pertinent to your setup.
Restarting Your Server

If you need to reboot your server for any reason while users are connected to hosted databases, the recommended best practice for stopping FileMaker Server services is as follows: 1. Send Message to All at least a few minutes before you start the Close process, telling them what time you will close the files and suggesting that they not start any long reports/scripts. 2. Using the Server Admin application, Close All Databases, but give 5 to 10 minutes before guests will be disconnected (instead of the default 2 minutes). 3. Halfway through the 5 or 10 minutes you selected for the Close, do another Send Message to those still connected. 4. After the 5 or 10 minutes runs out, verify in the Server Admin application that the files are all closed. 5. Use the Stop FileMaker Server command from the Server Admin application to stop the Server (not the Service Control Manager on Windows).

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Administering FileMaker Server 8 with the Command Line
As you’ve seen, FileMaker Server 8 can be controlled by the FileMaker Server Admin application. It can also be controlled through the use of a command line interface. On Windows, launch the Command Prompt to access the command line, and on Mac OS X, use the Terminal application. On the command line, the FileMaker Server 8 services are addressed by using the fmsadmin command in conjunction with an action command. On Mac OS X, these commands can be run from any directory, because FileMaker Server is installed in the /usr/bin directory, and that directory is included in PATH. On Windows, FileMaker Server’s default install location is c:\ Program Files\FileMaker\FileMaker Server 8\, and that directory is not added to the system path during installation. That means if you want to administer FileMaker Server 8 using the command line on Windows, you have two options. The first option is to navigate to the directory where the FileMaker Server executable resides before executing fmsadmin commands. The second option is to modify the path system variable so that the command can be run from any directory. To modify the path on Windows 2000/2003 Server, you need to follow these steps: 1. Open Control Panels and click System. 2. In the System Properties dialog, click the Advanced tab. 3. Click Environment variables to bring up the Environment Variables dialog. 4. Select Path in the list of System Variables, and click Edit. 5. In the Variable Value box, add a semicolon to the end of the path statement, then type in the path to the FileMaker Server 8 folder: C:\Program Files\FileMaker\FileMaker Server 8 6. Click OK to exit all the dialogs, then reboot the computer for the change to take effect. Following is a list of commands that you can use to administer FileMaker Server from the command line. Although the commands are shown in uppercase for emphasis, the command line is not case-sensitive. Certain commands will respond with a prompt that asks if you’re sure you want to execute that command. A y or n response will indicate if you want to proceed. For those commands, a –y/-yes parameter can be added to the command to suppress the prompt. Other options are available when using the command line. Options exist in a short form and a long form. When using the short form, a single hyphen should be used. Multiple options may be specified with one short form hyphen (i.e., -yfm). When using the long form, two hyphens are required for each option, and a space must be inserted between each option (--yes –force –message).

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The following options may be used with all commands: -h, --help -I address, --ip address -p password, --password password -u username, --username username -v, --version -w seconds, --wait seconds -y, --yes Show the help page for this command Specify the IP address of a remote server Specify the server password Specify server username and/or domain name Show version information Specify time out wait in seconds Automatically answer yes to all prompts

Remember to enclose any multi-word parameters in single or double quotation marks.
BACKUP

Syntax: fmsadmin BACKUP [File] [Path] [Options] Description: BACKUP is used to back up either specific files or all of the files in the paths specified in the command. It can be used in two ways. The default behavior is invoked when the BACKUP command is used by itself. In this scenario, it performs a live backup of the file(s), which causes the least interference with client sessions. The other way to use the BACKUP command is in conjunction with the PAUSE and RESUME commands. The sequence of PAUSE, BACKUP, then RESUME will execute an offline backup, which is the type of backup performed by earlier versions of FileMaker Server. Options: -d path, --dest path -o, --offline

Specify the destination path for the backup file.: Perform an offline backup

Examples: fmsadmin BACKUP Sales.fp7 fmsadmin BACKUP –o fmsadmin BACKUP /SalesMgt/ -d D:\Backups

Backs up Sales.fp7 file Performs offline backup of all hosted files Backs up contents of SalesMgt folder to the D:\Backups folder

CLOSE Syntax: fmsadmin CLOSE [File] [Path] [Options]

