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PART-A

Manual Control No: ....................

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LIMITED
(INDIGO)

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

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INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 00

FOREWARD & COMPLIANCE

FDW

The Operations Manual (Part A, B, C, D) has been prepared by InterGlobe
Aviation limited (IndiGo), Flight Operations department. The purpose is to;
Provide the necessary Operating Limitations, Procedures, Performance
and System Information to Flight Crew to safely and efficiently operate
the company airplanes.

Establish standardised procedures and practices for uniform application.

Serve as a review guide.

The manual will be periodically revised to incorporate procedural and system
information changes. Items of a more critical nature will be issued as ‘Notices’ to
crew.
The manual is prepared in accordance with Civil Aviation Requirements (CAR)
Section 8, Series O, Part VII. The manual is to be read in conjunction with other
manuals and documents specified in Chapter 0. In case of a conflict between
Operations manual and the national regulations, the latter will apply.
The Manual is Company (IndiGo) property and any disclosure of its contents to
others is given in strictest confidence. It must not be reproduced by any other
person, agency or company without specific approval and permission of the Vice
President (Flight Operations).

InterGlobe Aviation Limited.
st
1 Floor, Tower ‘C’, Global Business Park,
Gurgaon-1220002 ,
Haryana, India.
Tel: +91 124 435 2500
Fax: 91 124 406 8536
A-COM-1

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17-Aug-11

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INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 00

FOREWARD & COMPLIANCE

FDW

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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

A-COM-2

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INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

ACKW

It is the responsibility of every employee to be aware of the provisions of
the Operations Manual and use them in day to day operations.
Suggestions for improving the contents are requested, just as your
compliance with the Operations Manual is expected.
This is your personal copy for reference. It is manual owner’s
responsibility to update the manual as required.

Capt. Ashim Mittra
Vice President (Flight Operations)

Manual Control No.

................................

Signature

................................

Name of Holder

................................

Assigned Position

................................

A-ACKW

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To provide necessary information and instructions to guide personnel
connected with Flight Operations in the proper discharge of their duties,
the Operations Manual (Part A, B, C, D and EDTO) is being issued to all
concerned.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

ACKW

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A-ACKW

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INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

GTOC

Details
Manual Administration
DGCA Approval

-

Foreword and Compliance

-

Acknowledgement

-

Global Table of Contents

-

Distribution List

-

List of Effective Pages (LEP)

-

Record of Normal Revisions (ROR)

-

Revision Highlights (RH)

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-

Chapters 0 to 38
Chapter No

Chapter Name

00

Administration & Control Of Operations Manual

01

Operations Supervision

02

Flight Duty And Time Limitations

03

Navigation Equipment Required

04

Long Range Navigation Procedures Required

05

Radio Listening Watch

06

Determination Of Minimum Flight Altitudes

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

GTOC

Chapter No

Chapter Name
Determination Of Aerodrome Operating Minima

08

Safety Precautions During Refueling With Passengers On
Board.

09

Ground Handling Arrangements & Procedures

10

Procedures For Pilot In Command An Observing An Accident

11

Flight Crew For Each Type Of Operation And Succession Of
Command

12

Computation Of Quantities Of Fuel And Oil To Be Carried

13

Conditions Under Which Oxygen Shall Be Used And Amount
Of Oxygen Determined.

14

Instructions For Mass And Balance

15

Instructions For Conduct & Control Of Ground De-Icing /
Anti-Icing Operations

16

Specifications Of Operational Flight Plan

17

Standard Operating Procedures For Each Phase Of Flight

18

Instructions On Normal Use Of Normal Checklist

19

Departure Contingency Procedures

20

Instructions On Maintenance Of Altitude Awareness

21

Sue Of Auto Pilot And Thrust In IMC

22

Clarifications And Acceptance Of ATC Clearances

A-GTOC

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07

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

GTOC

Chapter No

Chapter Name
Departure And Approach Briefings

24

Route And Destination Familiarisation

25

Stabilised Approach Procedure

26

Limitation On High Rates Of Descent Near Surface

27

Conditions Required To Commence Or To Continue An
Instrument Approach

28

Precision/Non-Precision Instrument Approach Procedures

29

Night And IMC Instrument Approach And Landing Operations

30

Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS)

31
32

Airborne Collision Avoidance System (ACAS) /Traffic Alert &
Collision Avoidance System (TCAS)
Information And Instructions Relating To The Interception Of
Civil Aircraft

33

For Airplanes Intended To Operate Above 15000M

34

Details Of Accident Prevention And Fight Safety Program

35

Dangerous Goods And Weapons

36

Security Instructions And Guidance

37

Suspected Sabotage

38

Instructions and training requirements for the use of Head-Up
Displays (HUD) and Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS)
equipment as applicable.

ANX

Annexures

A-GTOC

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS

GTOC

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A-GTOC

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 03

DISTRIBUTION LIST

DL

The Operations Manual (Part A, B C, D and EDTO) shall be distributed as
follows:
Manual Holder

Type of Format

001

Master Copy

Hard Copy/ PDF

002

Vice President (Flight Operations)

Hard Copy /DVD

003

Vice President (Special Projects)

Hard Copy / DVD

004

Chief Pilot (Training)

Hard Copy / DVD

005

Operations Control / Dispatch

Hard Copy / DVD

006

Vice President (OCC)

Hard Copy / DVD

007

Chief Of safety

Hard Copy/DVD

008-015

DGCA

Hard Copy / DVD

016

Director(Training)

Hard Copy / DVD

017

Director (Flight Operations Support)

Hard Copy / DVD

018-035

All Ground Instructors

Hard Copy /DVD

036-045

Flight Operations Support (Region)

Hard Copy

046-50

Simulator

Hard Copy

51

Deputy Chief Instructor (Performance &
Documentation Standardization)

Hard Copy / DVD

52-100

Intentionally Left Blank

-

101-200

All Aircraft

Hard Copy

-

All Station Managers

DVD

-

All Pilots

DVD

-

All HOD

DVD

A-DL-1

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Serial No.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 03

DISTRIBUTION LIST

DL

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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

A-DL-1

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES

LEP / HC

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0
0
0

DGCA Approval
Foreword and Compliance
Acknowledgement
Global Table of Contents
Distribution List
List of Effective Pages (LEP)
Record of Normal Revisions
Revision Highlights
00
01
02
03

A-LEP-1

Page No.

Date of Issue

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04

Revision
No
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3
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1
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3

Chapter/Details

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES

LEP / HC

Chapter/Details

A-LEP-2

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Annexures

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INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 00

RECORD OF NORMAL REVISIONS

ROR

The manual holder /representative shall enter the appropriate data in the
revision sheet after updating the manual. An initial of the holder/representative
until officially replaced.
Rev. No.

ISSUE DATE

DATE FILED

A-ROR-1

INITIALS

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17-Aug-11

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incorporating the revision signifies compliance. This sheet is to be retained

REV. NO.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 00

RECORD OF NORMAL REVISIONS

ROR

ISSUE DATE

DATE FILED

INITIALS

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A-ROR-2

Effective

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INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS

RH

Some chapters have been completely revised/ re-issued to maintain chronological
order of the contents, in spite of a few changes therein.
The revision highlights for Issue II, Revision 04, dated 09-Jul-2014, are as under
Please note that changes are termed as either: New (N), Revised (R), Shifted (S),
or Editorial (E).
Para/Page
No.

Change Description

Reason of
Change

Chapter 00 ADMIN CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL

Complete Chapter

R

Chapter 01 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION

Complete Chapter

R

Chapter 07 AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA

Complete Chapter

R

A-RH-1

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As the Company has been growing steadily there has been a continuous update
on policies and procedures which were reviewed since the initial approval of the
Company Operations Manual in form of TRs/Notices. The TRs were ‘accepted’ by
DGCA and have been incorporated in this revision.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS

RH

Chapter 11 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION &
SUCCESSION OF COMMAND

R

Chapter 12 COMPUTATION OF QUANTITIES OF FUEL AND OIL TO BE
CARRIED

Complete Chapter

R

Chapter 14 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL

Complete Chapter

R

Chapter 17 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

Complete Chapter

R

Chapter 27 COMMENCEMENT OR CONTINUATION OF AN INSTRUMENT
APPROACH

Complete Chapter

R

A-RH-2

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Complete Chapter

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS

RH

Chapter 30 GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEM

R

Chapter 34 SAFETY MANAGEMENT AND ACCIDENT PREVENTION
PROGRAM
Complete Chapter

R

A-RH-3

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Complete Chapter

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS

RH

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A-RH-4

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL ........3

0.1

INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................3

0.2

0.3

0.1.1

Compliance ................................................................................3

0.1.2

Abbreviations..............................................................................6

0.1.3

Definitions.................................................................................25

0.1.4

Units conversion table ..............................................................43

0.1.5

International standard atmosphere (ISA) ..................................44

0.1.6

Parts of operations manual.......................................................45

0.1.7

Volumes of the operations manual ...........................................46

0.1.8

Official language and modes of communication .......................47

0.1.9

Gender applicability ..................................................................47

FLIGHT OPERATIONS DOCUMENTS ..................................................47
0.2.1

System for dissemination of information ...................................49

0.2.2

On board documentation ..........................................................50

0.2.3

Missing document ....................................................................52

0.2.4

Navigation bag: ........................................................................52

0.2.5

Documents library at bases: .....................................................55

0.2.6

Documents at Simulator ...........................................................55

0.2.7

Standard operating procedure ..................................................55

0.2.8

Carriage of Documents by Cockpit Crew..................................56

SYSTEM OF AMENDMENTS AND REVISIONS ...................................56
0.3.1

Procedures and checklists:.......................................................56
A-0-1

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0.

0.3.2

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Operations Manual................................................................... 56

PROMULGATION OF ADDITIONAL OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONS
AND INFORMATION ............................................................................. 58

0.5

DISTRIBUTION OF OPERATIONS MANUAL ....................................... 59
0.5.1

0.6

Disposal/Destruction Obsolete documents .............................. 60

DOCUMENT PROCESS MANUAL ....................................................... 60

A-0-2

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0.4

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL

0.1

INTRODUCTION

0.1.1

Compliance

The Operations Manual is prepared in conformity with Rule 140B of Aircraft Rules
1937 and the requirements specified in CAR Section 8, Series „O‟ Part VII and
other instructions issued by DGCA. Guidance laid down by ICAO in Annexure 6
Vol-1 and EASA, where applicable, has also been incorporated. The Operations
Manual complies with all applicable regulations and the terms and conditions of
the Airline Operator‟s Permit (Air Operator‟s Certificate).
The Operations Manual is issued under the authority of the Vice President (Flight
Operations). It contains policies procedures and guidance on all matters that are
the responsibility of Flight operations.
The contents of the manual shall not be deemed to supersede any instructions
contained in the following documents:
a)

Aircraft Manual (India)

b)

Flight Manual

c)

Civil Aviation Requirements (CAR)

d)

DGCA Mandatory Circulars and Directives.

All Personnel connected with the Operation of Company aircraft shall comply with
the prescribed methods of Operation as laid down in the Operations Manual and
the above documents as well as Company Notices (circulars) issued from time to
time. Any wilful and deliberate violation of flight operations organizational/ State
policies and/or procedures by flight operations personnel shall be viewed
seriously.
The Operations Manual provides necessary information and instructions on
policies, procedures, duties and responsibilities and other relevant information. Its
contents may require amendments from time to time which are to be incorporated
immediately and the Manual should be kept updated. All Air Crew and Operations
personnel are required to be fully conversant with the relevant contents of the
Manual. All employees when aboard must comply with Laws, Regulations and
Procedures of those States in which operations are conducted.
A-0-3

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0.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

All operating staff are required to adhere to instructions laid down in this Manual
and any deviations should be reported, the reasons for such deviation being given
in writing.

Should any individual consider that all or any part of a procedure or instruction
requires to be amended, he should notify the Vice President (Flight Operations)
with reasons and suggested improvement.
Notes:

Commander, Pilot-in-command, Captain, P1, CM1 are used synonymously.

Co-pilot, First Officer, P2, CM2 are used synonymously.

For conciseness, the pronoun "he" is used throughout the text. Where appropriate,
"she" should be added to or substituted for "he".

When used in the Operations Manual, the following terms shall imply:
- “Shall”, "will", "must" or an action verb in the imperative sense means that the
application of a rule or procedure or provision is mandatory.
- “Should” means that the application of a procedure or provision is
recommended.
- “May” means that the application of a procedure or provision is optional.
- “No person may...” or “a person may not...” means that no person is required,
authorised, or permitted to do the act concerned.
- "Approved" means the Authority has reviewed the method, procedure or policy
in question and issued a formal written approval.
- "Acceptable" means the Authority or the airline has reviewed the method,
procedure or policy and has neither objected to nor approved its proposed use or
implementation.
- "Prescribed" means the Authority or the airline has issued a written policy or
methodology which imposes either a mandatory requirement, if it states "shall",
"will", "must" or an action verb in the imperative sense, a recommended
requirement if it states "should" or a discretionary requirement if it states "may".
- "Note" is used when an operating procedure, technique, etc., is considered
essential to be emphasised.

A-0-4

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CRM principles should be applied in line operations by all personnel at all times.
Nothing contained in the Operations Manual shall keep personnel from exercising
their own best judgement during any irregularity for which the Operations Manual
gives no provisions or in an emergency.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

- "Caution" is used when an operating procedure, technique, etc., may result in
damage to equipment if not carefully followed.
- "Warning" is used when an operating procedure, technique, etc., may result in
personnel injury or loss of life if not carefully followed.

- Crew Member refers to a person assigned by the Company a duty/task on a
company aircraft during flight duty period.

-INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK-

A-0-5

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- Air Crew refers to both Flight and Cabin Crew.

0.1.2

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Abbreviations

AAL

Above Aerodrome Level

ABM

Abeam

ABAS

Aircraft Based Augmentation System (GNSS/GPS)

AC

Advisory Circular, Alternating Current, Aircraft

ACARS

Aircraft Communication Addressing and Reporting System

ACJ

Advisory Circular Joint (JAR)

ACMS

Aircraft Condition Monitoring System

ACN

Aircraft Classification Number

AD

Airworthiness Directive

ADC

Air Data Computer

ADD

Acceptable Deferred Defect

ADI

Attitude Direction Indicator

ADIRS

Air Data Inertial Reference System

ADF

Automatic Direction Finder

ADV

Advisory

ADS

Automatic Dependent Surveillance

AFM

Airplane Flight Manual

AEA

Association of European Airlines

AFTN

Aeronautical Fixed Tele-Communication Network

AFS

Automatic Flight System

AGL

Above Ground Level
A-0-6

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The following abbreviations may be found throughout the manual. Some
abbreviations may also appear in lower case letters.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Alert Height

AIP

Aeronautical Information Publication

AIRS

Aircrew Incident reporting System

AIS

Aeronautical Information Service

ALD

Actual Landing Distance

ALS

Approach Light System

ALT

Altitude

ALTN

Alternate

AMC

Acceptable Means of Compliance (JAR)

AMJ

Advisory Material Joint

AMSL

Above Mean Sea Level

AOA

Angle Of Attack

AOC/P

Air Operator Certificate/Permit

AOC

Airline Operations Communications/Control

AOG

Aircraft On Ground

AOM

Airplane Operations Manual

AOT

All Operators Telex

A/P

Auto-Pilot

APA

Accident Prevention Adviser

APM

Airplane Performance Monitoring

APQ

Airline Pre-Qualification

APU

Auxiliary Power Unit

ARINC

Aeronautical Radio Inc.

A-0-7

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AH

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Airport

ARP

Aerodrome Reference Point

ASAP

As Soon As Possible

ASDA

Accelerate Stop Distance Available

ASI

Air Speed Indicator

AMM

Aircraft Maintenance Manual

ASR

Airport Surveillance Radar

ASR

Air Safety Report

ASU

Air Starter Unit

ATA

Actual Time of Arrival

ATA

Aeronautical Transport Association

ATC

Air Traffic Control

ATD

Actual Time of Departure

ATHR

Auto Thrust

ATIS

Automatic Terminal Information Service

ATM

Air Traffic Management

ATN

Aeronautical Telecommunication Network

ATPL

Airline Transport Pilot License

ATS

Air Traffic Services

ATS

Auto Thrust System

ATSU

Air Traffic Services Unit

ATT

Attitude

AVGAS

Aviation Gasoline

A-0-8

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ARPT

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

AWO

All Weather Operations

AWY

Airway

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B
BARO

Barometric

BAT

Battery

BFE

Buyer Furnished Equipment

BITE

Built In Test Equipment

BRG

Bearing

BRK

Brake

BRNAV

Basic Area Navigation

C
C

Celsius, Centigrade

CAPT

Captain

CAR

Civil Aviation Regulations

CAS

Calibrated Airspeed

CAT

Clear Air Turbulence

CAT I/II/III

Landing Category I (II or III)

CAVOK

Ceiling and Visibility OK

CB

Cumulonimbus

C/B

Circuit Breaker

CBT

Computer Based Training

CCOM

Cabin Crew Operating Manual
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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Cross Crew Qualification

CDL

Configuration Deviation List

CDU

Control Display Unit

CEFA

Cockpit Emulator for Flight Analysis

CFDS

Centralized Fault Display System

CFIT

Controlled Flight Into terrain

CFP

Computerised Flight Plan

CFD

Centralised Flight Dispatch

CIDS

Cabin Intercommunication Data System

CG

Centre of Gravity

C/L

Check List

CMD

Command

CMP

Configuration, Maintenance & Procedures

CNS

Communication, Navigation, Surveillance

COM

Communication

CP

Critical Point (ETOPS)

CPDLC

Controller Pilot Data Link Communications

CP(LINE)

Chief Pilot Flight Operations (Line Operations)

CP(STD)

Chief Pilot Flight Operations (Standards & QA)

CP(TRG)

Chief Pilot Flight Operations (Training)

CRM

Crew Resource Management

CRS

Course

CRT

Cathode Ray Tube

A-0-10

Effective

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

CCQ

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Cruise

CTA

Control Area

CTR

Centre

CVR

Cockpit Voice Recorder

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

CRZ

D
DA

Decision altitude

daN

Deca Newton

DDG

Dispatch Deviation Guide

DEG

Degree

DEST

Destination

DFDR

Digital Flight Data Recorder

DFO

Director Flight Operations

DGCA

Director General of Civil Aviation

DGPS

Differential GPS

DH

Decision Height

DIST

Distance

DME

Distance Measuring Equipment

DOI

Dry Operating Index

DOW

Dry Operating Weight

DU

Display Unit

E
ELT

Entry Level Training

ELT

Emergency Locator Transmitter

A-0-11

Effective

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Emergency

EO

Engine Out

EOSID

Engine Out SID

EST

Estimated

ETA

Estimated Time of Arrival

ETD

Estimated Time of Departure

ETOPS/EDTO

Extended Twin Engine Operations/ Extended diversion time
operations

ETP

Equi Time Point

EUROCAE

European Organisation for Civil Aviation Equipment

EXP

Exit Point (ETOPS)

EXT

External

ECAM

Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitoring

EEP

ETOPS Entry Point

EFB

Electronic Flight Bag

EFIS

Electronic Flight Instrument System

EFOB

Estimated Fuel On Board

EGPWS

Enhanced GPWS

EGT

Exhaust Gas Temperature

EIS

Electronic Instrument System

ELEC

Electrical

ELEV

Elevator, Elevation

F
FAF

Final Approach Fix
A-0-12

Effective

09-Jul-14

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

EMER

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Future Air Navigation System

FAP

Final Approach Point

FAR

Federal Aviation Regulations

FBS

Fixed Base Simulator

F/C

Flight Crew

FCOM

Flight Crew Operating Manual

FCTM

Flight Crew Training Manual

FCU

Flight Control Unit

FD

Flight Director

FDM

Flight Data Monitoring

FDTL

Flight Duty & Time Limitations

FF

Fuel Flow

FFS

Full Flight Simulator

FIR/FIC

Flight Information Region/Center

FL

Flight Level

FLT

Flight

FM

Flight Manual

FMA

Flight Mode Annunciator

FMGS

Flight Management and Guidance System

FMS

Flight Management System

F/O

First Officer

FOB

Fuel On Board

A-0-13

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

FANS

Effective

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Foreign Object Damage

FOM

Flight Operations Manual

FOQA

Flight Operations Quality Assurance

FOT

Flight Operations Telex

F-PLN

Flight Plan

FPV

Flight Path Vector

FQI

Fuel Quantity Indication

ft, FT

Foot (Feet)

FTL

Flight Time Limitation

FU

Fuel Used

FWD

Forward

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

FOD

G
GBP

Global Business Park, Gurgaon

GEN

Generator

GBAS

Ground Based Augmentation System (GNSS/GPS)

GLONASS

Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System

GMT

Greenwich Mean Time

GMU

GPS (height) Monitoring Unit

GNLU

Global Navigation and Landing Unit

GNSS

Global Navigation Satellite System

GPS

Global Positioning System

GPU

Ground Power Unit

A-0-14

Effective

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Ground Proximity Warning System

GS

Ground Speed

G/S

Glide Slope

GW

Gross Weight

GA

Go Around

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

GPWS

L
LP

Low Pressure

LPC

Less Paper Cockpit (Airbus concept)

LRNS

Long Range Navigation System

LROPS

Long Range Operations

LRU

Line Replaceable Unit

LSK

Line Select Key

LVL

Level

LVP

Low Visibility Procedures

LVTO

Low Visibility Take-Off

LW

Landing Weight

M
MASPS

Minimum Aviation Systems Performance Standards

M

Mach

MABH

Minimum Approach Break off Height

MAA

Maximum Authorised Altitude

MAG

Magnetic
A-0-15

Effective

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Maintenance

MAP

Missed Approach Point

MBOH

Minimum Break Off Height

MCC

Maintenance Control Centre

MIALS

Medium Intensity Approach Light System

MIRL

Medium Intensity Runway Light

MLW

Maximum Landing weight

MME

Maintenance Management Exposition

MMEL

Master Minimum Equipment List

MMO

Maximum Operating Mach

MMR

Multi-Mode Receiver

MNPS

Minimum Navigation Performance Specification

MOCA

Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude

MOE

Maintenance Organisation Exposition

MOR

Mandatory Occurrence Reporting

MORA

Minimum Off-Route Altitude

MRVA

Minimum Radar Vectoring Altitude

MSA

Minimum Safe (or Sector) Altitude

MSG

Message

MSL

Mean Sea Level

MSN

Manufacturer's Serial Number

MTBF

Mean Time Between Failure

MTOW

Maximum Take Off Weight
A-0-16

Effective

09-Jul-14

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

MAINT

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

MEW

Manufacturer's Weight Empty

MZFW

Maximum Zero Fuel Weight

N/A

Not Applicable

NAI

Nacelle Anti Ice

NAT

North Atlantic

NAV

Navigation

NAVAID

Navigation Aid (Radio)

NCD

Non Computed Data

ND

Navigation Display

NDB

Non Directional Beacon

NM

Nautical Mile

NOPAC

North Pacific

NOTAM

Notice To Airmen

NOTOC

Notice To Crew (Dangerous Goods)

NPA

Non Precision Approach

NTO

No Technical Objection

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

N

O
OAT

Outside Air Temperature

OBRM

On Board Replaceable Module

OCA/H

Obstacle Clearance Altitude / Height

OCC

Operational Control Centre

OEB

Operations Engineering Bulletin

A-0-17

Effective

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Operating Empty Weight

OIT

Operator Information Telex

OM

Outer Marker

OM

Operations Manual

ONC

Operational Navigation Chart

OPS

Operations

OPT

Optimum

OTS

Oceanic Track System

OXY

Oxygen

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

OEW

P
PA

Passenger Address

PAC

Pacific

PACOTS

Pacific Oceanic Track System

PANS

Procedures for Air Navigation Services

PAPI

Precision Approach Path Indicator

PAR

Precision Approach Radar

PAX

Passenger

PB

Pushbutton

PBN

Performance Based Navigation

PCN

Pavement Classification Number

PERF

Performance

PF

Pilot Flying

PFD

Primary Flight Display

A-0-18

Effective

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Pilot Report

PIC

Pilot In Command

P/N

Part Number

PNR

Point of No Return

PNF/PM

Pilot Not Flying/ Pilot Monitoring

POS

Position

PROC

Procedure

PROF

Profile

PPR

Prior Permission Required

PSI

Pounds per Square Inch

PT

Point

PTS

Polar Track System

PVI

Para Visual Indicator

PWR

Power

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

PIREP

Q
QA

Quality Assurance

QDR

Magnetic bearing from facility

QFE

Field elevation atmosphere pressure

QFU

Magnetic orientation of runway

QGH

Procedure or facility to be used for recovery to airfield

QNE

Sea level standard atmosphere (1013 hPa or 29.92" Hg)

QNH

Sea level atmosphere pressure

QRH

Quick Reference Handbook

A-0-19

Effective

09-Jul-14

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

R

Radio Altitude/Radio Altimeter

REF

Reference

RESA

Runway End Safety Area

RMI

Radio Magnetic Indicator

RNAV

Area Navigation

RNP

Required Navigation Performance

RPL

Repetitive Flight Plan

RPM

Revolutions Per Minute

RQRD

Required

RSV

Reserves

RTA

Required Time of Arrival

RTCA

Requirements and Technical Concepts for Aviation

RTO

Rejected Take Off

RTOW

Regulatory Take Off Weight

RVR

Runway Visual Range

RVSM

Reduced Vertical Separation Minima

RWY

Runway

S
SARPS

Standards And Recommended Practices

SAT

Static Air Temperature

SATCOM

Satellite Communication

SB

Service Bulletin
A-0-20

Effective

09-Jul-14

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

RA

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD

FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A

ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF
OPERATIONS MANUAL

CHAPTER 00

Selector

SELCAL

Selective Calling

SEP

Safety & Emergency Procedures

SFE

Seller Furnished Equipment

SSFDR

Solid State Flight Data Recorder

SI

International System of units

SID

Standard Instrument Departure

SIGNET

Significant Meteorological report

SOP

Standard Operating Procedures

SOPAC

South Pacific

SPECI

Aviation selected special weather report

SPD

Speed

SRA

Surveillance Radar Approach

SRE

Surveillance Radar Element of precision approach radar
system

SSR

Secondary Surveillance Radar

STAR

Standard Terminal Arrival Route

STD

Standard

T
T, t

Ton, Tonne, Temperature

TA

Traffic Advisory

TACAN

Tactical Air Navigation

TAF

Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

TAS

True Air Speed
A-0-21

Effective

09-Jul-14

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal

SEL

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal TAT 09-Jul-14 . Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Total Air Temperature TAWS Terrain Awareness and Warning System TBC To Be Confirmed TBD To Be Determined/Defined TCAS Traffic alert and Collision Avoidance System TDZ Touch Down Zone TEMP Temperature THR Thrust TMA Terminal Maneuvering Area T/O Take off TOC Top Of Climb TOD Top Of Descent TODA Take-Off Distance Available TOGA Take-Off/Go-Around TOGW Take-Off Gross Weight TORA Take-off Run Available TOW Take-Off Weight TR Temporary Revision TRE Type Rated Examiner TRI Type Rated Instructor TVMC Temperature Velocity Minimum Control TWR Tower A-0-22 Effective Not a controlled copy.

TWY INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Taxiway U Ultra High Frequency (300 – 3000 MHz) UNM Unaccompanied Minor U/S Unserviceable UTC Universal Time Coordinated Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal UHF V VMIN Minimum Operating Speed VMO Maximum Operating Speed VNAV Vertical Navigation VOR VHF Omni-directional Range VPFO Vice President (Flight Operations) VR Rotation speed VREF Landing reference speed VS Stall speed V/S Vertical Speed VSI Vertical Speed Indicator w WBM Weight and Balance Manual WGD Windshield Guidance Display WGS World Geodetic System WPT Waypoint WX Weather A-0-23 Effective 09-Jul-14 .

printed from e-manual / Company Portal XCVR Z Z Zulu time (UTC) ZFCG Zero Fuel Centre of Gravity ZFW Zero Fuel Weight A-0-24 Effective 09-Jul-14 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Weather Radar X Transceiver XFR Transfer XMTR Transmitter XTKE Cross Track Error Not a controlled copy.WXR INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

Aerodrome Elevation: The elevation of the highest point of the landing area.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Aerodrome: A defined area on land or water (including any buildings. installations and equipment) intended to be used either wholly or in part for the arrival. Aircraft identification: A group of letters. departure and surface movement of aircraft. and which is used to identify the aircraft in ground-ground air traffic services communications. if such stop way is declared available by the appropriate authority and is capable of bearing the mass of the Airplane under the prevailing operating conditions Adult: Male and female. or the coded equivalent of.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. containing limitations within which the aircraft is to be considered airworthy.1. the distance between aircraft as well as their relevant positions and speed A-0-25 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Also referred to as Air Operator‟s Permit Airprox Incident: A situation in which.0. the aircraft call sign to be used in air-ground communications. Aeronautical Information Publication: A publication issued by or with the authority of a State and containing aeronautical information of a lasting character essential to air navigation. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Definitions Accelerate-Stop Distance Available: The length of the take-off run available plus the length of stop way. Air Operator Certificate (AOC): A certificate authorising an operator to carry out specified commercial air transport operations. and instructions and information necessary to the flight crewmembers for the safe operation of the aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Accountable Manager: Is the manager who has corporate authority for ensuring that all tasks as per the scope of approval of the approved organization can be financed and carried out to the standard required by DGCA. Aircraft (Airplane) Flight Manual: A manual. . associated with the certificate of airworthiness. figures or a combination thereof which is either identical to. in the opinion of a pilot or controller. is defined as person of an age of 12 years and above.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. departure. and expeditious flow of air traffic at aerodromes and during the approach. Alternate aerodromes include the following: A-0-26 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Air Traffic Control: A service that promotes the safe. and on the manoeuvring area between aircraft and obstructions - Expediting and maintaining an orderly flow of air traffic Air Traffic Service: A generic term meaning variously. Air Traffic Control Clearance: Authorisation for an aircraft to proceed under conditions specified by an air traffic control unit Air Traffic Control Instruction: Directives issued by air traffic control for the purpose. Alternate aerodrome: An aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed when it becomes either impossible or inadvisable to proceed to or to land at the aerodrome of intended landing. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 have been such that the safety of the aircraft involved was or may have been compromised. All weather operations. flight information service. air traffic advisory service.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and assist such organisations as required. orderly. Airway: A control area or portion thereof established in the form of a corridor equipped with radio navigation aids. and en route environments. approach control service or aerodrome control service). departure. Alerting Service: A service provided to notify appropriate organisations regarding aircraft in need of search and rescue aid. approach or landing operations in conditions where visual reference is limited by weather conditions. if requiring a pilot to take a specific action Air Traffic Control Service: A service provided for the purpose of: - Preventing collisions between aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Air Traffic: All aircraft in flight or operating on the manoeuvring area of an aerodrome . alerting service. take-off. air traffic control service (area control service. Any surface movement.

on a land aerodrome. Altitude: The vertical distance of a level. Appropriate authority: ( also see Authority) - Regarding flight over the high seas: the relevant authority of the State of Registry - Regarding flight other than over the high seas: the relevant authority of the State having sovereignty over the territory being over flown Approved: The Authority has reviewed the method. fuelling. - En-route alternate: An aerodrome at which an aircraft would be able to land after experiencing an abnormal or emergency condition while en route. Approach and landing operations with vertical guidance: An instrument approach and landing which utilizes lateral and vertical guidance but does not meet the requirements established for precision approach and landing operations. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Take-off alternate: An alternate aerodrome at which an aircraft can land should this become necessary shortly after take-off and it is not possible to use the aerodrome of departure. a point or an object considered as a point. Apron: A defined area. Approach ban point: The point on an approach segment where the reported weather conditions at the runway must meet the applicable minima. intended to accommodate aircraft for purposes of loading or unloading passengers. - Destination alternate: An alternate aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed should it become impossible or inadvisable to land at the aerodrome of intended landing. so as to be able to meet regulatory requirements for continuing an instrument approach to a landing. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - . mail or cargo.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. measured from mean sea level. procedure or policy in question and issued a formal written approval.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Note: The aerodrome from which a flight departs may also be an en-route or a destination alternate aerodrome for that flight. A-0-27 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. parking or maintenance.

Medium to Good. Braking action: a report on the conditions of the airport movement areas. using Co-ordinated Universal Time or local time. arrival or departure route. Calendar day: The period of elapsed time. Base training: Flight training required by Airworthiness Authorities to obtain the aircraft type rating. . but who shall not act as a flight crew member. advisory route. separated from the runway surface by a thin fluid film. Braking action is reported in terms of: Dry. controlled or uncontrolled route. providing pilots the quality or degree of braking that may be expected. The organization must ensure that the certifying staff (type rated AMEs/authorized/approved persons) is/are fully aware of the organization policies and procedures as detailed in the QC Manual.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Medium. Medium to Poor. in the interest of safety of passengers. Nil or Unreliable. (also See Cabin Crew member) Certifying Staff: The organisation must employ sufficient number of licensed/ authorised/ approved personnel (including unlicensed category of personnel such as technicians) required for production and certification in proportion to the quantum of the work and appropriate to the approval sought. Good. Authority: The competent body responsible for the safety of civil aviation in the state of the applicant or operator. printed from e-manual / Company Portal ATS route: A specified route designed for channelling the flow of traffic as necessary for the provision of air traffic services. Poor.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Aquaplaning (or hydroplaning): is a situation where the tyres of the aircraft are. to a large extent. A-0-28 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. duties assigned by the operator or the commander of the aircraft. airway. Note: The term "ATS route" is used to mean variously. that begins at midnight and ends 24 hours later in the next midnight Cabin attendant: A crew member who performs. Children: Person who is of an age of two years and above but who are less than twelve years of age. etc.

(See Pilot-incommand) Commercial air transport operation: An aircraft operation involving the transport of passengers. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Civil aircraft: Any aircraft on the civil register of a state. for flying the final approach segment of a non-precision instrument approach procedure as a continuous descent.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. He may delegate the conduct of the flight to another suitable qualified pilot.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.125 in) of water. or ice. without level-off. either permanently or temporarily. This is also referred to as CANPA (Constant Angle NonPrecision Approach) Converted Meteorological Visibility (CMV): A value equivalent to an RVR which is derived from the reported meteorological visibility. equivalent to more than 3 mm (0. from an altitude/height at or above the final approach fix altitude/height to a point approximately 15 m (50 ft) above the landing runway threshold or the point where the flare manoeuvre should begin for the type of aircraft flown. Contingency fuel: A quantity of fuel carried to compensate for items such as: A-0-29 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Circling: The visual phase of an instrument approach to bring an aircraft into position for landing on a runway which is not suitably located for a straight-in approach Commander: The pilot designated by the operator responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft during flight time. Continuous Descent Final Approach (CDFA): A technique. Contaminated runway: A runway is considered to be contaminated when more than 25% of the runway surface area (whether in isolated areas or not) within the required length and width being used is covered by the following: - Surface water more than 3 mm (0. consistent with stabilized approach procedures. cargo or mail for remuneration or hire. as converted in accordance with the specified requirements in the CAR. other than those which that state treats as being in the service of the state. or - Snow which has been compressed into a solid mass which resists further compression and will hold together or break into lumps if picked up (compacted snow). . including wet ice. or loose snow. or slush.125 in) deep.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal - .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. - Cabin crew crewmember. except cruise flight Cross Crew Qualification (CCQ): An Airbus Industrie term for applying the concepts of FAA AC 120-53 to related aircraft type like the A320. Crew member: A person assigned by an operator to duty on an aircraft during a flight duty period. Damp runway: A runway is considered damp when the surface is not dry. and A340. but when the moisture on it does not give it a shiny appearance.000 feet. - Flight crew member: A licensed crewmember charged with duties essential to the operation of an aircraft during a flight duty period. takeoff and landing. hardware. or currency. authorisation. Critical phases of flight: Those portions of operations involving taxiing. qualification. A-0-30 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. and if applicable to transition between types as well as mixed fleet flying of different types of aircraft. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Deviations of an individual airplane from expected fuel consumption data - Deviations from forecast meteorological conditions - Deviations from planned routings and/or cruising levels/altitude Co-pilot: Pilot serving in any piloting capacity other than as pilot in command or commander. A330. The term is intended to provide for the carryover of credit from one aircraft type to another based on the common design characteristics. but excluding a pilot who is on board the aircraft for the sole purpose of receiving flight instruction for a license or rating. Cruising level: A level maintained during a significant portion of a flight. efficient. Course: A program of instruction to obtain an airman license. member: A crewmember other than a flight Crew Resource Management (CRM): A program designed to improve the safety of flight operations by optimizing the safe.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. rating. and information through improved crew communication and co-ordination. and effective use of human resources. and all flight operations below 10.

.. Elevation: The vertical distance of a point or a level. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Dangerous good: Articles or substances that are capable of posing significant risk to health. A-0-31 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.g.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. . The scope of the EFB system functionality may also include various other hosted databases and applications. Physical EFB devices may use various technologies. Dry lease: Is when the airplane is operated under the AOC of the lessee. and forms of communication. fuel calculations). Note 2: The "required visual reference" means that section of the visual aids or of the approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the pilot to have made an assessment of the aircraft position and rate of change of position. or built into the aircraft (Class 3). aircraft operating manual (AOM) or perform basic calculations (e. checklists. Note 1: "Decision altitude (DA)" is referenced to mean sea level (MSL) and "decision height (DH)" is referenced to the threshold elevation. Electronic Flight Bag (EFB): An electronic display system intended primarily for flight deck or cabin use. attached to an approved mounting device (Class 2). printed from e-manual / Company Portal Deadhead Transportation: Time spent in transportation on aircraft (at the insistence of the AOC holder) as a passenger to or from a crewmember‟s home station. formats. EFB devices can display a variety of aviation data (e.g. Decision altitude/height (DA/DH): A specified altitude or height (A/H) in the precision approach at which a missed approach must be initiated if the required visual reference to continue the approach has not been established. performance data. on or affixed to the surface of the earth measured from mean sea level. in relation to the desired flight path. and includes those paved runways which have been specially prepared with grooves or porous pavement and maintained to retain “effectively dry” braking action even when moisture is present. safety or property when transported by air and which are classified according to ICAO Technical Instructions.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. navigation charts. Physical EFB displays may be portable (Class 1). Dry runway: A dry runway is one which is neither wet nor contaminated.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Filed flight plan: The flight plan as filed with an ATS unit by the pilot or his designated representative. it denotes the content and format of the filed flight plan data as transmitted. can be completed automatically. The authorisation may or may not be conditional. there is no significant out-of-trim condition or deviation of flight path or attitude but the landing is not completed automatically. Flight control system: A system which includes an automatic landing system A-0-32 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Extended over-water operation: An operation over water at a horizontal distance of more than. Final reserve fuel: An amount of fuel for all turbine powered airplanes. In the event of a failure. calculated with the estimated mass on arrival at the alternate or the destination. in the event of a failure below alert height.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. without any subsequent changes Note: When the word "message" is used as a suffix to this term. For a fail-passive automatic flight control system the pilot assumes control of the airplane after a failure. calculated to fly 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft above the aerodrome elevation in standard conditions. the automatic landing system will operate as a fail-passive system. Fail-Passive flight control system: A flight control system is fail-passive if. . when no alternate is required. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Exemption: A formal authorisation issued by the Authority providing relief from part or all of the provisions of a CAR. Extended Range Operations with Twin Engine Aeroplane (ETOPS): Any flight by aeroplane with two turbine power engines where from any point on the route the flight time at the one engine inoperative cruise speed to an adequate aerodrome is greater than the threshold time. Fail-Operational flight control system: A flight control system is failoperational if. flare and landing. the approach. in the event of a failure. 50 NM away from shore. Extended Diversion time operations: Any operation by an aeroplane with two or more turbine engines where the diversion time to an en route alternate aerodrome is greater than the threshold time set by the state of the operator. EDTO regulations are applicable to routes over water as well as remote land areas.

or bound for a given aerodrome. 1013. Heading: The direction. operations and maintenance to ensure equipment. indicate altimetric rather than geometric heights and altitudes. measured from a specified datum. magnetic. . so as to ensure the most effective utilisation of the airspace. Note 2: The terms "height" and "altitude". Note 1: A pressure type altimeter calibrated in accordance with the Standard Atmosphere: - When set to QNH altimeter setting. used in Note 1 above. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Flight level: A surface of constant atmospheric pressure which is related to a specific pressure datum.2 hecto -Pascals (hPa).2 hecto-Pascals (hPa) may be used to indicate flight levels. The normal force depends on the weight of the aircraft and the lift of the wings. will indicate height above the QFE reference datum When set to a pressure of 1013. Glide path: A descent profile determined for vertical guidance during a final approach. compass or grid). Ground visibility: The visibility at an aerodrome.ATS Flight Plan: Specified information provided to air traffic services units. Hydroplaning: Refer to Aquaplaning Human Factors Principles: Principles applied to aeronautical design. will indicate altitude When set to QFE altimeter setting. Height: The vertical distance of a level. Flow control: Measures designed to adjust the flow of traffic into a given airspace. certification. Friction coefficient: Relationship between the friction force acting on the wheel and the normal force on the wheel.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. in which the longitudinal axis of an aircraft is pointed. a point or an object. Flight plan: . along a given route.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. usually expressed in degrees from North (true. training. relative to an intended flight or portion of a flight of an aircraft. as reported by an accredited observer or by an automatic system. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Flight crewmember: See Crewmember. and is separated from other such surfaces by specific pressure intervals. A-0-33 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

Infant: A person who has not yet reached his second birthday. less than the minima specified for visual meteorological conditions. if a landing is not completed. route and airport qualifications. are excluded during all ILS operations. where applicable. to a position at which holding or en-route obstacle clearance criteria apply. to a point from which a landing can be completed and thereafter. Instrument approach procedure: A series of predetermined manoeuvres by reference to flight instruments with specified protection from obstacles from the initial approach fix or.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. distance from cloud. Inspection: The examination of an aircraft or aeronautical product to establish conformity with a standard approved by the Authority. and other air traffic. ILS critical area: An area of defined dimensions about the localizer and glide path antennas where vehicles. etc. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 systems. The objective of IOE is to familiarize the pilot with revenue operations. including aircraft. processes and procedures take into account human capabilities and limitations as well as the safe interface between the human and system components. using Airbus and airline approved documents: FCOM. Instrument Meteorological Conditions: Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility. Instrument Flight Rules: Rules that are applicable to all IFR flights (AIP India). OEBs.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The critical area is protected because the presence of vehicles and/or aircraft inside its boundaries will cause unacceptable disturbance to the ILS signal-in-space. MEL. and ceiling. it is an alternative to Visual Flight Rules (VFR). . Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) are a set of regulations and procedures for flying an aircraft without the assumption that pilots will be able to see and avoid obstacles. terrain. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Human Performance: Human capabilities and limitations that have an effect on the safety and efficiency of aeronautical operations. from the beginning of defined arrival route. for the purpose of optimizing human performance and reducing human error. A-0-34 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Initial Operating Experience (IOE): Operational support given to newly type rated pilots.

Take-off (one engine failure): 0. 1. Missed approach procedure: The procedure to be followed if the approach cannot be continued. Maintenance: Tasks required to ensure the continued airworthiness of an aircraft or aeronautical product including any one or combination of overhaul. replacement. and time of arrival and departure Low Visibility Procedures (LVP): Specific procedures applied at an aerodrome for the purpose of ensuring safe operations during Categories II and III approaches and/or low visibility take-offs. . crew member names and duty assignments. 0.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Journey log: A form signed by the Commander of each flight that records the airplane's registration. The sensitive area is protected to provide protection against interference caused by large moving objects outside the critical area but still normally within the airfield boundary. En-route (two engine failure): 0.3 % for three-engine aircraft. is controlled to prevent the possibility of unacceptable interference to the ILS signal during ILS operations. and 1. including aircraft. modification.4 % for threeengine aircraft. inspection.6 % for four-engine aircraft .8 % for two-engine aircraft. Maintenance release: A document containing a certification that inspection and maintenance work has been performed satisfactorily in accordance with the methods prescribed by the Authority.0 % for four-engine aircraft .5 % for fourengine aircraft A-0-35 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. It is established in such a manner that it represents the actual climb performance diminished by a gradient equal to: . 1. repair. En-route (one engine failure): 1. place. printed from e-manual / Company Portal ILS sensitive area: An area extending beyond the critical area where the parking and/or movement of vehicles. 0. and the date. Low Visibility Take-Off (LVTO): A term used in relation to flight operations referring to a take-off on a runway where the RVR is less than 400 m.1 % for two-engine aircraft. Net flight path: Is a flight path determined for engine(s) failure case. the type of flight.9 % for threeengine aircraft. and defect rectification.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

„D‟ and „G‟ depending mainly upon the type of airport (Civil / Defence) and the duration of applicability of NOTAM. Operational control: The exercise of authority over the initiation. used in establishing compliance with the appropriate obstacle clearance criteria. Approaches with lateral guidance from localiser. Although often a helpful tool for lateral and vertical navigation during approach. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Night: The hours between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight or such other period between sunset and sunrise. other operating limitations. and relevant expected conditions on the route to be followed and at the aerodromes or heliports concerned. - Class I: Distribution by means of telecommunication - Class II: Distribution by means other than telecommunication (NOTAMs are also classified as „A‟. or alternatively the lowest height above the elevation of the relevant runway threshold or above the aerodrome elevation as applicable (OCH). .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. VOR. Civil twilight ends in the evening when the centre of the sun's disc is 6 degrees below the horizon and begins in the morning when the centre of the sun's disc is 6 degrees below the horizon.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. diversion or termination of a flight in the interest of the safety of the aircraft and the regularity and efficiency of the flight. the timely knowledge of which is essential to personnel concerned with flight operations. Descent limit is the MDA. NDB or GPS are considered non-precision approaches. continuation. Operational flight plan: The operator's plan for the safe conduct of the flight based on considerations of aircraft performance. „C‟. and obstacle clearance (including go-around) is guaranteed if the approach is discontinued no farther than the MAP. A-0-36 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. NOTAM: A notice containing information concerning the establishment. „B‟. FMS guidance is not a certified approach aid. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Non-precision approach: Instrument approach with lateral guidance only from the FAF to the runway environment. procedure or hazard. service. condition or change in any aeronautical facility.) Obstacle clearance altitude/height (OCA/H): The lowest altitude (OCA).

Post Holder: Persons nominated by an operator. is in charge of the controls of an aircraft. Precision approach: Instrument approach with lateral and vertical guidance from the FAP to the runway touchdown zone.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Positioning: The practice of transferring crew from one place to another as passengers in surface or air transport at the behest of the Company. which corresponds to that pressure in the Standard Atmosphere. Pilot Not Flying/ Pilot Monitoring (PNF/ PM): The pilot crew member who is monitoring and supporting the pilot flying in accordance with the multi-crew co-operation concept. Prescriptive Compliance: A conventional means of achieving target levels of safety performance of a system or process based on operator compliance with pre-established non-variable standards or limitations. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Performance-based navigation (PBN): Area navigation based on performance requirements for aircraft operating along an ATS route.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and typically approved or accepted by the Authority. Pilot-in-command: The Pilot designated by the operator as being in command of the aircraft and charged with responsibility for the operational control and safe conduct of the flight. Pilot Flying (PF): The pilot. ILS. Policy: The stated intentions and direction of an organization. . Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Operator: A person. who for the time being. MLS and PAR are considered precision approaches. A-0-37 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. integrity and obstacle clearance (including go-around) guaranteed until the descent limit (decision altitude or decision height) is reached. Pressure-altitude: An atmospheric pressure expressed in terms of altitude. in an instrument approach procedure or in a designated airspace. Pre-flight inspection: The inspection carried out before flight to ensure that the aircraft is fit for the intended flight. with system accuracy. when the required flight crew is more than one. organisation or enterprise engaged in or offering to engage in an aircraft operation. that are responsible for the management and supervision of specific areas of operations.

cannabinoids. alcohol. opioids. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Quality Assurance: All those planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that operational and maintenance practices satisfy given requirements. Runway: A defined rectangular area on a land aerodrome prepared for the landing and take-off of aircraft. coffee and tobacco are excluded. other psychostimulants. . but not limited to. submitted by an operator for retention and repetitive use by ATS. Rest Period: An uninterrupted and defined period of time during which a crew member is free from all duties and airport standby Rostered /Planned duty: A duty period. Quality System: The organisational structure. A-0-38 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. to include. hallucinogens and volatile solvents. stating special conditions. Reporting point: A specified geographical location in relation to which the position of an aircraft can be reported Required Navigation Performance (RNP): A statement of the navigation performance accuracy necessary for operation within a defined airspace RESA: An area symmetrical about the extended runway centre line and adjacent to the end of the strip primarily intended to reduce the risk of damage to an aeroplane undershooting or overrunning the runway. or a series of duty periods. with stipulated start and finish times. privileges or limitations pertaining to such license or certificate. cocaine. Repair: The restoration of an aircraft/aeronautical product to a serviceable condition in conformity with an approved standard. regularly operated individual flights with identical basic features.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Repetitive flight plan (RPL): A flight plan related to a series of frequently recurring. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Psychoactive Substances: Substances that can produce mood changes or distorted perceptions in humans. notified by the Company to crew in advance. sedatives and hypnotics. Rating: An authorisation entered on or associated with a license or certificate and forming part thereof. procedures and resources for implementing quality management. responsibilities.

if compacted by hand.  Compacted snow: Snow which has been compressed into a solid mass that resists further compression and will hold together or break up into chunks if picked up. Except for offsetlocalizer approaches.5 and over. Non-precision approaches can be constructed as a stabilised A-0-39 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. will fall apart upon release.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Slush: Water-saturated snow which with a heel-and-toe slap-down motion against the ground will be displaced with a splatter.35. Stabilised approach procedure: An approach procedure along the extended runway centreline with a constant. an ILS approach is inherently a stabilised approach procedure. SIGMET information: Information issued by a meteorological watch office concerning the occurrence or expected occurrence of specified en-route weather phenomena which may affect the safety of aircraft operations. separated by less than a minimum rest period.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Special VFR: Flights under VFR rules. if compacted by hand. These are subject to specific authorisation from ATC Split Duty: A flying duty period which consists of two or more sectors.35 up to but not including 0. on the designated parking position. specific gravity: 0.5 up to 0.5.8 Snow (on the ground): Dry snow: Snow which can be blown if loose or. Stabilised approach: An approach without speed and/or configuration changes during final descent. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Sector: The time between an aircraft first moving under its own power until it next comes to rest after landing. specific gravity: 0. in-flight verifiable descent gradient from the final approach altitude to the runway touchdown zone. . permitted upto 1500M visibility. specific gravity: up to but not including 0. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Runway visual range: The range over which the pilot of an aircraft on the centreline of a runway can see the runway surface markings or the lights delineating the runway or identifying its centreline.  Wet snow: Snow which. will stick together and tend to or form a snowball. specific gravity: 0.

Track: The projection on the earth's surface of the path of an aircraft. whereby any operation that results in a time beyond requires an EDTO (ETOPS) approval from the State. Taxiing: Movement of an aircraft on the surface of an aerodrome under its own power.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and with which an Operator/Provider will be expected to be in conformity at the conclusion of an Audit. printed from e-manual / Company Portal approach procedure by choosing the FAF accordingly and by publishing a distance-versus-altitude (VOR+DME. type of equipment. component. program. that is considered an operational necessity. the direction of which path at any point is usually expressed in degrees from North (true. A-0-40 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. System of Shared Responsibility (Operational Control): A system whereby the pilot-in-command and a Flight Dispatcher/Flight Operations Officer (FOO) have joint responsibility for all aspects of operational control. System of Non-Shared Responsibility (Operational Control): A system whereby the PIC has sole responsibility for all aspects of operational control. or any other aspect of operations under the Audit Scope of IOSA/ISAGO. assisted and/or supported by Flight Dispatchers/ Flight Operations Officer (FOO) or other operational control personnel. procedure. process. facility. LOC+DME) or waypointversus-altitude table (GPS) to be able to verify adherence to the (imaginary) glide path. excluding take-off and landing Taxiway: A defined path on a land aerodrome established for the taxiing of aircraft and intended to provide a link between one part of the aerodrome and another. magnetic or grid). to an en route alternate airport. plan. Standby Duty: A period during which the Company places restraints on a crew member who would otherwise be on off duty. Threshold Time: The range established by the State and expressed in time. NDB+DME. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Standard: A specified system. Technical log: A document carried on an aircraft that contains information to meet ICAO requirements. Threshold: The beginning of that portion of the runway usable for landing. policy. a technical log contains at least two independent sections: a journey record section and an aircraft maintenance record section. set of measures.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. .

equal to or better than specified minima. Wet lease: when the airplane is operated under the AOC of the lessor. Waypoint: A specified geographical location used to define an area navigation route or the flight path of an aircraft employing area navigation. situated near the ground. Visual approach: An approach when either part or all of an instrument approach procedure is not completed and the approach is executed with visual reference to the terrain. Visibility: Visibility for aeronautical purpose is greater of: a) The greatest distance at which a black object of suitable dimensions. Note 2: The definition applies to the observations of visibility in local routine and special reports. b) The greatest distance at which the lights in the vicinity of 1000 candelas can be seen and identified against unlit background. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Transition altitude: The altitude at or below which the vertical position of an aircraft is controlled by reference to altitudes.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The former a) is represented by meteorological optical range (MOR). UN number: The four-digit number assigned by the United Nations Committee of experts on the transport of dangerous goods to identify a substance or a particular group of substances. Visual meteorological conditions: Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility. can be seen and recognized when observed against a bright background. and ceiling. or a combination of these. distance from cloud.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and the latter b) varies with the background illumination. . Note 1: The two distances have different values in air of a given extinction coefficient. A-0-41 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Transition level: The lowest flight level available for use above the transition altitude. external flight path references. Vertical Navigation (VNAV): A method of navigation which permits aircraft operation on a vertical flight profile using altimetry sources. to the observations of prevailing and minimum visibility reported in METAR and SPECI and to the observations of ground visibility.

evaluator or current and qualified Pilot-in-Command (PIC) designated for the purpose by the Operator and/or State. . less than or equal to 3 mm or when there is sufficient moisture on the runway surface to cause it to appear reflective. . Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Zero Flight Time Training (ZFTT): A flight crew qualification concept whereby: Flight training and evaluation is conducted solely in advanced simulation devices without the need for flight time in an aircraft. but without significant areas of standing water.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Wet runway: A runway is considered wet when the runway surface is covered with water. or equivalent.A final demonstration of competency is completed in an aircraft during actual line operations under the supervision of an instructor.Intentionally Left Blank - A-0-42 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

353 oz 1 oz = 28.3048 m 1 m = 1.daN = 88.92 mbar 1 mbar = 1 hPa = 0.0689 bar 1 mbar = 1 hPa = 0.514 m/s 1 g = 0.daN °C = 5/9 (°F .281 ft 1 ft = 0.4536 kg 1 t (tonne) = 2 204.94635 l 1 m.32) °F = (°C x 1. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Units conversion table METRIC  US SPEED WEIGHT FORCE PRESSURE VOLUME 1 mm = 0.6 lb 1 lb = 0.35 g 1 kg = 2.094 yd 1 yd = 0.0113 m.in = 0.6215 statute mile 1 statute mile = 1.1.003785 m3 1 l = 1.914 m 1 km = 0.0004536 t 1 N = 0.864 mbar 1 l = 0.540 NM 1 NM = 1.54 kt 1 kt = 1.944 kt 1 ft/s = 0.864 hPa = 33.4448 daN 1 bar = 14.2046 lb 1 lb = 0.3048 m/s 1 km/h = 0.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.505 PSI 1 PSI = 6892 Pa = 0.8) + 32 °C = 5/9 (°F + 40) – 40 °F = 9/5 (°C + 40) .92 hPa = 68.4 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.0567 US Quart 1 US Quart = 0.0394 in 1 in = 25.785 l 3 MOMENTUM TEMPERATURE 1 m = 264.609 km 1 m/s = 3.2248 lb 1 lb = 4.5 lb.2642 US Gallon 1 US Gallon = 3.4 mm 1 m = 3.in 1 lb.0145 PSI 1 PSI = 68.852 km/h = 0.448 N 1 daN = 2.248 lb 1 lb = 0.0. printed from e-manual / Company Portal LENGTH US  METRIC .281 ft/s = 1.02953 in Hg 1 in Hg = 33.40 A-0-43 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.2 US Gallons 1 US Gallon = 0.852 km 1 km = 0.

22 16.84 26.10 6.7 .8 .30 3.8 .4 .3099 0.21 6.1.97 8.75 7.4406 0.4806 0.4 .51 10.70 15.90 25.6932 0.7385 0.5875 0.30 9.5 .92 11.36 4.28.6614 0.63 8.1942 0.7 .22 5.34 11.3 .6 .6 .6113 0.5699 0.4481 0.3220 0.10.5 .4173 0.79 20.99 5.2970 0.23 12.6 .54.7 .63 3.2243 0.47 6.95 6.5 .03 19.7428 0.04 7.6877 0.17 13.4 .2138 0.70 5.34 7.56.2583 0.3250 0.4 .17 14.0 + 15.82 27.72 10.0 hPa PSI In.2467 0.99 9.6 .0000 1.50.73 10.89 17.5 .0000 1.2709 0.5643 0.4595 0.5892 0.8359 0.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.5420 0.24.0.2353 0.16.1 + 11.3107 0.5203 0.38 7.17 10.18.36.09 23.5328 0.8617 0.40.22 23.92 31.34 14.34.2.20.4223 0. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 International standard atmosphere (ISA) PRESSURE 40 000 39 000 38 000 37 000 36 000 35 000 34 000 33 000 32 000 31 000 30 000 29 000 28 000 27 000 26 000 25 000 24 000 23 000 22 000 21 000 20 000 19 000 18 000 17 000 16 000 15 000 14 000 13 000 12 000 11 000 10 000 9 000 8 000 7 000 6 000 5 000 4 000 3 000 2 000 1 000 0 .6713 0.94 15.56.10 10.4325 0.57 4.2844 0.5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.52.46.38.75 14. printed from e-manual / Company Portal ALTITUDE TEMP.8962 0.3876 0.39 22.29 19.8 .44.98 24.8 .7148 0.2981 0.3881 0.02 A-0-44 0.2586 0.2710 0.58 2.82 28.89 9.11 8.9151 0.8637 0.Hg 188 197 206 217 227 238 250 262 274 287 301 315 329 344 360 376 393 410 428 446 466 485 506 527 549 572 595 619 644 670 697 724 753 782 812 843 875 908 942 977 1013 1050 2.72 2.10 11.9644 1.5 .80 3. (Feet) (°C) PRESSURE DENSITY RATIO  = ρ/ρo  = P/Po .58 18.8881 0.63 11.04 7.7860 0.0.1 000 .4046 0.5 .5 .9711 1.8.99 3.7 .54 5.7 .3741 0.1 + 5.5 .71 7.46 3.3711 0.4994 0.48.8014 0.17 4.14.4791 0.23 5.4025 0.2462 0.4976 0.8106 0.14 3.56.30.1851 0.305 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.64 13.2837 0.6.4.35 9.8 .29 8.0 + 13.78 12.18 13.40 6.5150 0.5 .12.26.22.1 + 3.6090 0.0295 SPEED of SOUND (kt) 573 573 573 573 573 576 579 581 584 586 589 591 594 597 599 602 604 607 609 611 614 616 619 621 624 626 628 631 633 636 638 640 643 645 647 650 652 654 656 659 661 664 Effective ALTITUD E (metres) 12 192 11 887 11 582 11 278 10 973 10 668 10 363 10 058 9 754 9 449 9 144 8 839 8 534 8 230 7 925 7 620 7 315 7 010 6 706 6 401 6 096 5 791 5 406 5 182 4 877 4 572 4 267 3 962 3 658 3 353 3 048 2 743 2 438 2 134 1 829 1 524 1 219 914 610 305 0 .7716 0.11 12.3605 0.9298 0.58 21.4 .0 + 17.8 + 1.0366 0.74 8.60 12.5511 0.3473 0.6360 0.2038 0.67 14.45 5.65 7.57 16.6 .3345 0.7620 0.1 + 9.78 4.81 6.3552 0.1 + 7.56.9428 0.56.7156 0.6292 0.6500 0.3 .69 13.42.3398 0.86 29.98 4.8320 0.49 8.4642 0.32.5 .

Airline training policy may differ in certain areas. Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM) and Quick Reference Handbook (QRH) Flight Crew Training Manual (FCTM) – Practical and trainingoriented information is addressed in the Flight Crew Training Manual Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual (SEP) The Flight Crew Training Manual (FCTM) is published as a supplement to the Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM) and is designed to provide pilots with practical information on how to operate the Airbus aircraft. the FCOM is the overriding authority. procedures. instructions and guidance necessary for company flight operations personnel to perform their duty and needed for a safe operation. In the case of any conflict. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Parts of operations manual 0. It should be read in conjunction with the FCOM. the airline training policy is the over-riding authority.6 The Operations Manual is divided into following parts: Part A defines all non-type related operational policies. A-0-45 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Minimum Equipment List (MEL).1. Material produced by the company for this Part is supplemented or substituted by applicable parts of the following manuals for the operated aircraft:      Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) including the Configuration Deviation List (CDL).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Part A: General (Operations Policy Manual) . Should this be the case. variants or individual aircraft used by the company. It takes account of any differences between types. Part B: Airplane Operating Information Part B comprises all type related instructions and procedures needed for a safe operation.

7 Volumes of the operations manual The following Manuals form a part of the Operations Manual: a) Company Policy and Administration Manual b) A 320  Flight Manual  FCOM (GEN/DSC.PRO/LIM/OEB/FCBUL. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Part C comprises all instructions and information needed for the area of operation.PERF)  FCTM  QRH  MEL c) Flight Safety Manual d) EDTO Manual. 0. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Part C: Routes and Aerodromes Material produced by the company for this Part is supplemented or substituted by applicable Route Guide material produced by specialised professional company:     En-route charts Airport charts Airport briefing NOTAM Part D: Training Part D comprises all training instructions required for a safe operation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. e) Document Management System Manual (DMS) f) EFB Policy and Procedure Manual In addition following documents are also to be used as reference as and when required.1. i) ICAO/IATA dangerous goods annual ii) Emergency response manual iii) Security manual iv) SEP manual v) Flight despatch and Flight operations Process manuals A-0-46 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

Company shall use letter/e-mail/circulars etc as official mode of communication.  Manufacturer's Approved Flight Manual (AFM).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.1.  Aeronautical Information Publications (AIP) and NOTAMS. weight/mass and balance data/manual. Crew is expected to use English language of an operationally acceptable standard. although some references may refer to one gender only. . airport analysis data etc. iii) During flight crew training and evaluation activities. iv) English shall also be used as the universal language in radiotelephony. GPWS terrain and obstacle databases.2 FLIGHT OPERATIONS DOCUMENTS Flight Operations Support is responsible for ensuring that regulations of the State and of the other states or authorities relevant to operations are available to the users. references to one gender shall also be deemed equally applicable to both genders. printed from e-manual / Company Portal English shall be the official language for communication. A-0-47 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1. as applicable  Airworthiness Directives. 0.  ICAO International Standards and Recommended Practices. 0. In all cases. FMS databases. checklists and MMEL/CDL. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Official language and modes of communication The English language shall be used as a common language for use by all flight crew members for communication: i) On the flight deck during line operations.9 Gender applicability The Operations manual applies to both female and male personnel. The Company Operations manual and all other company documents will be published in English and in such a way that entire documentation contains legible and accurate information. including performance data. ii) Between the flight crew and cabin crew during line operations.  Route and airports charts.0.

.  Distribution to ensure appropriate availability at points of use. identified. distributed. distribution and retention of documents of external origin.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Flight ops support section will ensure:  Retention of a master copy.  Identification. including on-board library documents.  Identification and retention of background or source references as history. Flight Ops support team shall be responsible for the documentation control and updates.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00  Any manufacturer's operational communications The company utilises an paper/electronic method of document management. update.  Identification and retention of revisions as history.  Review and update. Dissemination shall essentially be via electronic means. presented. A-0-48 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. All operational documents shall be duly signed by the issuing authority and these signed copies shall be deemed as original copy and shall be maintained at Flight Operations Support Section.  Version control (electronic documents). accessed. revised.  Identification and retention of obsolete documents  Disposal of documents A distribution list for all operational documents and their dissemination shall be maintained. maintained.  Identification of revision status. control and distribution. to include an approval process. and/or data used directly in the conduct or support of operations. like email and suitable software shall be used to establish that the individual user has received the correct documents.  Examination and approval prior to issue. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The company has a system for the management and control of documentation (both internal and external).  checking of documents to verify they remain legible and readily identifiable. Within which document files are typically created. retained and/or deleted using computer systems.

B.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 0. System for dissemination of information Electronic documentation (e-manual and company portal) E-manual along with IndiGo Portal (6E World) has been the main tool for training and reference. It is recommended that crew access IndiGo‟s portal and check e-mails before operating a flight. issued to FCOM by the end of the preceding month shall be included in the e-manual. Operations Circular. iv) All new notices will be only disseminated electronically. A record of receipt of all documents sent by Flight Ops support to individual users shall be maintained for a period of 6 month. Flight Crew Training Manual (FCTM). OEBs etc. MEL EDTO Manual Flight Safety Manual Flight Safety Circulars Flight Safety forms Regulatory documents (CAR. etc.1 . Flight Crew Operating Manuals (FCOMs) Quick Reference Handbook (QRH). The Captain acknowledges by signing the Flight A-0-49 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. i) The e-manual is issued every quarter or if deemed necessary can be issued earlier or postponed. and D) Flight Operations Notices Flight Manual (FM). ALAR briefing notes. AIC.2. C. Particulars of latest notices issued will be listed on the Flight Release.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Air Safety Circulars) and other flight operations reading material like FOBN. On the Portal and in the E-manual Crew shall be able to refer. iii) Any new document/Notice issued in between two issues of the e-manual will be posted on the portal. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 All documents shall be published in PDF format for electronic dissemination. a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k) l) Company Operations Manual (Part A. ii) All temporary revisions. Some salient features of electronic documentation are.

i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) viii) ix) x) xi) xii) xiii) xiv) xv) xvi) xvii) xviii) xix) xx) xxi) Documents Certificate of Registration Certificate of Airworthiness Airworthiness Review Certificate (ARC) Noise Certification Department Responsible Engineering Engineering Mandatory / Informatory Mandatory Mandatory Engineering Mandatory Engineering Mandatory Air Operator‟s Permit Engineering Mandatory Appropriate Crew Licences Aeromobile Radio Operations Licences Journey Log Book or appropriate document Operations Manual Minimum Equipment List Flight Manual Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM) Quick Reference Handbook ( check list) Cabin Crew Manual (SEP Manual) Route Guide. Part VII) Sr.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 0. (in original or attested copies (CAR Section 2.2. printed from e-manual / Company Portal List of documents required to be carried . Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Release that all Flight Deck crew members have reviewed the latest Notices and are well versed with their contents. No.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.2 On board documentation As part of pre-flight inspection. Navigation Charts and Topographical Maps Airplane Search Procedure Checklist Maintenance Release/Certificate of Release to Service * Crew Mandatory Engineering Mandatory Engineering Mandatory Flight Operations Engineering Flight Operations Flight Operations Mandatory Mandatory Mandatory Mandatory Flight Operations Mandatory Inflight Services Mandatory Flight Operations Mandatory Flight Operations Engineering Mandatory Mandatory Weight Schedule Load and Trim Sheet Passenger Manifest Crew Manifest Engineering Airport Services Airport Services Airport Services Mandatory Mandatory Mandatory Mandatory A-0-50 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Series X. flight crew are required to check before commencement of a flight that all mandatory manuals/documents are available on board.

In case. A CRS is not required to be issued after Transit/ Pre-flight inspection. the previous CRS is no more valid and a new CRS is issued. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Cargo Manifest (when carried) Dangerous Goods Manifest (when carried) Chart showing location of emergency and safety equipment‟s carried onboard RTOW Charts Company Operational Notices Flight Safety Manual Red Book (Emergency Response – DGR Goods) LOPA (Layout of Passenger Arrangement). nos. Pilots are expected and required to ensure that if any documents / chart is taken out for use during flight. For example there is a snag another CRS after snag rectification will be issued. vii) to xv) shall be stored in a suitable place accessible to the crew in flight. A CRS is valid till next maintenance action. This document shall be carried on board. printed from e-manual / Company Portal xxv) xxvi) xxvii) xxviii) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . This is the reason after every lay over. The remaining may be carried in any other safe place on board the aircraft. In such a case a document shall be issued stating that the required document has been submitted to the authority. Item vii) to xv) are placed either in the Navigation bag in the cockpit or are placed in the various document stowage boxes. A-0-51 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. If a layover check is carried out. Items at sr. check a new CRS is signed off in the Tech Log. Note 2: In case a document has been submitted to a competent authority for renewal or for any other reason. It is a common courtesy to leave the cockpit in a condition a crew would expect to find it in. a Manual/document is missing this is required to be reported to local flight operations personnel / flight dispatch by filling up the relevant form. Similarly after every Check a new CRS is issued and is valid till next maintenance action. Now Certificate of Release to Service (CRS) has replaced FRC. Airport Services Mandatory Airport Services Mandatory Engineering Mandatory Flight Operations Flight Operations Flight Operations Mandatory Informatory Informatory Flight Operations Mandatory Engineering Mandatory * Note 1: With the introduction of CAR 145. The Pilot-InCommand is responsible to ensure that all manuals and documents are placed in the proper place after completion of flight.xxii) xxiii) xxiv) xxix) FLT. Flight Release Certificate (FRC) is no longer issued for an aircraft.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. that fact shall be deemed as valid for it’s not being on board an aircraft. and previous CRS will not be valid. It will be replaced at the earliest opportunity. it is placed back in the correct position and correct order.

Operations Notice. A-0-52 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. safety forms are kept in the coat stowage compartment. . Parts A. in the same binder. crew can contact Senior Manager Flight Ops Support.2.0. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Missing document 0. In-case of any urgent assistance.  Coat Stowage Compartment : In order to create extra space in the cockpit. Note: Administrative notices are disseminated electronically. Hard copy of this manual is available on every aircraft. This shall be printed in white sheets. RTOW Charts: Each aircraft shall have a single RTOW file for both domestic and international stations. EDTO Manual: Approved EDTO manual is available on the portal and in e-manual. The on board minima file shall consist of. C-NOTAM.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. on: +919818125126. DGR (Red book).  Normal Minima – Single document for both domestic and international stations. They are not part of on-board documentation and are only available on the Portal and in e-manual.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Company Minima: Minima shall be available in the on-board minima file. The manual is placed along with Route Guide.4 Navigation bag: On board Operational Documents are placed as below:  Nav Bag kept behind Right Seat will contain: FCOMs and Company Operations Manual. Missing documentation will be replaced at the earliest opportunity. B.2. Cabin Crew manual (SEP). Nav bag 2 has been removed and remaining documents such as Sealed Jeppesen manual. Security manual. which is kept in On Board Notice File. and Technical Notice. RTOW charts are also available on Company Portal. C (Including EDTO manual) and D. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In case a document is missing or requires replacement flight crew should inform local Flight Operations Personnel / Flight Dispatch by filling up the relevant “Missing Documentation form”.  On board Notice File: All Notices have been placed in following order: NOTAC. On board form file.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Top transparent flap. Securing the bags –These bags have two belt to secure them. A-0-53 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.  Alternate Minima: Alternate minima(dispatch planning minima) is printed in yellow sheets. The details of trip kits vary for 77T and 73. .This shall ensure that the manuals remain within the bag.Single document for both domestic and international stations. Jeppesen trip kits were placed in small blue bags. Big Navigation Bags: is secured with the belt which is attached with the floor. navigation bags have been re-designed with the option of securing facility. This shall be printed in light blue sheets. destination. This shall be printed in light pink sheets.Front: Only manuals covering domestic area of operations.Coat Stowage Area: manuals covering International area of operations. en-route and alternate aerodromes charts. First Officer Side: The bag is secured by tying the bag with floor belt provided for Navigation bag. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 LVTO/Non LVTO Minima. plus sealed Jeppesen for domestic area of operations. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . even in case of severe disturbances. Small Navigation Bags (Containing Trip Kit) - Captain Side: Bag shall be kept under Left observer seat. adjacent to either seat.  CMV Cards.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. It is secured by tying it with the seat belt of observer seat.  Jeppesen Kits in 73. These kits include introduction.5 T fleet: . These bags were open bags with no securing option. To meet the international norms and safety standards. Jeppesen Manuals: Two kits are kept in all aircraft.5 T fleet as under.  Jeppesen Kits in 77 T fleet: On 77 T fleet.Single document for both domestic and international stations.

both Captain and First Officer shall Take out the relevant approach plates. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Crew responsibility (i) Before commencement of flight.  - Refer Next Page - A-0-54 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. (ii) After the flight  Keep the chart back in respective folders inside the bag. including alternate.  Ensure both bags remain secure.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. .  Ensure both bags remain secure.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal No night kits or any personal bags are to be placed on Navigation Bag.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 0.5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Documents library at bases: As all Company Documents are available on Company Portal and in e-manual. These are primarily maintained to refurbish aircraft libraries. hard copies of selected documents have also been kept at aircraft night halt bases.2.FLT.2. 0.6 Documents at Simulator The documents required for training shall be placed and maintained at all simulators used by Company.7 Standard operating procedure Company strictly adheres to Airbus SOPs. All the bases have dedicated Flight operations computers for crew to access electronic libraries. Any deviation from Airbus SOPs will be reflected in Operations Notice 4 (series) A-0-55 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.2. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 0.

Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Carriage of Documents by Cockpit Crew Refer Para 11.1 Procedures and checklists: The Operations manual procedures and check lists. cognitive and decision-making resources. Series „O‟ part VII) The Vice President (Flight Operations) is responsible for issuance of amendments and revisions. colours. identifiable and consistent with manufacturer specifications. at the appropriate reading technical sophistication and clarity.  Designed with simplicity.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.  Enabling operators to perceive and understand elements of the current situation and project them to future operational situations. Few points to be kept in mind while preparing the checklist:  Information is in a useable format. using objective and subjective performance measures. formats and data fields. 0.  Assess the net impacts upon the physical. acronyms. when needed and in a form that is directly usable.4.3.2 level. abilities.1. i.3.3 . terms. Each holder of a paper version of the manual is responsible for insertion of amendments and revisions in their copies.e. consistency and ease of use. included in e-manual and will be available on the 6E World Portal A-0-56 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Any deviations from manufacturer procedures or checklists will be based on operational requirements as identified.  Consistent labels.  Availability and usability for specific tasks. Chapter 11. Operations Manual (Refer CAR Section 8. SYSTEM OF AMENDMENTS AND REVISIONS 0. Operations manual and its revisions will be issued to crew in electronic format only. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 0.8 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.0. symbols.  Minimizes special operator skills.2. abbreviations. when published are useable.6. tools or characteristics.

if these revisions are not governed by CAR/CAP 8100. If the revision to the contents of Operations manual is more than 50%. and Chapter Number. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 For the digital version. e) The Header of each page contains Company Logo. NOTAC.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. d) No handwritten amendments and revisions are permitted except in situations in which in the interest of safety immediate amendment / revision is required. Chapter Title. f) A list of effective pages will be issued for incorporation in the manual. Subsequently any revisions shall also be provided to FSD. then the change will be incorporated as a new Issue. c) Each manual will have a record of amendments and revisions with insertion dates and effective dates. The Footer of each page contains Issue Number. DGCA Headquarters in duplicate for review and acceptance /approval. as deemed appropriate for immediate dissemination to all. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) . C-NOTAM. The Vice President (Flight Operations) will designate an officer who will be responsible for incorporation of amendments / revisions in official copies of the manual that are maintained in the flight dispatch libraries and placed on board aircraft. a fresh media will be provided. b) The DGCA will be provided at least two copies of the Operations Manual. A-0-57 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Additional copies may be required by the DGCA for distribution among the authority Inspectors. g) Any amendments. The formal amendment revision will be incorporated on receipt. Name of Manual.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Additionally the company may issue. these revisions may be issued under the authority of Vice President (Flight Operations). Administrative Notice. Effective Date and Page Number indicating Part. Part Name. corrections to the contents of this Operations Manual will be issued as Revisions. Chapter and Page. and Operations/Technical Notices.

guidance and or compliance to the Crew which is of technical nature and is related to aircraft systems. technical explanations. i) Personnel becoming aware that amendments or revisions have been made. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 h) The contents of these notices will subsequently be incorporated in the Operations manual twice a year. k) The manual will be in A5/appropriate size so that it is conducive to easy handling and study in the cockpit. manufacturer‟s bulletins and NOTAMs if any. modification being progressively carried out on airline fleet etc.4 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . pending DGCA approval. c) Operation Notice . j) The manual (Paper version where applicable) will be provided in a ring binder outer cover for easy incorporation of amendments. but not in receipt of those amendments. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 0.Administrative issues with regard to duties and obligations of Flight Operations will be notified in Administrative notices.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. These shall also include airworthiness directives. which shall be filed and kept updated. a) NOTAC – Notice to Air Crew – Information in a NOTAC is of more permanent nature and may effect a revision of the Operations Manual. technical and administrative instructions and dissemination of changes in policy through the following Circulars. A-0-58 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. NOTACs are for compliance. to all concerned.Changes in Standard Operating procedures. should apply to the Head Flight Operation Support for the relevant amendment or revision as soon as possible.FLT. PROMULGATION OF ADDITIONAL OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONS AND INFORMATION The Vice President /Director (Flight Operations) will issue additional safety critical operational. Training Procedures etc. d) Administrative Notice. flight crew bulletins or directives. However. b) Technical Notice – Information. These are for Compliance. will be provided in the form of Technical Notice. DGCA policies will be incorporated on issue. shall be issued as an Operation Notice.

Technical Notices. Technical. will be distributed under Each paper Manual will be assigned a Control number and the digital version shall be issued on a DVD (e-manual) to each holder. All current & valid NOTACs.Information and guidance to Crew on various flight operation related aspects that are of a temporary nature not covered in the Operations Manual will be provided in Company NOTAMs. C-NOTAMS. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Notification of withdrawal and checklist of effective NOTACs.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. All current and valid NOTACs. all amendments and revisions. Operations Notices and CNOTAMs will kept on board each company aircraft and will also be available on the company portal. All crewmembers and other holders shall be responsible for the possession and use of the latest edition. They can be viewed through secured access by using user Id / password. Operations Notices and CNOTAMs will be issued in digital format every quarter. A-0-59 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. The electronic copy of Operations manual will have search functions. The DGCA will be provided with a copy of the Operations Manual. Administrative and Operations Circulars will be issued under CNOTAMs. 0. Subsequently all revisions shall be added to the next version of e-manual. Intimation regarding any revisions will be sent to all concerned via e-mail. printed from e-manual / Company Portal e) C-NOTAMs – Company Notice to Airmen . .5 DISTRIBUTION OF OPERATIONS MANUAL All Crewmembers will be issued digital version of the Operations Manual quarterly.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The Operations Manual and amendments acknowledgement from the manual holder. Technical Notices. Revisions to Operations manual will be issued to crew electronically and will be posted on Company portal. These can be either Informatory or mandatory in nature. receipt of which will be duly acknowledged by the recipient. A record of the holders name. position and department will be maintained for all paper manuals. The same is to be returned by the holder while leaving the company.

A-0-60 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Senior Manager Flight Operations Support shall be responsible for disposal / destruction of obsolete documents. maintained.5.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The owners of DVD (e-manual) will be responsible to destroy older version on receipt of the latest version. . and destroyed. Document process manual shall be available for reference on company portal and a hard copy in-turn shall be made available in all Flight Operations Support offices. Library.6 DOCUMENT PROCESS MANUAL Flight Operations has established a comprehensive documentation processes to ensure QUALITY and ACCURACY in „on board documents‟. Rev 04 ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL CHAPTER 00 Disposal/Destruction Obsolete documents 0. and copies distributed to management personnel/ non-management personnel including Crew. The manual provides all the policies and procedures under which documents are issued.1 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Hard copies shall be destroyed centrally at Flights Operations Support facility at main base (DEL) by shredding.0.

..........30 1..............................27 1.3....................3................14 Fleet Captain (Safety) ..1........35 A-1-1 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy......18 Fleet Captain (SMS and FDM) ..........15 1.............3.........5 Chief Pilot (Training) ....................3......20 1....................3 Director (Flight Operations) ....3................................3.............3..........................................................................3.........................................26 1....6 Chief Pilot (Standards & Quality Assurance) .....2 SCOPE ..3........................32 1........12 1........................................4 Chief Pilot (Line) ..................15 Fleet Captain (Region) ......................1 Continuity of Operations ...............8 Director (Pilot Management).............1 ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE .............3..................................34 1.................33 1..OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.............................. OPERATIONS SUPERVISION.....3............10 Fleet Captain (Line Training) ........................................11 Fleet Captain (Simulator Training)..........3 RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL ...........................3....................15 1..........29 1...3........................................................................7 Director (Flight Operations Support) ........3...................12 Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations).....16 Fleet Captain (Standards & QA) ....... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.....16 1.......9 Fleet Captain (Corporate) ..............9 1.........18 1........17 Fleet Captain (Technical) ...................................................11 Flight Operations Management Structure .....................................................................................13 Deputy Chief Instructor (Performance & Documentation Standardization) .........................3..24 1....................... Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1......31 1...........22 1.....2 Vice President (Flight Operations) .............3...........................................................................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.....3........................14 1...........32 1....1 ..........27 1..............................14 1.3.........................................................................................

...3...........................40 Meteorologist ........33 Senior Manager Flight Dispatch ..............................3.......................... 57 1......3............. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Fleet Supervisor (Line)....34 Manager Dispatch ..38 Assistant Manager – Operations Control Center & Flight Dispatch ........35 Duty Officer Flight Dispatch ...... 37 1.............. 40 1......................42 Executives (Training) ........ 48 1..............39 Executive-OCC / Controllers ..28 Senior Manager (Pilot Resourcing) .. 42 1.........23 Manager (FDM & SMS) .....................3.........................................3.......................... 42 1......3........3.......... 54 1.................... 41 1........................ 36 1........................................................ 58 1...............Training .....3.......................26 Senior Manager (Flight Operations Support) .......Operations Control Centre (OCC) ...............3................... 45 1..........3.. 50 1.....43 Communication Pyramid .......22 Manager (Safety & Technical) ...........31 Director Crew Scheduling .............. 58 A-1-2 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy....................................3......OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II...............................................19 ....... 38 1.............................3........................32 Associate Director.............................. 44 1................20 Fleet Supervisor (Training) ............3. 53 1.... 37 1....................................21 Fleet Supervisor (Standards and QA) ......................................................................................41 Executives (Flight Operations Support) .................3.....36 Duties and Responsibilities of Controlling Flight Dispatchers ....................... 43 1......3.......3....................29 Associate Director / Manager (Pilot Administration) .. 39 1..........3..... 49 1....................25 Director ......... 56 1.............................Flight Dispatch ......3........................3..............24 Training Captains . 46 1.... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.................3......... 38 1..........3..................................3....37 Assistant Manager OCC ..........................................................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT................... 57 1...3.3.... 47 1...............30 Vice President ....3....27 Senior Manager (Performance Management).......

..1 Flight Execution.....5....69 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF CREW MEMBERS OTHER THAN THE COMMANDER .....4 1.......................67 1........................................5......69 1...............................6.....................44 1.................73 A-1-3 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.....................7 On-Time Performance...............................................4...OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II....................6......1.....................................................5...................6 FLT......5......1 Position in the Organisation....................1........1 General ........66 1.................................2 Flight Preparation ...............73 1...71 1.................................5.....6 VIP Passengers ....6.....................5 Customer Relations..................2 Lead Cabin Attendant ...........64 1............1 Co-Pilot.63 1.............70 1..............63 1........5.........5.....................62 1.................4......4.....4 Commander‟s Emergency Authority...6.1.............................................70 1....3 Flight Crew Members Responsibility In Case Of Special Crew Pairing ..2 Flight Preparation ............................3 Period of Command ............................61 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITY OF COMMANDER ...... Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Coordination with Other Departments ..................68 1.......60 1.......6.....4 Responsibility and Authority ..........3...4.....3 Flight Execution............................1.........70 1...........59 CREW MEMBER RESPONSIBILITY .............................................................................................5.......................3 Flight Execution.........60 1.4..........4......2................1 Crew Member shall not perform duties On an Airplane: ....................................62 1..6.........................................60 1.......4...72 1...............................4......Handling .....................................2 Status and Conduct .4..... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.........1 General ..................4....................................................................................5.................62 1.5..2 Crew Advocacy ......................68 1......5.......5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .............................................................

...................................6........8.............................6.................... 81 1.......... 84 A-1-4 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy............8..........8..6 Mandatory Reporting ........8............8................................ Mission and Goals ........3 OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II...................... 81 1... printed from e-manual / Company Portal On Board Sale Of Merchandize ............ 77 Duties and Responsibilities: .1 1....... 80 1.............8.......... 81 1...8...................................8....... 83 1........................................ 77 1................. 80 1................... 81 1. 84 1...............8...8..................................................6....2 Cockpit crew inside the lavatory ..........3 Management Responsibilities ............. 81 1.............. 81 1.................... 78 DESIGNATED PILOT OPERATIONS CONTROLLER ..............8........1 General Policy ..8.........................3 Safety Management & Accident Prevention Activities 83 1............ 75 Management of Crew Fatigue during flight .........8............................4 Air Operator's Permit (AOP).....................1....4 Anonymous/Voluntary Reporting ..................7 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .............8............6................6 Competence of operations personnel .2 Means of Flight Operation Supervision .............8..8............................7 Control analysis and storage of records.....8 FLT.9 Policy Conflict Resolution ..... 80 1...8....7 Defining Clear & Practical Operational Policies and Procedures ........ 84 1............................ 78 1.8.....1 1....3...............5 Hazard Reporting .....2 Operations Policy....8...8....................... 82 1.. 83 1........8............................. flight documents.5 Licence and qualification validity ....8 Operational Supervision.....1 General .................7..............3...........................................8..8 Flight Data Monitoring ....8...... 81 1..4 1...............8... Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Cabin Attendant .........OMA 1.. 79 SUPERVISION OF THE OPERATION BY THE OPERATOR ...8..............8.......... 83 1...........................

...8....86 1.........8.......13 Legality Tracking Of Licenses and Records .......7 Reporting For Duty .......8................8........87 1.........17 Operations Coordination and Operations Control..........93 1.8...................8....................10 ............91 1.....9...........................................8...9.....................................................92 1..8......8................................15 Operations of Airworthy Aircraft In Accordance With The Approved Limitations ......8....... Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Regular Surveillance of Flights & Operational Activities .....92 1............84 1............94 1...................................8.....9.....OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II..8 Shift Changeover Briefing ................9..8......19 Fuel Monitoring ..........85 1.......85 1............12 Standards and Training Committee Meeting ....93 1.......................................Fltops and Pilot Admin.....8.9......................94 A-1-5 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.......8............94 1........... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.........8.........8..8..........90 1......11 Standardisation of Operations Policies and Training Programs ..8......................8.................9.........89 1.8.......................18 Establishing Processes To Receive Crew Feedback From Line Operations ....8..8..9 Central Flight Dispatch ................1 Safety ............8.........INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT...... .8.14 FDTL Monitoring .................8..................20 Putting In Place A Flight Dispatch and Ops Supervision System to Manage All Daily Operational Activities ...............8.....86 1.....................3 Notice of Violations ...........................................93 1..................8..............5 Personal Conduct...6 Personal Devices .......8...................90 1....2 Standardisation ......8.....16 Flight Crew Scheduling .21 Outsourcing and product quality control ..................8.........4 Training ................................8...............................86 1............85 1.8.9.............90 1.....9.......8..

.........9..8.......9..............9............ 112 1.....15 Operational Policies & Processes.........8......8... 102 1....24 Crew Briefing/Debriefing Procedure ...........8..................................8............9 .....8........ 102 1.......8.... 100 1...............INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.............................22 Handling Payload Restrictions .......................8.. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.....9....9................ 109 1.......................................General .............................8............9... 106 1...9...17 Route Guide .........9.. 111 1...............................8..............8...9. 113 1....8..9....29 Manual Flight Planning ............ 98 1.8.9..... 112 1................ 107 1.10 Workload Management ...9..............19 Operational Flight Plan (Manual and Computerized)103 1......13 Flight Dispatch Library ....... 109 1..........8..............................20 MEL / CDL Handling Procedure ....8........ 112 1........8...32 Test Flights.9............... 96 1...........................................................9.... 102 1..8....11 Flight Dispatch Log Book .. 113 A-1-6 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.9................16 Flight Planning ..9...........27 Requirement for issuance of amended Flight Release ..............31 Repetitive Flight Plan (RPL) ............... 98 1........30 ATS Flight Plan......23 Fuel Tankering..................8.................8. Maintenance Ferry & Training Flights ..OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.. 113 1...............9......9................18 Alternate Airports ........... Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Shift Process ..28 Requirement for issuance of New Flight Release ..................9............8......8..............14 Procedures for Dispatch Quality Assurance ........8......................9...................9... 108 1.......12 Record Retention............. 95 1..25 Flight Release.9....21 Aircraft Performance Weight Limitations ..............9........ 98 1...................26 Issuance of amended Flight Release ..... 111 1.....8....9.......... 100 1.....8..

.................9....11 Operations Control Centre (OCC) ..115 1.............8.......33 Automated Systems Failure .114 1....OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.9...................... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1...............................9...............9 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .........FLT..............9...9...............117 1.....114 1......117 1.39 Communications ...............8.....115 1...............................8....9.... Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 1..40 Delay Handling Procedures .8................118 1............34 Scheduled System Outage ..37 Disagreement Resolution Policy .8..............38 Flight Watch .......9...9...................8..............................8.......35 Unscheduled System Outage ........10 Operations Supervision and Crew Records...116 1....................118 ADMINISTRATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE ......41 Diversion Handling Procedures ........9.119 A-1-7 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy..............................................8.....8........................114 1...114 1.....8............8..36 Role of Dispatcher And Pilot-In Command...

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 A-1-8 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK .

duties. The charts show the relationship between corporate management and management in the operational areas. . In addition to internal standards and regulations of the State. DLF City. New Delhi 110001. Janpath.1. structure and functionality of the management system and depicts lines of accountability throughout the organization.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Thapar House. duties and responsibilities are given such that they define and clearly delineate the management system. The organisation charts also indicate the continuity within the management system that ensures the entire organization works as a system and not as a group of independent or fragmented units.in A-1-9 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Name of Company InterGlobe Aviation Limited Address Of Reg Office Ground Floor. Global Business Park. to comply with authorities that have jurisdiction on operations conducted over the high seas or within a foreign country. responsibilities and the interrelation of functions and activities within the system for ensuring safe and secure operations. 124. Third Floor. Central Wing. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 OPERATIONS SUPERVISION The organograms. Corporate Office Tower C. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The chapter provides a comprehensive description of the scope. India Tel No : +91-(0)124 4352500 Fax No : +91-(0)124 4068536 E-Mail : fltops@goindigo. Gurgaon-122 Haryana. The management system shall ensure compliance with all applicable standards and regulatory requirements. as well as authorities.

He shall be accountable to President for Compliance with the requirements contained in the Operations Manual. . -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-1-10 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. He is accountable to President for Compliance with the laid down requirements. Chief of Flight Safety The Chief of Flight Safety is the approved person accountable to President for all matters concerning Flight Safety.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The President is the Accountable Manager of the Airline / Company to the aviation authorities. . Chief of Engineering The Vice President (Engineering) is the approved person responsible for all engineering aspects of airplane operations. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 APPROVED PERSONNEL Accountable Manager Chief of Operations The Vice President (Flight Operations) is the approved person responsible for Flight Operations and Flight Operations Training.