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Description: This command closes the named file(s) or the files that reside at the specified paths. Remember to leave a space between any option and its specified parameter. If no space is present, the default command will take over. For example, the command “fmsadmin CLOSE –y Inventory.fp7” will close only the Inventory database. The command “fmsadmin CLOSE – yInventory.fp7” will close all hosted databases. Options: -f, --force -m message, --message message -t seconds, --grace-time seconds

Forces database to close Sends message to clients Specifies the number of seconds before databases force clients to disconnect. The default is 120 seconds. Closes all hosted databases, with a y/n prompt Closes all hosted databases, suppresses prompt Closes Sales.fp7 database, suppresses prompt Closes Sales Management database, suppresses prompt) Closes Sales Management database, suppresses y/n prompt, gives users 10-second grace period Closes Sales Management database, sends message “Closing for maintenance” to clients

Examples: fmsadmin CLOSE fmsadmin CLOSE –y fmsadmin CLOSE –y Sales.fp7 fmsadmin CLOSE –y “Sales Management.fp7” fmsadmin CLOSE –y –t 10 “Sales Management.fp7” fmsadmin CLOSE –y –m “Closing for maintenance” “Sales Management.fp7”

DELETE Syntax: fmsadmin DELETE schedule [Schedule Number] [Options] Description: This command deletes a specific schedule by referencing its schedule number. You can learn the schedule numbers by using the LIST SCHEDULES command. There are no optional parameters specific to this command. Examples: fmsadmin DELETE schedule 100 fmsadmin DELETE schedule 100 –y

Deletes schedule 100, with a y/n prompt Deletes schedule 100, suppresses prompt

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DISABLE

Syntax: fmsadmin DISABLE [Type] [Plug-in Number] [Schedule Number] Description: This command can be used to disable plug-ins and/or schedules. The LIST PLUGINS or LIST SCHEDULES commands can be used to find the number of a plug-in or schedule. Types: PLUGIN SCHEDULE Examples: fmsadmin DISABLE PLUGIN 98 fmsadmin DISABLE SCHEDULE 5
DISCONNECT

Disables plugin 98 Disables schedule 5

Syntax: fmsadmin DISCONNECT client [Client Number] [Options] Description: Used to disconnect a specific client. The client will get a disconnection message as a result of this command. The LIST CLIENTS command can be used to find the number of a specific client. Option: -m message, --message message Examples: fmsadmin DISCONNECT client 35 –y –m “Sorry, it’s time to go.” Disconnects client 35, sends message “Sorry, it’s time to go” to user 35 fmsadmin DISCONNECT client 27
ENABLE

Syntax: fmsadmin ENABLE [Type] [Plug-in Number] [Schedule Number]

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Description: Often used in conjunction with DISABLE, this command can be used to enable a plug-in or schedule. Note: this command cannot be used to enable the xDBC plug-in, which has a nonstandard plug-in behavior and can only be administered using the SAT and Server Properties. The LIST PLUGINS or LIST SCHEDULES commands can be used to find the number of a plug-in or schedule. Examples: fmsadmin ENABLE PLUGIN 8 fmsadmin ENABLE SCHEDULE 14
HELP

Syntax: fmsadmin [options] HELP [COMMAND] Description: This command is used to display help information on fmsadmin commands. Note: fmsadmin by itself will also display help information for the fmsadmin command. Examples: fmsadmin HELP fmsadmin HELP DISCONNECT fmsadmin HELP commands fmsadmin HELP options
LIST

Displays help information for the fmsadmin command Displays help information on the DISCONNECT command Lists available commands Lists available options

Syntax: fmsadmin LIST [Type] [Options] Description: This command can be used to list all objects and their corresponding numbers. Can be used to discover numbers for schedules, plug-ins, files, and clients. Types: SCHEDULES PLUGINS FILES CLIENTS

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Option: -s, --stats

Shows statistical information about CLIENTS or FILES

Examples: fmsadmin LIST SCHEDULES fmsadmin LIST PLUGINS fmsadmin LIST FILES –s fmsadmin LIST CLIENTS –s
OPEN

Lists all schedules Lists all plugins Lists files and statistics about files Lists clients and relevant information

Syntax: fmsadmin OPEN [File] [Path] Description: This command is used to open database files in the default and additional folders. Can also be used to open specific files or all files in a specific path. Examples: fmsadmin OPEN “Sales Management.fp7” fmsadmin OPEN fmsadmin OPEN 3
PAUSE

Opens file Sales Management.fp7 Opens all files in the default folder Opens file ID 3