1 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD Effective 09-Jul-14 .FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE A-1-11 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-1-12 Effective 09-Jul-14 . Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Flight Operations Management Structure Not a controlled copy.1 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1.1.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-1-13 Effective 09-Jul-14 . Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

Pilot Management Flight operations – Support The Vice President Flight Operations shall ensure that the management and nonmanagement positions within the flight operations organization that require the performance of functions relevant to the safety and security of aircraft operations are filled by personnel on the basis of knowledge. within the department. However. legal and efficient operation of IndiGo aircraft.3 RESPONSIBILITIES AND MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL DUTIES OF OPERATIONS The designated managers in the flight operations organization are responsible. its primary responsibility is to ensure safe. to ensure safe air and ground operations.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1. play a key role in the recruitment of new flight deck crew.Standards and Quality Assurance Flight operations . Investigating. monitoring and disseminating information on all accidents. performance and other necessary operational data to flight crew. . Specially trained operational staffs. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The flight operations department manages various facets of the operational side within the Company. and thus are accountable. efficient and customer-friendly manner. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 SCOPE The flight operations department comprises of the following sections:      Flight operations – Line Flight operations – Training Flight operations . skills. This includes training of flight deck crew to ensure that they meet all licensing and regulatory requirements and can execute high-quality operation in a safe. The support staff is involved in effective surveying of all new routes and making available all navigation.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. training and experience appropriate for the position in consultation with HR department. incidents and other occurrences involving indigo aircraft also come within the scope of this function. 1. for ensuring: i) The management and supervision of all flight operations activities. A-1-14 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

3. at least one of the under mentioned managers shall be available at all times.1 .3.management personnel that perform functions relevant to the safety or security of aircraft operations in areas of the flight operations are enumerated in the succeeding paragraphs.2 Vice President (Flight Operations) The Vice President (Flight Operations) will be responsible for all Flight Operation functions of the Company. which shall include directing the company‟s Flight Operations in a safe and efficient manner. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. Continuity of Operations The authority and responsibilities of management and non . and in compliance with applicable regulations and standards.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 ii) The management of safety and security in flight operations. Procedures and Safety Standards Flight Crew Standards Flight Operations Engineering Evaluating Schedule Performance Flight Operations cost control A-1-15 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The Vice President (Flight Operations) has the functional & administrative authority and responsibility for the following: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) All Flight Operations Personnel and their training Structuring and Staffing the Flight Operations Department Determining the feasibility of Flight Operations Operations of the Company‟s fleet Flight Operational Policies. iii) Flight operations are conducted in accordance with conditions and restrictions of the Air Operator Certificate (AOC).    Vice president (Flight operations) Director (Flight operations) Chief pilot (Line operations) 1. To ensure continuity of operations. They are over all responsible for making decisions that affect the safety and/or security of operations and also ensure operations are conducted in accordance with applicable regulations and standards of the Company.

Director (Flight Operations) will assume all functions of Vice President (Flight Operations). Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in setting budget priorities and exercising budgetary cost controls. 1. Monitor all government regulations related to flight operations and ensure compliance at all times. Provide input.3 Director (Flight Operations) Director (Flight Operations) shall report directly to the Vice President (Flight Operations). Chief Pilot (Training). printed from e-manual / Company Portal In the absence of the post holder. Director (Pilot Management) and Director (Flight Operations Support) will report to him. and procedures are adhered to so as to result in a high level of safety and efficiency in all flight operations functions. All Flight Operations verticals.3. . Ensure that all company instructions. including Chief Pilot (Line). and in the selection and hiring parameters for Indian and Expat pilots so as to meet the objectives of A-1-16 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Develop a performance matrix to ensure that operational objectives are measured and achieved. Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 The Vice President (Flight Operations) is accountable to the President (Accountable Manager) for compliance with all regulatory requirements and renewal of Air Operator‟s Permit.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in setting Flight Operations policy. Ensure harmonious pilot/management relations with open and effective channels of communication. guidance and leadership towards the structure and staffing of the Flight Operations department to ensure the operational needs and business objectives are achieved. Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in the review of Indian and Foreign Pilot Employment Agreements. Responsible for the morale. He is: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k) Responsible for all day-to-day Flight Operations functions. He reports to the President. policies.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. welfare and discipline of all pilots through the Chief Pilot (Line). Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in the establishment of quarterly and annual performance goals for the department and direct reporting staff.

s) In conjunction with the Chief Pilots. ensure that all training is carried out in a timely. HR. ensure that required proficiency and safe practices are maintained at all times in all aspects of flight operations. safe and efficient manner based on company‟s needs.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 the company. p) In coordination with the Director (Flight Operations Support). and inclusion of best practices and SOPs so as to improve safety. and recommend to the Vice President (Flight Operations). and in adherence with company policies and procedures. Also to continually seek out improvements and new technologies for the betterment of flight operations safety practices and efficient operations. m) In conjunction with Chief Pilot (Training). Appeal and Review Boards. select pilots for Command Upgrade. efficiency and standards in all flight operations functions. u) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel under him in Flight Operations. r) Coordinate as appropriate with all other departments. n) In conjunction with the Chief Pilot (Standards and QA). printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-1-17 . Inflight and Engineering. base assignments. LOSA flights or Training Captains feedback. t) Be a member of the Upgrade. v) Carry out any other duties as assigned by Vice President (Flight Operations). as also all administrative matters concerning pilots such as leave and rotation planning. w) Assume all functions of Vice President (Flight Operations) during his absence. In conjunction with the Director (Pilot Management). pilots to be considered as Check Pilots. etc.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. so as to build synergies and improve efficiency. l) Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. particularly with Crew Scheduling. o) To seek continuous improvements in training practices and standards based on industry best practice and evidence of gaps in training or standards as brought out by FDM/CVR analysis. suggest changes to Operations Manuals. ensure that all support functions are accomplished at a high order of efficiency and in a timely manner. Instructors and Examiners. q) In conjunction with each vertical head. ensure well planned and timely induction and processing of pilots joining.

guidance and leadership towards the structure and staffing of the Flight Operations department to ensure the operational needs and business objectives are achieved.4 Chief Pilot (Line) a) Assist and support the Director Flight Operations in the management of Line Operations in a safe. k) Provide input. guidelines and procedures to provide a high level of safety. d) Ensure that all company instructions. c) Recommend updates and changes to policy. Select pilots for Command Upgrade. j) Be a member of the Upgrade. b) Follow Established policies. h) Be responsible for continuous review of pilot‟s performance and up gradation of those found suitable. and procedures with regard to Line operations. i) Ensure harmonious management/ pilot relations and provide necessary feedback and communications between management and pilots. welfare and disciplinary matters with regard to all pilots. pilots to be considered as Check Pilots. A-1-18 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Chief Pilot (Line) will assume all functions of Director (Flight Operations). policy. g) Be responsible for all morale. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Chief Pilot (Line) will function under the authority of Director (Flight Operations) and will provide full-time efforts and services in all aspects related to the continued safe operation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. are adhered to.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. f) Coordinate Flight Dispatch issues with GM (Flight Operations Support). 1. but not limited to the following: . e) Coordinate Pilot scheduling issues with Director (Pilot Management). planning of the Flight Operations Department in meeting these objectives including. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 In the absence of the post holder. efficiency and standardization in Line Operations. procedures in the Operations Manual. Appeal and Review Boards. and recommend to the Director (Flight Operations). Instructors and Examiners in conjunction with Chief Pilot (Training) and Chief Pilot (Standards and QA). efficient and economic manner.3. policies.

x) Assume all functions of Director (Flight Operations) during his absence. GM (Flight Operations Support). r) Liaise with Vice President (In Flight) to ensure flight crew and cabin crew procedures are compatible and in agreement with Flight Operations procedures / policies in the FCOM and Company Operations Manual. Fleet Captain (Corporate) will assume all functions of Chief Pilot (Line). s) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in the review of Indian and Foreign Pilot Employment Agreements. A-1-19 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. w) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Director (Flight Operations). Make recommendations to ensure the Pilot Head count is adequate to meet the business objectives of the company. Chief Pilot (Training).l) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. n) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in the establishment of quarterly and annual performance goals for the department and direct reporting staff.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. . o) Establish Flight Operations Safety Management guidelines. v) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to him. Chief Pilot (Standards and QA). p) Assist in conducting pre-hire screening of flight crew applicants and their selection in coordination with Director (Pilot Management) as per guidelines laid down by the Vice President (Flight Operations). t) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) with the Selection of Fleet Captains and Fleet Supervisors and monitor their performance. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Assist Director (Flight Operations) in the formulation of Flight Operations budget. Vice President (Maintenance and Engineering) and Vice President (OCC). will conduct Pilot counselling. printed from e-manual / Company Portal m) Work in close coordination with Director (Pilot Management). In the absence of the post holder. u) In absence of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). q) Develop performance matrix to ensure that operational objectives are measured and achieved.

for transition training. recurrent training.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. e) Execute training plans and programs for pilot training in coordination with Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). pilot training execution as per the Company and DGCA policies so as to meet the Company‟s business objectives including. c) Be responsible for Trainers Matrix. Training Standards. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Chief Pilot (Training) will report to the Director (Flight Operations) and will be responsible to him to provide full-time efforts and services in all aspects related to the planning of pilot training. Crew Resource Management. and amendments / revisions to the Company Operations Manual Part D. f) Flight Crew Training facilitation and support.3. Recurrent Training. special qualification and any other training as mandated by the Company. d) Be responsible for the supervision and completion of all simulator. which will be based on actual training requirements of the entire fleet and to be reviewed twice in a year. aircraft and line training after induction until the pilot is ready for line release. experience & instructions from the regulatory authority. b) Execute flight operations training curricula for all types of aircraft operated by the company taking into consideration latest operating techniques. Such training will include Endorsement Training. g) Interact and coordinate with Training providers to whom the Company has out sourced its training requirements and ensure implementation of the training agreements and clearance of training Invoices. h) Suggest changes in Training Policies / methodologies. Check Pilots and Command Training as per laid down Company Policy. but not limited to the following: . Flight Instructors Training.1. Safety and Dangerous Goods Training. i) Ensure that all training is conducted as per the policies and instructions of the Company j) Plan 12/9/6/3/1 monthly Simulator Training with CAE as per the Training Agreement and implementation thereof.5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Chief Pilot (Training) a) Chief Pilot Training is responsible for training pilots to proficiency. A-1-20 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. LVO training.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal k) . s) Develop performance matrix to ensure that training objectives are achieved. Appeal and Review Boards. u) Be a member of the Upgrade. license renewal. n) Planning and Control of crew training records. This includes supernumerary. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Coordinate/plan Line training in consultation with the Director (Scheduling) and monitoring its implementation to ensure early line ready dates for pilots under training. supervised line flying (SLF).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. v) In absence of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. AICs. p) Monitor all government regulations related to crew training and directives and ensure compliance at all times. Circulars and orders. w) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to him. o) Coordinate with Airbus TRI/TRE and TRE/TRI deputed under the Constituted Crew Schemes on training progress of constituted crew cadets and IndiGo pilot‟s and to review their recommendation for implementation in coordination with the other chief pilots. l) Be responsible for Planning of Post Induction training and all facilitation for trainee pilots. r) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in the establishment of quarterly and annual performance goals for the department and direct reporting staff. all route checks. m) Will be responsible for recurrent training. rating or license medical requirements. will conduct Pilot counselling. Initial Operating Experience (IOE). yearly ground refreshers of Indian and Foreign pilot and their FATA renewals. A-1-21 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. He is responsible to ensure that no pilot exceeds the validity of a license. q) Ensure that the Operations Manual Part D is kept updated at all times based on Company / DGCA requirements. t) Ensure that no instruction contradicts the Company Operations Manual and DGCA instructions contained in CARs. reports. instrument rating checks and special checks as required by Director (Flight Operations) / Chief Pilot (Line). certification of log books and crew license control.

Chief Pilot (Standards & QA).6 Chief Pilot (Standards & Quality Assurance) The Chief Pilot (Standards and QA) functions under the authority of the Director (Flight Operations). He will be responsible for: a) Checking Pilot proficiency and ensuring that the required proficiency and safe practices are maintained at all times in Flight Operations Training and Line Operations Standards. and or nominate personnel to carry out all avaluations and checks on similator and aircraft for line release . He is responsible for Flight Crew Standards and Quality Assurance of Flight Crew Training. Fleet Supervisors (Standards and QA) and Examiners. b) Formulating and enforcing.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. His main function is to audit the Flight Operations Training and Line Operations Standards so as to ensure that the required proficiency and safe practices are maintained at all times. GM (Flight Operations Support) and Director (Pilot Management). evaluation. c) Flight Data Monitoring (FDM) and Standardisation of Flight Crew and procedures.3. He will be assisted by Fleet Captain (Standards & QA). d) Monitor. printed from e-manual / Company Portal x) . command assesment. Director (Corporate Learning). and any special assesment /evaluation required by the company. He will be accountable to the Vice President (Flight Operations) for Compliance on all Training Standards. A-1-22 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. y) Carry out any additional duties assigned to him by the Director (Flight Operations). within the requirements of Company and DGCA Policy the standards of flight proficiency necessary for safe and efficient operation of all types of aircraft in use. 1. e) Company Surveillance and Observation flights for Flight Operations Quality Assurance. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Coordinate his activities with Chief Pilot (Line). Fleet Captain (SMS & FDM). Fleet Captain (Line Training/Simulator Training) will assume all functions of Chief Pilot (Training).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. In the absence of the post holder.

o) Ensuring acceptance and overview of any residual risk or hazard. Executive Vice President ( AOCS & OCC) and Vice President (Maintenance & Engineering) in so far as his functions have a bearing on their activities. Circulars and AICs issued by DGCA. and Company Operations Manual Control. Vice President (In-flight Services). Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Pilot counselling. printed from e-manual / Company Portal f) . p) Ensuring that safety issues are identified and reported in a timely manner. n) Ensuring the application of the Company Safety policy and procedures in accordance with the Safety Management System. l) Coordinate with the concerned departments for the preparation for and compliance with recommendations and actions required for Surveillance flights. h) Be a member of the Training Review Boards. q) Ensuring that all executives and staff reporting to him / her are trained. Chief Pilot (Training).) g) Bringing to the attention of the Director (Flight Operations) any dilution of Flight Standards and any unsafe practices and trends. They can be assisted by Fleet Captain (FDM & SMS) for flight analysis and review. Director (Pilot Management. i) Making recommendations for changes in Flight Operations Standard Operating Procedures. qualified and competent to discharge their safety related obligations. and their associated control in accordance with the procedures contained in the Company Operations Manual. j) Maintaining close coordination with the Chief Pilot (Line). Monitor government regulations and directives and ensure their Regulatory Compliance with the Chief Pilots with regard to CARs. Captain Upgrade Board and the Appeal Boards. GM (Flight Operations Support). Chief Pilot(Training). A-1-23 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. (In absence of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). Chief Pilot (Line) or a nominated TRE will conduct Pilot counselling.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. k) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in Regulatory Compliance. m) The performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to him.

calibration and record keeping b) All coordination with the regulatory and airport authorities on Operations Support Requirements. s) Any other duty assigned by the Director (Flight Operations).alerts and advisory control i) Fuel Tankering analysis A-1-24 Email ID and resolving Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. o Flight operations Voice and Data communications o Pre-flight Medical setup. procedures. He will be responsible to: a) Provide Technical Support.7 Director (Flight Operations Support) The Director (Flight Operations Support) will be accountable to the Director (Flight Operations). policies. which will consist of: o Flight Dispatch support o Flight Operations requirements of Maps Charts. e) Managing the Company fltops@goindigo. and the Chief Pilots.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. He will be responsible to provide the required operations support to the Vice President (OCC). . d) Responsible for Flight Operations Systems. processes and systems. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 r) Ensuring that fitness for service including any necessary safety assessment has been declared and accepted by the responsible authority in relation the development of all plans.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. electronic management of documents and Special Projects.3. 1. Nav Data bases. equipment procurement. Fleet Captain (Standards & QA) will assume all functions of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA).in operational & technical issues in the Company f) Aircraft & Regulatory document control g) Mandatory document distribution h) NOTAM surveillance. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In the absence of the post holder. c) Technical feasibility of new stations.

Operational Data Management. Automation & implementation of: Electronic Flight Bag. Manager (Flight Operations Support) will assume all functions of Director (Flight Operations Support). Sr. m) Central point of contact for amendments to all Company Operations Manuals after co-ordination with relevant Chief Pilots. Modifications (MOD‟s). non-scheduled flight planning and support.  Carrying out Operations IT. Vice President (OCC). q) Monitor industry for technological applications that could enhance operational efficiency and bring these to the knowledge of Director (Flight Operations).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Operational software/ hardware and communication setup. charter. s) Any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations). Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Operations MIS & Cost Analysis k) Ferry. OEBs and issues. In the absence of the post holder. final approval by Vice President/Director (Flight Operations) and their publication thereafter. o) Work in close coordination with the Chief Pilots.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-1-25 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. n) Perform function related to Operations & Performance Engineering consisting of :      Aerodrome and Runway Surveillance Performance and Route analysis Fuel monitoring Feasibility of special operations Development of Engine out Standard Instrument Departures. Director (Pilot Management). p) Coordinating with Engineering department and Airbus on Airworthiness Directives (AD‟s). printed from e-manual / Company Portal j) . l) Supporting Vice President /Director (Flight Operations)/ Chief Pilots on issue of all Notices. r) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to him.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. VISAs and their renewals. Pilot requirement projection. j) Be responsible for Flight Operations Cost Control and make recommendations for cost reduction. A-1-26 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. h) Pilots leave planning & authorisation. k) Work in close coordination with the Chief Pilots and GM (Flight Operations Support) on matters relating to Crew management. d) Flight Crew Management and Administration.8 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. sourcing and recruitment of National and Foreign pilots and their pre training induction. b) Interact with all foreign pilot providers and monitor their agreements and clearance of their invoices.1.3. c) Foreign Pilot Security Clearances and initial foreign license validation. e) Coordinating with Airbus Customer Services for AIB TRE assignment with IndiGo and the clearance of all related invoices f) Coordinating all constituted crew schemes and implementation of their agreements and invoice clearance. g) Implementation and monitoring of the CAE and SABENA Trainee/ Cadet Pilot Schemes and any such other schemes in the future. i) Review and coordinate flight crew schedules with Crew Scheduling to ensure adequate crew staffing and fair and efficient distribution of flying. Will be responsible for flight crew management and administrative control including: Flight Crew Planning. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Director (Pilot Management) He will be accountable to the Director (Flight Operations) and be the single point contact for all flight crew Administrative issues. m) Carry out any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations). l) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel assigned.

welfare and disciplinary matters with regard to all pilots.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. g) Ensure harmonious management/ pilot relation and provide necessary feedback and communications between management and pilots.10 Fleet Captain (Line Training) The Fleet Captain (Line Training) is accountable to the Chief Pilot (Training). . Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 In the absence of the post holder. l) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned m) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Chief Pilot (Line). b) Recommend updates and changes to policy and procedures in the Company Operations Manual. A-1-27 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. d) Coordinate Flight Dispatch issues with Director (Operations support) e) Assist Chief Pilot (Line) on all morale. 1.3. 1. h) Process and act on Commander‟s Trip reports. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Fleet Captain (Corporate) is accountable to the Chief Pilot (Line). efficient and economic manner.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. c) Coordinate Pilot scheduling issues with GM (Crew Scheduling). i) Carry out day-to-day administration of the fleet. Appeal and Review Boards when deputed. guidance and leadership towards the structure and staffing of the flight operations department to ensure the operational needs and business objectives of IndiGo are achieved.9 Fleet Captain (Corporate) He will assist Chief Pilot (Line) in the following: a) Assist and support the Chief Pilot (Line) in the management of IndiGo Line Operations in a safe. Manager (Pilot Management) will assume all functions of Director (Pilot Management). f) Provide input.3. j) Work in close coordination with other Fleet Captains k) Represent Chief Pilot (Line) as member of the Upgrade.

Crew Resource Management. j) Monitor all government regulations and directives to ensure compliance at all times. recurrent training.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. three and monthly line training and implementation thereof. d) Flight Crew Training facilitation and support. i) Coordinate with Airbus TRI/TRE and TRE/TRI deputed under the Constituted Crew Schemes on training progress of constituted crew cadets and IndiGo pilot‟s and to review their recommendation for implementation in coordination with the other Chief Pilots. nine. Flight Instructors Training. g) Carry out day to day administration of training programs as assigned by Chief Pilot (Training). Responsible for all Check Pilot scheduling and effective utilization. experience and instructions by the Regulatory Authority. h) Supporting Chief Pilot (Training) to ensure that the Operations ManualPart D is kept updated as and when required by company/DGCA.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Special qualification and any other training that is mandated by the Company. c) Joint responsibility with Fleet Captain (Simulator Training) for coordinating and ensuring Instructor and Examiner scheduling and effective utilization. LVO training. f) Planning yearly. Safety and Dangerous Goods Training. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) . A-1-28 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 He will assist the Chief Pilot in the following: Execution of flight operations training curricula for all types of aircraft operated by the company taking into consideration latest operating techniques. of transition training. b) Execution of line training plans and programs for pilot training in coordination with Chief Pilot (Training). six. e) Suggesting changes in Training Policies / methodologies and Training Standards. Such training will include Recurrent Training. Check Pilots and Command Training as per laid down Company Policy.

f) Plan 12/9/6/3/1 monthly or any other Simulator Training with CAE/other providers as per the Training Agreement and implementation thereof. He / She will assist the Chief Pilot in the following: a) Execution of Simulator training curricula for all aircraft operated by the company taking into consideration latest operating techniques. c) Joint responsibility with Fleet Captain (Line Training) for coordinating and ensuring Instructor and Examiner scheduling and effective utilization. appropriate for the training/evaluation and are updated periodically. printed from e-manual / Company Portal l) . weather and environmental conditions are standardized.k) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Ensure that no instruction is issued regarding training that contravenes the Operations Manual/IGO notices and DGCA instructions contained in CARs. Flight Instructors Training. recurrent training. of transition training. experience and instructions by the Regulatory Authority. Circulars and orders. g) Carry out day to day administration of training programs as assigned by Chief Pilot (Training). Recurrent Training. Special qualification and any other training that is mandated by the Company. Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned m) Any other duties as assigned by Chief Pilot (Training). AICs. e) Suggesting changes in training policies / methodologies and training standards. Check Pilots and Command Training as per laid down Company Policy. A-1-29 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Such training may include Endorsement Training. d) Flight Crew Training facilitation and support. He is also to ensure that a requirement of simulated aircraft. 1. b) Execution of training plans and programs for pilot training in coordination with Chief Pilot (Training).11 Fleet Captain (Simulator Training) The Fleet Captain (Simulator Training) is accountable to the Chief Pilot (Training). LVO training.

Appeal and Review Board.12 Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations) The Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations) is accountable to the Chief Pilot (Training). Monitor all government regulations and directives to ensure compliance at all times. 1. Be responsible for ATPL training of pilots on as required basis.h) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. AICs. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Supporting Chief Pilot (Training) to ensure that the Operations ManualPart D is kept updated as and when required by company/DGCA. Coordinate and plan the training schedule of the pilots / FDs and impart training in keeping with regulatory / company requirements.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Liaise with other departments to ensure that training is conducted A-1-30 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. k) Represent Chief Pilot (Training) if required as member of the Upgrade. experience and instructions by the Regulatory Authority. Circulars and orders. Organize and ensure that corrective training to line pilots is conducted on as required basis.3. Monitor and ensure that induction training in accordance with AIC 02/2007 is conducted for national pilots vide approved syllabus. l) Carry out flight and flight related duties when assigned m) Carry out any other duty as assigned by the Chief Pilot (Training). He/ She will assist the Chief Pilot (Training) in the following: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) Execution of training curricula for aircraft operated by the company taking into consideration latest operating techniques. Coordinate and integrate new entrants (pilots) so that required training is imparted and they attain the desired standards. printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) . j) Ensure that no instruction is issued regarding training that contravenes the Company Operations Manual / notices and DGCA instructions contained in CARs. Ensure that detailed briefing / training to expatriate pilots is conducted vide approved syllabus on regulatory / company policies and procedures and prepare them for re-validation. Coordinate with GM/ DGM (Training) that Pilots / FDs due for training are detailed and ground school accomplishes the task.

m) Suggesting changes in training policies / methodologies and training standards. Ensuring smooth transition towards electronic documentation and liaison with Flight Operations Support team. . Any other duty assigned by Chief Pilot (Standards and QA) A-1-31 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Cross checking of any-references to the same item /procedure in one manual or circular with all other similar references in all IndiGo documents across departments without any ambiguity or duplication. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 and completed in time. k) Ensure that additional training task as and when assigned is completed. Ensuring all Company documentation complies with DGCA regulations and timely amendments as necessary. j) 1. o) Ensure that operational and training objectives are quantified.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Ensuring compliance with IOSA requirements.13 Deputy Chief Instructor Standardization) (Performance & Documentation Following duties shall be carried out In addition to the duties of Performance Instructor:       Streamlining all Flight Operations documentation with the aim of making referencing simpler and less prone to error. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In the absence of the post holder. n) Carry out day to day monitoring of training programs and other tasks as assigned by Chief Pilot (Training). Monitor and ensure that Instructors conduct training as per approved syllabus.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.3. Deputy Chief Ground Instructor will assume all functions of Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations). l) Responsible for coordinating and ensuring Instructor scheduling and effective utilization. Also ensure that new instructors are qualified in time and in accordance with the regulatory criteria. measured and achieved.

h) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned i) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Vice President (Flight Operations).3. c) Coordinate Pilot scheduling issues with Director (Pilot Management) A-1-32 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. d) Be a member of all audit teams and monitor compliance of the recommendations made during internal Safety Audits as detailed by Vice President (Flight Operations). For administrative purposes he reports to Vice President (Flight Operations). Fleet Captain (Safety) is responsible to Chief of Flight Safety.3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. efficient and economic manner. He will be responsible to: a) Assist and support the Chief Pilot (Line) in the management of Line Operations in a safe. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Fleet Captain (Safety) For matters pertaining to flight safety. on the requirement of Chief of Flight Safety.14 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) . He will: Be a Flight operations member of all Flight Safety investigation boards as detailed by Vice President (Flight Operations). 1. b) Act as a bridge between Flight Operations and Flight Safety. b) Recommend updates and changes to policies and procedures in the Company Operations Manual. g) Will work in close coordination with Chief Pilots and Director (Pilot Management). on the requirement of Chief of Flight Safety. c) Ensure that all recommendations and safety issues are brought to the attention of Vice President (Flight Operations) for action. f) Ensure timely dissemination of safety related information to Flight Crew.1.15 Fleet Captain (Region) He will be accountable to Chief Pilot (Line). e) Shall assist Chief Pilot (Standards and QA) in Pilot counselling.

within the requirements of Company and DGCA Policy the standards of flight proficiency necessary for the safe and efficient operation of all types of aircraft in use. A-1-33 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Met department and regional BCAS whenever required for the company work.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. l) Recommend pilots as Supervisory Pilots.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. g) Provide inputs towards the structure and staffing of the flight operations department (at respective bases) to ensure the operational needs and business objectives are achieved. printed from e-manual / Company Portal d) . Fleet Captain (Standards & QA) He will be accountable to Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) and will assist him for: a) Checking Pilot proficiency. welfare and disciplinary matters with regard to pilots under his control. k) Forward Commander‟s Trip reports to Chief Pilot (Line) for required action. i) Liaise with regional DGCA. b) Formulating and enforcing. Air safety. e) Ensure day-to-day administration of the base in coordination Director (Pilot Management) f) Assist Chief Pilot (Line) on all morale. c) Follow up recommendations made during Company Surveillance and observation flights for Flight Operations Quality Assurance. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Coordinate Flight Dispatch issues with GM (Flight Operation Support). m) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned n) 1.16 Carry out any other duty assigned by the Chief Pilot (Line).3. h) Ensure harmonious management/ pilot relation and provide necessary feedback and communications between management and pilots. Air Traffic Control. j) Work in close coordination with other Fleet Captains.

f) Work in close coordination with other Fleet Captains g) Represent Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) as member of the Captain upgrade Board and the Appeal & Review Board when deputed.17 Carry out any other duty assigned by the Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). b) Supporting Director (Flight Operations) on issue of Technical and Operations Circulars.3. d) Coordinate feasibility of Flight Operations with GM (Flight Operations Support). c) Interfacing with DGCA and process all Flight Operation Approvals in coordination with the Chief pilots. DGCA and aircraft & engine Manufacturers. He will be responsible for: a) Taking up all technical matters related to Flight Operations with Engineering department. printed from e-manual / Company Portal d) . Fleet Captain (Technical) The Fleet Captain (Technical) is accountable to the Director (Flight Operations). h) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned i) Addressing findings that result from audits of flight operations functions. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Bringing to the attention of the Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) any dilution of Flight Standards and any unsafe practices and trends.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. e) Suggesting changes in Flight Operations Standard Operating Procedures. ii) Development of corrective action as appropriate to address the finding(s). A-1-34 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. j) 1. iii) Implementation of corrective action in appropriate operational areas.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. to ensure: i) Identification of root cause(s).

1. g) Represent Flight Operations with airport operators and DGCA in matters under his responsibility.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. mitigation and elimination. f) Conducting SMS analysis as required by the Director (Flight Operations). e) Establishing safety matrix and providing periodic reports on the department‟s safety performance. c) Performing / facilitating hazard identification and safety risk analysis. A-1-35 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Undertaking ongoing review of safety management system to evaluate its effectiveness in ensuring that improvements are made where required. d) Operational risk management. Monitoring corrective actions and evaluating their results.3. i) Work in close coordination with Chief Pilots and other Fleet Captains j) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned. including recommending changes / reinforcement in operating and training procedures based on trend analysis. He will be accountable to Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) and shall ensure: a) Flight Operations Accident Prevention initiatives. f) Carry out technical evaluations and feasibility studies required by Flight Operations. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Technological upgrade of the Flight Operations Department. h) Evaluate new technologies beneficial to flight operations in coordination with GM (Flight Operations Support) and incorporate after approval by Director (Flight Operations). k) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Vice President /Director (Flight Operations). reduction.18 Fleet Captain (SMS and FDM) He is tasked by the Director (Flight Operations) for Flight Operations Safety Management and Flight Data Monitoring (FDM/FOQA).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. b) Flight Operations Safety Management System involving risk identification. printed from e-manual / Company Portal e) .

A-1-36 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. as per the Communication Pyramid below. e) Co-ordinate with Pilot management and crew scheduling f) Recommend pilots‟ leave requests to Director (Pilot Management). j) During counselling may assist Chief Pilots for flight analysis and review. Also provide feedback to management on pilots‟ issues before they become a problem. c) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned d) Act as a communication link between pilots and management.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The Fleet supervisor will be responsible to: a) Bring to the attention of management. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Working on Flight Data Monitoring /FOQA for exceedance grading & trend analysis. i) Work in close coordination with Chief Pilots and other Fleet Captains. utilizing the FDM/FOQA cell. g) Any duty assigned by the Fleet Captain. problems faced by pilots during day-to-day administrative and operational work. b) Any duty assigned by the Fleet Captain. k) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned l) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Director (Flight Operations). printed from e-manual / Company Portal g) . Ensure that all management communications are passed down the line quickly and accurately.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 1.19 Fleet Supervisor (Line) Capable and willing pilots will be nominated as Fleet Supervisors to obtain necessary exposure and opportunity in Flight Operations Management. m) Providing independent advice on safety matters. Fleet Supervisors will report to Fleet Captain (Region). h) Providing feedback to Line pilots on exceedance and trend analysis. He will interact with flight operations management to resolve them.3.

c) Performing / facilitating hazard identification and safety risk analysis.21 Fleet Supervisor (Standards and QA) Fleet Supervisors will report to Fleet Captain (Standards and QA) / Fleet Captain (FDM and SMS). mitigation and elimination.3. b) Be available on allocated days for hand holding / indoctrination of new hires. including recommending changes / reinforcement in operating and training procedures based on trend analysis. c) Be responsible to maintain close liaison with Crew Scheduling and track all training requirements on a daily basis to ensure optimal and efficient conduct of all line or simulator training. subject to flight schedule. 1. e) Conduct of FDM data analysis when required.1. Monitoring corrective actions and evaluating their results. The fleet supervisor will report to Fleet Captain (Line or Simulator Training) a) Be responsible to Fleet Captain (Line / Simulator Training) for line/simulator training activities.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. d) Operational risk management. e) Undertake any other duty assigned by Chief Pilot (Training) /Fleet Captain (Line or Simulator Training). The Fleet supervisor will assist in the following functions: a) Flight Operations Accident Prevention initiatives. reduction. d) Be available for office duties as assigned. b) Flight Operations Safety Management System involving risk identification.20 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. f) Processing significant Commander Trip Reports / Pilot Voluntary reports with regard to flight parameter exceedences. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Fleet Supervisor (Training) Capable and willing pilots will be nominated as fleet supervisors to obtain necessary exposure and opportunity in flight operations management. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Fleet Supervisor (Training) will: .3. A-1-37 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

3. He will function as a Flight Operations Manager fulfilling both a safety and technical role to include:a) Act as a resource to Fleet Captain (Safety) in fulfilling all Safety related duties as assigned by him. d) In due course. new Technical Notices. Collection and storage of Flight Operations Quality and Standards data. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 g) Conduct of CVR analysis as required by regulation. Analysis of Flight Operations Quality and Standards data. A-1-38 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.22 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . e) Carry out CVR monitoring if required.23 Manager (FDM & SMS) The Manager (FDM & SMS) shall be a fulltime office employee reporting directly to the Fleet Captain (FDM & SMS). h) Assist in Pilot Counselling to the extent of data analysis and record keeping. Manager (Safety & Technical) Manager (Safety & Technical) will be accountable to the Chief Pilot (Standards and QA). f) Any other duties as assigned by Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). 1.FLT. He shall be responsible for: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) Set up and maintenance of the Flight Ops FDM / FOQA cell. be trained in FDM analysis so as to conduct the same.3. c) Assist in the functioning of the FDM / FOQA cell. enhanced technical functionalities. This could include compiling data on fleet modifications.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. coordination with Flight Operations Support and Engineering. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. Flight operations Risk Assessment and Risk Management programs Flight Operations Safety Surveys Flight Operations Safety reviews Flight Operations Safety study Any other task assigned by Fleet Captain (FDM & SMS) / Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). i) Any duty assigned by Chief Pilot or Fleet Captain. b) Act as resource to Fleet Captain (Technical) in assisting with all Technical matters related to the fleet.

actual or abnormal or emergency situations arise. necessary for proper operation of the aircraft and essential to safety. During assessment the Training Captain should observe any deficiencies in the Pilot. during the course of flight. When not flying the aircraft himself he should perform the duties of PNF. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Training Captains Duties Training Captain is the Commander of the aircraft in a formal sense. he should intervene to ensure safety.1. The Pilot under check should be monitored and assessed for his ability & judgment. If the limitations of the Aircraft Flight Manual are likely to be infringed.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. He is at all times responsible for the safe and efficient conduct of the flight. His task is to allow the pilot under check to do all the duties of a crew member.Training for the maintenance of professional standards of all pilots as required by the company and in accordance with relevant air legislation. including decision making for which he is being checked. b) Privileges Examiners * i) Simulator and Airplane Training ii) Skill test for Co-Pilot‟s rating (CA 40-A). including his relationship & interaction with the other crew members.24 a) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. At the same time the good qualities of the Pilot should be appreciated.3. No deviations from the normal procedures should be made or allowed to be made on a scheduled flight. which should be forwarded to the Chief Pilot (Training). Operating Procedures are a code of practice and discipline. flying through weather and let down in IFR conditions should be allowed by the Training Captain at his discretion. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Training Captains (Instructors & Check Pilots) are responsible to the Chief Pilot . himself acting as the other crew member. In case. they should be handled by the Training Captain himself. A-1-39 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. ground personnel and passengers. . Take-off and landing.

1. provided a type qualified Captain less than 60 years of age having no medical restrictions placed on his licence shall be on board as ‘Safety Pilot’ Check Pilots i) Route checks.3. vi) Local Checks and Route Checks vii) Supervised Line Flying viii) To exercise the privileges of a Check Pilot. for the purpose of training / skill test of pilots for Co-Pilot rating /Initial Type Endorsements and also initial issue of Instrument Rating. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Skill test for Pilot in Command rating (CA 40-B) iv) Skill test for issue of Instrument Rating(IR) v) Proficiency Checks on Simulator and Aircraft. vi) Final Simulator Check.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. vii) Ninth and tenth route checks for Command endorsement. He / She will be responsible to: a) Maintain records of Crew Qualifications/Licences and Dispatcher training A-1-40 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. ii) Under supervision flying for eligible pilots for command upgrade and for line release as co-pilots.25 Director . printed from e-manual / Company Portal iii) . viii) All release Route Checks ix) Training of Examiners to exercise the privileges of an Instructor and a Check Pilot. Instructors * i) Simulator and Airplane Training ii) Training of Pilots for Type/Command rating.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.Training He / She will report to Chief Pilot (Training). Instructor and check pilot rating iii) Training of Check Pilots. Note: * . iv) Proficiency checks (LR and Route Check) v) Instrument Rating (IR) renewal checks.Examiners /Instructors approved by DGCA can be utilised after they have attained 60 years of age.

AFCME and follow up for securing various approvals.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-1-41 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Difference. Refresher and Upgrade Trainings. He / She will be responsible to: a) Implement various software for Flight Operations b) Carry out NOTAM Surveillance and development of RTOW charts c) Manage Aircraft and Regulatory information & Route Guides d) Distribute operational information to crew and Dispatchers e) Develop LPC infrastructure f) Liaise with DGCA.26 Senior Manager (Flight Operations Support) He / She will report to Director (Flight Operations Support). Fleet.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. AAI. Simulators including control of documents. 1. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Plan Crew Training – Transition. BCAS and defence authorities g) Manage documentation for Crew. . printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) . c) Plan Dispatcher Transition. j) Any Other duty assigned by Director (Flight Operations). Difference and Refresher training d) Co-ordinate with Training Providers and Crew Scheduling for Simulator Training and booking of slots.3. breakdown of training facilities etc. h) Any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations Support). g) Liaise with DGCA on Licensing matters h) Advise Crew Scheduling of the requirements to carry out Route checks and specific assessments for various pilots i) Maintain a Pilot Not Available Status due Training for the Monthly Scheduling Meeting. e) Manage Crew Training on day-to-day basis and take prompt recovery action in case of any deviation of programs due to nonavailability of resources. Ab-Initio. f) Prepare documentation for submission to DGCA.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. NOTAMs etc.  Ensuring timely completion of the other administration issues related to National Pilot recruitment. Recruitment of National pilots  Screening of Application received for matching with qualification and experience criteria set out by the company.  Coordination with flight Crew training team for establishing the training needs based on the qualification and experience of the prospective candidates.28 a) . He will be responsible for: a) b) Flight crew Requirement Planning based on fleet expansion plan.1. A-1-42 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. to analyse suitability of various airports for Flight Operations and keep everyone concerned informed c) Carry out Route & Alternate Analysis d) Analyse and propose Fuel Tankering options e) Carry out Fuel Burn Analysis f) Formulate guidelines for Fuel conservation and optimization of Flight Operations g) Carry out Aircraft Performance Monitoring h) Develop Aerodrome Operating Minima i) Any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations Support) Senior Manager (Pilot Resourcing) He will be accountable to the Director (Pilot Management).  Advising the agreement signing schedule for the selected candidates.27 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.3.  Establishing contact with eligible candidates and planning the interviews. AIP amendments.3. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Senior Manager (Performance Management) He will report to Director (Flight Operations Support) and be responsible to: Carry out Aircraft Performance Evaluations b) Regularly monitor ICAO/DGCA/AAI circulars.

29 Associate Director / Manager (Pilot Administration) He will be accountable to Director (Pilot Management).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.  Intimation to providers on the pilot Security clearance update. Any other task assigned by reporting Manager or Director (Flight Operations). Verification of Pilot Provider Invoices. medical and ratings as per Indian DGCA norms.  Coordinating with various departments for the joining of pilots. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) .  Supervising and follow up the security clearance of the foreign pilots.3. Single point of contact for the pilots for all their pre-employment queries. Recruitment of Foreign pilots  Assess the comprehension of English language of foreign pilots. Interaction with various pilot providers in terms of:  Receipt of initial documents of the proposed pilot candidates. He will be first point of contract for all pilots for all Admin/Finance/HR issues and will also be responsible for: a) b) Coordination with HR/Admin/Finance departments on pilot issues Monitoring of pilot hourly utilization A-1-43 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Controlling foreign and Indian pilot data along with the pilot provider.  Interacting with Chief Pilot (Training) for the selected pilot application.  Communication of initial documents of the candidature to the providers based on the screening of the CVs. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Keeping in touch with the selected candidates and regular follow up on their joining schedule.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.  Coordinating with various departments for the joining of pilots.  Requisition of and timely issuance of pilot contracts and forwarding the same to the respective providers.  Ensuring timely completion of other administration issues related to foreign pilot recruitment.  Managing the pilot provisioning the schemes or Cadet Programs presently run by the company or contemplated in future.  d) e) f) g) h) 1.  Follow-up regarding availability of pilots and ensuring that the pilots join as per the committed timelines.  Ensuring that the pilots arrive with current license.

delay analysis and investigation of systemic causes that affect regularity and efficiency of operations. He/ She shall be responsible for the functioning of the Operation control Centre and Coordination & Control of the Company Aircraft.30 Vice President . Vice President (OCC) will also be responsible for maintaining the Company „On time performance‟ for which he /she is authorised to initiate. as required by Company Policy and DGCA requirements. o) Any other duties assigned by Director –Crew Resourcing. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Pilot privilege leave planning and authorization Pilot sick leave monitoring Expat and Indian pilot rotation leave planning and authorization Temporary duty assignment planning and administration Base manning levels and transfers FDTL exceedance reporting to DGCA Coordination with crew scheduling on individual pilot rostering issues to help in decision making by chief pilot (Line) j) Responsible for ensuring that all pilot lapsable items (VISA.) A-1-44 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. cancel. He / She will be responsible for maintaining all records of OCC aircraft communications (ACARS / Voice etc.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. k) Advising human resource on pilot salary deductions and maintain a record. He / She will be responsible for delay reporting. Operational. Engineering and DGCA guidelines.) are flagged and renewals done well in time. terminate. l) Ensuring that all pilot admin files/records are up to date. OCC) and is accountable for central co-ordination of operating departments to meet the company‟s operating plan. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) d) e) f) g) h) i) . He / she will be responsible for initiating the Emergency Response Management Procedure and notifying all Incident & Accident Reports.Operations Control Centre (OCC) The Vice President (OCC) will report to the Executive Vice President (AO & CS. AEP etc.3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. m) Direct supervision and monitoring of the team members assigned. n) Development systems and procedures to streamline all the function listed above. within laid down Safety. 1. reroute flights for commercial viability and efficiency of operations.

1. d) Monitoring flight movement and ensure that expected prolonged delays are included in the crew planning process and FDTL exceedances do not occur.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. He will be responsible for ensuring that legal and qualified crew are rostered for all flights and their optimum utilisation. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Vice President (OCC) will work in close coordination with Vice Presidents of Flight Operations. f) Monitoring non-adherence to the DGCA guidelines on FDTL and report on all FDTL exceedences with justifications. air traffic service providers. in-flight and the Chief Commercial Officer in addition to maintaining a close liaison with airport authorities.3. b) Implementation of DGCA & Company Operational Manual policies with respect to FDTL and scheduling (refer Para 1. 1. g) Liaise with Pilot Training for rostering / release of pilots for training duties.8. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 In the absence of the post holder. h) Regular Scheduling of qualified crew for flights to airports / routes that have special qualification / recurrent requirements. Airport services. e) Development & Publication of crew roster as per flight operations policy. Engineering. ground service providers and airport operators for the efficient discharge of his responsibilities.4.31 Director Crew Scheduling He /She will be responsible for a) Air crew scheduling as per guidelines laid down by Vice President (Flight Operations) and within the stipulated Flight & Duty Time Limitations (FDTL). A-1-45 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. . c) Assessment of minimum crew strength required to maintain company flight schedule within DGCA/Company FDTL rules. Director (OCC) will assume all functions of Vice President (OCC).8.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Chapter 11 for qualification requirements).13 and 11.

k) Ensuring that all changes in crew scheduling are communicated to Air Crew. industrial unrest etc. policies and procedures pertaining to the Flight Dispatch function. cleared.32 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . A-1-46 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. suggest ways to minimize them and recommend changes in procedures for smooth functioning. Provide day-to-day functional. j) Ensuring that all information related to flights & crew is recorded in software for crew scheduling and FDTL monitoring. in accordance with Operations Manual. but not limited to Flight Planning.Flight Dispatch He/ she will be a qualified and DGCA approved Flight Dispatcher in charge of the Central Flight Dispatch unit and will be responsible for implementing the company Flight Operations and Flight Dispatch policies laid down in the Operations Manual in conformity with DGCA rules and guidelines.FLT. Weather Briefing and communications as required by Company Policy. administrative.3. Flight Dispatch. Ensure that all Flight Dispatch personnel are provided with adequate training. and monitored in accordance with established standards. regulations and flight operations policies. Be responsible for disruption containment due weather. Providing work schedules which ensure adequate and efficient Flight Dispatcher staffing. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 i) Scheduling of crew and day-to-day roster planning to meet the requirements of Airline policies and guidelines with regard to crew pairing and distribution of flight duty assignments amongst air crew. assessment and route familiarization suitable to the position being held within the Flight Dispatch. Flight Safety instructions and DGCA requirements. OCC & Crew Logistics. unlawful interference events etc. and technical direction to the Flight Dispatch. He/she will be responsible for Notification of any incident. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. He will:        Provide operational support to crew through Flight Dispatch including. accident. Associate Director. as per laid down notification procedure. Flight Watch. Analyze delays on the network. Ensure that Company flights are safely and efficiently planned.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Implement and enforce operational supervision standards.

  INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Maintain himself current and his approval valid for him/her to be able to discharge his/her responsibilities and maintain adequate supervision and A-1-47 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Associate Director .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Preparing the operating and capital expenditure budgets relative to Flight Dispatch. accident. and DGCA requirements Analyze delays on the network. In the absence of the post holder. in accordance with Operations Manual. Airport authorities and Vendors. assessment and route familiarization suitable to the position being held within the Flight Dispatch as per directions of Associate Director .Flight Dispatch will work in close coordination with Director . unlawful interference events etc. original equipment manufacturers and other external entities relevant to operational control.Flight Dispatch to ensure delegation of authority and assignment of responsibility within the management system for liaison with regulatory authorities.Flight Dispatch.33 Senior Manager Flight Dispatch Will be a qualified and DGCA approved Flight dispatcher who is in-charge of the Central Flight Dispatch Unit and will be responsible for implementing the company Flight Operations Dispatch policies laid down in the Operations Manual and in conformity with DGCA rules and guidelines. Ensure that all Flight Dispatch personnel are provided with adequate training. Flight Safety instructions. He/she will be responsible for Notification of any incident. 1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Preparing the operating and capital expenditure budgets related to Flight Dispatch.Flight Dispatch.3. Providing work schedules which ensure adequate and efficient Flight Dispatcher staffing. as per the laid down notification procedure.Flight Operations Support who is responsible for long term formulation of Flight Supervision processes and interaction with all Nodal agencies including DGCA. He will: a) b) c) d) e) f) Implement and enforce operational supervision standards. . Associate Director . policies and procedures pertaining to the Flight Dispatch function. suggesting ways to minimize them and recommend changes in procedures for smooth functioning. designated Sr. Manager/Manager will assume all functions of Associate Director .

Flight Planning. b) Ensure that Company flights are safely and efficiently planned. printed from e-manual / Company Portal control. as per the laid down notification procedure. suggesting ways to minimize them and recommend changes in procedures for smooth functioning.3. f) Maintain himself current and his approval valid for him/her to be able to discharge his/her responsibilities and maintain adequate supervision and control. accident. He/she will be responsible for Notification of any incident. regulations and flight operations policies. and monitored in accordance with established standards.34 Manager Dispatch Will be a qualified and DGCA approved as Flight dispatcher who is incharge of the Central Flight Dispatch Unit and will be responsible for implementing the company Flight Operations Dispatch policies laid down in The Operations Manual and in conformity with DGCA rules and guidelines. Flight Watch. d) Analyze delays on the network. and communications as required by Company Policy. but not limited to. administrative.g) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. He/ She will: a) Provide day-to-day functional. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 In the absence of the post holder. c) Be responsible for disruption containment due weather. He/she will provide operational support to crew through Flight Dispatch including. Manager-Flight Dispatch will work in close coordination with Flight Operations Support who is responsible for long term setting up of Flight Supervision processes and interaction with all Nodal agencies including DGCA. e) Providing work schedules which ensure adequate and efficient Flight Dispatcher staffing. . and technical direction to the Flight Dispatch. designated Manager will assume all functions of Senior Manager . industrial unrest etc.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.Flight Dispatch. A-1-48 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Weather Briefing. unlawful interference events etc. 1. cleared. Sr. Airport authorities and Vendors.

Maintenance Coordinator and Airport Dispatch Coordinator. termination. printed from e-manual / Company Portal g) . Providing quick flight planning assistance when desired by the Commander. the responsibility for operational control functions is assumed by qualified personnel. Airport authorities and Vendors. Monitoring all delays and taking pre-emptive and corrective measures to contain the extent and duration of delays. h) Manager-Flight Dispatch will ensure that in the case of absence of Duty Manager Flight Dispatch in a shift. designated Duty Manager will assume all functions of Manager . based on the inputs provided by Flight Dispatcher. accidents. re-planning of flights. if required. environmental or any other reasons. diversion and cancellation of flights due operational. He/she will be responsible for the Notification of all Incidents. In the absence of the post holder. if required. Operations Controller. Exercise flight supervision and assist the PIC to decide on initiation.35 Duty Officer Flight Dispatch This function is performed by Deputy Manager in Flight Dispatch and in their absence senior most Assistant Manager will assume the role of Duty Officer – Flight Dispatch.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. He is responsible for: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) Supervision. He/she is responsible for the working of the Flight Dispatch Shift and ensuring that all Flight dispatch activity is effectively executed. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Manager-Flight Dispatch will work in close coordination with Flight Operations Support who is responsible for long term setting up of Flight Supervision processes and interaction with all Nodal agencies including DGCA. Arranging for re-routing. unlawful interference to his superiors. Ascertaining the availability of aircraft and crew to operate the flights scheduled for the day and plan rescheduling. on day-of-flight for the Company network. technical. He will be a qualified and DGCA approved flight dispatcher and will be responsible to keep his approval current.3. continuation. 1. Compiling information about all operational delays over the network for A-1-49 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.Flight Dispatch.

impede or benefit operational capabilities inclusive of.    Assisting the PIC for the release of an aircraft to operate in accordance with the terms and conditions established by the Operational Flight Plan. Customer Service. Series M-Part II. authorizing. A-1-50 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. in keeping with Safety. Flight Dispatcher is responsible for: a) b) c) Exercising operational supervision and assist the pilot-in-command for the safe &efficient planning and monitoring of a flight. and aircraft performance. on behalf of the Vice President (Flight Operations). Performing Operational Flight Watch and for determining if changes in operational and meteorological conditions may affect the safety of flights within a prescribed area or on assigned routes. Analyzing operational conditions and identify any opportunities that may constrain. qualified as per CAR mentioned above. . facilities. is assigned the responsibility of exercising safe and efficient operational supervision over flights in conjunction with the Pilot-in-Command. Air Traffic Control. Analyzing operational and meteorological conditions to evaluate and determine the safest and most efficient minimum fuel requirement. and Company fiscal requirements. but not limited to weather. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 the duration of his duty. Work in close coordination with flight Crew Scheduling. and for communicating those changes to the Pilot-in-Command. of the Operational Flight Plan for all scheduled and nonscheduled flights inclusive of training and test flight operations. as required. Maintaining the Flight dispatch written log and record of all Company Radio Transmissions between OCC and Aircraft.36 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. issuing and revising. However the final decision lies with the Pilot in Command. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Indian Aircraft Rules and DGCA issued CARs have not considered flight dispatchers as a licensed category and they operate subject to an approval accorded under CAR Section 7.3. Regulatory. reviewing.h) 1. PRE-FLIGHT DUTIES The developing. Duties and Responsibilities of Controlling Flight Dispatchers A Flight Dispatcher.

subject to operational constraints and within proper Safety parameters Ensuring. NOTAMs etc. of any reported deviations from standard which occur during flight and which could impact down line scheduling integrity. covering all significant information which may impact the operation of his flight. To provide the Pilot-in-Command with a thorough and professional flight crew briefing package. to Maintenance and Ground Operations. problems caused by any aircraft deviation from standards including MEL. if warranted. and to communicate any operational limitations to the respective operating Departments. Providing timely analysis of meteorological risk which may reasonably be anticipated to impact local and/or system operations including aircraft on layover. and implementing economic fuel policies to maximize company profitability. which the Flight Dispatch function performs safe and efficient Operational supervision in accordance with all A-1-51 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. which may limit or impact flight operational capabilities. During irregular operations. Soliciting.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . as required. on day-of-flight. and initiating alternative plans. Apprising respective operating departments and Flight Operations Management Pilots. congruent when practical with the Pilot-inCommand. Providing and communicating revised information for Load Control with total fuel requirements and aircraft weight limitations that maximizes revenue payload potential while satisfying all Safety standards. Resolving with Maintenance Control. the pilot-in-command. and when conditions warrant. as required. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Formulating and implementing revised Operational Flight Plans when conditions warrant. to provide flight crew with the latest operational information. interpreting. Administering. and maintaining current flight and field conditions reports. advising flight delays to Associate Director Flight Dispatch/ Director-OCC. Flight Operations Management Pilots.          FLT. Communicating to Air Traffic Control Services all Operational Flight Plan requirements. and for communicating the revised plans to the Pilotin-Command. recommending flight cancellations. managing.

weather at destination & alternate should be monitored and the commander of the flight advised of any weather deterioration through available communications channels. Remain on duty unless he has been properly relieved. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Company policies and procedures. Note: A Flight Dispatcher shall avoid taking any action that would conflict with the procedures established by:     Air Traffic Control the meteorological service the communications service Authority of Commander IN -FLIGHT DUTIES a) b) After a flight has departed a flight watch shall be maintained till the flight lands at the destination or in case of a diversion a watch must be kept on the flight to the alternate and its departure thereafter to the destination. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. During flight watch. FLT. en-route weather. Obtain the Pilot-in-command's signed concurrence with the operational flight plan and flight release. POST-FLIGHT DUTIES The Flight Dispatcher on duty shall: a) b) Ensure that all reports of the commander are sent to Chief Pilot (Line). A-1-52 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. with the maximum fuel load possible. taking into account likely weather conditions at the destination and alternate aerodromes. Capturing up-to-date flight progress information of assigned flight movements (Flight Watch) and to ensure that the flight movement information is both current and accurate. To advise on delay / cancellation of the flight or otherwise decide on a possible / alternative routes which may be flown safely in accordance with company procedures & standards.

who will however be responsible to verify its correctness.3. to extract ATS PLAN from OFP and send it to respective station / ATC unit. To assist/prepare the formatted automated”Flight Release” in the word document as per our current schedule and Pilot roster/Aircraft rotation.e. following are the list of duties and responsibilities of Assistant Manager . To follow-up wherever ATS plan not available and take appropriate action i. To retrieve FIC/ADC for all flights. To prepare automated RPL report and fax to the respective ATS units. for assistance of Flight Dispatcher and Flight Crew. Get en-route significant weather information from Meteorologist and communicate to flight crew through ACARS or available channels of communication. ZFW change mails and Crew roster on daily basis for conditional crew and change in crew pattern and to inform Flight Dispatchers accordingly. He/she will have readily available information on latest weather.37 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. To follow-up with IndiGo MET and confirm Summary weather brief/ Met Folder is placed in MET shared folder and same to be placed in respective flight folder well in time. He/she may be asked to prepare an operational flight plan under the guidance of Flight Dispatcher. . To assist Flight dispatcher in Flight follow-up.Flight Dispatch. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Assistant Manager OCC Assistant Manager .1. In addition.OCC are operations personnel assigned duties in OCC to assist flight dispatch in operations supervision. airfield limitations etc. To retrieve NOTAMs through RBT system.OCC will function under the Flight Dispatcher and be responsible for all VHF/HF communication and maintain records/logs of all communication and will monitor all company frequencies on real time basis. They are suitably trained to perform their job functions efficiently. edit flight wise/FIR wise and place in the respective folders. To monitor maintenance status of Aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Assistant Manager .OCC: i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) viii) To perform job responsibilities as allocated to him by Duty Officer .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-1-53 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

MET PLUS. according to responsibilities assigned.38 His duties and responsibilities are as follows: a) Assistant Manager (OCC & Flight Dispatch) will be responsible to maintain all documents and publications necessary for provision of technical support on operational matters. ACARS. convert into PDF and upload on IndiGo world portal. xii) To monitor ACARs messages & handle company frequency.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Document Updation. xiii) To attend incoming telephone calls and transfer calls to respective Flight Dispatcher i.3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal ix) To assist Flight dispatcher to prepare the flight folder. xviii)To perform any other tasks assigned by Associate Director – Flight Dispatch/ Sr. Schedule Change Activities etc. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Assistant Manager – Operations Control Center & Flight Dispatch 1. xvii) Visit and brief station staff regarding ATC and other procedures before commencement of operation to new stations. xv) To perform job responsibilities as allocated to various groups i.e. Report Engine.e. xvi) Attend ROC meetings as and when required. xiv) To clear Post-flight folders on daily basis. xi) Checklist Amendment etc. . List of documents/publications requires maintaining & updating for this purpose are given below:i) Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) ii) Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM) iii) Cabin Crew Training Manual iv) RTOW Charts folders v) MEL/CDL vi) Operations Manual vii) Flight Dispatch Manual viii) DGCA Circulars A-1-54 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. x) All Executive-OCC should be familiar with MC Plot. Manager/ Manager -Flight Dispatch.

g) Check the board for watch hours.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and firefighting category etc. A-1-55 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. bomb scare and incidents/accidents. their updating and status. renewals/refreshers and provide them required forms. d) Keep the record of all the documents. m) Update Dispatch directory with latest tankering. l) Brief the trainees who go for FD training. f) Follow up of post flight folders or FSR required by flight safety. h) Update Admin info file for dispatchers on daily basis. k) Update routine check file whenever routine check of any station done by dispatchers. hijacking. performance factor etc. fuel policy. c) Maintain a record of revisions received and action taken. j) Order the Stationary as and when required in consultation with that group in charge. i) Get approvals for the new staff inducted and update his records in Dispatch documents. b) All the above documents are to be kept updated by Assistant Manager (OCC & Flight Dispatch). Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 ix) NOTAC‟‟s/ C NOTAMS/ Technical Notice/ Operations Notice x) Technical Circular (QAN) issued by Engineering/ Quality Control xi) Aircraft Manual of India xiii) AICs xiv) AIP Supplement xv) Civil Aviation Requirements (C A R) xvi) Jeppesen Route Manual xvii) ICAO Annexes xviii) Defence Airfields IAL Charts xix) Any other relevant documents/publications including security alerts and Flight Crew Bulletins.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. any closure. printed from e-manual / Company Portal xii) AIPs . e) Keep and maintain a file in the Flight Dispatch Section for various circulars on emergencies.

following are the list of duties and responsibilities of Executive-OCC: i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) viii) ix) To perform job responsibilities as allocated to him by Duty Officer . To prepare automated RPL report and fax to the respective ATS units. To follow-up with IndiGo MET and confirm Summary weather brief/ Met Folder is placed in MET shared folder and same to be placed in respective flight folder well in time. In addition.39 Executive-OCC / Controllers Executive-OCC will function under the Flight Dispatcher and be responsible for all VHF/HF communication and maintain records/logs of all communication and will monitor all company frequencies on real time basis. the above jobs and responsibilities are delegated to the Executive in shift. airfield limitations etc. to extract ATS PLAN from OFP and send it to respective station / ATC unit. To retrieve FIC/ADC for all flights. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Executive-OCC are operations personnel assigned duties in OCC to assist flight dispatch in operations supervision. To retrieve NOTAMs through RBT system. edit flight wise/FIR wise and place in the respective folders. To assist Flight dispatcher in Flight follow-up. To assist Flight dispatcher to prepare the flight folder. To assist/prepare the formatted automated “Flight Release” in the word document as per our current schedule and Pilot roster/Aircraft rotation. He/she may be asked to prepare an operational flight plan under the guidance of Flight Dispatcher. . ZFW change mails and Crew roster on daily basis for conditional crew and change in crew pattern and to inform Flight Dispatchers accordingly. To follow-up wherever ATS plan not available and take appropriate action i. convert into PDF and upload on IndiGo world portal. Get en-route significant weather information from Meteorologist and communicate to flight crew through ACARS or available channels of communication. He/she will have readily available information on latest weather.3. They are suitably trained to perform their job functions efficiently.Flight Dispatch.e. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 In the absence of Assistant Manager (OCC & Flight Dispatch). 1. who will however be responsible to verify its correctness.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. for assistance of Flight Dispatcher and Flight Crew.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-1-56 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. To monitor maintenance status of Aircraft.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.e. according to responsibilities assigned. country-wide and international forecast to assist Operations Co-ordination Centre with operational decision making. f) Keep watch on weather requests through ACARS 1.e.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal xi) xii) xiii) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .41 data from Indian Executives (Flight Operations Support) Flight Operations Support Executives shall be accountable to Manager Flight Operations Support/ Manager Flight Operations. To perform job responsibilities as allocated to various groups i.40 Meteorologist Meteorologists function under the Manager Operations Control and are responsible for a) Collecting and analyzing meteorological Meteorological Department (IMD) websites b) Prepare MET Folders for all IndiGo flights in accordance with DGCA rules. e) If destination weather deteriorates provide latest METAR /SPECI to aircraft in flight. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 All Executive-OCC should be familiar with MC Plot. 1.3. To perform any other tasks assigned by DGM – Flight Dispatch/ Sr. Report Engine. d) Provide general. c) Forecast inclement weather for the entire IndiGo network. To monitor ACARs messages & handle company frequency. ACARS. Manager/ Manager -Flight Dispatch. MET PLUS. Schedule Change Activities etc. Checklist Amendment etc. Document Updation.x) xiv) xv) FLT. a) Update and maintain base library b) Update and maintain aircraft library c) Update and Simulator library A-1-57 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. To attend incoming telephone calls and transfer calls to respective Flight Dispatcher i. To clear Post-flight folders on daily basis. and are responsible for.

Note: Fleet Captain (Safety) communicates directly with Vice President (Flight Operations). and related activities b) Assist Manager Flight Operations in renewal of crew medical . 1. and related activities c) Any other duty assigned by Manager Flight Operations Communication Pyramid A communication system has been established within the organisation that enables and ensures an effective exchange of information relevant to the conduct of flight operations throughout the flight operations management system and among operational personnel.42 Executives (Training) 1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Flight Operations Training Executives shall be accountable to Manager Flight Operations and are responsible for.3. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. e-manual to Crew e) Any other duty assigned by Manager Flight Operations Support. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 d) Disseminate Company Notices.3.43 a) Assist Manager Flight Operations in renewal of crew licenses.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The pyramid given below indicates the flow of communication. However there is no restriction on direct communication at different levels for the sake of speed and necessity. A-1-58 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. TR.

Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Coordination with Other Departments It is to be ensured that the issues that affect operational safety and security are coordinated among personnel with expertise in the appropriate areas within the flight operations organization and relevant areas outside of flight operations. conference call and meetings).44 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . Operational control/flight dispatch. new equipment. new destinations/routes. Manufacturers.g. memos. Cabin operations. Operations engineering. Regulatory agencies or authorities. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. Ground handling.3. operational and safety communication). Engineering and maintenance.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. (AFM/AOM. Human resources. i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) viii) ix) Flight safety. The issues that could affect operational safety and security include aircraft modifications. A-1-59 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. The flight operations shall ensures that necessary internal and external coordination occurs through the meetings or other means of liaison (e.FLT. as appropriate. cargo operations and dangerous goods. The following aspects may need constant liaison with various departments on day to day basis. e-mail. or regulatory changes.

consume alcohol during the flight duty period or whilst on standby IV.2 I. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 1. consume alcohol in contravention of the DGCA and company rules II. f) if she is pregnant.4. engaging in any kind of problematic use of psychoactive substances Crew Advocacy It is the responsibility of all aircrew to bring to the attention of the Commander any departure from prescribed procedures and safe practices. or feels unfit to the extent that the flight may be endangered. d) if he / she is in any doubt of being able to accomplish his assigned duties e) if he / she knows or suspects that he is suffering from fatigue.4 CREW MEMBER RESPONSIBILITY 1. b) following deep sea diving except when a reasonable time period has elapsed.1 Crew Member shall not perform duties On an Airplane: while under the influence of any drug that may affect his faculties in a manner contrary to safety. commence a flight duty period with a blood alcohol level in excess of permissible limits III. This is essential so that the Commander is aware and understands the particular situation to enable him to A-1-60 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. He / she shall not: 1. g) Under the effect of Illness. surgery or use of medication It shall be the responsibility of every crew member to immediately bring to the notice of the cockpit crew scheduling if he/she is unable to perform duties on an airplane for any of the above mentioned applicable reasons. c) following blood donation except when a reasonable time period has elapsed.4.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

indicating that the pilot flying is aware of the deviation followed by the oral response “correcting”. This is especially relevant to all co-pilots. or is likely to enter an unsafe flight condition. TYPE OF FLIGHT Line Training Commercial flights or checking situations No training or checking Left hand seat Right hand seat CAPT FO CAPT TRG CAPT CAPT/T TRG CAPT Training Captain FO TRG CAPT TRG CAPT FO/T CAPT CAPT FO TRG CAPT TRE TRI CAPT CAPT (b) A-1-61 Observer Remarks Crew Line check CAPT line check FO line check Safety Additional Pilot (a) CAPT IOE FO IOE Standard crew Lack of FO and no CAPT qualified on the right hand seat Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.3 Flight Crew Members Responsibility In Case Of Special Crew Pairing The table below clearly determines the Designated Captain when special crew pairing is planned by the Company. Two Communication Rule 1. who due to large experience/age gap may be hesitant. the PNF shall immediately take over control by calling “I have controls” and pressing the side stick takeover pushbutton so that flight control priority is transferred to his side stick and the other side stick is deactivated. The oral response shall be “check”.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. If the airplane is in an unsafe flight condition.Pilot shall bring any potentially unsafe flight condition immediately to the attention of the Commander. The Co. If there is no response to two verbal standard callout communications. . printed from e-manual / Company Portal The pilot flying shall respond to any flight related standard callout communication made by the pilot not flying (PNF) with regard to deviation from standard operating procedure. the PNF must promptly evaluate if a situation of pilot incapacitation exists.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 take appropriate action. standard practice and any deviation beyond the stipulated parameters laid down for the different phases of flight. indicating that he is initiating corrective action.

the Commander is responsible that his/her crew attain an equally high standard. Nevertheless. he may provide advice. A Commander is a senior official of the Company. When a TRG CAPT is Observer. about the management of the flight. he must not interfere in any decision process except on the Commander request.2 Status and Conduct For each Flight.5 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITY OF COMMANDER 1. CAPT/T= Captain on Training . In addition to setting and maintaining a high standard of self discipline. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 TRG Base training FO/T (OBS) CAPT CAPT/T TRG CAPT (OBS) Designated by Vice President (Flight Operations) c) Special flights = maintenance check. He must ensure that orders are correctly given and are always promptly obeyed and do his utmost to develop a high level of "Espirit de Corps". He is expected at all times to act as such in relation to his duties and responsibilities.5. . It should be recognised. IndiGo Pilots are professional and are required to conduct themselves in a manner consistent with the highest professional standards. as described by law. FO= First Officer FO/T= First Officer on Training. The inherent nature of our operations requires the maintenance of the highest level of safety and public confidence.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. at the appropriate time. 1. 1. designated to be the Co-pilot for this flight. A-1-62 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. OBS= Observer TRG CAPT = Type Rated Examiner / Instructor / Check Pilot Each time a TRG CAPT is operating as Pilot Flying or Pilot non-Flying. he has to take the responsibility of the flight. that he also has certain duties. the company designates the Commander.5. however. Aircraft positioning flight … CAPT= Captain.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Special flights (c) Note: a) Safety additional pilot if required by Airline during Initial Line Training (IOE) b) Airline Captain trained on the right-hand seat.1 Position in the Organisation The Commander is directly subordinate to the Chief Pilot (Line).

When dealing with any breach of personal conduct it is recognised that no two situations are quite alike. apparently different treatment may be required for circumstances that might be facially similar.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. etc.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. c) The term 'flight' as used in the law may in general be assumed to represent the period between 'doors closed' and `door open' A-1-63 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. He shall have the final authority as to the disposition of aircraft while he is in command. however. 1. . Thus. b) This legal philosophy implies that the law draws no strict lines as to the beginning and end of the Commander's responsibility and authority. He is also responsible for discipline on board and orderly conduct of the flight.4 Responsibility and Authority The Commander is responsible for the safe execution of the flight and for the safety of the aircraft and its occupants. It is. ATC. and it does not exclude the responsibility of others at the same time as that of the Commander (for instance. Authorities on the ground.).5.5. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 1. These measures may include the restriction of freedom of one or more occupants until they are delivered to the competent authorities. a basic philosophy of our legal system to leave room for judgment against the specific circumstance prevailing at the time. His command continues until the termination of his flight duty when he/she completes all the post flight documentation and leaves the aircraft. whichever is earlier. calls for the constant attention of both management and pilots. He has the authority to take such measures as necessary for the safety of the flight and in this connection he may take such reasonable measures as are necessary for order and discipline on board. defined the period of command above.3 Period of Command The designated Commander assumes command the moment he accepts/signs the aircraft acceptance (Flight Report Book / Technical log book) and /or enters the aircraft with the intention of carrying out a flight. judgment must be used in dealing with any breach of professional conduct. Therefore. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The discipline required to maintain these extremely high standards. The company has however. This general description of the Commander's legal responsibility requires elucidation on the following points: a) The legal text leaves many specific questions open to interpretation. baggage and freight during the flight.

If an emergency situation arises which endangers the safety of the aircraft or personnel and necessitates taking of action which involves violation of local regulation or procedures. This includes complying with all health. g) It is incumbent on the Commander to comply with laws. b) promote an atmosphere under which optimum crew co-operation may be expected. A report shall be submitted of any such emergency action to the DGCA through the Vice President (Flight Operations) as soon as possible. e) have no doubts about his condition and proficiency when reporting for duty.5. d) report facts which may influence the quality of the general flight execution to his Chief Pilot. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 General The Commander will: maintain over-all responsibility for the flight execution. He / She shall ensure that no crew violates any of these laws and no contraband or unauthorised articles are placed anywhere on board an aircraft. h) At Base stations. regulations and procedures of the state in which the aircraft is flown.1. f) The Commander whether handling the controls or not is responsible for the operation of the aircraft in accordance with Rules of the Air except that he may depart from these rules in circumstances that render such departure absolutely necessary in the interest of safety.1 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Immediately as this happens. it shall be the responsibility of the Lead Cabin Attendant to contact the Captain once all Cabin Attendants are present. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the Commander shall notify the appropriate local authority. upon arrival at the briefing area. be the representative of the company when dealing with other crew members during flight duty time and at layovers. and towards passengers in his capacity as Commander of the airplane.4. Custom and Immigration laws in force. the Captain shall assemble the other pilot/s and all the Cabin A-1-64 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. c) be responsible for flight preparation and execution in compliance with legal and company regulations.

the introduction will not be insisted upon by the Captain. and if possible under the prevailing circumstances. the Captain shall brief the Lead before doors closing. Specific details can be briefed to the Lead Cabin Attendant once in the cockpit. this meeting should nevertheless be conducted during this time window.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. In case the Captain does not at this stage have specific briefing details on the flight. the joining Cabin Attendants must visit the cockpit and introduce themselves to the pilots when time and their duties permit. congenial. using best CRM practices.7. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Attendants. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01  Commander and Lead will cross check / confirm with each other regarding PFMC compliance for their respective crew & self. In all cases. because the cabin attendants need to complete their briefing and be at the aircraft by D-45 (Domestic)/ D60 (International).10. A-1-65 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. upon the Lead presenting the details of Cabin Attendants. as its purpose is to enhance the feeling of being part of the same team and for the crewmembers to get to know each other. In this scenario. and will only be done if the Lead determines that it will not impact boarding or passenger service. she will confirm to the commander that all the crew have done their PFMC.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the Lead shall facilitate this.( Flight Dispatch Activity – Responsibility Matrix is placed at Para 1. He will conduct a short 3-4 minute briefing with the intent of creating a harmonious. . The underlying principle will be that a face-toface meeting between the pilots and cabin crew enhances a feeling of teamwork. i) During transit flights when a crew change occurs. It is recommended that this briefing be completed by D-55 (Domestic) /D70 (International) at the latest.15 of this chapter) Cabin crew joining (flight deck Crew remains same) As and when the Lead reports to the flight deck for giving the preflight check. and professional atmosphere amongst all crewmembers.

k) The primary responsibility of the Commander is that he must not commence a flight when in his judgment the aircraft is not in a satisfactory condition and to conduct the flight in a safe manner in order to maintain a high level of safety. The Commander is responsible for filing de-briefing reports and ensuring reporting of accident/incident as per laid down procedures. 1. Should a Commander's duties detain him and he is unable to board the aircraft before the passengers. .4. This includes but is not limited to items such as mechanical problems. l) In the absence of Company Ground Personnel. This is to permit the airline to initiate follow up action. It is his obligation to report any areas of operation which could be detrimental to safety.2 j) The Commander is responsible for ensuring that all passengers are fully briefed on safety procedures and that all emergency exits are kept clear during flight. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Flight Deck crew joining (Cabin Crew remains same) As and when the Flight deck crew conducts the joint Pre-flight briefing on board. the Commander during his period of command is also responsible for the safety of the aircraft passengers. crew proficiency. He shall make all efforts to mobilise available resources until Company personnel are available to takeover and resume their responsibilities. airport facilities or ATC problems.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. weather. printed from e-manual / Company Portal He shall confirm that all pre-departure drills and safety checks are completed.5. he/she will confirm to the Lead that the crew has done PFMC. Flight Preparation The Commander will: a) acquaint himself with all relevant particulars and latest instructions concerning aircraft type and flight to be flown A-1-66 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. he must ensure that all preparations are made by the remainder of the crew so that departure can be made with a minimum delay after he boards the aircraft. crew and their comfort while on the ground.

e) be responsible for certifying the Flight Report / journey log book or equivalent document f) co-ordinate all crew duties as described in company manuals g) direct his flight management in such a manner that all cockpit crew members are constantly aware of his intentions h) take all actions which may improve the efficiency and comfort of the flight. without having any adverse effect on safety A-1-67 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.5. The crew may be allowed to conduct their duties with the Seat Belt sign „ON” if the Commander considers it safe to do so. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 b) co-ordinate the flight preparation and ascertain that all aspects have been covered c) convince himself of the airworthiness of the aircraft and have no doubts as to the fitness and proficiency of his crew members Flight Execution The Commander will: a) be responsible for the operation and safety of the airplane and for the safety of all persons on board. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. when the defect is accepted after the cabin door‟s closure and the flight is continued. c) ensure that checklist and standard operating procedures are adhered to and thoroughly carried out d) be responsible for notifying the nearest appropriate authority by the quickest available means of any accident involving the airplane resulting in serious injury or death of any person or substantial damage to the airplane or property m) be responsible for reporting all known or suspected defects in the airplane at the time of termination of the flight.3 . The commander shall inform OCC & MCC of the defect and associated MEL application through ACARS.4.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. during flight time b) be responsible to ensure that passengers and crew are seated and strapped during takeoff and landing and when the seat belt sign is 'ON'.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

a Use of Emergency Authority Report. preferably the Captain. advise OCC using any possible means. as specified in Company Operations Manual Part B shall be submitted.5. Whenever a Commander uses his emergency authority. mail and freight. is required to be at the forward exit to wish our customers Good Bye and thank them for flying IndiGo. This instruction is inviolate and applies to all Pilots on IndiGo flights irrespective of their rank. It has been decided that one of the pilots. Instructions exist on the cockpit door being kept open when on ground to encourage children (our future customers and employees) to visit the flight deck. from now on. A-1-68 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.4. Attention to the little details is one way that IndiGo can create a competitive advantage in the marketplace. 1. about the planned course of action l) In case of diversion to an airport where company personnel are not available.5 Customer Relations It is very important that our customers‟ experience of IndiGo is consistent and standardized. 1.4 Commander’s Emergency Authority Nothing contained in this manual is to be construed as relieving a Commander of his responsibilities to take any action in an emergency or under unusual circumstances. something all children would love to do. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 take all actions deemed necessary to ensure the safety of the flight. printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) . after completion of the Parking Checklist. its occupants. if these actions divert from prescribed procedures he will (if time permits) do so in consultation with the other crew members and submit a report about his action to his Chief Pilot (Line) j) be responsible to file a debriefing report on completion of every flight duty in the event that in his opinion any matter needs the attention of management k) In case of diversion.5.4. in order to preserve the safety of the aircraft. remains in-charge of the flight until airport services personnel / handling agent and/or engineering personnel arrive.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

e. As per existing procedure. . 1. 1. The Lead will check with the Captain if he would like to greet/pay his compliments to the VIP passenger/s before departure. As an important operating department Flight Operations has a major role to ensure that the controllable reasons of delays are kept effectively under check. The Captain is requested to inquire and assure the same. between the closing of the Cabin doors before departure and their opening on arrival.6 VIP Passengers . the Captain (or other pilot depending on post-flight duties) is required to say „Goodbye‟ and thank all passengers.4. In case of frequent delays. including the VIP.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. all courtesies will be extended to the VIP passenger/s by the Lead. the Captain must ask the Lead to do so on his behalf. Pilots are expected to be polite and friendly in such cases.5. it is expected that the Captain will personally meet the VIP passenger/s and welcome him/her before doors close. operational slots at various airports can be threatened. There is a proposal to gift „Log Books‟ to children which when presented should be signed by the Captain. i. The Captain will be informed of the presence of such passengers on his flight before departure.Handling The company will refer certain persons as VIP passengers. there are others which can be managed. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The above instruction is not intended to override the existing DGCA order on cockpit entry in flight.5. do not let the other passengers feel that all the attention is only being given to the VIPs.4. Any courteous but professional gesture (like sending a business card with a short note) from the Captain / crew are welcome.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-1-69 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Also. Remember that every action mentioned above must display professionalism and not over do them.7 On-Time Performance DGCA regularly monitors company‟s ON-Time performance on behalf of travelling public. Time and duties permitting. If this is not possible. During the flight. While some delay reasons are external to the airline and are beyond control. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Cabin attendants will encourage customers and especially children to „peep‟ into the cockpit while deplaning.

Crew reporting late is an avoidable reason of delay.1 Co-Pilot 1.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Specific clearance from the Commander is not required. A-1-70 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1 General The co-pilot is: a) subordinate to the Chief Pilot and to the commander during the flight duty and flight execution.1. Reporting Sick at last minute causes irreparable damage to our ON-Time performance. In case of a pick up or en-route delay crew must contact OCC ASAP and advise OCC of the situation. a Pilot report. Airport Services personnel at various airports are required to start boarding as soon as feasible. must be submitted. Pilots are NOT repeat NOT to insist that passenger boarding is delayed or interrupted except for reasons affecting safety of aircraft operations.6.6. b) expected to report facts which may influence the quality of the general flight execution to the commander and to the Chief Pilot. justifying the reasons why boarding was delayed / interrupted. printed from e-manual / Company Portal To achieve this target. d) is equally responsible for the safety of flight operations. Crew are expected to report No Later than 1:00 hr (domestic)/1:15 hr (International) prior to the notified departure time.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. If a crew member feels that he is medically unfit to exercise the privileges of his license. This last minute report “Sick” inconveniences fellow crew members and destabilizes the roster. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Procedure: The Company expects. c) to have no doubts about his condition and proficiency before starting a flight and during flight execution.6 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF CREW MEMBERS OTHER THAN THE COMMANDER 1. passenger boarding is targeted to be completed at ETD15 min. MUST inform crew scheduling as soon as possible instead of intimating at the last minute. In case of such an action. . 1.

He does not have authority to directly reprimand the cabin attendant. However.6. A-1-71 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. weather etc.1. The Co-pilot shall read out the check list at the appropriate time and ensure its compliance. He shall not normally alter any flight condition. The Co-pilot shall normally maintain a listening watch on R/T when within Area. If track deviation occurs due to circumnavigation. without the knowledge and approval of the Commander except where such alteration is necessary in an emergency.. 1. The Co-pilot shall periodically obtain destination and alternate weather. Any deviation from track shall be brought to the attention of the Commander.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.2 Flight Preparation The Co-pilot will: a) acquaint himself with all relevant particulars and latest instructions concerning aircraft type and flight to be flown. The Co-pilot shall remain at his station at all times during flight except when authorised to leave his station by the Commander. Approach or Airport Control boundaries and shall make position reports as and when required. When a Co-pilot is carrying out under supervision PF duties. Commander will retain the authority and responsibility for final disposition of the aircraft. controls. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 The Co-pilot is under the direct supervision of the Commander and shall carry out all duties pertaining to the operations of a flight as directed by him and any other duty as may be assigned from time to time. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Co-pilot is responsible for the navigation of the airplane (unless a navigator is carried on the flight). Aircraft defects will only be entered with the permission of the Commander. switches etc. the Commander will discharge all PNF duties. the Co-pilot Shall keep a track of the airplane position at all times. The Co-pilot is responsible for filling in all required documents and logs. but shall bring the lapses to the notice of the Commander.

A-1-72 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. flight operation techniques of the commander will be studied.b) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.6. Notes: Co-Pilots. any aspect of the flight preparation has been overlooked. It is obvious that with the action described above. Flight Execution The Co-pilot will: a) perform all duties as described in the company manuals under the supervision of the Commander: b) assist in promoting an atmosphere in which a good understanding and co-operation between the crew members may be expected. iii) Any methods or procedures which are not thoroughly understood shall be requested from the Commander to be explained. at all times ii) The most valuable instruction is the experience gained in actual flight operations and therefore. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 advise the Commander if. All further initiatives should be aimed at the safe completion of the flight. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.3 i) .1. are considered to be potential Commanders. in his opinion. a highly undesirable situation is created. strong doubts exist as to the physical or mental fitness of the Commander (incapacitation) and/or immediate action is required to prevent a highly critical situation. they shall understand and study the duties and responsibilities of the Commander in addition to their own.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. in his opinion. if he believes these developments exist he will: - d) Note: - advise the Commander ask the Commander to take appropriate action if. he shall take such action as deemed necessary (if possible in consultation and agreement with other crew members). c) be alert on developments which may endanger the safety of the flight.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Immediately as this happens. upon the Lead presenting the details of cabin attendants‟ . etc. toilets. printed from e-manual / Company Portal At Base Stations. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Lead Cabin Attendant The Lead Cabin Attendant is in charge of all cabin attendants in flight and is responsible to the Commander for their duties on-board. the introduction will not be insisted upon by the Captain. In all cases. upon arrival at the briefing area. cabin. catering stocks.1.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. During transit flights when a crew change occurs. and will only be done if the Lead determines that it will not impact boarding or passenger service. d) Take report from all cabin attendants regarding emergency equipment and report to Commander.6.1 Flight Execution The Lead Cabin Attendant will carry out the following responsibilities:a) Allocate duties to the other cabin attendants. the Lead shall facilitate this. c) Conduct the pre-flight briefing to all cabin attendants on safety. 1. the Captain shall assemble the other pilot/s and all the Cabin Attendants. in consultation with the Commander. He will conduct a short 3-4 minute briefing with the intent of creating a harmonious. In this scenario. using best CRM practices. and maintain proper team work and coordination on board. the joining cabin attendants must visit the cockpit and introduce themselves to the pilots when time and their duties permit. and if possible under the prevailing circumstances. service and merchandise sale procedures and timings to be followed. if necessary.6. it shall be the responsibility of the Lead Cabin Attendant to contact the Captain once all cabin attendants are present. congenial and professional atmosphere amongst all crewmembers. the Captain shall brief the Lead before doors closing. e) Take report from all cabin attendants regarding status of galleys. The underlying principle will be that a face-to-face meeting between the pilots and cabin crew enhances a feeling of teamwork. b) Check turn out of all cabin attendants and report.2. A-1-73 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

Immediately. This information will be passed on as follows: Observations during a) Taxi. n) Complete the Cabin Attendant Flight Report and submit on arrival.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. safe custody and delivery of diplomatic bags. pouches and high value consignments or other security removed items on behalf of Commander and keep at safe place so that they are inaccessible to any person during flight. availability and usage of oxygen masks and the safety cards available in each pocket. No smoking. l) Attend to any complaints or problem on board. if necessary. However. no calls will be made during commencement of take-off roll till the retraction of landing gear. m) Report any cabin incident/accident on board to the Commander. k) The Lead Cabin Attendant must ensure that suitable announcement to passengers are made as per announcement booklet provided to each cabin attendant. no calls will be made from extension of landing gear till the end of landing roll. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Check Cabin Defect Report Book and make appropriate entries. (No contact period) c) final approach landing and A-1-74 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. non-usage of electronic devices and mobile/cellular telephones. location of emergency exits. h) Ensure that cabin services/sales are carried out as per norms laid down. g) Ensure that all necessary announcements are made on time. cruise or descent Warning to Commander Immediately b) take-off and climb out Immediately. However. The Lead Cabin Attendant must inform the Commander whenever smoke. fire. printed from e-manual / Company Portal f) . unusual sounds or other abnormal conditions are observed. These announcements must include usage of seat belt.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. i) Take and advise all clearances to the commander j) Be responsible for receipt.

b) Report any deficiency noticed in cabin. she may request assistance from any additional and non-working crew members. as a minimum. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. emergency equipment. which. After an aircraft has been left unattended by the flight crew or cabin crew for any period of time. catering stocks etc to the Lead Cabin Attendant. The duty station of any Cabin Attendant may be changed by the Commander during the course of the flight. Part-B. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 During an emergency.3 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. landing and whenever the Commander so directs. The Cabin attendants shall keep their seat belt/harness fastened during take off. shall be conducted by the cabin crew prior to the first flight:   After a new cabin crew or. If an evacuation is anticipated. decorum and turn out.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.6. Cabin Attendant The Cabin attendants detailed for a flight will work under the Lead Cabin Attendant and shall be under the direct command and supervision of the Commander during the period of their duty and at lay over station. This shall include a preflight inspection of all systems and equipment. The Lead Cabin Attendant will allocate the other Cabin Attendants their duty stations with the concurrence of the Commander. A-1-75 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. The Cabin Attendant shall ensure the availability. The duties and responsibilities of Cabin Attendant are laid down in detail in the Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual but notwithstanding anything mentioned therein a Cabin Attendant shall: a) Ensure that they maintain the highest standard of discipline courtesy. cabin cleanliness. if no cabin crew is used. a new flight crew has assumed control of the aircraft cabin. as specified in chapter 11. Cabin attendants rostered for a particular flight shall report to the Lead Cabin Attendant who will brief them on any special procedure. the Lead Cabin Attendant is responsible for preparation of the cabin and execution of evacuation procedures. Operations Manual. accessibility and serviceability of aircraft cabin emergency systems and equipment.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. shall instruct the passengers regarding the emergency actions to be taken as appropriate to the circumstances. They shall also ensure that they are seated and strapped whenever the seat belt sign is switched on unless authorized by the Commander to continue the service or move about. i) Ensure that they are seated and strapped for take-off and landing and during a declared emergency. ensure by means of head count that the number of passengers on board tallies with the number reflected on the trim sheet. e) Carry out in flight service and merchandise sales as per company procedures notified from time to time f) Ensure that all crockery and cutlery are removed before take-off and landing from the cockpit/passenger cabin unless instructed to the contrary by the Commander. friendly and professional conduct towards passengers A-1-76 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. This does not preclude entry into the cockpit in an emergency or to make reports which are required under their duties and responsibilities. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) . any unruly act. before take off and landing and a report made thereof to the Commander through the Lead Cabin Attendant. m) Ensure courteous.flight emergency. armed and disarmed on instructions from the Cockpit crew. k) Bring to the notice of the Commander any strange noise or anything which in their opinion may cause passenger apprehension or affect the safety of the flight. This does not preclude them from taking any action that may be required for the comfort and safety of passengers or in an emergency. j) Immediately bring to the notice of the Commander any suspicious article that may be carried by a passenger. drunkenness or any violation of regulations etc. h) Ensure that no unauthorized person has access to the Cockpit. d) Ensure that the passengers are fully briefed with regard to emergency procedure etc. g) Ensure that all doors are closed. During in.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. l) Not enter the cockpit in flight unless called to attend. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 If required by the Commander/Lead Cabin Attendant.

w) Report to the Lead Cabin Attendant after the flight for debriefing 1. r) Ensure that passenger baggage is properly stowed and aisles/ emergency exits are cleared of all baggage and obstructions.3. The door should be closed immediately after removal of the ramp. Part A 1. p) Ensure that no passenger smokes on the flight. y) Interact with other crew Professionally and with courtesy Management of Crew Fatigue during flight Refer Chapter 17. A-1-77 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.3. t) Ensure that they do not leave the airplane without the permission of the Commander at transit stations.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Company Operations Manual. o) Ensure that the passengers fasten their seat belts whenever the seat belt sign is "ON". Check with the Commander before starting any meal/snack service. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Ensure that Exit row seating policy is complied with chapter 9.2 Cockpit crew inside the lavatory It has been observed time and again that when one pilot enters the lavatory the cabin attendants generally reveal it to the passengers waiting in the area.6. q) Ensure that no passenger uses mobile / cellular telephone on board when the airplane doors are closed unless permitted by the Commander.6.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal n) . s) Ensure that cabin door is kept guarded if open and the door safety strap is attached when passenger ramp has been removed. u) Ensure that they do not contravene any custom and censorship instructions. carry out any service/sale including meal service to the passengers as directed by the Commander/Lead. v) In case any flight is delayed on ground. could you please wait for a while or you may choose to use the Lavatories located in the rear side of the Aircraft”. In such an event the cabin attendants must use the following verbiage – “The forward lavatory is being serviced/ occupied.1 x) Seek authority from the Commander to stay away from designated hotel.

h) Safety and orderly conduct on board will take priority over any merchandise sale. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 On Board Sale Of Merchandize The Following process will govern on board merchandise sale. engineering and commercial representatives in OCC. g) At all times while sale of merchandise is in progress. The trolleys are to be stowed and secured under these circumstances. f) No merchandise sale/service is permitted if the Seat Belt sign is switched on and the captain has advised the cabin attendants „to be seated & fasten seat belts‟. DESIGNATED PILOT OPERATIONS CONTROLLER Flight Operations department will designate suitably qualified Captains as Operations Controllers in the Operations Control Centre to carry Operations Control duty (OCD). The Pilot Operations Controller is an integral part of OCC and must ensure that his actions are taken in consultation and cooperation with airport services. c) Merchandise for sale will be stored in standard service trolleys secured (latched & locked) in either the forward or aft galley.4 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.7 a) . All Merchandise meant for sale on board will be under the stipulated pre loading Security Procedures b) It will be ensured by the Company that no goods that fall under the Dangerous Goods Regulation or listed as items prohibited by the BCAS for carriage by passengers in their person/ hand baggage are loaded for sale on board. Pilots on OCD duty will not A-1-78 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1. one cabin attendant shall not be involved in the sale of merchandise and be present at the rear galley to keep the entire cabin in full view and is responsible for passenger safety and service.6. d) Only serviceable trolleys with foot brakes will be used for merchandise sale e) When not in use such trolleys must be stowed and locked so that they do not move out into or obstruct the Galley area.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.

Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 interfere with the normal day to day activity and decisions of OCC. mechanical problem and adverse weather. The Pilot Operations Controller will also provide guidance to pilot in the application of the MEL so as to reduce avoidable delays. continuation. he is expected to give due importance to the advice and guidance of the Operations Controller. In this regard the operations controller has resources of Flight Dispatch. 1. He will function under the authority of the Director OCC and will be responsible and accountable to The Vice President (Flight Operations) for his decisions. Pilots on OCD will also ensure that no take-off or landing is conducted in conditions below the approved minima such that a flight does not commence or continue if the weather conditions at the destination or alternate are forecast to be below the minima at the expected time of arrival. A-1-79 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Although. However a flight can commence if the destination is below a aerodrome operating minima as long as one destination alternate is above minima. .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. He is responsible to support the Pilot in Command in making a decision with regards to continuation/diversion of a flight. diversion or termination of a flight in the interest of efficiency and regularity. the Pilot Operations Controller is responsible for maintaining flight supervision. The operations controller while exercising this function will strive to provide timely relevant information and guidance to the pilot in command who will ensure that laid down procedures are not infringed and no take-off or landing is conducted in conditions below the approved minima. diversion of a flight for the safety of the aircraft operations. Maintenance Control and Crew Scheduling at his disposal. continuation.1 Duties and Responsibilities: The company follows a non-shared operational control system where in the operations controller‟s responsibility is limited to provide advice on the commencement. He is to provide the Pilot in Command with guidance when due to certain failures. the final authority remains with the Captain. Meteorological Services.7. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Operations Control is the authority over commencement. There exists a vast difference between Central Coordination and Operations Control Central Coordination is the exercise of authority over the initiation. continuation or diversion of a flight for reasons of flight safety.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. While the Pilot in Command is responsible for the safe conduct of the flight. a ground or air turn back is being considered.

efficient and cordial work force.8. dependability. Safety The convenience.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. conditions. to one of the Chief Pilots. for resolution before departure. simplified services.2 Operations Policy. Mission and Goals Mission The Company is dedicated to providing on-time.8.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Identification and reduction of all hazards and risks affecting flight operations will be the priority of the Company. economy.  Friendly. which is air transport's priority.  High airplane utilization and employee productivity. speed and comfort of air transportation cannot be viable without Safety. punctuality. The price of carelessness or neglect is so much greater in the air than it is on the ground. hassle-free courteous and affordable Air transport service. A-1-80 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1 General Policy The Flight Operations department shall advise the feasibility of all Flight Operations. 1. Management at all levels should provide means for prompt corrective action in the elimination of unsafe acts. Goals  Commitment efficiency to safety. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Cases where agreement between the two cannot be reached are to be brought to the attention of the Vice President (Flight Operations). etc. the Operations Manual or the Airplane Flight Manual shall be undertaken. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 and to override his suggestions only when deemed essential in the interest of safety. 1. .8 SUPERVISION OF THE OPERATION BY THE OPERATOR 1.  Market driven fares. or in his absence. Safety is the responsibility of everyone connected with the air transport system. No operation that jeopardizes safety or is in contravention of the State Rules.

Company Operations Manual. (Refer annexure 1) 1.President (Flight Operations) is responsible for overall supervision of Flight A-1-81 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.8. the economy of flight operations is just as important as reliability and service. No instructions shall conflict with the authority of the Commander.8.8.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.8. flight documents Refer Chapter 5. part D 1. For the Company to remain financially viable.3 Management Responsibilities It will be the responsibility of Management to ensure that no instructions are given that will be in conflict with the procedures established by the State.1 General Vice. 1.5 Licence and qualification validity Refer Chapter 11 and Company Operations Manual part D 1. To achieve this management and employees must carry out their responsibilities with integrity.8 Operational Supervision 1. 1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Profitability .8. professionalism and enthusiasm.6 Competence of operations personnel Refer Chapter 11 and Company Operations Manual part D 1. It is the responsibility of all personnel connected with the operation of the aircraft to bring to the attention of the Vice President/Director (Flight Operations) any infringement of the provisions of Operations Manual. The productivity and efficiency of a Company is measured by the quality of its service and care shown towards people. The conditions mentioned in the permit must be complied with by the concerned departments.4 Air Operator's Permit (AOP) The Air Operator's Permit (AOP) is obtained by the Company from DGCA after fulfilling all the laid down requirements.8.8.7 Control analysis and storage of records.8. the Operations Manual or the Airplane Flight Manual. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Reliability It is obligatory on the Company to provide "reliability" with a high level of service and operational efficiency.

8. the policies. k) Legality tracking of Licenses and records l) FDTL monitoring m) Operation of airworthy aircraft in accordance with the approved limitations n) Flight crew scheduling o) Operations coordination and Operations Control p) Establishing processes to receive Crew feedback from line operations – Flt Ops and pilot admin q) Fuel monitoring r) Putting in place a flight dispatch and ops Supervision system to manage all daily operational activities A-1-82 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. He specifies the policies.8. The operational supervision of the whole operation is ensured by: Specifying the organisation.2 a) . printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. He co-ordinates and supervises the operational departments and appoints managers. procedures and instructions b) Maintaining competence of the staff c) Performing the operations within the authorised limits Means of Flight Operation Supervision Supervision of flight operations is achieved by: a) b) c) d) e) Safety Management & Accident prevention activities Anonymous reporting Hazard reporting Mandatory reporting Defining clear & practical operational policies and procedures f) Flight Data Monitoring g) Policy Conflict Resolution h) Regular surveillance of flights & operational activities i) Standardisation of Operations Policies and Training Programs j) Standards and Training committee meetings. the procedures and any associated control to ensure safe operations. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Operations.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

8. encouraging reporting of occurrence. List of reportable incidents / occurrences is reproduced in Operations Manual. etc.) Accident Prevention is achieved by Flight Data Trend analysis.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Safety Management & Accident Prevention Activities The aim of an accident prevention program is:. reduction and eventual removal.5 Hazard Reporting Refer chapter 34 for details of Hazard reporting.4 Anonymous/Voluntary Reporting The Company supports and promotes all legal requirements pertaining to safety. Chapter 34.8. hazard and incidents with non-punitive programs. increase in fleet size. are mandatorily reported upon so as to bring to the notice of the authorities. A successful safety management system endeavours to reduce risk to an acceptable level. A-1-83 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1. 1. Safety management involves timely identification of risk. its mitigation. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Aviation is inherently risky.8. 5 of 1982 lists the incidents / occurrences affecting aircraft design.8.8. Safety in operations and at the work place is primarily the responsibility of the operating departments.8. . investigation of the causes of occurrences. 1. developing preventive methods.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. a) To review safety results and identify significant safety issues b) To develop and implement safety action plans and review implementation and effectiveness c) To oversee accident prevention activities of all department involved with the operation of aircraft d) To review safety impacts of any project (new destination. Refer chapter 34 for details of Anonymous/Voluntary Reporting.8. 1.6 Mandatory Reporting DGCA Air Safety Circular No. Part A.8. maintenance and / or operation. Refer chapter 34 for details of the Safety Management and Accident Prevention program. All risks cannot be eliminated.

.8 Flight Data Monitoring Refer chapter 34 for details of Flight Data Monitoring program. there is a conflict between Policy / procedure stipulated in a company NOTAC and the Operations Manual. the information given in Airplane Flight Manual. through regular inspections.8.8. the information in the NOTAC will prevail. the policies and procedures to ensure that the operations comply with the content of the granted AOC and its associated Operations Specifications. in the Operations Manual. the State regulations will prevail. the airline shall ensure that a continued surveillance of its flights. 1. In case.8. Airplane Flight Manual and Flight Crew Operating Manual / Check List.8. Operations Manual and Flight Crew Operating Manual / Check List will prevail in that order. crew and aerodrome operations are carried out regularly by its examiners who are appropriately approved by DGCA.9 Policy Conflict Resolution In case there is a variation between the operating procedures given in Operations Manual.7 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 1.10 Regular Surveillance of Flights & Operational Activities The issuance of an air operator permit / certificate is dependent upon an airline demonstrating an adequate organisation and method of control and supervision of flight operations.1. Also the continued validity of this air operator permit / certificate is dependent upon the airline‟s continued maintenance of standards that were demonstrated upon original issuance of the air operator permit / certificate.8. Regular surveillance.8. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Defining Clear & Practical Operational Policies and Procedures It must be defined with reasonable clarity in the Operations Manual as to what prevails in case there is a variation between the guidelines & procedures given in Operations Manual. In case there is a variation between the policies outlined in Operations Manual and State Regulations. Manufacturer‟s Flight Manual and State regulations. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Vice President (Flight Operations) is responsible to define. ensures that various stakeholders / actors engaged in A-1-84 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. To achieve this objective. He is also responsible to communicate clear instructions to pilots to ensure that the aircraft is operated in compliance with the terms of its Certificate of Airworthiness and within the approved limitations contained in its Airplane Flight Manual.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8. 1.8.

Company has implemented procedures and deployed appropriate software systems to monitor legality of all crew licences and ratings.12 Standards and Training Committee Meeting Standards and Training Committee includes Vice President (Flight Operations). Additional members may be co-opted by Vice President /Director (Flight Operations).11 Standardisation of Operations Policies and Training Programs Apart from operational activities.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. qualifying and ensuring the continued proficiency of aircrew.8. Flight Operations Training Department under Chief Pilot (Training) is responsible to maintain all pilot training records and ensure that no pilot exercises the privileges of a license beyond its validity. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Operations surveillance shall be viewed as "system oriented" where individual performance may be considered in the context of the airline's total system for training. safety. 1.13 Legality Tracking Of Licenses and Records Regulations require that no aircraft may be flown on a licensed air transport service unless each member of crew is in possession of the appropriate licence issued or rendered valid in accordance with stipulated requirements.8. All training records will be preserved as A-1-85 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Chief Pilots. efficiency and standardisation.8. particularly where trend exists. Systemic causes for less than satisfactory performance during surveillance checks should not be ignored. The system warns Crew Scheduling in case any crew is rostered for flight duties without having valid and current licences / ratings.8. Examiner Pilots and designated Fleet Captains. airline examiners also undertake flights to carry out standardisation checks on its training activities.8. These include standardisation of Examiners/Instructors/Check Pilots and standardisation of simulators training activities etc. 1. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 flight operations activities continue to adhere to the standards to which they were certified or approved.8. All timelines related to expiration of licences are shared with Crew Scheduling. . Director (Flight Operations). 1.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Regular meetings of Operations & Training Committee ensure that the operating policies and training procedures are reviewed for consistency.

It also ensures that in case due to diversions / unplanned delays a flight crew infringes on the provisions of FDTL.8. Current records of flight time.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8.8.8. license and approval validity and FDTL. 1. . printed from e-manual / Company Portal Airline is required by regulations to formulate requirements to limit flight time and flight duty periods and provide adequate rest periods for all its crew members. 1.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Crew Scheduling software is capable of producing reports thereof. Pilot-in-command is also required to ensure that the provisions of MEL applicable to his flight do not affect the aircraft‟s compliance to the type of operations being undertaken. This system warns crew scheduling in case any crew is rostered in violation of Flight & Duty time limitations.14 FDTL Monitoring All prevailing Flight & Duty Time Limitations. Pilot-in-Command is required to satisfy himself that the aircraft is airworthy. adequate additional rest is provided. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 per company policy and in case of an accident the records of involved pilots will be immediately sealed. In case.8.15 Operations of Airworthy Aircraft In Accordance With The Approved Limitations The Company shall ensure that: - the aircraft shall be operated in an airworthy condition has serviceable operational and emergency equipment necessary for the intended flight has a valid certificate of airworthiness.16 Flight Crew Scheduling Crew scheduling is to ensure that the crew rostered on a flight are legal with respect to currency. flight duty periods and rest periods for all its crew members shall also be maintained.8. due to operational exigencies a crew ends up in a flight /flight duty in exceedance of company Flight & Duty Time limitations. 1. as given in Chapter 2 are coded in the Crew Scheduling software system. and is operated within approved operating limitations contained in the certificate of airworthiness / Flight Manual or other appropriate and relevant documents. A-1-86 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Before commencement of flight.

the extended flight time / flight duty time is considered during rostering of crew. diversion of a flight for the safety of the aircraft operations. e) Crew Scheduling is responsible to ensure that operating crew has minimum 500 hrs.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. continuation. Maintenance Control Meteorologists and Pilot A-1-87 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.8. c) Ensuring that crew planning and day-to-day roster meets the requirement of Airline policies and guidelines with regard to distribution of flight duty assignments amongst flight crew.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Crew Scheduling is also responsible for the following activities: Ensuring that all crew are rostered to undergo various trainings / recurrent checks as per the plan given by Chief Pilot (Training) and Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). diversion or termination of a flight in the interest of efficiency and regularity. f) Ensuring that only qualified and current crew are rostered for flights g) Monitoring flight movement and ensure that expected prolonged delays are included in the crew planning process and FDTL exceedances do not occur h) Monitoring non-adherence to the DGCA guidelines on FDTL and report on all FDTL exceedances along with justifiable explanation thereof.17 a) .8. continuation. b) Ensuring that pilots who are qualified for flight/routes which have special recency requirements are rostered accordingly to maintain their qualification. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. d) Ensuring that in case of prolonged anticipated delays. Operations Coordination is the exercise of authority over the initiation. total cockpit experience on type wherein PIC hours are considered from release on type and Co-pilot hours are considered after endorsement on type”. Operations Coordination and Operations Control. Operations Control is the authority over commencement. Company however uses a method of Operations Coordination which engages Executive OCC / Controllers.

diversion or termination of the flight. continuation.  Station manager supervises all airport activities (passenger.  The Central Flight Dispatch must provide the commander with any information having an operational impact or with any other information requested by the commander. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Operations Controllers. The station manager is responsible for the flight until the Commander takes the responsibility of the flight (door closed). Once the flight has commenced  The authority on the disposition of the aircraft rests with the Commander and the Pilot Operations controller.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Commencement of the flight  It is the responsibility of the commander to commence the flight. A-1-88 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. However. The Commander will be guided by the Pilot Operations Controller. the Commander can override the instructions of the Operations controller by use of Emergency Authority.  Flight Dispatcher(s) collates latest information on the planned flight and take the necessary decisions to initiate the flight or to cancel it.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Operations Control Centre and the Commander of the flight. He coordinates also with Flight Dispatcher. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Before the flight . ground handling. Operations Control of the flight is vested in the Designated Pilot operations controller and The Pilot in command with regard to safety of Aircraft Operations for the commencement. After the flight  The Commander must report to the Chief Pilot (Line) any operational procedure deviation and any event providing useful information for the enhancement of flight safety and promotion of smooth operations. loading).

Flight Operations Management encourages a free exchange of information. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Establishing Processes To Receive Crew Feedback From Line Operations . Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Any use Of Emergency authority by a Commander is to be reported to the Vice President (Flight Operations) on termination of the flight. Commercial: Effect of schedules on crew fatigue. passenger complaints alleging Company infringement of safety rules. development and content of Safety Equipment and Procedures training. rumours may not be acted upon. on Flight Operations has put processes in place to provide a timely response to the pilots on the feedback provided by them.  fltops@goindigo.18 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. for filing Trip reports.  pilotadmin@goindigo.in . Medical: Crew sickness on duty. feedback and opinion for the consideration of Flight Operations Management. Company has setup two dedicated e-mailboxes where pilots can send in their reports. Fltops also includes feedback/comments on the content of Operations Manual. enhance the safety of the operation as a whole and promote smooth operations. incident reviews. 1. aircraft ground damage. passenger illness. They include:      Cabin Crew Training: Quality. ideas and feedback.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.Their feedback to management. flight numbering confusion.8. deaths in flight. By regularly processing Crew Reports and by having an effective working relationships with line pilots. A-1-89 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. which can be used to identify hazards. Airport Services: Inadequate ground handling procedures. However.8.Fltops and Pilot Admin . There are other areas where working relationships are developed.in All communication from crew administrative issues are required to be sent to this e-mail ID. Cargo: Mishandling/loading of dangerous goods and general cargo. Training and Crew Management related issues. PIREPs and for raising questions of Technical. advice on applying procedures. Operational. interpretation of regulations.

IndiGo has set up a Central Flight Dispatch office at its corporate office at Gurgaon.8.8. providing information and support to crew when in-flight and certain post-flight activities is permissible. Regulation also requires that before a flight commences. files the flight plan with ATS/FIC authorities. the company shall monitor such external service providers to ensure that the requirements of safety or security of flight operations are being fulfilled in accordance with the specifications of the contract/laid down guide lines.21 Outsourcing and product quality control For all external service providers that conduct outsourced flight operations functions. Pilot-in-Command has prepared and checked an Operational Flight Plan. and provides documents and manuals for consultation of flight crew.8. prepares the flight plan. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Refer Chapter 12 . the use of flight dispatchers / flight operations officers to assist the flight crew in completing the pre-flight planning. 1.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Flight dispatcher(s) monitor the progress of flights under their jurisdiction and initiate recovery/alternate plans in case diversion / unscheduled events take place. are adequate for the type of operation under which the flight is being conducted and are available for this purpose. The central flight dispatch office is co-located with Operations Control Centre and Central Maintenance Control. enabling Operations Supervision.8.19 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.8. 1. However. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Security Services: Events concerning unruly passengers. for the safe operations of the aircraft and protection of passengers.20 Putting In Place A Flight Dispatch and Ops Supervision System to Manage All Daily Operational Activities Airline is required to ensure that a flight will not commence unless it has been ascertained by every available means that the ground and/or water facilities directly required on such flight.8. Fuel Monitoring 1. Central Flight Dispatch collects MET and AIS briefing. aircraft sabotage. The company outsources the services of :   Nav Data Base Flight Planning software A-1-90 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

9 Central Flight Dispatch IndiGo‟s method of Operations Supervision provides for a central flight dispatch. flight deck. Monitoring and control of external organizations should typically include random samplings. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Aeronautical charts from Jeppesen Simulator training FOS/Training/Standards shall conduct audit and integrity checks for the outsourced functions and ensure that the services are provided as per the contract and agreement signed with the service provider. or cabin operational safety (Such as GPWS terrain and obstacle databases. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A contract and agreement shall be executed with external service provider. must be approved or accepted by regulator and electronic navigation data products acquired from suppliers. .  INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The Flight Ops Support department is to ensure that the electronic navigation data utilized by the aircraft. prior to being used as a means for navigation in operations:    Are assessed for a level of data integrity. Annual audit of the system shall be conducted to check the integrity and correctness of the data used by the system. accurate and complete. 1. supplier audits. Central flight dispatch is responsible for: a) Providing assistance to Pilot-in-Command in flight preparation A-1-91 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. The company shall include auditing as a process for the monitoring of external service providers. airport analysis data. Are compatible with the intended function of equipment in which it is installed. or other similar methods.8. Are distributed in a manner to allow insertion of current and unaltered electronic navigation data into all aircraft that require it. weight/mass & balance data and performance data) acquired from external suppliers and used for the support of flight operations should be current.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. product audits. Any data or product that directly affect aircraft.

The Flight Dispatcher is expected to plan ahead. policies and procedures.8. 1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) . Be proactive not reactive. should it not be possible to operate as planned The responsibility of Operations Supervision and Flight Dispatch is to plan safe and efficient flight operations in coordination with the Pilot-in-Command and other departments and agencies.9. Use of standard procedures reduces the burden on planning process and promotes confidence & precision within the Flight Dispatch department. providing information necessary for the safe and efficient conduct of the flight to the PIC f) Monitoring the progress of each flight under their jurisdiction (Flight Watch) g) Advising the PIC of company requirements for cancellation. The operating philosophy of IndiGo directs that safety is an essential ingredient to success. A-1-92 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. To achieve these objectives.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.2 Standardisation The use of standard operating procedures enhances safety and efficiency by logically assigning various tasks to appropriate personnel.9.8.1 Safety Safety is the most important consideration in all Flight operations. Knowing and adhering to safe practices that have been established for the mutual benefit of both Flight Crew and Flight Dispatch personnel are essential to the prevention of mishaps. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Preparation of operational & ATS flight plan and providing RPL supplementary information to ATC c) Liaison with Air Traffic Services for collection of NOTAMs d) Collection & compilation of meteorological data and preparation of flight crew briefing folder e) During flight. Every policy or procedure shall be developed around such safety-oriented guidelines. anticipate problems. 1. rerouting and re-planning. establish work priorities and exercise good judgment in the performance of his duties. Flight Dispatcher and Executive OCC must constantly be aware of the changing conditions that affect the operations environment and be prepared to react to these conditions in the manner specified by established regulations.

speaking engagements. etc.4 Training All flight Dispatchers are to be trained as per requirements of CAR Section 7 Series M Part II. to enable them to discharge their daily function effectively.3 Notice of Violations Any communication received by Flight Dispatch personnel from DGCA / ATC concerning a reported flight violation or incident will be immediately forwarded to the Manager Flight Dispatch 1. 1. other employees. flight watch system. carelessness and the development of individualised procedures but not too stringent to discourage operational flexibility. Approval from President is also required prior to representing IndiGo at any public forum (i. communications.9. A-1-93 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8. Flight Dispatch personnel must use discretion when dealing with the public or news media regarding company matters. it has been well proven that the best operations occur when a high level of planning. prior to participating in interviews or make public statements. and standardisation exist.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. good judgment and professionalism. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Although not all eventualities can be foreseen. .e. They may also be trained to work on Flight Planning software. All flight dispatchers must ensure that they meet the re-currency requirements before accepting flight dispatch duties. the Company or cause any unfavourable reaction from current or potential internal and external customers. Flight Dispatch support. ACARS communication etc. school career days.9.8. 1. Trainee Dispatchers – May be provided ground school training as per the requirements of the CAR. Acceptable conduct involves not only sincere respect for the rights and feelings of others but assuring that personal conduct in both business and personal life avoids any action that might be harmful to the employee himself. printed from e-manual / Company Portal It is the goal of Flight Dispatch to achieve a precise level of standardisation that discourages unsafe practices.5 Personal Conduct IndiGo expects all employees to accept certain responsibilities of adhering to ethical business principles in matters of personal conduct and to exhibit a high degree of personal integrity.8.9.).

time sensitive environment and to rule out delays/disruptions due to miscommunications. responsibilities and authorities associated with respective duties. while performing the duties of Controlling Flight Dispatcher.9. 1. while on duty. printed from e-manual / Company Portal No person shall be under the influence of alcohol and/or mind altering drugs. it is necessary to have a seamless exchange between the outgoing and the incoming shifts. This will ensure a smooth handover of all operational matters from outgoing shift to incoming shift. either directly or indirectly by the DGCA. at shift changeover. . Flight Dispatch personnel shall report for duty at the scheduled time and be prepared to assume duties as assigned. terminal areas. DGCA representative calling shall be referred to Vice President (Flight Operations).9.8.8. 1.8. Flight Dispatch personnel shall not wear headset apparatus for the purposes of listening to non.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.7 Reporting For Duty Due to the dynamic nature of the Flight Operations in a fast-paced. and cyclonic activity c) Any Non Schedule flights d) Any significant NOTAMS A-1-94 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.8 Shift Changeover Briefing A Flight Dispatcher debriefing.operational supervision related broadcasts. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Flight Dispatch personnel when contacted. shall refrain from commenting on any operational matters. they may not accept shift responsibilities until they are fully briefed.6 Personal Devices While on duty. If incoming shift is not comfortable and is not fully briefed.9. 1. all personnel must be aware of operational functions. monitor company communications. A flight dispatcher shall at all times. Prior to assuming duty. Sleeping at any time. is forbidden.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. shall consist of a thorough explanation of categories as outlined below: a) Flights under the flight watch phase b) Weather conditions for departure. en-route.

No one shall leave his workstation unless properly relieved / authorised by the Controlling flight dispatcher. that may affect Dispatch Operations i) Revisions to Aircraft Manuals j) Changes to Operating Manuals k) Any other information which may be relevant for operation l) Miscellaneous items under Dispatcher Handover Checklist Shift Process Flight Dispatchers upon joining a shift. b) All personnel on duty in Flight Dispatch shall remain at their work stations during their shift. Note: Flight Dispatcher(s) will be considered relieved from duty only when the individual(s) assuming their duties and responsibilities are satisfied with the briefing. any new Instructions issued by e-mail or Memo h) Items like scheduled system outage. f) Aircraft Operating under MEL g) Any pertinent log entries from previous shifts.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and brief Flight Dispatchers of any special requirements for their shift.9 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .9.8.FLT. destination / destination alternate. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. equipment failure etc. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 e) Significant changes to NOTAM bulletins or new NOTAM issued since incoming Dispatcher‟s last shift that affect departure. allocate shift duties. a) Joining Duty Manager shall record the names of all Flight Dispatch personnel on duty. assume responsibility and authority over the assigned workload/areas and shall remain on duty until relieved by another Dispatcher. Request to leave the work station shall be made with the Duty Manager. c) All Flight Dispatch personnel shall have a heightened „Situational Awareness‟ and shall bring to the attention of the Controlling Flight Dispatcher all matters which may have the potential to adversely A-1-95 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Assumption of the shift by the incoming Flight Dispatcher implies an acceptance of responsibility for the on going operations. and any other areas affecting IndiGo routes.

clear air turbulence and thunderstorms on route of flight A-1-96 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Support to flights in progress (Not listed in any specific order) - Notice of cyclonic activities.Flight emergencies and safety related situations will be handled with top priority. SIGMETs.9.8. Controlling shift Dispatcher is expected to demonstrate sound judgement. Workload Management Operational tasks must be given priority over administrative tasks. Flight Dispatch shall coordinate with OCC to obtain the necessary DGCA approval. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 impact the flight operations. Some of the examples are: Non-receipt of Pre-flight documents by any airport or data-link failures - Non-receipt of ATS plans by respective ATC units - Aircraft diversions or deviations - Volcanic or Cyclone Activity - SIGMETs - Non-availability of fuel - Any unscheduled system or equipment problems / limitations - ATC strikes or any other event that affects flight planning for the shift or future shifts - Details of any movement messages that give dispatch a delay reason - All adhoc. The Controlling Flight Dispatcher shall consider and re-evaluate each situation and formulate a suitable response. be willing to seek help and mobilise additional resources if the workload increases.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. unscheduled.10 - . printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. and additional flights shall require a prior DGCA approval.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. While normal priorities between various tasks are listed below. a) Operational Tasks . Providing operational support to flights in progress will be given priority over the flights which have not yet departed or are likely to depart in following couple of hours. adjustments for daily operations are expected. administrative skills.

identify yourself follow good communication protocol - Assisting other Flight dispatchers as the need requires - On-the-job training of Executive OCC - Professional knowledge enhancement activities - Answer radio calls A-1-97 Effective 09-Jul-14 and Not a controlled copy. record-keeping & reporting activities shall be kept on hold if the operational environment needs attention from flights operations personnel. Be courteous. monitoring.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. - Answering telephones promptly.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - . Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Information about diversion alternates - ATC co-ordination / liaison for smooth operations of flights - Information about sudden degradation of ATS facilities - Information about changes in Meteorological conditions - Post landing operational / passenger facilitation support Pre-departure issues (Not listed in any specific order) Providing information to crew about: - Change in Alternate aerodrome - Change in Airfield / ATC conditions - Weather conditions affecting Maximum Take-off Weights and other changes affecting payload - Degradation of Aircraft Performance Capabilities due to invocation of MEL - Slot Times - Changes in Aircraft rotation (Tail swaps) and resulting changes to OFP - Revisions to Operational Flight Plans and Amend previously released flights to reflect OFP changes in operating conditions b) Administrative Tasks – Ongoing flight dispatch administrative.

9. These documents thereafter are retained for a period of an additional six (6) months.8. and legible. 1.12 Record Retention All Operational Flight Plan (OFP) will be retained in the Flight Planning System for a period of forty-eight (48) hours. flight progress and performing other dispatch duties.11 . the current log book shall be sealed and all further communications shall be logged in the fresh log book.  All pre-flight crew briefing documents and amendments thereof are placed in a central server.8. All the abnormal and non-routine situations shall be entered in the log book.13 Flight Dispatch Library A flight dispatch library is maintained at Central Flight Dispatch.  All flight documents for a flight involved in an accident or in an incident are retained until the termination of the accident or incident investigation. neat.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and checked & stored at the respective bases for six (06) months. Sealed log book will be kept under the possession of controlling flight dispatcher until taken over by Vice President (Flight Operations). facilities. Post-flight documents for flights terminating at other bases are collected. In case of an accident. 1. Entries made in the log book shall be concise. therefore a high level of professionalism shall be maintained while making any entry in the log book. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 - Read. Flight Dispatch Log Book Central Flight Dispatch shall maintain a log of day‟s activity.8. evaluate and action all written communications dealing with operational supervision - Monitoring of weather. A-1-98 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.9.  Post-flight documents for flights terminating at Delhi are collected and stored at CFD on daily basis for a period of six (06) months. A log book is an official document. Copies of flight release signed by PIC are sent by respective airports to central flight dispatch and saved for a period of six (06) months.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1.9.

Company Operational Circulars and Technical Notices m) Flight Safety Manual n) Flight Dispatch Manual o) Cabin Crew Manual (SEP Manual) p) DGR Manual q) Aircraft Handling Manual. Company – NOTAMs.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. FCOMs & QRH h) MEL i) RTOW Charts j) Route Manual – Jeppesen k) Military airfields‟ instrument arrival charts l) NOTACs. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 The following documents are required to be kept in Flight Dispatch Library for ready reference: a) AIP and AIP Supplements AIC c) ICAO Annexures d) DGCA CAR e) DGCA Circulars f) Company Operations Manual g) Aircraft Flight Manual. printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Flight Operations Support is responsible to ensure that all revision services are fully subscribed to and are provided to Flight Dispatch in a timely manner. An electronic copy of various manuals / documents is also made available on IndiGo intranet portal for ready reference at all airports of crew layover. DGMFlight Dispatch shall be responsible to ensure that all the documents in Flight Dispatch Library are kept current & updated and record of revisions is maintained. A-1-99 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Passenger Handling Manual r) Master copy of all Operations Reporting Forms All Flight Dispatchers shall familiarize themselves with all the operational documents in Flight Dispatch library.

8.14 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Procedures for Dispatch Quality Assurance Following items should be reviewed during assessment: a) Support to crew in accessing and printing Crew Briefing Folder b) Collation of various documents c) Accessing Weather server and providing requisite weather to crew d) Pre-flight medical records e) Any other significant issue 1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Central Flight dispatch and airports of crew layover shall be assessed for availability of required infrastructure.Responsibility Matrix Time Flight Dispatch Activity Responsibility Automatic D-0400 EZFW based on booked load & assumed cargo are automatically updated in the Flight Planning Software through Reservation system (Navitaire) D-0400 Retrieve NOTAMs from RBT System installed at GBP.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.9. data-links and compliance to various procedures laid down in this manual. . CFD D-0330 Compute Company Operational Flight Plan from Computerized Flight Planning System CFD D-0300 Obtain Met folder from Company Met section (International flight) CFD D-0230 Obtain Met folder from Company Met section (Domestic flight) CFD D-0230 Collate all documents in flight folder and upload on IndiGo World Portal (International flight) CFD D-0200 Collate all documents in flight folder and upload on IndiGo World Portal (Domestic flight) CFD D-0145 Obtain FIC/ADC .Respective Airport Services CFD A-1-100 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1.15 Operational Policies & Processes Flight Dispatch Activity .Flights originating from other FIRs: Responsibility .8.Flights originating from DEL/JAI : Responsibility – Central Flight Dispatch . Such assessments will be done after every 3-month by Flight Dispatchers under instruction from Manager Flight Dispatch.9.

to be written on flight Release along with Crew signature. D-0010 Check on the latest for DEP/DEST/ALT Wx INDIGO MET D-0010 Any bad weather reported. intimate CFD INDIGO MET D-0005 Intimate bad weather if reported.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. to operating crew ETD At event CFD Airport Services CFD Flight departure from station Capture airborne timings of the flight from ROCADE software and automatic updation of airborne time in Flight Following software for the purpose of flight tracking.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. This signifies flight acceptance by Operating crew D-0030 Crew reporting at Aircraft D-0010 Send scanned copies of all flight releases to CFD to be saved along with Pre flight document. A-1-101 Automatic Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Retrieve Flight documents from IndiGo World Portal Airport Services D-0130 Print all documents and place them in Pre-Flight Envelope for Crew Briefing Airport Services D-0100 Obtain latest weather of DEP/DEST/ALT from IndiGo Report Engine and provide it to crew. Airport Services D-0115 Crew reporting at Airport (International flight) D-0100 Crew reporting at Airport (Domestic flight) D-0055 Pre-Flight Medical for operating crew Doctor D-0055 All flight briefing documents provided to Operating Crew Airport Services D 0050 Dispatcher contacting crew if there is any important briefing Crew contacting CFD if they have any queries related to flight (facilitated by Airport Services) D-0045 Finalize Fuel figure for the flight D-0050 D-0045 CFD Airport Services Crew Pass final figure to Load Planner and MCC Airport Services D-0045 Pass flight release number to crew. printed from e-manual / Company Portal D-0130 .

9. prevailing / forecast weather conditions and fuel required A-1-102 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. NOTAMs. DGCA requirements & company policy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.General Flight Dispatch is responsible for preparing an Operational Flight Plan (OFP) that is safe. aerodrome Weather. 1.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.9. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Flight Following software obtains position report through ACARS for Flight Tracking. Flight dispatcher. Significant Weather Charts. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In-Flight .18 Alternate Airports Refer Chapter 17 for selection of alternate airports. a take-off alternate must be assigned after the flight plan has been issued the dispatcher will: i) Contact the flight crew and advise the pilot-in-command the take-off alternate assigned. Chapter 16.8.9. 1. Part C.g. Upper Air Data. a take-off alternate may be specified for certain flights. in such a case. Detailed explanations about the layout of Operational Flight Plan (OFP) are provided in Operations Manual.17 Route Guide Refer Operations Manual. Expected payload & RTOW limitations.8. In-Flight ORIG / DEST / ALTN weather uploaded to aircraft through ACARS At event Capture Touchdown timings of the flight by Rocade/Flight Following software. Company has set up a computerised flight planning system to generate the OFP. aircraft under MEL / CDL. Take-Off Alternates Under conditions specified in Chapter 17. During the process of preparation of flight plan a number of checks are required e. 1. In case.16 Automatic Automated Wx Server Automatic Flight Planning . will provide a notation on the flight plan designating a take-off alternate. economical and complies with prevailing ATC constraints.8. Tankering etc.

It is the duty of the Flight Dispatcher to review that the OFP has been computed on latest meteorological forecast data to simulate an actual operating environment. An optimum route shall be selected keeping in mind weather. The Commander will advise: . The Flight Release/OFP for all sectors shall be approved and signed by the Pilot-inCommand. suitable and adequate en-route alternate airports. Flight shall be planned to operate at the optimum altitudes.8. sector length etc.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.ii) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.19 Operational Flight Plan (Manual and Computerized) An Operational Flight Plan (OFP) shall be prepared for all IndiGo flights. OFP shall be computed for a take-off weight which shall be lowest of: i) Structural Limited TOW ii) Performance Limited TOW (correction if any) iii) Estimated Zero Fuel Limited TOW iv) Estimated Landing weight limited TOW A-1-103 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. a) Preparation Of An Operational Flight Plan (OFP) Flight planning is the process of optimising aircraft performance and economics. availability of en-route navigational aids. ii) Verify the acceptability of the take-off alternate suggested iii) Record the agreed take-off alternate on the operational flight plan 1.9. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Record the acceptability of the take-off alternate in the dispatch log book iii) Flight crews will record the agreed take-off alternate on the operational flight plan. prohibited & restricted areas. flight crew will advise dispatch in the event they become aware a takeoff alternate is required. based on Fuel & Speed policy defined by the Airline. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Similarly. i) The requirement for a take-off alternate.

5) hours prior to ETD. The following steps are recommended for computation of OFPs: i) Check with OCC for any changes to ETD. the following actions shall be taken: - e) For additional flights/ rerouting etc to pick up stranded passengers. Prepare an OFP. Permission from defence authorities must be obtained. legal and economical operation.b) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. an ATC plan must be filed. This will allow enough time for collection and distribution of documents at out station airports.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. d) AD HOC Flights For non-scheduled operations to any online / off line airports. Indicate fuel tankering requirements when applicable. OFPs shall be computed based upon EZFW which includes 01 tons of cargo for all flights. Part B. The performance penalty shall be in accordance with the aircrafts AFM / FCOM. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) . Flight Dispatch shall verify all the data used / entered in the preparation of flight plan before releasing the OFP for safe. Computation Of OFP The OFPs for all flights shall be computed no later than three and a half (3. an OFP shall be generated reflecting the performance penalty. However. cargo may be reduced / omitted to meet the minimum fuel requirements for the sector. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Minimum Fuel Required Minimum fuel computed for a flight shall be as per Airline‟s fuel policy given in Chapter 12. An indicative list of MEL / CDL which may result in aircraft performance restrictions / penalties is placed at Company Operations manual. Operational Flight Plan For Dispatch Under MEL / CDL When an airplane is dispatched with a MEL / CDL bringing performance penalty. Routing and Airplane Registration Number. A-1-104 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

Note: In the event of decrease / increase in ZFW up to three (3) tons. consider a change in alternate for destination. viii) Based on weather and NOTAMS. it is the duty of Flight Dispatcher to perform the following checks to detect any inadvertent error/omission. as the landing minima may get altered and affect the scheduled flight operation. if tankering will be required. . f) Check Accuracy Of OFP: Irrespective of the fact that flights plan computation is computerised. including En-route Alternates. no fresh OFP is required to be given to the crew. a fresh OFP will be computed and issued. printed from e-manual / Company Portal iii) Get MET folder from IndiGo MET section and compile a summary of weather brief.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.ii) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. location of jet stream. iv) Check TAFs for Origin. etc. after an OFP have been computed. Upper Air Wind Data. Significant Weather Charts. v) Refer to applicable Airline Aerodrome Operating Minima (AOM) for the Minima requirements. CAT and CB clouds from Significant Weather Chart. arrival at destination or at the alternate airport should a diversion become necessary. If the change in ZFW is greater than three (3) tons. reduction in runway length. ix) Check Fuel Advisory Bulletin and determine. No payload should be offloaded to achieve fuel tankering. vi) Ascertain area of low / high Pressure. Terminal Area Forecast (TAFs). vii) Check NOTAMS for origin. Special attention shall be paid to landing aids and their components. however the crew shall be briefed. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Check for MEL / CDL for applicable performance penalties. Destination and Alternates to ascertain that the weather shall be at or above the prescribed minima at the estimated time of departure. A-1-105 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Attention shall be given to any deficiencies in services. closures of runways/ taxiways/ un-serviceability of landing/ navigational aids. Destination & Alternate airport. Aviation Meteorological Routine Report (METARs) or Aerodrome weather warnings. Closure or restrictions on airways etc.

iv) Minimum required fuel for each flight sector. MEL / CDL Handling Procedure MEL provides operational flexibility to maintenance.8.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Flight Dispatch shall review the impact of restrictions / penalties on the entire series of flights planned for affected airplane.20 MEL / CDL items when applicable and the performance penalty. A-1-106 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. estimated ZFW / TOW / FOB.9. Registration. a) Flight Dispatch shall be advised by Maintenance Control Centre (MCC) whenever a new MEL / CDL is invoked / revoked from an airplane. there may be certain amount of restrictions in its operational use or certain operational penalties might apply. estimated time of departure (ETD).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . It is permissible to operate revenue flights without certain systems being fully serviceable. b) The message from MCC shall contain the following details: i) Airplane registration number ii) Type of defect iii) MEL / CDL reference iv) Expiration date of the MEL / CDL v) Additional relevant information if any. CDL caters to nonavailability of certain fitments in the airplane without affecting its airworthiness. d) If there is a performance penalty. printed from e-manual / Company Portal iii) Wind data compared to en-route MET forecast. c) Flight Dispatch shall refer to the MEL / CDL manuals to calculate the restrictions / penalties associated with invocation of MEL / CDL on airplane performance. v) 1. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 i) Conformity of the OFP routing with ATC Flight Plan. ii) Airplane type. departure date. However. when an airplane is certified airworthy under MEL / CDL.

Structural limitations .8. When calculating airport MTOW limits using the RTOW charts dispatchers should be aware that take-off weights established by this transaction may limit payload.9.En route terrain clearance  Establish the Maximum allowable landing weight based on: . Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 e) Flight Dispatch shall advise MCC / OCC to review the tail rotation plan to minimise the impact of MEL/CDL operational restrictions / penalties.Structural limitations .Aircraft performance . The review should aim at maximising the payload available and minimising additional fuel burn.21 Aircraft Performance Weight Limitations The controlling Flight Dispatcher shall maintain an adequate working knowledge of the performance parameters. .Aircraft performance . g) OFPs shall be re-computed with the performance penalty applied and the flight release remarks section shall include the Reference number of the MEL / CDL along with action taken by the Flight Dispatch.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.Runway limiting factors for destination and alternate terminals The company RTOW charts provide Take-off data for airports on the company network and some frequently used alternates airports. It is essential therefore that Flight Dispatchers closely monitor takeoff weights to A-1-107 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.Runway limiting factors . including performance and structural limitations of the aircraft types operating under his jurisdiction.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal f) Flight Dispatch shall inform Operations Control Centre (OCC) and Load Control Staff about the payload reduction. This knowledge in conjunction with meteorological and operational analysis shall be used to:  Establish the Maximum allowable takeoff weight based on: . 1.

This may lead to a last minute offloading of passengers and / or baggage. Flight Dispatch shall take the following actions. Temperature) etc. payload restrictions might apply.8. f) If the aircraft cannot be fixed and planned to be dispatched under the existing MEL / CDL. Check sequence: a) Analyze the effect of the restriction for the given sectors. c) Run a TEST OFP to determine allowable payload for the sectors. due to aircraft MEL / CDL. When any of the above situations prevails. If the restriction is expected in advance.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. an early notice of payload penalty to Load Control at respective airport and other concerned sections needs to be sent.9. Some of these are: a) Destination / Alternate weather b) En-route Tropical Storm Warning c) Route restrictions d) Aircraft MEL / CDL e) Non-availability of fuel at destination for onward journey f) WAT limitation (Weight. d) If the penalty results in offloading of passengers.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. b) If it affects payload. advice Flight Operations Support to A-1-108 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. check the booked load or get the EZFW. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Due to various operational reasons. .22 Handling Payload Restrictions Procedures to Handle Payload restrictions Dispatcher must monitor factors that may cause payload restrictions. All out efforts shall be made to avoid last minute offloading of fare-paying passengers and their baggage. 1. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 ensure maximum payload is carried and that an overload is not permitted. including extreme weather or aircraft released under MEL. inform the penalty to Load Control of that airport and Operations Control Centre (OCC) for further action. Altitude. e) If payload is affected. check if the defect can be rectified or airplane may be swapped.

Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 produce special optimised RTOW Charts to minimise the extent of restriction. c) Dispatcher on duty shall ensure that at no time.24 Crew Briefing/Debriefing Procedure a) Crew Check In Flight Crew after completion of the pre-flight medical will “check in” together into their crew briefing computer with their unique password and will confirm their legality. seek Maintenance Control Centre‟s advice prior to tankering.23 Fuel Tankering IndiGo has a policy to tanker fuel from airports where the fuel costs are low. RTOW charts must be checked and QNH correction applied. view any recent circular and then down load the flight document for selfbriefing (once automated check in/out process is in place). the Flight Dispatch shall consider the following: a) Tankering must only be done to benefit from the cost differential of next sector. 1. RTOW for airports at elevation greater than 1. especially with their combined effect. The only exception when additional fuel may be carried shall be due to the weather consideration and the flight safety. station staff have been trained to help the crew A-1-109 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Details of the crew check in procedure for each originating station will be intimated by a NOTAM from time to time.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The Flight Operation Support is responsible to analyse the benefit of cost differential vis-a-vis additional fuel burnt to carry tankered fuel and advice flight dispatch on tankering sectors based assumed payloads. When temperatures are high. Before tankering decisions are made. a tankering / uplifting of additional fuel shall result in loss of payload. - At each airport. Tankering for onward sectors is not recommended. . printed from e-manual / Company Portal Note: WAT stands for Weight.8.8. Altitude and Temperature and all three can affect RTOW. Central Flight Dispatch is responsible to provide comprehensive briefing documentation for self-briefing of Crew. 1.9.9.000 feet shall be checked when OAT is high. b) For aircraft going into maintenance.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

safety and final disposition of aircraft. Once the flight release has been signed Pilot-in-Command is responsible for the operations control. - Satellite Picture (Alternate airports may be destination / enroute alternates and take off alternate when required).- FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. maintaining data-links with Central Flight Dispatch. On completion of the flight both crew members are required to Check out and file A-1-110 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. List of alternates (preferred/non preferred) Debrief and Crew Check Out. Security Briefing when applicable. (Alternate airports may be destination / enroute alternates. taking print outs. - Significant Weather Charts and Upper Air Wind Data. However the „Period of Command‟ is defined earlier in the chapter. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 in accessing pre-compiled briefing documentation. he is required to sign and specify time (UTC) along with ATPL number on flight release signifying his acceptance of the flight. MEL / CDL listing applicable. destination and alternate airports. and take off alternate when required) and list of important NOTAMs for each FIR. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . Miscellaneous Documents: Frequency List Flight Safety Circulars Any other important circulars. NOTAMs for departure. Once the Pilot-in-Command is satisfied with the flight plan. providing communication facilities to crew whenever they want to discuss an operationally important matter with flight dispatch. etc. - TAF / METAR for departure. destination and alternate airports. The crew briefing documentation will contain the following information: a) Flight Release b) An OFP for each flight segment c) ATS Flight Plan for each flight segment d) MET Folder containing: e) f) g) h) b) - Summary of Weather Brief.

9. All details including the new fuel requirements are a matter of record and for retention in the flight file. Code Status CPT IGA FO IGA Local Boarding FO IGA Transit Boarding2 Reporting Time Signature Local Boarding1 1 Local Boarding: Crew reporting at station where the flight originates.8. The hard copy will be presented to the crew. 1.8. This procedure is applicable for cockpit crew only. it may be preferable to generate a New Flight Release. . 1. A-1-111 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. which shall be appended with reporting time and the signatures against it.9. If several revisions are to be made. till the automated check in /out process is in place. Crew joining during transit will also be provided with a copy of crew manifest form for recording „reporting time‟.26 Issuance of amended Flight Release If the Flight Dispatch becomes aware of significant changes in the conditions on which the original release was predicated.They will be required to review the updated roster and confirm etc. The completed crew manifest will be scanned and forwarded by airport services to the dispatch for record purpose. whether at departure or enroute. it does not always require that a complete new release be generated and an Amended Release may be sufficient. 2 Transit Boarding: Crew joining during transit. An Amended Release may comprise a revision of one or more items contained in the original release. It may consist of handwritten changes entered on the original with the UTC Time and Dispatcher‟s initials are noted.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. NOTE: Flight Dispatch must annotate all details of amended releases and the time of the amendment. relevant reports etc. Crew Name Category Emp. When a flight release is amended. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 a debrief. (once automated check in/out process is in place). printed from e-manual / Company Portal However.25 Flight Release A sample Flight Release is placed at Annexure 2. two additional columns namely “Reporting Time” and “Signature” are being included in the crew manifest (as shown below). the concurrence of the PIC must be obtained.

A-1-112 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.29 Manual Flight Planning In the event of a computer failure and operations is unable to produce electronic flight plans. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The following conditions will require an amended Flight Release to be issued by Company Flight Dispatch: a) When a flight is delayed beyond a release void time specified in the remarks section of that release. alternate.8. The difference between release time and the planned departure time of a flight leg from any of the enroute airports should not exceed six hours.8.9. This would be considered an amendment to the flight release. and will require that a New Flight Release to be issued by company Flight Dispatch.28 b) When an operational condition set forth in that release cannot be met.1.9.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the Flight Dispatch should provide the flight crew within 6 hours of scheduled departure time updated numbers for the fuel burns to destination.27 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. c) Any time there is a change of a PIC / tail d) Invoking of MEL having operational impact etc. hold. Requirement for issuance of New Flight Release The following conditions will render a Flight Release automatically void.8. The most recent weather available should also be provided at this time.9. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Requirement for issuance of amended Flight Release 1. . reserve. A Flight release may be issued for multiple legs. a) When a flight crew has discontinued a takeoff and has returned to the gate for change of aircraft. Flight Dispatch will use the historical Flight Plan Data by applying an appropriate route reserve based on current weather conditions and applicable NOTAMs on the route to be flown. b) Whenever a revised OFP is issued c) Whenever an aircraft has remained on the ground at an intermediate stop for more than six (6) hours. If the difference between the release time and the planned departure time of a flight leg from any of the enroute airports exceeds six hours. and minimum fuel required. additional fuel. 1.

Maintenance Ferry & Training Flights It is a company requirement to prepare an OFP for Test Flights. Delay message / Cancellations / Change of A/C registration formats. Chapter 17 are filed with respective ATC authorities by IndiGo Flight Operations as per current schedule. and any other relevant information which varies from the RPL filed with ATC.e. A-1-113 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Test Flights & Maintenance Ferry Flights are conducted at the request of Maintenance Control or Maintenance Planning. On daily basis Flight Dispatch shall prepare list of all flights with current registration. Flight Dispatch shall provide OFP and shall file the ATS Flight Plan for all the above flights.8. unless a copy of Maintenance Authorization is furnished to Flight Dispatch by Maintenance. as per the format given in Operations Manual. Often these flights will require a Maintenance Authorization. The list shall be transmitted to the concerned ATC via following methods: a) Fascimile Transmission (FAX) .32 Test Flights.8. as given in Chapter 17 are used to inform respective ATC units in the event of any disruption. Part A.9.1. The RPLs. If required.8.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.31 Repetitive Flight Plan (RPL) b) AFTN or other acceptable means c) Through airport services staff Flight Dispatch will confirm the receipt of this transmission to the appropriate authorities by phone. 1.9.30 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal IndiGo has an arrangement with ATC for filing repetitive flight plans. Flight Dispatcher shall abide by the restrictions placed in Maintenance authorization to generate the OFP and necessary flight documents and shall verify that the Commander (PIC) has a copy of Maintenance Authorization as well. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 ATS Flight Plan Refer Chapter 16 and 17. Maintenance Ferry Flight. SELCAL.9. for maintenance reasons. and Training Flights even if these flights are conducted in the vicinity of the local airport. Flight Dispatch shall not release a flight requiring a Maintenance Authorization. origin airport and destination airport of the flight are the same. a manual routing shall be obtained from the local ATC authority. i. 1.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Most systems provided in Flight Dispatch are highly reliable and have adequate redundancy.34 Scheduled System Outage Flight Dispatch shall schedule their work around the scheduled outage time.35 Unscheduled System Outage Unscheduled Flight Planning System failure shall be passed to the Flight Planning Provider‟s help desk. An all out efforts shall be directed to re-store all systems back to normal as soon as possible.8. 1. Flight Dispatch shall take all necessary precautions and advise all concerned departments of the scheduled system outage in advance to avoid flight disruptions. Other system failures (VHF. as delegated by the Chief of Flight Operations is exercised by the flight dispatcher.8. It is important that Flight Dispatchers shall be aware of all the scheduled maintenance and plan their work around the system down time.33 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.9. 1.9. 1. etc. along with their consequences. Phone numbers for all the Help Desks have been provided in Flight Dispatch Directory. Operational control on the flight. and shall be passed down to next shift personnel for proper follow up. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 Automated Systems Failure All electronic data are backed up at disaster recovery‟ (DR) site. E-MAIL. Once a A-1-114 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.8. All occurrences of the system failure shall be logged in the dispatch log. which is controlled by the IT department.8. However. their assistance shall be solicited to generate / transmit the required documents and to get an estimated time when the system will be restored. They shall ensure that all flight documents are produced and transmitted to the airports for an on time departure.36 Role of Dispatcher And Pilot-In Command Prior to acceptance of the Operational Flight Plan (OFP) by the pilot-in-command.) shall be reported to their respective Help Desks. the flight dispatcher and the pilot-in-command have responsibility for Flight Watch. . a system may be unavailable due to a scheduled maintenance or may not be available due to an unscheduled outage. After the pilot-in-command accepts the Operational Flight Plan.1.9.9.

1. airport services personnel etc. efficient and timely manner. Variation between the two is used to identify any enroute delays / direct routing and revised flight time estimates are notified to maintenance.38 Flight Watch Flight watch is a process to monitor the progress of a flight.8.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the Pilot-inCommand will either prior to departure inform flight dispatch of intended flight plan or when possible. If no response is received. The flight movement / progress information received from aircraft through ACARS is fed into automated systems. expected weather / ATC disruptions / other irregularities enroute and at Destination/Alternate airports. and the response is awaited. A-1-115 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Whenever flight movement or position reports are not received.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. - An ACARS message is sent to the flight involved requesting the appropriate information.37 Disagreement Resolution Policy The controlling Flight Dispatcher and the Pilot-in-Command shall make every effort to resolve all disagreements pertaining to the exercise of operational supervision in a safe. All IndiGo aircraft are equipped with ACARS which is used to transmit flight movement and position reports as per the company policy. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 flight has commenced. In such a case. the final decision on any changes to the Operational Flight Plan shall be taken by the pilot-in-command based on considerations of safety. When for the reasons other than flight safety. Air Traffic Control is contacted to confirm that the flight is still on its planned route. will establish enroute communication with flight dispatch for monitoring of the flight. keeping crew informed of such disruptions etc. Chief Pilot (Line) shall provide necessary resolution 1.9.9. . following steps are taken by Dispatch to ensure the flight is still safely enroute to the planned destination. which compare the flight planning information with the actual flight movement. there arises a dispute between Pilotin-Command and Flight Dispatcher. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Limited pilot self-dispatch of flights may be permitted at those enroute stops where a lack of communications facilities may exist. Flight Dispatchers on duty are responsible for maintaining Flight Watch.8.

. in case any flight is likely to be affected. Radio calls associated with airborne flights operating under normal conditions.8. For the continued preservation of safety. All communication records shall be stored & maintained for minimum 03 months.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the following sequence shall be followed:     Radio calls associated with airborne flights and flights in motion on the ground. These software are able to segregate SPECIs from METARs. Company mainly relies on ACARS for communication between aircraft and Operations Control Centre. Any deterioration in weather is also transmitted to aircraft through ACARS. which have declared an emergency.9. Procedures for the flight crew to use the ACARS system are laid down in FCOM -DSC. The SPECIs and weather warnings are immediately presented on the computer displays at meteorologist‟s workstations. there should become a necessity to prioritise the handling of incoming radio and/or telephone calls. Order of Priority All incoming Flight Dispatch radio communications shall be answered by Flight Dispatch personnel immediately upon receipt. if due to individual and/or Flight Dispatch departmental workload requirements. Radio calls associated with flights while in normal motion on the ground A-1-116 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Meteorologist are required to promptly evaluate the change and if required bring it to the notice of flight dispatcher on duty.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. if the information supplied is critical to the continued safe conduct of the flight and/or has been specifically requested by the operating Flight Crew and/or controlling Flight Dispatcher. Telephone calls associated with airborne flights and flights in motion while on the ground that have declared an emergency only. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 1.39 Communications All Flight Dispatch personnel shall comply with and adhere to all guidelines as stipulated by DGCA for the use and control of radio telephone communications and equipment. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Various software installed in Flight Dispatch continuously retrieve airfield weather information (METARs and SPECI) from authorised IMD websites.

41 Flight Dispatch shall receive a delay notification from OCC along with a provisional ETD when the length of delay is known. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. Air Traffic Control (ATC). IndiGo Flight Dispatch in conjunction with OCC shall make all efforts to minimize the impact of the delay / diversion on IndiGo network     1. Flight Dispatch shall either revise or prepare a new OFP depending upon the duration of the delay. ACARS. However.40 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .8. Flight Dispatch shall either revise or re-file ATS plan as may be appropriate. Radio calls associated with flights while in normal motion on the ground during their arrival phase of operation. Flight Dispatch shall coordinate closely with the crew scheduling and OCC to monitor the crew flight duty time limitations (FDTL).9. Diversion Handling Procedures Diversions may be effected from any point in flight. Pilot-in-Command Pilot-in-command will endeavour to inform flight dispatch of his intended future action and his requirements on ACARS / VHF. Flight Dispatch   Flight Dispatch may receive information regarding diversion through. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 during their departure phase of operation. It could be due to aircraft developing in-flight defects or Pilot-in-Command not being able to land at his destination. Flight dispatch shall review NOTAMs and weather A-1-117 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8.9. VHF. When a flight is delayed / diverted. there may be occasions when delays / diversions are inevitable. Airport staff It is the primary responsibility of flight dispatch to provide support to aircraft in flight. Telephone calls associated with normal operations of either ground or airborne flights communication on ACARS Delay Handling Procedures All out efforts shall be made by Flight Dispatch to run the entire IndiGo network on schedule.  FLT. OCC.

OCC. As weather improvement is observed. on receiving information from flight dispatch. will relay the relevant departure / arrival / delay messages to all stations concerned with details of the diversion. controlling ATC unit may be requested to relay the information.            1.8. Operations Supervision and Crew Records Refer Operations Manual Part D 1. New OFP shall be sent to crew through email or fax. flight dispatch will be the focal point to provide following support to crew: Advise OCC/Airport service for ground facilitation Locate the address for the handling agent or the ATC centre to send the OFP. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .8. Upon receipt of such information Flight Dispatcher on duty shall inform OCC (if not already aware of the diversion).11 Operations Control Centre (OCC) The Operations Control Centre (OCC) is the nerve centre of IndiGo‟s operations which monitors and direct the daily execution of the IndiGo flight schedule on a A-1-118 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. If an aircraft diverts to an off line airport.10 FLT. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 information for the enroute and alternate airport and advise crew through ACARS/VHF. If the aircraft has a serviceable ACARS printer. In case of a weather related diversion. an ATS flight plan with delayed time shall be filed in conjunction with crew. If flight dispatch is unable to establish direct contact with the aircraft. Identification of route in consultation with Pilot-in-command. flight dispatch shall seek opinion from Meteorologist who shall be monitoring surface weather conditions along with the weather trend. forecast for destination and the airport of diversion. the OFP (Route and fuel summary) may be sent directly to the crew. Flight Dispatch shall coordinate closely with the crew scheduling and OCC to monitor the crew flight duty time limitations (FDTL).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Availability of fuel Availability of load & trim personnel Development of RTOW charts in coordination with flight operations support.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. flight dispatch. meteorology and commercial planning. delays or cancellations and initiate management notification of operational irregularities when necessary. equipment and supporting services. assessing operational and customer needs regarding aircraft re-assignments. The OCC will coordinate the activities associated with any condition that could negatively impact operations or service delivery including ATC initiatives. Operations Manual. DGCA and Government Rules. While Exercising supervision and Control it must also be assured that no action is taken that conflicts with established procedures. Present within the OCC will be the disciplines of Flight operations (pilot operations controllers). in order to preserve the safety of the aircraft. He must ensure that the provisions of the Company Operation Manual and DGCA instructions and Directives are complied with and that Constant flight watch (flight following) on each Aircraft is maintained. and delayed or cancelled flights.9 ADMINISTRATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE The Company administration department is responsible and shall provide the necessary facilities. During periods of anticipated or actual irregular operations (“IRROPs”). The Vice President (OCC) shall be responsible for the functioning of OCC. regulations and directives. necessary to deliver safe and secure flight operations. as well as work environment. Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 real time basis focusing on optimum system performance and customer service. mail and freight.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. severe weather. airport operations. A-1-119 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. workspace. Engineering (maintenance controllers). . printed from e-manual / Company Portal The OCC will exercise control of airline operations from the present time plus 72 hours. 1. Under Commander‟s Emergency Authority a Pilot in Command retains full authority to take any action in an emergency or under unusual circumstances. winter operations. the OCC will coordinate the actions of the airline to recover safely and efficiently by coordinating the activities of all relevant departments. crew scheduling (both pilot and cabin attendant). its occupants.

Rev 04 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01 A-1-120 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

.. 14 2.......3.............2 RESPONSIBILITY OF ALL AIR CREW .................................11 Standby ....................................................................................7 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ...... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 2......6 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: International operations .................3 GENERAL GUIDELINES ...... 12 2...........3................13 Rest .......................15 Records .................14 Reporting time: ....... 15 A-2-1 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy............. 11 2..............................3 CUMULATIVE FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic and international ................9 Consecutive night operations ........3 2................................................................2 Applicability .................................3......... 10 2............3......1 .7 2.......3 2...............................FDTL ........... 10 2.........8 2....3........5 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic/ neighbouring countries ..........6 2......................................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.....................3........3.........3 2........3..............................................8 Extension due unforeseen operational circumstances ...................3 2...............3.........................3................................ Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 TABLE OF CONTENTS FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITS AND REST PERIODS ...........3.....................................7 2....... 12 2.... 11 2.............7 2.......................................4 DUTY PERIOD: domestic and international operations ..........................1 Definitions........................................................ 14 2.....3...............16 Cabin Attendants ..........................................................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.....3..........................................................12 Positioning ........................3..............3........................

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-2-2 Effective 04-Dec-12 . Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 Not a controlled copy.

A flight crew that comprises more than the minimum number required to operate the aeroplane and in which each flight crew member can leave his or her assigned post and be replaced by another flight crew member. who shall hold qualifications A-2-3 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Vice President/Director (Flight Operations) and Pilot–In–Command at their discretion. 2. reminded that the provisions of this paragraph are not intended to cover instances where normal tiredness resulting from the physical and mental effort of a flight is likely. Flight Duty Time Limitations (FDTL) specifies Duty Time. so as to minimize the risk of fatigue. All flight crew are.3 GENERAL GUIDELINES (CAR – Section 7.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Series J. Individual crew members should make the best use of their rest periods.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Flight time limits and Rest Period requirements. revert to the requirements as laid down in the CAR. Part III) Company policy IndiGo policy is more restrictive in certain areas.2 RESPONSIBILITY OF ALL AIR CREW In accordance with the provision.1 FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITS AND REST PERIODS 2. and after taking note of the circumstances of other members of the crew. Flight Duty Time. in case of exigencies. however. Remaining within the established limits is the responsibility of both the individual crew and crew scheduling. However.1 Definitions a) Augmented flight crew. herein. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 2. Under all circumstances the provisions of the CAR will be binding unless specific approval of DGCA is received in extraordinary circumstances. . it is the responsibility of each flight crew not to fly if he is suffering from such fatigue as may endanger the safety of the aircraft or its occupants. 2.3. in order to prevent cumulative sleep deficit. printed from e-manual / Company Portal It is the responsibility of all Air Crew to make the optimum use of the opportunities and facilities for rest provided by the Airline and to plan their rest periods properly.

including. Note. if crew has been advised about it prior to leaving residence /hotel.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. flight duty. Flight Duty Time will end 30 minutes after completing a flight/ series of flights (CHOCKS ON). A period which commences when a flight crew member is required to report for duty that includes a flight or a series of flights and which finishes when the aeroplane finally comes to rest and the engines are shut down at the end of the last flight on which he/she is a crew member. Flight Duty Time will be calculated so as to start from 60 minutes prior to schedule time of Domestic Departure and 75 minutes prior to the schedule time of International Departure. The total time from the moment an aeroplane first moves for the purpose of taking off until the moment it finally comes to rest at the end of the flight. training. . administrative work. f) Flight time. c) Duty period. printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) Duty. Any task that flight crew members are required by the operator to perform. e) Flight Duty Period. or revised time of departure. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 which are equal to or superior to those held by the crew member who is to be replaced for the purpose of in-flight rest. for example.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.—“Flight time” as here defined is synonymous with the term “block to block” time or “chock to chock” time in general usage which is measured from the time an aeroplane first moves for the purpose of taking off until it finally stops at the end of the flight. positioning and standby when it is likely to induce fatigue. Note: As a company policy. A-2-4 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. d) Fatigue. A physiological state of reduced mental or physical performance capability resulting from sleep loss or extended wakefulness. A period which starts when a flight crew member is required by an operator to report for or to commence a duty and ends when that person is free from all duties. or workload (mental and/or physical activity) that can impair a crewmember’s alertness and ability to safely operate an aircraft or perform safety related duties. circadian phase.

m) Rest Period. i) Neighbouring Countries. The time at which flight crewmembers are required by an operator to report for duty. o) Standby. However. being less than a rest period.e. which counts as duty. Countries whose standard times falls within a band of 3 hours (+1:30 hours on either side of India) i. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 g) Home base. Pilots will log flight times based on the actual conditions in their respective logbooks as per Aircraft Rules 1937.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. IndiGo will follow a fixed 8 hour period of 0000-0800 Local Time . which is due to start 10 hours or more ahead. n) Split Duty (Break). Note — “Positioning” as here defined is synonymous with the term “Deadheading”. it shall not include any time during which an operator requires a crewmember to be contactable for the purpose of giving notification of a duty. j) Night Operations: For FDTL planning purpose. k) Positioning. Night will be defined as a time starting from 0000 to 0800 Hrs. l) Reporting time. The transferring of a non-operating crewmember from place to place as a passenger at the behest of the operator. However. It is a defined period of time during which a flight crewmember is required by the operator to be available to receive an assignment for a specific duty without an intervening rest period. An uninterrupted and defined period of time during which a crewmember is free from all duties and airport standby. printed from e-manual / Company Portal h) Local night. A period of eight hours falling between 2200 and 0800 local time. Means a period free of all duties. countries covered in the standard time zone band of UTC+4 to UTC+7.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The location nominated by the operator to the crewmember from where the crewmember normally starts and ends a duty period or a series of duty periods. A-2-5 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.

The scheme for ULR operations will be updated as and when such operations are commenced. equipment malfunctions.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Applicability These flight time/flight duty time limitations shall be applicable to all flight crew personnel. the window of circadian low is estimated to be 0200 to 0600 referred to local time at the point of departure.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. This estimate of the window is calculated from scientific data on the circadian low of performance. the window of circadian low is estimated to be 0200 to 0600 home-base/ domicile time.. such as unforecast weather. Continuous non-stop flights between the specific city pairs having a flight time of over 16 hours and duty periods between 18 and 22 hours. After a crew member remains more than 48 hours away from home-base/ domicile time. peak fatigue). It will neither form a part of Flight Duty nor of Rest period. the window of circadian low is estimated to be 0200 to 0600 home-base/ domicile time for the first 48 hours only. s) Flight Crew Flight crew means the pilots who fly the aircraft and shall also include a flight engineer and flight navigator t) Period of transportation It will be considered as 45 minutes before start of Flight Duty and 45 minutes after end of Flight Duty. subject report (i. printed from e-manual / Company Portal p) Ultra Long Range (ULR) operations. For flight duty periods that cross 3 or fewer time zones. and body temperature.3. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 q) Unforeseen operational circumstance. An unplanned event.e. 2. . For flight duty periods beyond 3 or more time zones. A-2-6 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.2 r) Window of Circadian Low (WOCL) is best estimated by the hours between 0200 and 0600 for individuals adapted to a usual day-wake/ night sleep schedule. alertness. As of date IndiGo doesn’t have ULR operations. or air traffic delay that is beyond the control of the operator.

5 a) 190 duty hours in any 28 consecutive days.3. and c) 60 duty hours in any seven consecutive days.5 hours 5 11 hours 6 A-2-7 Maximum Flight Time Limitation 9 hours 8 hours Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.3.2.3.3 FLT. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 CUMULATIVE international FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic Cumulative Period Flight Time Limitation (Hours) In 7 consecutive days 35 In 30 consecutive days 125 In 365 consecutive days 1000 and DUTY PERIOD: domestic and international operations Crew Scheduling shall not assign and no flight crew member shall accept any duty to exceed: 2. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 2.4 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .5 hours 2 for night operations 3 for day operations 12 hours 4 11. FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic/ neighbouring countries The Flight Time Limitations are as follows : Maximum Daily Flight Duty Period (FDP) Limitation Maximum Number of landings 12. spread evenly as practicable through out this period.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. b) 100 duty hours in 14 consecutive days.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . printed from e-manual / Company Portal When the FDP starts in the WOCL.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.6 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: International operations a) Requirements for international operations Daily maximum flight time limitations for international operations during any 24 consecutive hours: Crew Complement Two-Pilot Operations Maximum Flight Time Limitation/ Max Number of Landings** 10 hours/ up to 1 landings For day operations: 9 Hours/up to 3 landings For night operations: 9 Hours/up to 2 landings Three-Pilot Operations Four-Pilot Operation Four-Pilot ULR Operations* 12 Hours/1 landing 16 Hours/1 landing More than 16 hours ** Maximum Number of Landings is further dependent on Flight Duty Period b) Maximum Daily Flight Duty Period – Two Pilot Operations Maximum Daily Flight Duty period for two pilot operations shall be as per the following table: Maximum Daily Flight Duty Period (FDP) Limitation** 13 hours 12.5 hours Maximum Number of landings Maximum Flight Time Limitation 1 2 for night operations 10 hours 9 hours 3 for day operations 9 hours ** Reduction of Flight duty period due to operation in WOCL A-2-8 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. the maximum FDP stated in above points shall be reduced by 50 % of its encroachment.3. the maximum FDP stated in above points shall be reduced by 100 % of its encroachment up to a maximum of two hours. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 2. When the FDP ends in or fully encompasses the WOCL.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.  Rest Seat will be at least a ‘Business Class’ seat reclining to at least 40° back angle to the vertical. which may be part of the rest of 03 hours. All crew members are expected to be on controls for equivalent period.  The applicable Flight Duty Period may be increased up to a maximum of 16 hours in case of Rest Seat and up to a maximum of 18 hours in case of Bunk. It is the responsibility of PIC to ascertain that all crew members get equal rest during the flight. the division of duty and rest between the flight crew members being relieved will be kept in balance.  Crew shall be allowed to return to controls only after 30 minutes of waking after bunk/seat rest. printed from e-manual / Company Portal When the FDP starts in the WOCL. each crew member will log 9*2/3 = 6 hours individually and should be on controls for 06 hours each. For e. the maximum FDP stated in above points shall be reduced by 50 % of its encroachment. . In case of double crew. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 c) Augmented Crew The maximum flight duty period may be extended in accordance with the following table in case of the flight crew is augmented Rest facility available Rest seat Bunk Maximum extension of the FDP Augmented crew (3 Pilots) 2H 4H Double crew (4 Pilots) 4H 6H  In flight.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. rest facilities shall be available for both pilots not on active duty. A-2-9 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.  In case of augmented/double flight crew. rest of less than 03 hours doesn't allow for the extension of the FDP. the maximum FDP stated in above points shall be reduced by 100 % of its encroachment up to a maximum of two hours. if the flight is for 09 hours.g. outside the cockpit and separated from passengers by a dark curtain. When the FDP ends in or fully encompasses the WOCL.

an additional crew member over and above the minimum crew complement. or air traffic delay that is beyond the control of the Company ‘Flight Time’ and ‘Flight Duty Period’ may be extended as follows: i. such as un-forecast weather. this flight has to be completed within the Extended Flight Duty Time and Duty Period. Under all circumstances. if all sectors of a flight are within the neighbouring countries. then requirements for ‘domestic operations’ shall be followed and in case even one sector of the flight falls in international operation then for the full/ entire flight requirements of ‘international Operations’ shall be followed. Subject to the maximum limit of extension of FDP i.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.e.3.6) for Aircraft Recovery and Passenger convenience provided.7 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Flight Time by maximum of 1½ hours and FDP by maximum of 03 hours subject to a cumulative limit of maximum of 03 hours and maximum of 06 hours respectively in 30 consecutive days. extension shall be decided between PIC and other members of the crew. 03 hours on individual event and 06 hours on cumulative basis. equipment malfunction.3. iii.5 and 2. is available for specified operations. A-2-10 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. ii. PIC in consultation with the other crew members will convey their willingness (or consent) to the Duty Officer – Operations Control Center (OCC) who in turn will obtain the permission from Head of Operations. One Additional Landing is permitted over and above the prescribed limits (specified in 2.2. . (Example for two pilot operations.8 Extension due unforeseen operational circumstances a) For an unplanned event. there will be a third pilot provided as ACM). b) Whenever the flight duty period gets extended.e.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal IndiGo follows the requirements of this CAR based on type of flight being operated i. the rest period shall be pro-rata increased by twice the amount of extended time of flight duty period.3. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 2.

Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 Consecutive night operations 2.9 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. If the standby period is at the airport and iii. b) Standby Period i. However. Standby period shall not extend beyond 12 hours.11 Standby a) General i. In case of exigencies when ‘Standby’ duty may go beyond the roster. .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. ii. Crew scheduling shall ensure that concerned crew is notified in advance. a pilot can undertake a duty if he had undergone a flight duty the previous night between 0000 to 0500 hours. Crew scheduling shall include ‘Standby’ as part of their regular rosters and concerned crew shall be kept notified.3.3.e. ii. a maximum standby at airport (with or without sleeping quarters) shall not exceed 08 hours.2.  Standby culminates into a flight duty then the total period (i. 100%) shall be counted towards cumulative duty period If the standby period is at home or in a hotel and culminates into duty  Within first 06 hours then no part of standby shall be considered as part of flight duty period or cumulative duty period A-2-11 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. However.e. 100%) shall be counted towards the flight duty period and also towards cumulative duty period  Standby does not culminate into a flight duty then the total period (i. Flight Crew can be planned for simulator/ground duties between 0000 to 0500 Hours for a maximum of 02 consecutive days. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Flight crew should not be deployed nor shall a flight crew undertake any Flight duty between periods embracing 0000 to 0500 hours local time if during the previous day he/she performed duty between the periods embracing 0000 to 0500 hours local time.

then the rest period shall be decided based on total period of duty i. 25% of its time shall be considered under cumulative duty. at least 10 hours rest shall follow prior to the next duty period. Positioning a) All the time spent on positioning for Company Requirements shall be counted as duty. c) Positioning after operating a flight duty period without an intervening rest period shall be counted for determining rest period. shall be atleast as long as the preceding duty period.e. d) Positioning shall not count as a landing for purposes of determining ‘Flight Duty Period’. and then extends FDP using ‘Split Duty’.. e) Positioning shall be counted as a landing if.e. c) 2. after a positioning journey. 2. b) Positioning time shall be part of a flight duty period when it immediately precedes (i. the crew member spends less than a minimum rest period at suitable accommodation provided by IndiGo or at home. which must be provided before undertaking a flight duty period.3. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . If standby period is at home or in a hotel does not culminate into a duty then.  When standby culminates in to a duty. A-2-12 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.13 a) Rest Minimum Rest (Before a flight) The minimum rest. without an intervening rest period) a flight duty period in which that person participates as a flight crew member.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal iv.12 FLT. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 At 06 hours or later then flight duty period shall be reduced by 50% of the standby time. during which a call-out has not occurred.OMA Rest period after Standby:  When any period of standby finishes. the duty plus the percentage of standby counted for duty.

IndiGo Policy on period of Transportation for planning purposes will be a fixed time of 45 Minutes each. then the ensuing rest period shall include a local night. Crew scheduling shall ensure that the minimum rest is increased periodically to a weekly rest period. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 12 hours /14 hours on crossing 3 time zones/ 36 hours on crossing 8 time zones whichever is the greater. A-2-13 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. we will restrict this to 144 Hours.  Minimum rest including local nights shall be given. to any crew member who has been away from the home base in such a way that the WOCL had to be modified. For planning purpose.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 OR If the preceding duty period. . before and after the flight. Time zone difference Hours of rest Local nights More than 3 to 7 Beyond 7 36 72 2 3 "Time zone difference" in this table is the time zone difference between the starting and finishing points of the initial duty. Period of transportation to and from an airport shall neither be counted towards duty time nor rest period.) c) Weekly Rest.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.” (Currently all Indigo Flights are less than 3 time zone difference. b) Rest after return to base  Crew Scheduling shall ensure that effects on crew members of time zone differences will be compensated by additional rest as specified below. exceeds 18 hours. being a 36-hour period including two local nights (0000 to 0800 Hours). such that there shall never be more than 168 hours between the end of one weekly rest period and the start of the next. which includes any time spent on positioning. according to the table below when coming back to home base.

Reporting time: a) Crew is to report 0100 /0115 Hours prior to departure time for Domestic/ International flights respectively b) A standard allowance of 30 minutes shall be added at the end of flight time to allow for the completion of checks and records. so as to facilitate inspection by the authorized personnel and surveillance/audit by DGCA officers. duration and end of each flight duty period. and  flight time.  rest periods. the weekly rest period is inclusive of the required rest period for the last day flight prior to the beginning of weekly rest period. The Crew scheduling shall ensure that these records include for each flight crew member. at least:  the start. If discretion was used for similar reasons on more than 20 percent of occasions when a particular route or route pattern is flown. the weekly rest period will be in addition to the required rest period for the last day flight prior to the beginning of weekly rest period. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02  In case Time Zone difference is less than 3. the pre-flight report time shall count both as duty and as flight duty. records will be kept for 18 months of the duties performed and rest periods provided.14 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 2. then the VP Flight Operations /VP A-2-14 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. 2.  In case time zone difference is more than 3.FLT. and the post-flight allowance shall count as duty. c) For record purposes.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.15 Records To ascertain that the fatigue management system is functioning. duration and end of each duty period. The Crew scheduling shall also keep records of occasions when discretion was used by the PIC to extend the prescribed limits. as intended and as approved.  the start.3.

Existing system is a fool proof. Through the computerised system it shall be ensured that the Flight Crew member is well within the flight time.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. IndiGo uses the ACARS automated messages for real time monitoring of Flight Times. The Company records are fully automated in terms of FDTL. 2. DGCA may require submission of copies and analysis of records in the manner deemed fit. flight duty period and rest periods. For the purpose of FDTL monitoring. duty and rest period requirements before permitting him to operate the flight.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The system also has a provision of ‘audit trail’ so that any changes made in the data can be tracked down to its source. transparent & computerised system. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In addition. flight duty. duty period. Any violation of this provision shall attract penalties as laid down in relevant law including action against persons. Series J . for Cabin Attendants flight duty time limitations.3.16 Cabin Attendants . All Flight crew members shall maintain a personnel record of their daily flight time in their personal Flying Log Books.FDTL Refer SEP Manual and CAR Section 7. A-2-15 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 OCC shall review and change the schedule or the crew scheduling arrangements so as to reduce the frequency at which such events occur. These records shall not be kept only on paper. Part 1. Only designated officers of the DGCA and Company will have access to the system. . Personal records maintained by individual pilot are to be reconciled with the Company’s records from time to time. on which there is an online link for DGCA to monitor. Flight crew members shall maintain a personal record of their daily flight time.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-2-16 Effective 04-Dec-12 .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 FLIGHT & DUTY TIME LIMITS CHAPTER 02 Not a controlled copy.

.3 Navigation Error Components .............5 3.....5 FLIGHT CREW PROCEDURES........3.......................................................................................... 11 3................9 3..6......1 Elements of PBN ....INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.. 23 3.....................................................2 General operating procedures ........................................................................1 OPERATING PROCEDURES.4 3.............. 24 3..........OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II...1 RNAV System .........................7............. 27 3............................................................................................6 OPERATING PROCEDURES SPECIFIC TO RNAV/RNP SPECIFICATIONS.........3 Operating procedure – RNAV 1 & 2 ......................5 3................................3.......7...6........ ............................................. 18 OPERATING PROCEDURE-BASIC RNP-1 .....7 3..........................................2 Operating procedures –RNAV 5 ..........................6..............................Basic Functions ........................................... 15 3...2 RNP System ....................... 28 RNAV INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE (IAP) ............ 11 3....................4 3....................3 3............................................. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 3...3.....................................................4 3......................1 EQUIPMENTS .......................4 Basic-RNP 1 STAR specific requirements.......................4 Equipment List..2 GENERAL CONCEPT ..4 3.......8 3.4...............................RNAV 10 (RNP 10) .............................7......................3 Basic-RNP 1 SID specific requirements ...................3.....................................8 3....7......6 3.....Basic Functions ...............5 Contingency Procedures ................ 23 3........ 11 3.......3 RNAV ..... Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 TABLE OF CONTENTS NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED .. 27 3..........................1 Pre-flight planning .......7.....8 PERFORMANCE BASED NAVIGATION (PBN) .. 29 A-3-1 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy..............................................

...............8...........................10 FLIGHT PLANNING & MANAGEMENT .....................9 FLIGHT CREW ERROR REPORTING ............................. 37 3.................8............ 38 3.... 36 3.....2 Aircraft requirements System performance monitoring and alerting .....12 NON COMPLIANCE WITH RNP REQUIREMENTS.............4 Contingency procedures .... 32 3... 29 3.3 Operating procedures ............... 38 A-3-2 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.....................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II..............................8.... 38 3........................13 RNAV PHRASEOLOGY ........................ Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Regulatory Background ..........................................8.................... 36 3.................... 29 3........... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 3......................11 DISPLAY AND SYSTEM CONTROL .......................5 NAV Database Integrity Validation Process ................................8............ 38 3.....................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.............................................1 ..........................................

and - in accordance with the requirements of air traffic services. On flights in which it is intended to land in instrument meteorological conditions.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. iii) Avionics. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Navigation procedures are dependent on the airplane equipment. except when. as applicable. A-3-3 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. Para 7) An airplane is provided with navigation equipment which will enable it to proceed:- in accordance with the flight plan. provide necessary redundancy and. The Aeronautical radio navigation service comprises all types and systems of radio navigation aids in the International aeronautical service. and RVSM operations. Series O. ii) Operational communication equipment requirements. Part II. including emergency communication. - in accordance with prescribed Required Navigation Performance (RNP) types. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the route being flown and ATS requirements. an aircraft shall be provided with radio equipment capable of receiving signals providing guidance to a point from which a visual landing can be effected. necessary to conduct operations in accordance with Air Operators Permit and meet applicable flight parameters. CHAPTER 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED (CAR Section 8. . The company aircraft (A 320) are equipped with: i) The Instrumentation and avionics which are clearly visible to the pilot. This equipment shall be capable of providing such guidance for each aerodrome at which it is intended to land instrument meteorological conditions and for any designated alternate aerodromes. manoeuvres and limitations. if not so precluded by DGCA. authorized by the State for use in RNP. navigation for flights under the visual flight rules is accomplished by visual reference to landmarks at least every 60 NM (110 km). equipment and components satisfy applicable navigation requirements.

This is illustrated in Figure below A-3-4 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. including instrument meteorological conditions. The ICAO has recognised the need to benefit from available RNAV technology to improve existing air navigation systems.2 GENERAL CONCEPT Conventional navigation procedures are based on the availability of satisfactory ground navigation aids. etc. NDB.” This removes the restriction imposed on conventional routes and procedures where the aircraft must over fly referenced navigation aids. (Refer FCOM DSC. The introduction of RNP and RNAV will enable each country to design and plan routes that are not necessarily located over radio Navaids installations. infrastructures (VOR. printed from e-manual / Company Portal v) Other components and equipment necessary to conduct operations under applicable flight conditions. FMS-IRS.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. in the interest of increasing airspace capacity.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. instrumentation and radio equipment necessary to satisfy applicable approach and landing requirements. Such air navigation structure of conventional airways. does not take into account the availability of modern navigation systems with enhanced performance or the availability of glass cockpits. etc. DME. VOR. DME 3.3 RNAV RNAV is defined as “a method of navigation which permits aircraft operation on any desired flight path within the coverage of station-referenced navigation aids or within the limits of the capability of self-contained aids. direct tracks. Large safety margins mandated with respect to airplane separation contribute to airspace saturation in certain areas. SIDs. and offering such advantages as fuel savings. Chapter 34 and 31) 3. . Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 iv) Avionics. which provide crew with improved awareness when flying such procedures.1 EQUIPMENTS The following facilities for Navigation purposes are available to the Pilots: GPS (Dual). which enable Navaids to Navaids navigation. 3. thereby permitting operational flexibility and efficiency. STARs. NDB) and airplane navigation systems. or a combination of these.

1 RNAV System . printed from e-manual / Company Portal Conventional Route CHAPTER 03 . Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED RNAV Route RNAV allows “point-to-point” navigation. satellite navigation. together with inputs from internal database and crew-entered data to perform the following functions:  Navigation  Flight Plan Management  Guidance and Control  Display and System Control 3. the aircraft position being determined by the on-board navigation systems using the information from several navigation aids such as VOR/DME. DME/DME or GNSS (GPS). inertial reference. repeatability and predictability.3. Inertial Reference System (IRS) / Inertial Navigation System (INS) allow extension of this “Area Navigation” further than the range of the navigation aids. appropriate to the application.Basic Functions RNAV systems are designed to provide a given level of accuracy. with repeatable and predictable path definition.3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. This allows approaches constituted by a succession of non-aligned straight segments. radio navigation.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The RNAV System typically integrates information from sensors such as air data.2 RNP System . including curved paths where vertical profiles are included for A-3-5 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. 3.Basic Functions An RNP system is an RNAV system whose functionalities support on-board performance monitoring and alerting. Specific requirements include: Capability to follow a desired ground track with reliability.

It must perform the integrity and reasonableness checks of the sensors and data. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 vertical guidance. RNP requirements may limit the modes of operation of the aircraft e. An RNP system utilizes its navigation sensors. for low RNP where flight technical error is a significant factor. Monitoring of the system performance and alerting the crew when RNP requirements are not met. and Navigation System Error (NSE). including: . The three main errors in the context of on-board performance monitoring and alerting are Path Definition Error (PDE). manual flight by the crew may not be allowed. Dual system/sensor installations may also be required depending on the intended operation or need. - - Display and indication of both the required and estimated navigation system performance. 3. as shown in Figure below.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.3 Navigation Error Components The inability to achieve the required lateral navigation accuracy may be due to navigation errors related to aircraft tracking and positioning. Cross track deviation displays scaled to RNP. in conjunction with separate monitoring and alerting for navigation integrity. and may provide a means to deselect specific types of navigation aids to prevent reversion to an inadequate sensor.g. Flight Technical Error (FTE).3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The performance monitoring and alerting capability may be provided in different forms depending on the system installation. (Refer next page) A-3-6 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. system architecture and modes of operation to satisfy the RNP navigation specification requirements. architecture and configurations. use of vertical angles or specified altitude constraints to define a desired vertical path. The distribution of these errors is assumed to be independent with zero-mean.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the path expected to be flown over the ground. Use of an RNAV system for navigation presupposes that a defined path representing the intended track is loaded into the navigation database.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. or occurs when the aircraft reaches a target altitude A-3-7 Effective 15-Dec-13 . A consistent.e. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Not a controlled copy. requires a fly-over of a waypoint. repeatable path cannot be defined for a turn that allows for a fly-by turn at a waypoint. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Lateral Navigation Errors (95%) PDE occurs when the path defined in the RNAV system does not correspond to the desired path i.

continuity and availability of functionality.g.3. FTE can be monitored by the auto pilot or air crew procedures and the extent to which these procedures need to be supported by other means depends. A-3-8 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. – FTE is sometimes referred to as Path Steering Error (PSE) NSE refers to the difference between the aircraft’s estimated position and actual position. CDI centring error). Series O. on the phase of flight and the type of operations. integrity. printed from e-manual / Company Portal FTE relates to the air crew or auto pilot’s ability to follow the defined path or track. Part VI.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4 PERFORMANCE BASED NAVIGATION (PBN) (CAR Section 8. Issue II) PBN is a concept based on the use of Area Navigation (RNAV) systems rather than sensor-specific navigation. Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Such monitoring support could be provided by a map display. for example. Note. . on required Navigation performance equipment.4 Equipment List MEL requirements are based on the type of RNAV / RNP airspace. 3. together with descriptions of how this performance is to be achieved in terms of aircraft and crew requirements. PBN signifies a transition to more extensive statements of required performance in terms of accuracy. – NSE is sometimes referred to as Positioning Estimation Error (PEE) 3. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Note. including any display error (e.. So far the RNAV requirements were based on the limited statement of required performance accuracy and containment limits.

Examples of NAVAIDS are as follows: - Ground: Very High Frequency Omni-Range (VOR).4. etc. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 3. to have RNAV / RNP terminal area procedures for Delhi. A new ICAO document 'Performance Based Navigation Manual’ replaces the existing document 'Manual on Required Navigation Performance (RNP) ICAO Doc 9613'. indicating the designation of the required Navigation Specification plus any established limitations imposed for the particular Navigation Application. will be detailed in charts and in the Aeronautical Information Publications (AIPs). - Space: Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). space or onboard NAVAIDs which support or provide positioning capability. a lot of RNP terminology has been replaced by PBN terminology. Distance Measuring Equipment (DME).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Therefore. - A Navigation Specification is either a ' RNP' specification or a ' RNAV' specification - A RNP specification includes a requirement for on-board selfcontained performance monitoring and alerting. Navigation Applications. A-3-9 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.1 Elements of PBN There are three elements of PBN within an Airspace context: a) Navigation Application The application of a Navigation Specification and the supporting NAVAID Infrastructure to specific routes. These are entered in the Air Operator Permit. (GPS and GLONASS) - On-board: Inertial Reference Units Navigation Specification The aircraft and aircrew requirement needed to support PBN operations. procedures and/or defined airspace volumes.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . b) c) Navigation Aid (NAVAID) Infrastructure The ground. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Required Navigation Performance (RNP) concept has been replaced by the PBN concept. whilst a RNAV specification does not. For example.

. Notes: i) The numbers given in the table refer to the 95% accuracy requirements (NM). e.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Facilitation of the operational approval process for operators by providing a limited set of navigation specifications intended for global use. RNAV 5. The number in the designator represents the minimum lateral navigation accuracy in nautical miles (nm) that must be maintained for at least 95% of the flight time. It should be noted that the accuracy limit is only one of the performance requirements for PBN procedures. ii) RNAV 5 is an en-route navigation specification which may be used for the initial part of the STAR outside 30NM and above MSA. iii) RNP 2 and Advanced-RNP 1 are expected to be included in a future revision of the ICAO PBN Manual. BASICRNP 1. the accuracy value for alerting becomes 2 NM A-3-10 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. as given below.g. The required lateral accuracy limits the combined total of all errors that may exist in an aircraft system.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Each Navigation Specification has a designator. RNP APCH. iv) 1a means that the navigation application is limited to use on STARs and SIDs only. v) 1b means that the area of application can only be used after the initial climb of a missed approach phase vi) 1c means that beyond 30 NM from the airport reference point (ARP). RNP AR APCH. This combined error is known as the 'Total System Error' (TSE).

1 Flight Planning TO RNAV/RNP Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for RNAV 10 (RNP 10) operations in AOP before routing the same on RNP 10 routes. printed from e-manual / Company Portal (Example of an Application of RNAV and RNP Specifications to ATS Routes and Instrument Procedures) . for example. weather conditions) that affect the aircraft’s ability to maintain navigation accuracy. Flight crew procedures are usually embodied in the company operating manual. b) IndiGo fleet is equipped with GNSS (GPS) which obviates the requirement of time limitation for RNP-10 operations.6 OPERATING PROCEDURES SPECIFICATIONS SPECIFIC 3. At a regional level.6.RNAV 10 (RNP 10) 3. These procedures could include. These procedures would also require the flight crew to state their intentions.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51. established contingency procedures should be made available so as to permit the flight crew to follow such established procedures in the event that it is not possible to notify ATC of their difficulties. a) Flight crew should verify that that two LRNS [long-range navigation systems. that the flight crew notify ATC of contingencies (equipment failures. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.5 FLIGHT CREW PROCEDURES Flight crew procedures complement the technical contents of the navigation specification. A-3-11 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.1 OPERATING PROCEDURES. 3.6. coordinate a plan of action and obtain a revised ATC clearance in such instances.1.Two FMGC (or 1 FMGC + 1 BACK UP NAV)] are operational.