Syntax:fmsadmin PAUSE [File] [Path] Description: This command pauses database files, meaning that clients can no longer actively work with them. The RESUME command is used to make them available again. Examples: fmsadmin PAUSE fmsadmin PAUSE 6 fmsadmin PAUSE Sales.fp7 fmsadmin PAUSE “Sales Management.fp7” fmsadmin PAUSE /SalesMgt/

Pauses all databases Pauses file ID 6 Pauses the Sales.fp7 file Pauses the Sales Management.fp7 file Pauses all databases in SalesMgt folder

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RELOAD

Syntax: fmsadmin RELOAD Description: This command reloads configuration properties from the last saved configuration. If any configuration changes have been made but not saved, they will be overwritten.
RESUME

Syntax: fmsadmin RESUME [File] [Path] Description: This command resumes databases that have been paused. Examples: fmsadmin RESUME “Sales.fp7”
RUN

Syntax:fmsadmin RUN schedule [Schedule Number] Description: Runs a schedule specified by number. Use LIST SCHEDULES to find schedule numbers. Examples: fmsadmin RUN Schedule 3
SEND

Syntax: fmsadmin SEND [Options] [File] [Path] Description: Used to send a text message to all clients connected to files in a specific path, all clients connected to a specific file, or a specific client. Options: -m message, --message message -c, --client

Sends message to clients Specifies specific client

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Examples: fmsadmin SEND –m “Knock knock.” fmsadmin SEND –m “Knock knock.” “Sales.fp7”

Sends message “Knock knock” to all clients Sends message “Knock knock” to all clients connected to the Sales database

STATUS

Syntax: fmsadmin STATUS [Type] [Client Number] [File] Description: The STATUS command is used to determine the status of a client or file. Types: CLIENT FILE Examples: fmsadmin STATUS CLIENT 47 fmsadmin STATUS FILE Sales.fp7 fmsadmin STATUS FILE “Sales Management.fp7”
STOP

Syntax: fmsadmin STOP [Options] Description: Stops FileMaker Server and grants all connected users 30 seconds to disconnect. This default grace period can be modified using the –t option. Options: -f, --force -m message, --message message -t seconds, --grace-time seconds

Forces database to stop Sends message to clients Specifies the number of seconds before databases force clients to disconnect.

Examples: fmsadmin STOP fmsadmin STOP –f fmsadmin STOP –t 180 –m “Shutting down in 3 minutes.”

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Review Questions
1. How many files can FileMaker Server 8 host?

2. What is the maximum number of FileMaker Pro 8 client connections that can access databases on a FileMaker Server 8?

3. What additional capabilities does FileMaker Server 8 Advanced provide?

4. What is the maximum number of connections FileMaker Server 8 Advanced can open for ODBC/JDBC and web?

5. What are the differences in hosting capabilities between FileMaker Server 8 and FileMaker Pro 8?

6. What are the critical hardware components to consider for optimizing your FileMaker Server 8 computer’s performance?

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7. What needs to be considered in configuring the network capabilities of a FileMaker server machine?

8. How can you secure network communication between FileMaker Server 8 and FileMaker Pro 8?

9. What ports must be open in a firewall to allow remote administration of a FileMaker Server and to allow remote client connections?

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Review Answers
1. 125 files per server. 2. 250 client connections. 3. FileMaker Server 8 Advanced allows Web and ODBC/JDBC connections. 4. The maximum is 50 ODBC/JDBC connections, which count against the 250-client connection limit, and 100 web connections, which are above and beyond the client connection limit. 5. There are many advantages FileMaker Server has over FileMaker Pro when it comes to hosting a file for multiple users, including the following: • FileMaker Pro 8 can only host up to 5 clients at one time, while FileMaker Server 8 can host 250. • FileMaker Server 8 can encrypt network traffic between itself and FileMaker Pro 8 clients. • FileMaker Server 8 can disconnect idle FileMaker Pro 8 client connections. • FileMaker Server 8 can backup live databases at scheduled times. 6. The hard drive subsystem, the number and speed of processors, memory, and the networking card(s). 7. You should disable any services, such as file sharing, that will compete with FileMaker Server for network and hard drive utilization. 8. FileMaker Server 8 can be configured to encrypt the network traffic between FileMaker Server 8 and FileMaker Pro 8. 9. Port 5006 for the Server Admin application, and port 5003 for FileMaker Pro client connections

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