3 Navigation equipment Indigo fleet is equipped with following long range navigation systems with the corresponding standards: a) The FMGS has been demonstrated to comply with applicable requirements of FAA AC 20-130A.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Refer Para 3. RAIM levels required for RNP10 should be verified through RAIM NOTAMs (where available) issued by ATS Authorities.3. when operating with aircraft position based on: A-3-12 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.8.2 h since IRS ground alignment.7 h since last FM radio update. 3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.3 for RAIM NOTAM description. for a navigation system integrating multiple navigation sensors.1.2 “R” (PBN approved) “A1” (RNP 10) Ref FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for any operating restriction on navigation system.  5. Ensure that maintenance action has been taken to correct defects in the required equipment b) Refer guidance given in FCOM PRO-SPO-51 P 4/6 to recognize when the aircraft is no longer able to navigate to its RNP 10 approval capability and ATC must be advised.1. c) ATS Filling guidance for RNP 10 routesItem 10a - Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/d) 3.6. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . Pre-flight procedures The following actions should be completed during pre-flight: a) Flight crew to review FRB to ascertain the condition of the equipment mentioned in FCOM PRO-SPO-51 required for flight in RNP 10 airspace or on an RNP 10 route. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 For aircraft with unserviceable GPS. the flight time outside radio navaid coverage is limited to the following criteria:  6.6.

or IRS position only. a navigation accuracy check must be performed by using external navaids.5 En route a) Refer guidance given in FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for minimum required equipment to enter a RNP-4/RNP-10 airspace . This may require DME/DME and/or VOR checks to determine navigation system errors through displayed and actual positions. A-3-13 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. The IRS has been demonstrated to comply with the position accuracy criteria of AC 25. In case of downgrading of GPS.6. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED    3. Refer FCOM DSC-22_20-20-20 for Navigation Accuracy Check.1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) CHAPTER 03 . 3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. or IRS position and radio navaid update. [5R] field and scratchpad) and temporarily on the ND which ensures navigation accuracy. b) Before entering oceanic airspace.4 and FAR 121 appendix G for flight time up to 16 h (ie in excess of aircraft range) Availability of navaids At flight planning stage. Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51 P. d) Flight Crew must advise ATC of any deterioration or failure of the navigation equipment below the navigation performance requirements or of any deviations required for a contingency procedure. flight crew should consider an alternate route which does not require that particular equipment or having to make a diversion for repairs.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. dispatch should check RAIM NOTAMS issued by ATS Authorities to ensure that the maximum allowable time for which the FDE capability is projected to be unavailable is 34 minutes on any one occasion only.In case of unavailability.4 IRS position and GPS update. check "GPS PRIMARY” message displayed on the MCDU (PROG page. c) Refer FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-15 for mandatory cross-checking procedures to identify navigation errors in cruise to prevent aircraft from inadvertent deviation from ATC-cleared routes.1.6.

both FMGCs use the operative radio receiver to compute the position of the aircraft.1.6. flight director. 3. 10 NM). The flight crew can also use the RAD NAV page to manually tune both VORs. up to a maximum of one-times the navigation accuracy (i.e.FF = frequency).  In dual mode and independent mode.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.e. 5 NM). Note: The manual selection of a VOR or VOR/DME may prevent the FMGS from automatically tuning a VOR/DME to compute position. one DME.6 Manual radio position updating (Refer FCOM DSC-22_20-20-30) Radio navaids are tuned for two different purposes: Display and computation. overshoots or undershoots) during and immediately after route turns. Brief deviations from this standard (e. one ILS and one ADF).  In single mode. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Flight crew should use a map display deviation (ND). ILS. the related MCDU displays ―TUNE BBB FFF. Note: If one radio receiver fails. The FMGS automatically tunes the radio navaids for computation of the radio position. In these modes. each FMGC simultaneously tunes the navaids on its own side (one VOR. In this case. the flight crew can also manually tune the VOR (and associated DME). FFF. A-3-14 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. f) The cross-track error/deviation (the difference between the RNAV system computed path and the aircraft position relative to the path) should be limited to ±½ the navigation accuracy associated with the route (i. are allowable. and ADF. both ADFs and the ILS. the valid FMGC tunes navaids on both sides. printed from e-manual / Company Portal e) . Manual tuning has priority over automatic tuning.g. or autopilot in lateral navigation mode on RNP 10 operations to maintain route centrelines.FF‖ (BBB = ident. as depicted by respective displays (unless authorized to deviate by ATC or under emergency conditions).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. It is possible to perform tuning for display in three different ways:  Automatic tuning via FMGC software  Manual tuning via the MCDU RAD NAV page  Manual tuning via the Radio Management Panel (RMP) if either both FMGCs or both MCDUs fail.

6.2 General operating procedures a) RNAV 5 routes should not be filled or requested unless they satisfy all the inherent criteria.2. Ref FCOM PRO-SPO-51 P 3/6 for guidance on same. delaying the departure or planning a different departure procedure) 3.3. e) RAIM levels required for RNAV 5 should be verified through RAIM NOTAMs (where available) issued by ATS authorities.8.3 for RAIM NOTAM description. including any non-RNAV contingencies. b) Flight crew should comply with any instructions or procedures identified by the manufacturer as being necessary to comply with the performance requirements of RNAV-5.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for list of the on-board navigation equipment necessary for the operation. Refer Para 3. Flight crew should inform the ATC. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3. d) Navigation database should be current and appropriate for the region of intended operation and must include the navigation aids and waypoints required for the route.2 Operating procedures –RNAV 5 3. the flight planning should be revised (i. continuous loss of appropriate level of fault detection of more than five minutes for any part of the RNAV 5 operation.6.6. b) ATS Filling guidance for RNAV 5 routes- c) Item 10a -“R” (PBN approved) Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/ -“B1” (RNAV 5) Dispatch should confirm the availability of the navaid infrastructure.2.1 Pre-flight planning CHAPTER 03 Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for RNAV 5 operations in AOP before routing the same on RNAV 5 routes.e.These should include AFM limitations or A-3-15 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. must be confirmed for the period of intended operations. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) . and revert to conventional navigation in case of nonconformity to the RNAV clearance. In the event of a predicted.

up to a maximum of one-times the navigation accuracy (i. 2. Brief deviations from this standard (e. 5 NM). h) If ATS issues a heading assignment taking the aircraft off a route. cross-track error/deviation (the difference between the RNAV system-computed path and the aircraft position relative to the path) should be limited to ±½ the navigation accuracy associated with the procedure or route (i.e. flight director. by cross-checks with conventional navigation aids using the primary displays in conjunction with the RNAV control and MCDU. If required. full-scale deflection: ±5 NM). f) For RNAV 5. When the aircraft is not on the published route. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) . e) During the flight. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 operating procedures required to maintain the navigation accuracy specified for the procedure. the pilot should not modify the flight plan in the RNAV system until a clearance is received to re-join the route or the controller confirms a new clearance. as depicted by on-board lateral deviation indicators and/or flight guidance. flight crew should use a map display deviation (ND). Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-15. A-3-16 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. For normal operations. d) Flight crews should cross-check the cleared flight plan by comparing charts or other applicable resources with the MCDU and the aircraft map display (ND). flight progress should be monitored for navigational reasonableness.e.g. during all RNAV operations. or autopilot in lateral navigation mode. Flight crew must confirm that the navigation database is up to date.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Lateral deviation scaling should be checked to be suitable for the navigation accuracy associated with the route/procedure (e. if applicable.5 NM). overshoots or undershoots) during and immediately after procedure/route turns.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.g. g) Flight crew are expected to maintain route centre lines. are allowable. the exclusion of specific navigation aids should be confirmed. the specified accuracy requirement does not apply. Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SRP-01-10. unless authorized to deviate by ATC or under emergency conditions.

or if both FMGCs have failed inform the ATC. periodically crosscheck the FM position with navaid raw data. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3. A-3-17 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. The communication to ATC must be in accordance with the authorized procedures. or when entering the terminal area revert to the default required accuracy.1 nm.6.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the flight crew should continue with the flight plan in accordance with the published “lost communication” procedure. . resume navigation with the other FMGC. Manual selection of a required accuracy on the MCDU is optional. If the accuracy check confirms that only one FMGC position is incorrect. If manual entry of a required accuracy is desired enter 5 nm or use the radial equivalent to 5 nm XTK accuracy that is 6. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Flight crew must notify ATC when the RNAV performance ceases to meet the requirements for RNAV 5.2. and revert to conventional navigation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. In inertial navigation. independently of the estimated accuracy displayed on the MCDU. RNAV-5 capability is maintained for 2 h. or enter the appropriate value on the MCDU.3 CHAPTER 03 Contingency Procedures When GPS PRIMARY is not available. When leaving RNAV-5 airspace. Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for further guidance. If one of the following MCDU or ECAM messages is displayed check navigation accuracy with navaid raw data. In the event of communications failure. or with the GPS MONITOR page:  NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD  FMS1/FMS2 POS DIFF  CHECK IRS 1(2)(3)/FM POSITION  ECAM : FM/GPS POS DISAGREE (if GPS installed) If the accuracy check confirms that RNAV-5 capability is lost.

— Navigation databases are expected to be current for the duration of the flight.6. e) Distance measuring equipment (DME) availability: For navigation relying on DME. The availability of the navaid infrastructure. and alternate airfields. Follow procedures described in FCOM DSC-22_20-20-50 P ½-[OPERATIONS WITH AN OUTDATED NAVIGATION DATABASE]. b) ATS Filling guidance for RNAV 1 & 2 routesItem 10a - Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/c) “R” (PBN approved) “C1” (RNAV 2) “D1” (RNAV 1) The on-board navigation data must be current and appropriate for the region of intended operation and must include the navigation aids. continuous loss of appropriate level of fault detection of more than five minutes for any part of the RNAV 1 or RNAV 2 operation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Note. arrival. and relevant coded ATS routes for departure.3 for RAIM notam description.8.6. In the event of a predicted. including the suitability of navigation facilities used to define the routes and procedures for flight. If the AIRAC cycle is due to change during flight. required for the intended routes. waypoints. delaying the departure or planning a different departure procedure). must be confirmed for the period of intended operations using all available information. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3. including any non-RNAV contingencies.g. d) RAIM levels required for RNAV 1 or RNAV 2 should be verified through RAIM NOTAMs (where available) issued by ATS Authorities. flight operation department should ensure the accuracy of the navigation data. Flight crew should be aware of their capability to navigate A-3-18 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. NOTAMs should be checked to verify the condition of critical DMEs.3.3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.1 Pre-flight planning CHAPTER 03 Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for RNAV 1 & 2 operations in AOP before routing the same on RNAV 1 & 2 en-route and terminal procedures. the flight plan should be revised (e. Refer Para 3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) .3 Operating procedure – RNAV 1 & 2 3.

The manual entry or creation of new waypoints by manual entry. 3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. f) Whenever possible. flight crew must confirm the navigation database is current and verify that the aircraft position has been entered correctly. Moreover. and follow ATC instructions in case of nonconformity to the RNAV clearance. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) .2 General operating procedures Flight crew should comply with any instructions or procedures identified by the manufacturer as necessary to comply with the performance requirements. Flight crew should inform the ATC of the loss of RNAV 1 and RNAV 2 capability. However. it is permitted to select and insert individual. RNAV 1 and RNAV 2 routes in the en-route domain should be extracted from the database in their entirety. (REF FCOM PRO-NOR-SRP-01-10) d) Flight crew must verify proper entry of their ATC assigned route upon initial clearance and any subsequent change of route. depicted by their navigation system. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 (potentially to an alternate destination) in case of failure of critical DME while airborne. b) Flight crew should not request or file RNAV 1 and RNAV 2 operation unless they satisfy all the inherent criteria of the intended operation.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. However. matches the route depicted on the appropriate chart(s) and their assigned route. provided all fixes along the published route to be flown are inserted. flight crew must not change any RNAV SID or STAR database waypoint type from a fly-by to a flyover or vice versa. e) Flight crew must not fly an RNAV 1 or RNAV 2 SID or STAR unless it is retrievable by route name from the on-board navigation database and conforms to the charted route. the route may subsequently be modified through the insertion or deletion of specific waypoints in response to ATC clearances. Additionally. c) At system initialization. They must ensure the waypoints sequence. Refer PRO-SPO-51 for guidance on the same.3. of latitude and longitude or rho/theta values is not permitted.6. the route may A-3-19 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. rather than loading individual waypoints from the database into the flight plan. named fixes/waypoints from the navigation database.

±2 NM for RNAV 2.5 NM for RNAV 1. ±1 NM for RNAV 1.0 NM for RNAV 2). cross-track error/deviation (the difference between the RNAV system computed path and the aircraft position relative to the path. Brief deviations from this standard (e.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. as with or without a flight director or autopilot. k) Flight crew must ensure that lateral deviation numeric values (in ND) is suitable for the navigation accuracy associated with the route/procedure: Lateral deviation values. Flight crews should cross-check the cleared flight plan by comparing charts or other applicable resources with the navigation system textual display and the aircraft map display. i) For RNAV 2 routes. flight crew must use a lateral deviation indicator (in ND). 0. as depicted by onboard lateral deviation indicators (ND) and/or flight guidance during all RNAV operations.e. unless authorized to deviate by ATC or under emergency conditions.— Crew may notice a slight difference between the navigation information portrayed on the chart and their primary navigation display(ND). where feasible.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 1. or autopilot in lateral navigation mode.g. FTE) should be limited to ±½ the navigation accuracy associated with the procedure or route (i.e. If required. For normal operations. flight crew may use a navigation map display with as a lateral deviation indicator. i. j) For RNAV 1 routes. Differences of 3 degrees or less may result from the equipment manufacturer’s application of magnetic variation and are operationally acceptable. A-3-20 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. if applicable. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 subsequently be modified through the insertion or deletion of specific waypoints in response to ATC clearances. the flight crew should use available data from ground-based navigation aids to confirm navigational reasonableness. The creation of new waypoints by manual entry of attitude and longitude is not permitted. printed from e-manual / Company Portal g) . l) Flight crew are expected to maintain route centrelines. Note. h) During the flight. flight director. the exclusion of specific navigation aids should be confirmed.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal m) If ATC issues a heading assignment taking the aircraft off a route. and the correct airport and runway data are loaded. When the aircraft is not on the published route. 3. [IndiGo’s fleet is equipped with TSO-C129/C129A certified GNSS sensors which subsequently require the departure airport to be loaded into the flight plan in order to achieve the appropriate navigation system monitoring and sensitivity. the specified accuracy requirement does not apply. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 overshoots or undershoots) during and immediately after procedure/route turns. up to a maximum of one times the navigation accuracy (i.3. is recommended. Flight crew who are assigned an RNAV departure procedure and subsequently receive a change of runway.6. d) Before the take-off roll commences GNSS (GPS) signal must be acquired.3 RNAV SID specific requirements a) Prior to commencing take-off. Prior to flight.0 NM for RNAV 1. c) Flight crew must use a navigation map display/flight director/autopilot to achieve an appropriate level of performance for RNAV 1. . are allowable. A final check of proper runway entry and correct route depiction. b) RNAV engagement altitude:.] A-3-21 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. climb to 304 m (1 000 ft) then direct to …). 1.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. operating correctly.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. flight crew must verify the aircraft’s RNAV system is available.e. 2. crew should not modify the flight plan in the RNAV system until a clearance is received to re-join the route or the controller confirms a new route clearance. shortly before take-off. The altitude at which RNAV guidance begins on a given route may be higher (e.0 NM for RNAV).g. Flight crew must be able to use RNAV equipment to follow flight guidance for lateral RNAV no later than 153 m (500 ft) above the airport elevation. procedure or transition must verify the appropriate changes are entered and available for navigation prior to take-off. it must be verified that the aircraft navigation system is operating correctly and the correct runway and departure procedure (including any applicable en-route transition) are entered and properly depicted.

reasonableness of track angles and distances. e) Flight crew must verify their aircraft navigation system is operating correctly and the correct arrival procedure and runway (including any applicable transition) are entered and properly depicted. This may include the insertion of tactical waypoints loaded from the database. a check will need to be made to confirm that updating will exclude a particular navigation aid. any published altitude and speed constraints must be observed. . and. necessary preparations must be completed before commencing the RNAV route. d) Route modifications in the terminal area may take the form of radar headings or “direct to” clearances and the flight crew must be capable of reacting in a timely fashion. the flight crew should verify that the correct terminal route has been loaded. A route must not be used if doubt exists as to the validity of the route in the navigation database. using temporary waypoints or fixes not provided in the database. where possible.3. b) The creation of new waypoints by manual entry into the RNAV system by the flight crew would invalidate the route and is not permitted. c) Where the contingency procedure requires reversion to a conventional arrival route. together with the proposed course of action.5 Contingency procedures Flight crew must notify ATC of any loss of the RNAV capability.6. f) Although a particular method is not mandated. This includes confirmation of the waypoint sequence.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 3. is not permitted. which waypoints are fly-by and which are flyover. If required by a route. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Prior to the arrival phase.: As a minimum.4 a) CHAPTER 03 RNAV STAR specific requirements Note.6. Manual entry or modification by the flight crew of the loaded route. The active flight plan should be checked by comparing the charts with the map display (if applicable) and the MCDU.3. any altitude or speed constraints. If unable to comply with the requirements of an RNAV A-3-22 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. the arrival checks could be a simple inspection of a suitable map display that achieves the objectives of this paragraph.

7 OPERATING PROCEDURE-BASIC RNP-1 3. the flight crew should continue with the RNAV route in accordance with established lost communications procedures. or “FMS1/FMS2 POS DIFF” (on MCDU). or ”CHECK IRS 1(2)(3)/FM POSITION” (on MCDU).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and check that HIGH accuracy is available. b) ATS Filling guidance for BASIC-RNP 1 SIDs and STARs  Item 10a -  Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/A-3-23 “R” (PBN approved) “O1” (BASIC-RNP 1) Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. while flying the procedure: a) b) c) d) ”NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD” (on MCDU and ND) on both sides. if GPS installed) Then inform the ATC of the loss of P-RNAV/RNP-1 capability. revert to the default value or enter the appropriate value on the MCDU PROG page. When completing the terminal procedure. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . IF GPS PRIMARY is not available: Crosscheck the FM position with the navaid raw data. before starting the procedure. or ”NAV FM/GPS POS DISAGREE” (on ECAM. and follow ATC instructions.   If GPS is NOT required for the P-RNAV/RNP-1 procedure : Check that GPS PRIMARY is available (GPS PRIMARY displayed on the MCDU PROG page). If one of the following messages appears.1 Pre-flight planning a) Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for Basic RNP-1 operations in AOP before routing the same on Basic RNP-1 terminal procedures. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 route. navigation may be continued using the other FMGC.7. Check or enter RNP-1 in the REQUIRED field of the MCDU PROG page. pilots must advise ATS as soon as possible. Note: If the ―NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD‖ message is displayed on one side only. 3. In the event of communications failure.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The loss of RNAV capability includes following failure or event causing the aircraft to no longer satisfy the RNAV requirements of the route (Ref FCOM PRO-SPO-51).

required for the intended routes.7. . b) Flight crew should not request Basic-RNP 1 procedures unless they satisfy system criteria (Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51).g. d) RAIM levels required for Basic-RNP 1 should be verified through RAIM NOTAMs (where available) issued by ATS Authorities. e) In the event of a predicted. If the flight crew receives a clearance from ATC to conduct a Basic-RNP 1 procedure. A-3-24 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. continuous loss of appropriate level of fault detection of more than five minutes for any part of the Basic-RNP 1 operation. flight crew must confirm that the navigation database is current and verify that the aircraft Position has been entered correctly. The availability of the navaid infrastructure.3 for RAIM NOTAM description. minimum equipment needed for Basic RNP-1 etc. Refer Para 3. c) At system initialization.3. they must advise ATC if he/she is unable to accept the clearance and must request alternate instructions. Flight crew must verify proper entry of their ATC assigned route upon initial clearance and any subsequent change of route and must ensure that the waypoint sequence depicted by their navigation system matches the route depicted on the appropriate chart(s) and their assigned route.8. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Crew should ensure on-board navigation data TO be of current AIRAC cycle.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Note. 3. System criteria should include navigation accuracy. delaying the departure or planning a different departure procedure). must be confirmed for the period of intended operations using all available information. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.Pilots must adhere to any AFM limitations or operating procedures required to maintain Basic-RNP 1 performance for the SID or STAR. the flight plan should be revised (e. including any non-RNAV contingencies.2 a) General operating procedures Flight crew should comply with any instructions or procedures identified by the manufacturer as necessary to comply with the performance requirements of Basic RNP 1.

Additionally.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. radar vectoring.. by comparing the waypoints. When HIGH is displayed - The RNP requirement is estimated to be fulfilled.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. insertion of waypoints loaded from the navigation database. RNAV TRANSITION. the crew informs the ATC. flight crew must use a navigation map display. However. the crew can insert the appropriate RNP value (1) in the REQUIRED ACCUR field of the PROG page. In this case: h)  The crew crosschecks navigation with raw data. When LOW is displayed - The RNP requirement is estimated not to be fulfilled.. A lateral deviation A-3-25 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. f) The terminal procedure (RNAV SID. flight director. Note. tracks. with the procedure chart. RNAV STAR.) must be loaded from the FM navigation database and checked for reasonableness. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Flight crew must not fly a Basic-RNP 1 SID or STAR unless it is retrievable by procedure name from the on-board navigation database and conforms to the charted procedure. by manual entry of latitude and longitude or rho/theta values is not permitted. if available. or if raw data is unavailable. distances and altitude constraints (displayed on the F-PLN page). printed from e-manual / Company Portal d) .  If the crosscheck is negative. the procedure may subsequently be modified through the insertion or deletion of specific waypoints in response to ATC clearances which includes DIR TO. — Pilots may notice a slight difference between the navigation information portrayed on the chart and their primary navigation display. e) The manual entry or creation of new waypoints. g) When flying in an RNP environment. pilots must not change any SID or STAR database waypoint type from a fly-by to a flyover or vice versa. . or autopilot in lateral navigation mode. For Basic-RNP 1 routes. Differences of 3 degrees or less may result from the equipment manufacturer’s application of magnetic variation and are operationally acceptable.

or "AREA RNP IS XX. up to a maximum of one-times the navigation accuracy (i.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 display must ensure that lateral deviation scaling is suitable for the navigation accuracy associated with the route/procedure (e. When this occurs.5 NM for BasicRNP 1).XX". FTE) should be limited to ±½ the navigation accuracy associated with the procedure (i.XX". full-scale deflection: ±1 NM for Basic-RNP 1). the flight crew should not modify the flight plan in the RNP system until a clearance is received to re-join the route or the controller confirms a new route clearance.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-3-26 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. overshoots or undershoots) during and immediately after turns. printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) . k) The terminal procedure loaded from the FM navigation database should be checked for RNP value in the REQUIRED field of the PROG page to be 1 or lower. cross-track error/deviation (the difference between the system computed path and the aircraft position relative to the path. and clear or modify it if necessary.g. as depicted by onboard lateral deviation indicators and/or flight guidance during all BasicRNP 1 operations unless authorized to deviate by ATC or under emergency conditions.e. the flight crew should verify the RNP value that was manually entered in the REQUIRED field of the PROG page.0 NM for Basic-RNP 1) are allowable. When the aircraft is not on the published Basic-RNP 1 route.g. one of the following messages is displayed: "PROCEDURE RNP IS XX.e. For normal operations. the specified accuracy requirement does not apply. 1. Brief deviations from this standard (e. j) If ATC issues a heading assignment that takes an aircraft off of a route. for Basic-RNP 1 SIDs and STARs. When a flight crew enters an RNP that is higher than the published value. i. Flight crew are expected to maintain center lines. The displayed RNP is (in a decreasing order of priority):    The value that the flight crew entered The navigation database procedure value The system’s default value.e. 0.

 A final check of proper runway entry and correct route depiction.7. The pilot must be able to use Basic-RNP 1 equipment to follow flight guidance for lateral RNAV no later than 153 m (500 ft) above airport elevation. the flight crew must verify: Aircraft’s Basic-RNP 1 system including navigation system is available and operating correctly (REF FCOM PRO-SPO-51 P 5/6). c) GPS signal must be verified before the take-off roll commences (GPS PRIMARY AVAILABLE MSG). shortly before take-off. 3. b) Engagement altitude. and clear or modify it if necessary. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . A-3-27 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. which waypoints are fly-by and which are flyover. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3. any altitude or speed constraints.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. is recommended.  Correct runway and departure procedure (including any applicable en-route transition) are entered and properly depicted (REF FCOM PRO-NOR-SRP-01-10 P 8/32). procedure or transition must verify the appropriate changes are entered and available for navigation prior to take-off (REF FCOM PRO-NOR-SRP-01-15). This includes confirmation of the waypoint sequence. and.3 a) CHAPTER 03 Basic-RNP 1 SID specific requirements Prior to commencing take-off. d) The flight crew should verify the RNP value required for Basic-RNP 1 SID in the REQUIRED field of the PROG page.4 a) Basic-RNP 1 STAR specific requirements Prior to the arrival phase.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The departure airport must be loaded into the flight plan in order to achieve the appropriate navigation system monitoring and sensitivity. reasonableness of track angles and distances.7. where possible.  Any subsequent change of runway. the flight crew should perform following checks: o Verify that the correct terminal route has been loaded. o The active flight plan should be checked by comparing the charts with the map display and the MCDU.

and the flight director or autopilot should be used. g) If the Basic-RNP 1 STAR begins beyond 30 NM from the ARP. d) Procedure modifications in the terminal area may take the form of radar headings or “direct to” clearances and the flight crew must be capable of reacting in a timely fashion. This may include the insertion of tactical waypoints loaded from the database.7. f) Published altitude and speed constraints must be observed. map b) The creation of new waypoints by manual entry into the Basic-RNP 1 system by the flight crew would invalidate the route and is not permitted. necessary preparations must be completed before commencing the Basic-RNP 1 procedure. o A route must not be used if doubt exists as to the validity of the route in the navigation database. If one of the following messages appears while flying the procedure: A-3-28 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. The loss of RNP capability includes any failures causing the aircraft to no longer satisfy the Basic-RNP 1 requirements of the route.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.. the arrival checks could be a simple inspection of a display(ND). 3. Manual entry or modification by the flight crew of the loaded route. printed from e-manual / Company Portal o . using temporary waypoints or fixes not provided in the database. is not permitted. If unable to comply with the requirements of a Basic-RNP 1 SID or STAR for any reason.As a minimum. REQUIRED field of the PROG page must be set for the Basic-RNP 1 STAR. c) Where the contingency procedure requires reversion to a conventional arrival route. e) Flight crew must verify navigation system is operating correctly and the correct arrival procedure and runway (including any applicable transition) are entered and properly depicted.5 Contingency Procedures Flight crew must notify ATC of any loss of the RNP capability (integrity alerts or loss of navigation). pilots must advise ATS as soon as possible.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Note. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 A check will need to be made to confirm that updating will exclude a particular navigation aid.

2 Aircraft requirements System performance monitoring and alerting The inability to achieve the required lateral navigation accuracy may be due to navigation errors related to aircraft tracking and positioning. ICAO PBN manual. Europe and other parts of the world.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1 Regulatory Background IndiGo fleet of A320-232 with its multi-sensor RNAV systems using GNSS. Recently RNAV IAPs have also been incorporated in Indian airspace. complies with both European (EASA AMC 20-27) and United States (AC 20-130A) guidance assures automatic compliance with ICAO PBN manual.8.8 RNAV INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE (IAP) With advent of modern navigation equipment. These IAPs incorporate RNP approach (RNP APCH) procedures include existing RNAV (GNSS) approach procedures designed with a Straight segment.2. if GPS installed) Then: Inform the ATC of the loss of P-RNAV/RNP-1 capability. or  ”CHECK IRS 1(2)(3)/FM POSITION” (on MCDU). Doc 9613. Doc 9613 mandates adherence to the respective limits as mentioned below along with the monitoring & alerting measures. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  .8. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 ”NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD” (on MCDU and ND) on both sides.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. or  ”NAV FM/GPS POS DISAGREE” (on ECAM.1 Flight technical error (FTE) FTE relates to the air crew or autopilot's ability to follow the defined path or track. 3. 3. 3. 3. and follow ATC instructions. including any display error. The three main errors are path definition error (PDE). Note: If the ―NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD‖ message is displayed on one side only.8. or  “FMS1/FMS2 POS DIFF” (on MCDU). During operations on the initial and intermediate segments: A-3-29 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. obviating the need for further assessment or AFM documentation. navigation may be continued using the other FMGC. RNAV IAPs are seen as the future of terminal navigation and is currently prevalent in the USA. flight technical error (FTE) and navigation system error (NSE).

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. It can be monitored by tracking estimated position error (EPU) on both MCDU s-pad message as well as ND indication. A-3-30 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.3 NM for at least 95 per cent of the total flight time. Crew Compliance The use of a deviation indicator (ND for XTKE) with 1 NM lateral deviation on the initial and intermediate segments. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 95 per cent FTE should not exceed comply accuracy) 0. respectively.2 Navigation system error (NSE) NSE refers to the difference between the aircraft's estimated (FMGS) position and actual position.8. and for the RNAV missed approach and 0. deviations above and below the Barometric VNAV path must not exceed +30 m/–15 m (+100 ft/–50 ft). printed from e-manual / Company Portal  .3 NM for at least 95 per cent of the total flight time.RNP ≤ 0.  The lateral total system error must be within ±0. When Barometric VNAV is used for vertical path guidance during the final approach segment.5nm.  The along-track error must also be within ±0.(as prerequisite to  The lateral total system error must be within ±1 NM for at least 95 per cent of the total flight time. During operations on the final approach segment of an RNP APCH:  95 per cent FTE should not exceed 0.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.25 NM as prerequisite to comply accuracy). to be used as an acceptable means of compliance as per ICAO PBN manual. Selected RNP value is monitored on PROGRESS page at [6L].3 NM is set automatically by NAV-database for a Departure or an Arrival/Approach procedure or manually by pilot 3.2.3 NM on the final approach segment. Doc 9613.

i. 3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. If these requirements are not met. "GPS PRIMARY LOST" message (amber) is triggered on MCDU and ND of the affected side.4 GPS accuracy and integrity monitoring- Crew Compliance When both GPS accuracy and integrity requirements are met.2. It cannot be cleared from ND..3 Path definition error PDE occurs when the path defined in the RNAV system does not correspond to the desired path..... the path expected to be flown over the ground.  PROG key..8. When EPE (ESTIMATED value) becomes greater than the REQUIRED value.... printed from e-manual / Company Portal Accuracy can be monitored on PROG page.e.. field [5R] is blank and GPS/IRS mode is lost. Regulatory Assurance: IndiGo’s fleet of A320-232 has multi-sensor systems using GNSS and is approved in accordance with AC20-130A (AFM DOCUMENTATION) A-3-31 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy..8. When accuracy improves to the required value "NAV ACCUR UPGRAD" s-pad msg (white) is displayed on MCDUs and NDs.Press  Check accuracy. . displayed on PROG page [5R].. GPS PRIMARY is again displayed in [5R].. 3.4 of this chapter.. Path definition error (PDE) is considered negligible due to the quality assurance process (NAV DATABASE INTEGRITY VALIDATION PROCESS) and crew procedures. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Crew Compliance  On ND message is displayed in amber.2..OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II........ When GPS/IRS mode is restored "GPS PRIMARY" message (white) is triggered on MCDU and on ND. the Confidence Status on GPS position is designated as GPS PRIMARY... "NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD" s-pad msg (amber) is displayed. Consider appropriate navigation Procedures as described in the contingency procedures as referred in Para 3.8.

 On-board navigation data must be current and include appropriate procedures. NDB). printed from e-manual / Company Portal 3.  Dispatch must take account of any NOTAMs that could adversely affect the aircraft system operation. or the availability or suitability of the procedures at the airport of landing.3. ATS Filling guidance for RNP APCH approachesItem 10a - “R” (PBN approved) Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/- - “S1” (RNP APCH)**S1 in ATS Flight Plan means Crew and Aircraft is capable of RNP APCH.3 . integrity and continuity requirements of aforesaid criteria of System performance monitoring and alerting.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Dispatch must file the appropriate flight plan suffixes.8. Operating procedures 3.  For missed approach procedures based on conventional means (VOR. If the AIRAC cycle is due to change during flight. the accuracy of navigation data.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Dispatch must ensure that the associated ground-based navaids are operational along with airborne equipment (any affecting MEL). the following must be included:  Crew must ensure that approaches which may be used for the intended flight (including alternate Aerodromes) are selected from a valid A-3-32 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. ICAO PBN manual Doc 9613 assures accuracy.1 Pre-flight planning Dispatch Action: To conduct operations using an RNP APCH procedure. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 as having been demonstrated for RNP APCH capability. including the suitability of navigation facilities used to define the routes and procedures for the flight has to be ensured.8. or any alternate airport. Flight Crew Action: In addition to the normal pre-flight planning checks.

This NOTAM ensures the RAIM availability with no outage.3.flight stage) & flight crew to plan non RNP-APCH approaches to the intended destination. Approach below the limiting temperature is prohibited. and are not prohibited by a company instruction or NOTAM (NAVDATA bulletin). During the pre-flight phase. the Crew should ensure sufficient means are available to navigate and land at the destination or at an alternate aerodrome in the case of loss of RNP APCH airborne capability. NOTAM are issued by ATS Authorities (AAI etc.3. Example: C0113/12 NOTAMN Q)VIXX/QXXXX/IV/NBO/E /000/999/ A) VIDF/VABF B) 1205040001 C) 1205042359 E) GPS RAIM PREDICTION FOR THE DAY 04/05/2012 AERODROME WISE DURATION OF NON AVAILABILITY RAIM FD AND FDE FUNCTIONALITY A-3-33 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. Example shown below is showing RAIM availability within 30sec of time interval and 5 DEG above azimuth.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 navigation database (current AIRAC cycle). printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . dispatch (at pre. 3. Example.3 RAIM Availability Dispatch Action: RAIM levels required for RNP APCH should be verified through NOTAM.  When cold weather temperatures exist. 3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the pilot should check the chart for the instrument approach procedure to determine the limiting temperature for the use of Barometric VNAV capability.) for all the FIRS citing availability of FD (fault detection confirming availability of 5 satellites) & FDE (fault detection and exclusion confirming availability of 6 satellites). In the event of degraded operation.8. VOCI ° RNP APCH Approach has limiting temp as +5 C.8.2 Required equipment to perform RNAV (GNSS) Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-18-C for the list of required equipment to perform RNAV (GNSS) (RNP APCH) approaches using either Final APP or FPA Guidance mode.Further these NOTAM specifies the time interval taken as unit for outage estimation.

pilots must realize that RAIM or GPS navigation altogether may be lost while airborne which may require reversion to an alternative means of navigation. printed from e-manual / Company Portal WITH ELEVATION CUTOFF = 5 DEG WITH TIME INTERVAL OF = 30 SEC FOR VAAH FAULT DETECTION . pilots should assess their capability to conduct:  Conventional Navaid approaches to the intended destination.  Check using the published charts.8. the map display or control display unit (CDU). A-3-34 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. Note: In the event of a predicted. rather they are tools to assess the expected capability of meeting the required navigation performances.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.  Reasonableness of the tracks and distances of the approach legs. Because of unplanned failure of some GNSS elements. Note: As a minimum.3.4 Prior to commencing the procedure In addition to the normal procedure prior to commencing the approach (before the IAF and in compatibility with crew workload). this check could be a simple inspection of a suitable map display that achieves the Objectives of this paragraph. continuous loss of appropriate level of fault detection of more than five minutes for any part of the RNP APCH operation. Therefore. and the accuracy of the inbound course and length of the final approach segment. the flight crew must verify that the correct procedure was loaded (comparison with the approach charts). the flight planning should be revised for non RNP-APCH contingencies. This check must include:  The waypoint sequence.  Navigate (potentially to an alternate destination) in case of failure of GPS navigation. RAIM NOTAM uses the time lapse period of 30 seconds so the availability of RAIM as per the AAI NOTAM ensures above.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 3. which waypoints are fly-by and which are flyover. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 RAIM availability prediction NOTAM does not guarantee the service.NO OUTAGES FAULT DETECTION EXCLUSION .NO OUTAGES .

 The flight crew should perform a new RAIM Availability checks if ETA is more than 15 minutes different from the ETA used during the pre-flight planning.  “Direct to” clearance to FAF is not acceptable. the flight crew should be aware of the implications for the RNP system:  The manual entry of coordinates into the RNAV system by the flight crew for operation within the terminal area is not permitted. the deviation on the PFD may be unreliable.  Flight crews should take precautions to switch altimeter settings before starting the final approach and request a current altimeter setting if the reported setting may not be recent.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. using the appropriate data: the distance to the runway or to the MAP versus altitude is the primary means of vertical navigation. FMS Modes to be used by Crew: FINAL APP GUIDANCE -‐ RNAV (GNSS) approaches with LNAV and LNAV/VNAV minima FPA GUIDANCE . that the GNSS sensor is used for position computation.  The crew must verify.  The lateral definition of the flight path between the FAF and the missed approach point (MAPt) must not be revised by the flight crew under any circumstances.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Remote altimeter settings are not allowed. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 The final approach is laterally and vertically monitored. A-3-35 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. particularly at times when pressure is reported or is expected to be rapidly decreasing.RNAV (GNSS) approaches using mixed NAV FPA guidance with LNAV minima only In complying with ATC instructions.  “Direct to” clearances may be accepted to the intermediate fix (IF) provided that the resulting track change at the IF does not exceed 45 degrees. during the approach.

the navigation database listing obtained from the diskette is converted to readable format through GE software and is manually crosschecked (by company authorized person as specified by OM-A) prior to its uploading on the aircraft. Standards for Processing Aeronautical Data. This generic data in turn is incorporated into the aircraft interface through compatible format by GE Aviation. If unable to comply with the requirements of an RNP APCH procedure.8. check that GPS PRIMARY is available on both MCDUs. EASA TYPE1 LOA issued in accordance with EASA IR 21 subpart G which demonstrates compliance with this requirement.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 3. the flight crew must continue with the RNP APCH in accordance with the published lost communication procedure.5 CHAPTER 03 During the procedure Flight Crew Action: Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-18-C for detailed guidance. The loss of RNP APCH capability includes any failure or event causing the aircraft to no longer satisfy the RNP APCH requirements of the procedure.4 RNP system is not operational.3. Contingency procedures Crew must notify ATC of any loss of the RNP APCH capability.8. Refer FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-18-C for detailed guidance. Crew must advise ATS as soon as possible. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Missed approach should not be commenced with RNP system if: . Before starting the approach. All A-3-36 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. together with the proposed course of action. In the event of communications failure.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. As a part of internal quality assurance process imbibing recommendations of AMC 20-27 .5 NAV Database Integrity Validation Process IndiGo navigation database in generic format is obtained from European Aeronautical Group UK Ltd that complies with EUROCAE document ED 76. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3. or Missed approach is not loaded from the database. The latter is endorsed by FAA LOA TYPE 2 in accordance with FAA AC 20-153 and conforms to RTCA DO 200A.   3.8.

9 FLIGHT CREW ERROR REPORTING The crew must report any errors / discrepancies between Nav Database and Jeppesen charts. lateral or vertical NAV guidance anomaly to Flight Operations Support at fltops@goindigo. MSN. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 IAP for \the envisaged destinations are then be verified. wind/temp  Navigation database cycle  Pilot selections. Any discrepancies found are subsequently notified to the CREW & Dispatch through “NAVDATA BULLETIN” with unequivocal flight crew instruction to mitigate these inconsistences. Appropriate Flight Crew Error reporting mechanism is established to mitigate any residual discrepancies. GW. with different altitude constraints This verification is performed periodically with every new cycle. MCDU displays  Description of anomaly. FMA. The following data are verified: Path Terminators Waypoint identifications Waypoint coordinates (as necessary) Distances between waypoints Approach course Crossing altitudes Flight Path Angle(s) No waypoint common to a STAR or VIA and FAF. 3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal         . ND.in The report must be fully documented for further investigation and corrective actions:  Approach designation and airport  A/C type.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. in comparison to the published approach charts. flight path A-3-37 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.

without reference to the location of any ground navigation aids. etc. for terminal and approach procedures. useful in tactical and planning coordination with ATC. 3.12 NON COMPLIANCE WITH RNP REQUIREMENTS In the event the airplane is unable to comply the RNP requirement the flight crew should: 3.11 DISPLAY AND SYSTEM CONTROL Display and system controls provide the means for system initialization.10 CHAPTER 03 FLIGHT PLANNING & MANAGEMENT RNAV systems routinely provide flight progress information for the waypoints enroute. 3. flight planning. weather. active guidance control and presentation of navigation data for flight crew situational awareness. RNAV PHRASEOLOGY Following phraseology is to be used between Pilot and ATC controller during PBN operations. The information includes estimated time or arrival. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Flight Planning function performs the creation and assembly of the lateral and vertical flight plan used by the guidance function. .) and state intentions and obtain revised clearances ii) If unable to notify and obtain prior ATC clearance for deviating from assigned flight path. and the origin and destination. progress monitoring. A key aspect of the flight plan is the specification of flight plan waypoints using latitude and longitude. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED 3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Refer next page A-3-38 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. and distance to go. crew should follow established contingency procedures and obtain ATC clearance as soon as possible. path deviations.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.13 i) Notify ATC of contingencies (equipment failure.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 PHRASEOLOGIES RNAV arrival or departure procedure cannot be accepted by the pilot *UNABLE (designator) DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL] DUE RNAV TYPE Pilot is unable to comply with an assigned terminal area procedure *UNABLE DEPARTURE (reasons) ATC unable to assign an RNAV arrival or departure procedure requested by a pilot due to the type of on-board RNAV equipment UNABLE TO ISSUE (designator) DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL] DUE RNAV TYPE ATC unable to assign an arrival or departure procedure requested by the pilot UNABLE TO ISSUE (designator) DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL] (reasons) Confirmation whether a specific RNAV arrival or departure procedure can be accepted ADVISE IF ABLE (designator) DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL] Informing ATC of RNAV degradation or failure *(aircraft call sign) UNABLE RNAV DUE EQUIPMENT Informing ATC of capability *(aircraft NEGATIVE RNAV [or (designator) ARRIVAL] no RNAV call sign) * Denotes pilot transmission A-3-39 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal CIRCUMSTANCES .

Rev 03 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK - A-3-40 Effective 15-Dec-13 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

.......................1 General Concept .....2 Abnormal Operation/Failure ............................................... 8 4.. 12 4. 11 4............9 Contingency Procedures .......................3........5...5.................2 EXTENDED DIVERSION TIME OPERATIONS (EDTO) PROCEDURES 4 4.........................................................3 Equipment And Database Requirements.. 4 4........5...7 MEL Requirements ................4 Approval Requirements ....... 9 4....................................... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 4............................................................................................................4.................................................... 13 4.......... 9 4..OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.............................5....................4 4................. 6 GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) ............. 3 4...........1 General Requirements .....8 RVSM Procedure ... 3 4...... 10 4.............................. 6 4.. Enroute..................................................5..................3 Flight Envelopes ..5..............2 Use of GPS for IFR Oceanic.......5 4...........4 4...................................... 15 A-4-1 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.............1 GENERAL .............. 13 4....................... And Terminal Area Operations ..............1 Accuracy Monitoring (In-flight Navigation Accuracy) .............................................4........6 Equipment Required ........................5 Airplane Certification Status ..2 Definitions......INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT...............4.....................3 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION ..........5................... 13 4........................................ 13 4........................................5...........3..5................................. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 TABLE OF CONTENTS LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES .......................9 REDUCED VERTICAL SEPERATION MINIMUM (RVSM) ........................................... 9 4..... ............................

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-4-2 Effective 15-Dec-13 . Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 Not a controlled copy.

or for complying with ATS procedures. full use shall be made of radio navigation and landing aids during all weather conditions.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. except an ILS which may be used. provided they can be cross checked by the use of other radio navigation aids. the commander shall notify the appropriate ATS unit making full use of radar assistance if available. using GPIRS. iii) If a radio navigation aid on which adjacent route segments are based or by which an intersection is defined is found unreliable or out of service the highest minimum safe grid altitude concerned shall apply to maintain adequate terrain clearance. Facilities published as being ‘ground checked only’ may be used during the enroute phase of flight. The operational flight plan which is handed over to the pilot during pre-flight briefings contains the enroute radio aids. Any facility which is ground checked only and is required for approach and landing or departure shall not be used. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 4. including flights being radar vectored. A-4-3 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. provided that without Glide Path MDA is applied. i) To ensure accurate navigation and monitoring of flight progress during all phases of flight. ii) Radio navigation aids promulgated as being ‘unreliable’ or ‘on test’ shall not be used. radio frequencies. destination and designated alternate fields.1 GENERAL The Airway Manual provides the complete route guide and some of the special information at departure. Route planning is done as per the enroute chart provided in the manual.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Except where topographical features dictate or operational requirements permit a reduction of the specified limits. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES 4. enroute alternate. the ILS localizer coverage sector extends from the localizer antenna to distances of 25 NM within ±10° of the front course and 17 NM within ±35° of the front course. . or operating with visual reference to the ground. In case of failure of any navigation aid or airborne radio navigational equipment essential for safe and accurate navigation. way point co-ordinates obtained from the Airway Manual.

. a latitude and longitude. this field changes its format to "CONFIRM UPDATE AT" followed by the latitude/longitude and IDENT of the inserted position with an asterisk . Cross checking the present position periodically on the Navigation Chart will draw the attention of the crew to any deviation so that corrective action can be taken without loss of time. only when the aircraft overflies the inserted position. Note: The flight crew should press the RSK adjacent to the asterisk to confirm the update. ii) If the distance between two consecutive waypoints is 300 NM or more. Any degradation in Navigation A-4-4 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.3 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION IndiGo airplanes are fitted with IRS and dual GPS equipments. iii) The flight crew can update the FMS position via the “UPDATE AT” field by entering either the IDENT for a waypoint. a place/bearing/distance.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. a midway point will be inserted between the two waypoints. When the flight crew has entered this data. FCOM recommended cross check procedures will provide the pilots with an indication of any deviation from the desired track on the ND. i) The crew will individually check the flight plan using the F-PLN page and ND in the PLAN mode versus the Computerised flight plan or the enroute chart.4. The total distance and time on the F-PLN page will be checked with the Computerised flight plan. a NAVAID. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 EXTENDED DIVERSION TIME OPERATIONS (EDTO) PROCEDURES 4. an airport.1 Accuracy Monitoring (In-flight Navigation Accuracy) Crew are to crosscheck navigation accuracy as ‘High’ in terminal areas/enroute (a comparison of actual navigation performance to the required navigation performance on FMGS) as appropriate through suitable means as described in the FCOM /FCTM /SOP. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Detailed Operational procedures governing EDTO are covered in Company EDTO Manual. or a placebearing/place-bearing.3. 4.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

Prior to any approach. However. This check verifies and quantifies the IRS accuracy. when over flying a waypoint. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 performance should be reviewed as per required procedures. . When the GPS primary is available.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the IRS position is considered reliable. the pilot must. Nevertheless. considering the estimated accuracy and integrity of each positioning equipment. crew are expected to check Track and Distance to the next waypoint. Co-located VOR/DME provides rapid and accurate quantification of nav accuracy. a navigation accuracy check is to be carried out.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. then only raw data should be used for navigation. If the error is less than 3 nm. perform this essential check: - When over flying a waypoint - prior to extended flight under IRS guidance - prior to initiating descent - when entering a terminal/approach area The procedure is to compare raw data from the tuned navaids with the corresponding IRS computed data on the navigation display. no navigation accuracy check is required as long as GPS PRIMARY is available. When the GPS is not available (GPS deselected or inoperative). During cruise. if the error is more than 3 nm. It confirms the reliability of IRS data itself and of the navigation display presentation. On aircraft equipped with GPS however. the navigation accuracy check is not required. Also refer FCOM – PRO – SPO – 51 The FMGS selects the most accurate position. and a computed radio position or GPS position. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Each FMGC computes its own aircraft position (called the "FM position") from a MIX IRS position (see below). A-4-5 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.

3. and time 24 hours a day. Department of Defence (DOD). If the ALIGN light flashes. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 4. crew must refer to FCOM PRO-ABN-34 4.S. If any of the 3 ADIRS indicates an alignment error.4 GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is a worldwide position and time determination system that includes one or more satellite constellations.1 Pre-Flight Errors If the ADIRS alignment or initialization is not correct. Global Navigation Satellite System – GLONASS is a similar system though operated by Russian Federation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. sea. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The ADIRS keeps a record of the last position it had the last time it was in NAV mode. GPS is a satellite-based radio navigation system developed and operated by the U. The ADIRS may use this information to detect coarse initialization errors. It is also able to estimate the present latitude after a complete alignment. anywhere in the world with a precision and accuracy far better than other radio navigation systems available today or in the foreseeable future. If the IR FAULT light flashes.3. velocity. . the ALIGN light will flash. aircraft receivers and system integrity monitoring.2.2 Abnormal Operation/Failure 4. GPS permits land.2. in all weather.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-4-6 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.2 In-Flight Failures / Errors For In flight failures & errors. crew must follow procedures as per FCOM PRO-SUP-34 4. the affected ADIRS can only be used in ATT mode.3. and airborne users to determine their three-dimensional position. the prompt REALIGN IRS appears on the INIT page (instead of ALIGN IRS). augmented as necessary to support the required navigation performance for the intended operation.

The information is then formatted into updated navigation messages for each satellite. The satellites act as precise reference points.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The GPS coordinate system is the Cartesian Earth-centred Earth-fixed co-ordinates as specified in World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS-84). The GPS concept of operation is based upon satellite ranging. The satellites are spaced in orbit so that at any time a minimum of 6 satellites will be in view to users anywhere in the world.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-4-7 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. which computes extremely precise satellite orbits. processors. velocity and time as needed for their marine.900 NM) above the earth. The satellites continuously broadcast position and time data to users. sea. control. which also transmit and receive satellite control and monitoring signals. The monitor stations send the information they collect from each of the satellites back to the master control station. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 GPS consists of three segments: space. The Control Segment consists of a master control station. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Space Segment consists of 24 operational satellites in six circular orbits 20. with five monitor stations and three ground antennas located throughout the world.200 km (10. The monitor stations track all GPS satellites in view and collect ranging information from the satellite broadcasts. The updated information is transmitted to each satellite via the ground antennas. terrestrial. . and antennas that allow land. Users figure their position on the earth by measuring their distance from the group of satellites in space. The User Segment consists of the receivers. or airborne operators to receive the GPS satellite broadcasts and compute their precise position. and user. or aeronautical applications.

active monitoring by the flight crew is only required when the RAIM capability of the GPS equipment is lost.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. on satellites and/or on board the aircraft: .4. printed from e-manual / Company Portal GNSS services that are used by aircraft may use various combinations of following elements installed on the ground.1 General Requirements General Requirements-Authorization to conduct any GPS operation under IFR requires: - Airplane using GPS equipment under IFR must be equipped with an approved and operational alternate means of navigation appropriate to the flight. A-4-8 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. For these systems. Active monitoring of the alternative navigation equipment is not required if the installation uses RAIM (Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring). Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 GPS / GNSS ABAS – Aircraft Based Augmentation System GBAS – Ground Based Augmentation System SBAS – Satellite Based Augmentation System GRAS – Ground based Regional Augmentation System Aircraft GNSS Receiver 4.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

B1.2 Use of GPS for IFR Oceanic. requires that: 4. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - . the flight must rely on other approved equipment or delay departure for rectification if using GPS primarily.5. - The specific approach procedure to be flown must be retrievable from the airborne navigation database. Pilots should review the appropriate NOTAMs. - Airplane navigating the GPS is considered to be RNAV aircraft.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Series S. Enroute. C1. A-4-9 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. Therefore. or O3 airspace. And Terminal Area Operations GPS in IFR operations in oceanic areas can be conducted as soon as the proper avionics systems are installed provided all general requirements are met. - The GPS operation must be conducted in accordance with the approved Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or Flight Manual supplement.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4. 4. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 In the event that the loss of RAIM capability is predicted to occur. the appropriate equipment suffix must be included in the ATC flight plan. GPS enroute and terminal IFR operations can be conducted as soon as the proper avionics systems are installed provided all general requirements are met.3 Equipment And Database RequirementsAuthorization to fly approaches under IFR using GPS avionics systems when authorised.4. 4. REDUCED VERTICAL SEPERATION MINIMUM (RVSM) (CAR Section 8. The objective is to increase the route capacity of saturated airspace.5 - A pilot uses GPS avionics with TSO C-129 authorization in class A1. B3. Part II) 4.1 General Concept RVSM airspace is defined as an airspace or route where airplanes are vertically separated by 1000 ft between FL 290 and FL 410 inclusive.

Flight Technical Error (FTE) is the difference between the altitude A-4-10 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. This can be achieved by imposing stringent requirements on equipment and on the training of flight crews and ATC controllers. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 DGCA requirements for aircraft & crew certification and operating procedures are given in CAR mentioned above. and of displaying the corresponding altitude. Non RVSM approved aircraft intending to climb/descend through RVSM airspace and other operations such as humanitarian.5. Assigned Altitude Deviation (AAD) is the difference between the transponder Mode C altitude and the assigned altitude/ flight level. ferry flights and State/military aircraft shall be dealt with by DGCA in coordination with the Air Traffic Management on case to case basis with limitations/ restrictions as may be considered necessary for relevant ATC airspace. the airplane “altitude-keeping performance” is monitored. As part of the RVSM program. Hg) and free stream pressure altitude. . Basic RVSM Envelope: The range of Mach numbers and gross weights within the altitude ranges FL 290 to FL 410 (or maximum attainable) where an aircraft can reasonably be expected to operate most frequently. overhead specific ground-based measurement units. to continuously verify that airspace users are effectively applying the approved criteria and that overall safety objectives are maintained.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Avionics Error (AVE) is the error in the processes of converting the sensed pressure into an electrical output. Automatic Altitude Control System: Any system that is designed to automatically control the aircraft to a referenced pressure altitude.25 hPa /29. printed from e-manual / Company Portal while maintaining (at least) the same level of safety.92 in. of applying any static source error correction (SSEC) as appropriate.2 Definitions Altimetry System Error (ASE) is the difference between the pressure altitude displayed to the flight crew when referenced to the International Standard Atmosphere ground pressure setting (1013. maintenance. 4.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. . with proper aircraft operating practices and maintenance. The RVSM operational flight envelope for any aircraft may be divided into two parts as explained below:Full RVSM Flight Envelope: The full envelope will comprise the entire range of operational Mach number. Static Source Error is the difference between the pressure sensed by the static system at the static port and the undisturbed ambient pressure. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 indicated by the altimeter display being used to control the aircraft and the assigned altitude/flight level.3 Flight Envelopes The RVSM operational flight envelope. Table below establishes the parameters to be considered. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Full RVSM Envelope: The entire range of operational Mach numbers. Total Vertical Error (TVE) is the Vertical geometric difference between the actual pressure altitude flown by an aircraft and its assigned pressure altitude (flight level). A-4-11 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. and altitude values over which the aircraft can be operated within RVSM airspace. divided by the atmospheric pressure ratio.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Height keeping Performance is the observed performance of an aircraft with respect to adherence to a flight level. Basic RVSM Flight Planning Envelope: The boundaries for the Basic envelope are the same as those for the full envelope except for the upper Mach boundary. Weight. is the Mach number W/δ and altitude ranges over which an aircraft can be operated in cruising flights within the RVSM airspace. W/δ: Aircraft weight. Static Source Error Correction (SSEC) is a correction for static source error. W. δ 4.5. Height Keeping Capability Aircraft height keeping performance that can be expected under nominal environmental operating conditions. W/δ and altitude values over which the aircraft can be operated within RVSM airspace. Residual Static Source Error is the amount by which static source error (SSE) remains under-corrected or overcorrected after the application of SSEC.

.Aircraft maximum certified altitude.Manoeuvre speed Gross weight . printed from e-manual / Company Portal Lower Boundary .FL 410 FL 290 .Altitude limited by. . Note: Long Range Cruise Mach number is the Mach for 99% of best fuel mileage at the particular wind speed under consideration.Speed limited by cruise thrust.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 FULL RVSM ENVELOPE BOUNDARIES Upper Boundary The lower of.Mmo / Vmo . Both the individual aircraft and the specific aircraft type or types that the operator intends to use will need to be approved by DGCA before the operator conducts flights in RVSM airspace.Maximum endurance (holding speed) .The lower of . Mach or Speed . other aircraft flight limitations. Approval process encompasses the following elements: a) b) c) Airworthiness aspects (including continued airworthiness) Operational requirements Provision for height monitoring of operator's aircraft A-4-12 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. cruise thrust / Buffet margins / other aircraft flight limitations.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4 Approval Requirements Airspace where RVSM is applied should be considered special qualification airspace. 4.5. . Level .The lower of: . buffet.The lowest gross weight compatible with operations in RVSM airspace.The highest gross weight compatible with operations in RVSM airspace.

4. it shall be ensured that all aircraft authorized for such operations are equipped to:  Indicate to the flight crew the flight level being flown.5.  Provide an alert to the flight crew when a deviation occurs from the selected flight level.5.5. with the threshold for such alert not to exceed 90 m (300 feet). A-4-13 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. In the RVSM airspace. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 Airplane Certification Status 4. printed from e-manual / Company Portal All IndiGo Airbus airplanes have RVSM capability and have been authorised by DGCA to operate in RVSM airspace.7 MEL Requirements The MEL for all Airbus models have also been revised to refer to the list of equipment required as per regulation. DGCA CAR requires that TCAS /ACAS (FCOM DSC-34-50-10) must be serviceable. In addition. Any Airbus airplane is considered to be a member of an airplane group for the purposes of RVSM approval.5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.4.6 Equipment Required RVSM equipment requirements are given in the FCOM PRO-SPO-50. This modification or SB is required for inclusion of the RVSM capability in the AFM. 4. A modification or SB number formalises the RVSM data package implementation..OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. .5.The required equipment for RVSM is operative (MEL).  Automatically maintain a selected flight level.8 RVSM Procedure General RVSM procedures valid in any RVSM airspace are published in the FCOM for all Airbus models: FCOM PRO/LIM/OEB/FCBUL a) (PRO-SPO-50) Pre-Flight Check that .

which may affect airplane altitude.Review the weather forecast paying particular attention to severe turbulence. Corrective actions have been taken. in order to maintain the required RVSM performance.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. concerning defects that may affect RVSM capability. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 . printed from e-manual / Company Portal On ground. A-4-14 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. . b) Prior to entry into RVSM Airspace The required minimum equipment as given in FCOM PRO-SPO-50 and the TCAS/ one ATC Transponder must be operative otherwise. the difference between the two primary altitude indications is less than the tolerance specified in FCOM PRO-SUP-34 "Maximum Differences between Altitude Indications". as given in RVSM airworthiness approval shall be complied with. c) Within RVSM AIRSPACE All operating limitations. a new clearance to avoid RVSM airspace must be obtained. . PFD altitude indications (QNH Reference) of ADR1 and ADR2 do not differ from the airport altitude by more than the tolerances indicated in the FCOM PRO-SPO-50.No maintenance log entry. .Check that the letter “W” is written in field 10 of the ATC Flight Plan to indicate RVSM capability. As per CAR. Procedures given in FCOM PRO-SPO-50 shall be followed. if necessary.On ground.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. except when circumstances such as the need to re-trim the aircraft or turbulence require disengagement. d) Post Flight Any malfunction or deviation in relation to the altitude keeping capability and failure of the required RVSM equipment must be reported. it should also include action taken by Crew to try to isolate and rectify the fault. Autopilot shall remain engaged during level cruise. .

45 or any other as per area of operation A-4-15 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy.5 MHz (as a back-up. the pilot should alert adjacent aircraft by making maximum use of aircraft lighting and broadcasting position. If the pilot is notified by ATC of an assigned altitude deviation which exceeds ±300 ft then the pilot should take action to return to cleared flight level as quickly as possible. This assumes that the monitoring system will identify the TVE or ASE within the set limits for accuracy. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 In-Flight Abnormal Procedures When flying within RVSM airspace.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.Excessive discrepancy of altitude indications without means of determining which indication is valid. 4. If the pilot is advised in real time that the aircraft has been identified by a height monitoring system as exhibiting a TVE greater than ±300 ft and/or an ASE greater than ±245 ft then the pilot should follow established regional procedures to protect the safe operation of the aircraft.Any of the contingencies mentioned in FCOM PRO-SPO-50 . preventing the airplane from maintaining the assigned FL If one AP is unable to keep the assigned altitude. .e) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and intentions on 121. a) If the Pilot is unsure of the vertical or lateral position of the aircraft or the aircraft deviates from its assigned altitude or track for cause without prior ATC clearance. printed from e-manual / Company Portal . the appropriate VHF interpilot air-to-air frequency 123.Abnormal situation.9 Contingency Procedures Weather deviation and engine failure procedures in RVSM environment are the basic contingencies that may arise. Guidance for contingency procedures should not be interpreted in anyway as prejudicing the final authority and responsibility of the Pilot in command for the safe operation of the aircraft. In this situation. flight level. the ATC must be informed in case of: . select the other AP.5. then the pilot must take action to mitigate the potential for collision with aircraft on adjacent routes or flight levels.

Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 may be used). Subsequent ATC action with respect to that aircraft shall be based on the intentions of the pilot and the overall air traffic situation.The Pilot may offset half the vertical distance between altitudes normally flown. - Continue to alert other aircraft using 121. . the VHF inter-pilot air-to-air frequency may be used).The Pilot may offset half the lateral distance between routes or tracks.The Pilot may also consider descending below FL 285 or climbing above FL 410. d) If a revised ATC clearance cannot be obtained in a timely manner and action is required to avoid potential conflict with other aircraft.5 MHz (as a back-up.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.9 "Special Procedures for In-flight Contingencies" provide recommendations on the order of preference for the following pilot actions: . printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) . A-4-16 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. e) When executing a contingency manoeuvre the pilot should: - Watch for conflicting traffic both visually and by reference to ACAS. (The vast majority of oceanic traffic has been found to operate between FL 290 and 410. the pilot should advise ATC as soon as possible of a contingency situation and if possible. Flight above FL 410 or below FL 285 may limit exposure to conflict with other aircraft). c) The radio-telephony distress signal (MAYDAY) or urgency signal (PAN-PAN) preferably spoken three times shall be used as appropriate. request an ATC clearance before deviating from the assigned route or flight level. then the aircraft should be flown at an altitude and/or on a track where other aircraft are least likely to be encountered: This can be accomplished by offsetting from routes or altitudes normally flown in the airspace. . Unless the nature of the contingency dictates otherwise.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The ICAO Doc 7030 / AIP India ENR 1.

or  any other equipment failure affecting the ability to maintain cleared flight level (CFL).FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. ii) If unable to notify ATC and obtain an ATC clearance prior to deviating from the assigned flight level.  loss of redundancy of altimetry systems. the pilot shall follow the established contingency procedures and obtain ATC clearance as soon as possible. i) The pilot should notify ATC when encountering greater than moderate turbulence.  loss of thrust on an engine necessitating descent. which shall be notified. Examples of equipment failures. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 - Continue to fly offset tracks or altitudes until an ATC clearance is obtained. weather) which affect the ability to maintain the cleared flight level. Five different scenarios are tabulated below: (Refer next page) A-4-17 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. and co-ordinate a plan of action appropriate to the airspace concerned. printed from e-manual / Company Portal f) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . to ATC are: g)  failure of all automatic altitude-control systems aboard the aircraft. - Obtain an ATC clearance as soon as possible. Contingency procedures after entering RVSM airspace are: - The pilot shall notify ATC of contingencies (equipment failures.

Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 Scenario 1: All automatic altitude control systems fail (e. advise the pilot of essential traffic information. the VHF inter-pilot air-to air frequency may be used. 3) If adequate separation cannot be established and it is not possible to comply with the pilot's request for clearance to exit RVSM airspace. notify other aircraft in the vicinity and continue to monitor the situation.) - Notify ATC of the failure and intended course of action. if possible. A-4-18 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. 2) Requesting ATC clearance to climb above or descend below RVSM airspace if the aircraft cannot maintain CFL and ATC cannot establish lateral.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Automatic Altitude Hold). and if so. or conventional vertical separation.5 MHz (as a back-up.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The aircraft can maintain level. longitudinal or conventional vertical separation.. 1) If the pilot intends to continue in RVSM airspace. longitudinal. apply the appropriate minimum. nearby aircraft by - alert 1) making maximum use of exterior lights. and intentions on 121. if ATC clearance cannot be obtained and the aircraft cannot maintain CFL. 2) Broadcasting position. 4) Notify adjoining ATC facilities/ sectors of the situation.9 contingency manoeuvre to offset from the assigned track and FL. The Pilot should ATC can be expected to Maintain CFL - Evaluate the aircraft's capability to maintain altitude - Subsequently Watch for conflicting traffic both visually and by reference to TCAS If considered necessary. 2) If the pilot requests clearance to exit RVSM airspace. Possible courses of action include: 1) Maintaining the CFL and route. 3) Executing the Doc 7030 / AIP India ENR 1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Initially . accommodate expeditiously. FL.g. assess if the aircraft can be accommodated through the provision of lateral.

and essential traffic information. 4) Notify adjoining ATC facilities/ sectors of the situation. and intentions on 121. longitudinal or conventional accommodated through the provision of vertical separation. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 Scenario 2: All primary altimetry systems are considered unreliable or fail ATC can be expected to Maintain CFL by reference to the standby altimeter (if the aircraft is so equipped). FL. and if so. A-4-19 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. if possible. if ATC clearance cannot be obtained. advise the pilot of essential traffic information.5 MHz (as a back-up.9 contingency manoeuvre to offset from the assigned track and FL. notify other aircraft in the vicinity and continue to monitor the situation. aircraft.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Pilot should . - Alert nearby aircraft by 1) making maximum use of exterior lights. Notify ATC of the failure and intended course of action. accommodate establish adequate separation from other expeditiously. If adequate separation cannot be established and it is not possible to comply with the pilots request for clearance to exit RVSM airspace. 3) 3) Executing the Doc 7030 / AIP India ENR 1. lateral. the VHF inter-pilot air-to-air frequency may be used. apply the appropriate minimum 2) Requesting ATC clearance to climb above or 2) If the pilot requests clearance to exit descend below RVSM airspace if ATC cannot RVSM airspace. pass 1) If the pilot intends to continue in RVSM airspace. - Consider declaring an emergency. or conventional vertical separation. 2) broadcasting position.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. longitudinal. assess traffic situation to 1) Maintaining CFL and route provided that ATC determine if the aircraft can be can provide lateral. Possible courses of action include: Obtain pilot's intentions.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. notify ATC of the loss of redundancy and maintain vigilance of altitude keeping.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. couple the functioning altimeter system to the altitude keeping device. if required). A-4-20 Effective 15-Dec-13 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Pilot should . Acknowledge the situation and continue to monitor progress Scenario 4: The primary altimeters diverge by more than 200ft (60m) The Pilot should Attempt to determine the defective system through established troubleshooting procedures and / or comparing the primary altimeter displace to the standby altimeter (as corrected by the correction cards. follow the guidance in Scenario 3 for failure or unreliable altimeter indications of all primary altimeters. If the defective system can be determined. If the defective system cannot be determined. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 Scenario 3: Loss of redundancy in primary altimetry systems ATC can be expected to If the remaining altimetry system is functioning normally. couple that system to the automatic altitude control system.

FL. the VHF inter-pilot air-to air frequency may be used). 2) Broadcasting position.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 2) Requesting necessary.5 MHz (as a back-up. longitudinal. conventional vertical separation. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 *Scenario 5: Turbulence (greater than moderate) which the pilot believes will impact the aircraft's capability to maintain flight level. and if apply the appropriate minimum: the the or so. if 3) Executing the Doc 7030 contingency manoeuvre to offset from the assigned track and FL. ATC can be expected to Watch for conflicting traffic both visually and by reference to TCAS. 4) Notify adjoining ATC facilities/ sectors of the situation A-4-21 Not a controlled copy. longitudinal or conventional vertical separation. 3) Notify other aircraft in the vicinity and monitor the situation. and intentions on 121. Possible courses of action include: - 1) Maintaining CFL and route provided ATC can provide lateral. 1) Assess traffic situation to determine if aircraft can be accommodated through Provision of lateral. alert nearby aircraft by: 1) making maximum use of exterior lights. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Pilot should Effective 15-Dec-13 . flight level change.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. if ATC clearance cannot be obtained and the aircraft cannot maintain CFL. 2) If unable to provide adequate separation Advise the pilot of essential traffic information and request pilot’s intensions. - Notify ATC of intended course of action as soon as possible. - If considered necessary.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 03 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES CHAPTER 04 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-4-22 Effective 15-Dec-13 .

...........3 Not a controlled copy.................... printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-5-1 Effective 17-Augr-11 ......... Rev 00 RADIO LISTENING WATCH CHAPTER 05 TABLE OF CONTENTS 5....... RADIO LISTENING WATCH ................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II......INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.........

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-5-2 Effective 17-Augr-11 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 00 RADIO LISTENING WATCH CHAPTER 05 Not a controlled copy.

The provision of SELCAL on HF/RT is deemed to satisfy this condition. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. It shall include. ii) If required. an additional requirement for the flight crew to monitor: i) VHF emergency frequency (121. The monitoring of the In Flight Broadcast Procedures (IFBP) frequency shall be adhered to. the appropriate common frequency used for inflight communication in designated airspace without ATC coverage. as a minimum. .45MHz is to be monitored for blind transmissions of position reports. A two-way communication must be established with the appropriate air traffic control unit.5. When outside control airspace and VHF range the inter-pilot air-to-air VHF 123. Over water and uncontrolled / advisory airspace. in areas or over routes where the possibility of military intercept or other hazardous situations exist.  On long-range over-water flights or on flights that require the carriage of an emergency locater transmitter (ELT). or when airborne equipment limitations or flight deck duties do not permit simultaneous guarding of two channels. in areas where such procedures are required.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 00 RADIO LISTENING WATCH CHAPTER 05 RADIO LISTENING WATCH It is the responsibility of the commander to ensure that at least one crew member continuously monitors the appropriate ATC frequency at all times The flight crew shall maintain a radio listening watch on the frequencies appropriate for the area of operation and as required by the applicable authorities. This frequency is the air to air dedicated frequency to exchange necessary A-5-3 Effective 17-Augr-11 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal An airplane shall not be flown on an IFR flight within controlled airspace unless a continuous listening watch is maintained on the appropriate VHF radio frequency. except during those periods when aircraft are carrying out communications on other VHF channels.5MHz).  If required by the applicable authorities. a radio listening watch must be maintained by one of the crew on appropriate primary HF frequency of the concerned Flight Information Centre.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-5-4 Effective 17-Augr-11 . Rev 00 RADIO LISTENING WATCH CHAPTER 05 operational information and to facilitate resolution of operational problems. Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

................................1 Normal Operation .....INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT..2 TERMINAL AREA ....................3 6.........4 6...............1................8 6.......7 6....8 6.........................................8 MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDE CORRECTIONS.................................. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 TABLE OF CONTENTS DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES ...........3 6...................9 6..........4...........................................1...............2 Abnormal Operation ............OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II............1 Temperature Correction ..............2 Minimum IFR Altitude Requirements .....1 MINIMUM VFR ALTITUDE REQUIREMENTS .......................................9 6...............................3 6....5 6....4 6............... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 6....................3 EN-ROUTE MINIMUM ALTITUDE ...............................3........... ........ 12 A-6-1 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy......................................2 Pressure Correction ...........................3.......................3 Minimum Altitudes Definitions ..................4..1 Application of Minimum Altitudes for VFR Flights ........................................1...............

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-6-2 Effective 17-Aug-11 .

the airplane shall not be flown: o Over congested areas. an authorisation of the Vice President Flight Operations is required unless the flight segment is a part of an approved company route.  VFR Flights outside controlled airspace shall not be conducted at a height of less than 300 metres (1000’) above the ground or water and shall maintain sight of the ground or water. cities. Note:  VFR Flights within a control zone shall not be conducted if the ground visibility is less than 5 Km or if the ceiling is less than 450 metres (1500’) at the aerodrome concerned except when authorised by the appropriate air traffic control unit. If VFR is required for a specific flight or part(s) of a flight. in the event of any emergency.2 / 1.7 The flights are conducted so that the airplane is flown in conditions of visibility and distance from clouds equal to or greater than those specified in ICAO Rules of the Air except as otherwise authorised by the appropriate air traffic control unit for VFR flights within control zones. DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES 6.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.Annex 2 chapter 4 and The Aircraft Rules 1937 and any national regulations applicable to the area over flown. Series C.  VFR flights shall not be operated o o  Above FL150 more than 100NM seaward from the shoreline within controlled airspace Except when necessary for taking off. This height shall not be less than 300 metres (1000’) A-6-3 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. For VFR altitudes requirements. landing. or with permission of appropriate Air Traffic Control Units.1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The company normally does not allow VFR operations for revenue flight. towns. (Also refer Para 4 of CAR section 9.1 MINIMUM VFR ALTITUDE REQUIREMENTS 6.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Part-1) .1 Application of Minimum Altitudes for VFR Flights AIP India ENR 1. refer to ICAO Rules of the Air . settlements or over an open air assembly of persons unless at such a height which will permit. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 6. a landing to be made without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface.

or by the need to maintain a safe height margin above any significant terrain or obstacle en route.7-3/CAR section 9. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 above the highest obstacle within a radius of 600 metres (2000’) from the aircraft. A-6-4 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. Minimum En-route Altitude (MEA). air traffic control requirements. Series C. . Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude (MOCA). the minimum altitude/flight level at which it is permitted to fly may be governed by national regulations.1. Note: 2. The minimum altitudes will be in compliance with the respective state regulatory stipulation. Whichever of these requirements produces the highest altitude/flight level for a particular route will determine the minimum flight altitude for that route.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. a) Minimum Safe Heights When an aircraft is operated for the purpose of commercial air transport. In respect of airfields that are not covered by Jeppesen manual. Minimum Off-Route Altitude (MORA) Minimum Vectoring Altitude (MVA) are published in Jeppesen Manual and every flight shall be planned to operate at or above these stipulated altitudes.2 VFR flights shall not be operated between 20 mts after sunset and 20mts before sunrise.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Note: 1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  Elsewhere than as specified in clause (i) above. All flights shall be planned to operate at or above the stipulated Minimum altitudes on a published route when operating or deviating from these routes. except when exempted by air traffic control for local flights and such training flights of flying club aircraft as may be cleared by air traffic control. Para 5) It is the Company Policy that the Pilot-in-Command will ensure that the minimum flight altitude applicable for all phases of flight is met. For information and definition regarding Minimum flight altitude such as Minimum Safety Altitude (MSA). Part-1. Minimum IFR Altitude Requirements (AIP India ENR 1. the above minimum flight altitudes shall be as published by state or its designated authority. at a height less than 150 metres (500 feet) above the ground or water. o 6.

Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 b) Minimum Levels AIP India ENR 1. 6.3 a) Minimum Altitudes Definitions MEA (Minimum En-route IFR Altitude) The lowest altitude (or Flight Level). A-6-5 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. as derived by Jeppesen and depicted on enroute charts.3-1 Except when necessary for take-off or landing or when specifically authorised by the appropriate authority. In India the quadrantal system of Flight Altitudes has been replaced by semi-circular system. A route MORA provides reference point clearance within 10 NM (18. an IFR flight shall not be flown at a level that is below the established minimum flight altitude or where no such minimum flight altitude has been established  Over high terrain or in mountainous areas. at a level which is at least 300M (1000 Ft) above the highest obstacle located within 8KM of the estimated position of the aircraft. AIP supplements or NOTAMs have been determined so as to ensure at least 1000ft (300M) vertical clearance above the highest obstacle within 10NM on each side of the centre line of the route.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1.5 km) of the route centreline (regardless of the route width) and end fixes. between radio fixes that meets obstacle clearance requirements between those fixes and in many countries assures acceptable navigational and radio signal coverage. b) MORA (Minimum Off-Route Altitude) – As derived by Navigational Database/Chart supplier like Jeppesen etc.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The procedures outlined in the following paragraphs are to be followed when calculating the minimum altitude for the safe avoidance of en-route terrain and obstacles keeping in mind the track. at a level which is at least 600M (2000 Ft) above the highest obstacle located within 8KM of the estimated position of the aircraft Elsewhere than as specified above. . the minimum flight altitude on the ATS routes as presented in AIP. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In India.

It may however be lower than the published MEA along an airway. MVA charts are not always available in the Jeppesen Airport charts. offairways routes. for radar approaches. d) MSA (Minimum Sector Altitude) Altitude depicted on instrument approach. c) MOCA (Minimum Obstruction Clearance altitude) The lowest altitude. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 A grid MORA altitude provides a reference point clearance within the section outlined by latitude and longitude lines. However. which meets obstacle clearance requirements for the entire route segment.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. When a MORA is shown along a route as "unknown" or within a grid as "un-surveyed" a MORA is not shown due to incomplete or insufficient information. although they are A-6-6 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. The altitude meets IFR Obstacle Clearance criteria. This altitude does not necessarily guarantee NAVAID reception. printed from e-manual / Company Portal MORA values clear all reference points by 1000 ft (300 m) in areas where the highest reference points are 5000 ft (1500 m) MSL. as derived by Jeppesen and depicted on Jeppesen en-route charts. During departure and approach. MORA values clear all reference points by 2000 ft (600 m) in areas where the reference points are above 5000 ft (1500 m) MSL. or route segments. Instrument Approach chart for the departure/ approach being conducted. or lower. during radar vectoring crew should be aware of the Minimum Vectoring Altitude (MVA).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. e) MINIMUM VECTORING ALTITUDE (MVA) The lowest MSL altitude at which an IFR flight can be vectored by a radar controller. in effect between radio fixes on VOR airways. . departures and missed approaches. SID or STAR charts and identified as the minimum altitude which provides a 1000 ft (300 m) obstacle clearance within a 25 NM (46 km) (or other value as stated) radius from the navigational facility upon which the MSA is predicated. crew should not descend below the Minimum Sector Altitude (MSA) or minimum altitude depicted on the Jeppesen SID/ STAR.

. OBSTACLE CLEARANCE ALTITUDE / HEIGHT (OCA/H) The lowest altitude (OCA). CAT I ILS (For Airbus aircraft) or circling approach below which descent may not be made without the required visual reference.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. ii) The required visual reference means that section of the visual aids or of the approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the Pilot to have made an assessment of the airplane position and rate of change of position. 6. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 f) DECISION ALTITUDE / HEIGHT(DA/H) A specified altitude or height in a precision approach at which a missed approach must be initiated if the required visual reference to continue the approach has not been established.2 TERMINAL AREA Except during IFR approach or departure when on track with a published minimum altitude on airport charts. in relation to the desired flight path. Note: g) i) Decision Altitude (DA) is referred to Mean Sea Level (MSL) and Decision Height (DH) is referred to the threshold elevation and is used in conjunction with CAT II and CAT III approaches. airplane must not be flown at altitude lower than the Minimum Sector Altitude (MSA). A-6-7 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal available to the radar controllers. If in doubt. For CAT I and non-precision approaches term MDA is used on airbus family aircraft. In case the crew are directed by the radar controller to descend below MSA and MVA charts are not available.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. crew should not descend below MSA. h) MINIMUM DESCENT ALTITUDE / HEIGHT (MDA/H) A specified altitude/height in a non-precision approach. crew must bring it to the notice of the radar controller. or alternatively the lowest height above the elevation of the relevant runway threshold or above the aerodrome elevation as applicable (OCH) used in establishing compliance with appropriate obstacle clearance criteria.

depressurisation).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.3. turn back or diversion outside the track depending on the aircraft position). . When obstacle limited. In case of incomplete or lack of safety altitude information.2 Abnormal Operation It may be necessary to establish diversion procedures for critical cases taking into account the topography along the route and the requirements mentioned below (engine(s) failure. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 6. The minimum safe en-route altitude must clear all obstacles within 5 NM (9. printed from e-manual / Company Portal En-route IFR flight levels or altitudes should be higher than the published Minimum En-route IFR Altitude (MEA) indicated on en-route charts.3 EN-ROUTE MINIMUM ALTITUDE 6. the pilot should be reminded for correct drift down procedure as specified in the appropriate chapter of the FCOM (one engine(s) inoperative). the grid MORA may be used as minimum flight altitude. If available and not limiting. A-6-8 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. These minimum altitudes must be respected along the track with all engines operative unless a procedure has been approved to cope with depressurisation. Both minimum altitudes are indicated on en-route charts when they exist.1 Normal Operation The minimum safe en-route altitude should be the higher of the Minimum OffRoute Altitude (MORA) and the published Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude (MOCA). the en-route minimum altitudes must be established for all the route segments. obstacles and reference points have to be located on Operational Navigation Charts (ONC) or topographic maps. 6.3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. It may be necessary to determine Point(s) of No Return (PNR) and establish appropriate procedures (drift down on course. During flight preparation.3 km) of the route centreline by 1000 ft (300 m) if the reference point is not higher than 5000 ft (1500 m) MSL or 2000 ft (600 m) if reference point is higher than 5000 ft MSL.

4 MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDE CORRECTIONS 6. of the height above the elevation of the altimeter setting source or decrease aircraft indicated altitude by 4% per 10°C below ISA of the height above the elevation of the altimeter setting source. The correction has to be applied on the height above the elevation of the altimeter setting source. The same correction value is applied when flying at either QFE or QNH. This method is generally used to adjust minimum safe altitudes and may be applied for all altimeters setting source altitudes for temperatures above 15°C. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In order to determine the geometrical altitude of the aircraft and thus ensure adequate obstacle clearance. a) Low altitude temperature corrections Approximate correction Increase obstacle elevation by 4% per 10°C below ISA. 6. Values to be added heights/altitudes (ft) by the A-6-9 pilot to minimum promulgated Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 Diversion procedures established for obstacle limited routes are described in the Operations Manual Part C (Route Guide). . The altimeter setting source is generally the atmosphere pressure at an airport.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Tabulated corrections For colder temperatures. It is conservative when applied at higher aerodrome.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.1 Temperature Correction FCOM PER (PER-OPD-GEN-P8/10) The calculated minimum safe altitudes/heights must be corrected when the OAT is much lower than that predicted by the standard atmosphere. a more accurate correction should be obtained from the following table calculated for a sea level aerodrome. and the correction on the height above the airport has to be applied on the indicated altitude.4. corrections have to be applied when Outside Air Temperature and/or pressure differ from standard atmosphere.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . In theory.Aerodrome Temperature FLT. When flying above high terrain. this correction applies to the air column between the ground and the aircraft. A-6-10 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. the use of this correction gives a conservative margin.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. It does not take into account the elevation of the altimeter setting source. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 Height above the elevation of the altimeter setting source (ft) 200 300 400 500 1000 2000 0°C 20 20 30 30 60 120 -10°C 20 30 40 50 100 -20°C 30 50 60 70 -30°C 40 60 80 -40°C 50 80 -50°C 60 90 300 4000 0 5000 170 230 290 200 290 390 490 140 280 430 570 710 100 190 380 570 760 950 100 120 240 480 720 970 1210 120 150 300 600 890 1190 1500 High altitude temperature corrections The graph given hereafter has to be used en-route for high altitude operation.

Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-6-11 Effective 17-Aug-11 .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

A-6-12 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. the minimum safe altitude must be corrected for deviations in pressure when the pressure is lower than the standard atmosphere (1013hPa). The appropriate correction is 28 ft per hPa below 1013hPa The following table gives more accurate data. QNH correction QNH of nearest station Correction QNH of nearest station Correction 1013 - 0 ft 80 ft 1050 + 1000 ft 1010 - 1045 + 860 ft 1005 - 220 ft 1040 + 720 ft 1000 - 380 ft 1035 + 590 ft 995 - 510 ft 1030 + 460 ft 990 - 630 ft 1025 + 320 ft 985 - 780 ft 1020 + 180 ft 980 - 920 ft 1015 + 50 ft 975 - 1080 ft 1013 + 0 ft Example: Given: Indicated altitude = 20000 ft.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Find: min FL = 230 . Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 Altitude temperature correction for high altitude use Example: Given: MEA = FL200 / ISA-30°C 6.510 = 19490 ft. The following correction is to be applied to the indicated altitude (reference 1013 hPa) to determine the geometrical aircraft altitude.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. ISA.2 Pressure Correction When flying at levels with the altimeter set to 1013hPa.4. local QNH = 995 hPa Find: Geometrical (true) altitude = 20000 .

printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-6-13 Effective 17-Aug-11 .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. a pressure correction is not required. Not a controlled copy. Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 When using the QNH or QFE altimeter setting (giving altitude or height above QFE datum respectively).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-6-14 Effective 17-Aug-11 . Rev 00 DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES CHAPTER 06 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

...........................................9 7.........................1 Cat I.......... 15 APPROACH CAT I................................................................................................................... METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATINGMINIMA ....2 7.......................................3..................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.............................4 AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA.................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II............3 ADDITIONAL CRITERIA TO BE ENSURED: .................4. 16 7..................................................................................................2.9 7............ 18 7................................................... 17 7............3...7 7..1.................3 REQUIRED VISIBILITY/RVR ...........................1 DEFINITIONS ...4.....................................3 MINIMUM DESCENT HEIGHT (MDH) .... 13 7.............. 19 A-7-1 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy..... 17 7.....................................1 CONCEPT OF MINIMA ...... 19 7......3.................................4.............................. 12 7.......... APV AND NON-PRECISION APPROACH OPERATIONS .. printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE OF CONTENTS .....................4.........16 7......2 DECISION HEIGHT (DH) .......... Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 7..........3...................4..6 APPROACH LIGHT SYSTEMS ..4..1 GENERAL .................................................2.... APV AND NON-PRECISION APPROACHES .........................................1 GENERAL ............5 7..............5 7..................... 10 7...................4 SYSTEM MINIMA ....3 7.....5 VISUAL REFERENCE ...........................................................................2 CONSIDERATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING THE AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA: ................................................................11 7.......... 10 TAKEOFF OPERATING MINIMA ........4 Pilot Assessment of equivalent TDZ RVR ............ 11 7...........2.2 VISUAL REFERENCE..

.... 32 7.......................................5................... 26 7..........OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II..... 37 7.. 33 7...................... 37 A-7-2 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy..... 20 LOW VISIBILITY OPERATIONS (CAT II....... 31 7..................... 27 7............................................... 25 7..............5...........3 BELOW MINIMA CONDITIONS.................1 PRECISION APPROACH – CATEGORY II OPERATIONS ............. 33 7.........7 VISUAL APPROACH ...................4 DISPATCH OF FLIGHT / CONTINUATION OF IFR FLIGHT ... 35 7.2 PRECISION APPROACH – CATEGORY III OPERATIONS ..........................9 PROHIBITION OF LANDING BELOW MINIMA .............2 ALTERNATE AERODROME PLANNING MINIMA FOR DISPATCH ..........1 LANDING MINIMA ..8 COMMANDERS’ RESPONSIBILITY ..................................3 OUTAGE OF LIGHTING SYSTEM-PRECISION APPROACH RUNWAY CATEGORY II AND/OR III .. 36 7.7 FLT. 33 7...... 37 7..........................8........4...........8............... 36 7.........................6 CIRCLING APPROACH MINIMA ........................... 36 7........................ printed from e-manual / Company Portal 7...8..................8.............5...................10 CONVERSION OF REPORTED METEOROLOGICAL VISIBILITY TO RVR/CMV ........8........................ LVTO) ............................. 37 7........ 33 7........5.....8.8...7........... 31 7. CAT IIIA/B...8 OPERATIONAL CRITERIA FOR MINIMA APPLICABILITY..................8...........................5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD ......................8....8.......... Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 RVR/CMV/Visibility Minima ...................6 TAKE-OFF FROM AERODROME HAVING MORE THAN ONE INSTRUMENT RUNWAY ...............................7 TAKE-OFF AND LANDING AT AERODROME HAVING NO INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE ..4 LOW VISIBILITY TAKE-OFF –LVTO ...5 COMMENCEMENT OF INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE .........................

.8.11 ...12 PRESENTATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA ..... 41 A-7-3 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy......... Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 FAILED OR DOWNGRADED EQUIPMENT ..EFFECT ON LANDING MINIMA: ................... 39 7.........INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 7..........8.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II......

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-7-4 Effective 09-Jul-14 . Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Not a controlled copy.

In determining the values of aerodrome operating minima. or landing a civil aircraft to this particular aerodrome. The minima always takes obstacle clearance into account and have different values depending on the weather conditions and the aerodrome facilities available.Basic. Intermediate or full facilities).The characteristics of the aeroplane and its equipment.1 CONCEPT OF MINIMA DETERMINATION OF AERODROME Aerodrome Operating Minima are established in order to ensure the desired level of safety in Airplane Operations at an Aerodrome by limiting these operations in specified weather conditions. and Decision Altitude/Decision Height (DA/DH) or minimum Descent Altitude/Minimum Descent Height (MDA/MDH). printed from e-manual / Company Portal 7. higher would be the corresponding visibility / RVR minima. a large number of factors are involved which fall primarily into three groups as follows: . usually expressed in terms of visibility or Runway Visual Range (RVR). The Aerodrome Operating Minima comprise the limits of usability of an aerodrome for either take-off or landing.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Aircraft capability as given in the Airplane Flight Manual defines the lowest minima for which an aircraft has been certified.The operator’s procedures. .The term “minima” refers to the aerodrome weather conditions and defines the minimum horizontal visibility and minimum ceiling prescribed for taking off from. The values of aerodrome operating minima for a particular operation must ensure that at all times the combination of information available from external sources and the airplane instruments and equipment is sufficient to enable the airplane to be operated along the desired flight path.The ground environment and the design. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Higher the DH/MDH. . Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 METHODS FOR THE OPERATINGMINIMA 7. DA (DH) or MDA (MDH) depends upon the OCA (OCH) specified in the Instrument Approach Procedure. maintenance and operation of ground equipment. A-7-5 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. The value of Visibility (RVR) minima depends upon Decision Height / Minimum Descent Height and Approach Lighting System (Nil. flight crew training and experience.

They are the lowest minima that the operator is allowed to use. • Crew minima. missed approach and the climb-out areas required for the execution of contingency procedures and necessary clearance. • Aerodrome operating minima are established in accordance with the national authorities of the aerodrome. performance and handling characteristics. The lowest minima depends on: . They are the minima that the crew is authorised to operate. The applicable minima are the highest of these minima. - The obstacles in the approach. National Authority of the operator may require the operator to apply increment to the published aerodrome operating minima. - The means to determine and report meteorological conditions. - The obstacle clearance approach procedures. A-7-6 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Different concepts of minima: Aircraft capability given in the Aircraft Flight Manual defines the lowest minima for which the aircraft has been certified.The equipment available on the aircraft for the purpose of navigation and/or control of the flight path. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.The aircraft type. printed from e-manual / Company Portal • .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. altitude/height for the instrument • Operator’s minima approved by the national authority of the operator. - The adequacy and performance of the available visual and nonvisual ground aids. The aerodrome operating minima depends on: - The dimension and characteristics of the runways which may be selected for use. They are based upon the qualification of the flight crewmembers.

The RVR values obtained from RVR equipment located midfield of the runway. midpoint or roll out end of the instrument runway and is reported in metres. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Runway visual range . It is based on the sighting either high intensity runway lights or on the visual contrast of other targets whichever yields greater visual range. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 7. There may be as much as three RVR values measured on an instrument runway. RVR is required to be reported when the prevailing visibility or RVR is less than 1500 meters. has not been established. RVR is horizontal visual range. if the required visual reference to continue the approach. in relation to the desired flight path. It is based on measurement of distance by a transmissometer located near the touchdown point. Decision altitude/ Decision height (DA)/ (DH) A specified altitude or height in a precision approach or approach with vertical guidance at which a missed approach must be initiated. iii) Roll out RVR . Note 2.1. Note 1.the RVR values obtained from RVR equipment located near the roll out end of the runway. — Decision altitude (DA) is referenced to mean sea level and decision height (DH) is referenced to the threshold elevation. The range over which the pilot of an airplane on the centre line of a runway can see the runway surface markings or the lights delineating the runway or identifying its centre line. The commander may request an RVR if it is not reported. A-7-7 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. not slant visual range.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. — The required visual reference means that section of the visual aids or of the approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the pilot to have made an assessment of the aircraft position and rate of change of position.The RVR readout values obtained from RVR equipment serving the runway touchdown zone.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. In Category III operations with a decision height the required visual reference is that specified for the particular procedure and operation. based on standard calibrations that represent the horizontal distance a Pilot is expected to see down the runway from the approach end.1 Definitions An instrumentally derived value. ii) Mid RVR . i) Touchdown RVR .

b) The greatest distance at which lights in the vicinity of 1 000 candelas can be seen and identified against an unlit background. — The definition applies to the observations of visibility in local routine and special reports. Note 1. descent must not be made without the required visual reference. — For convenience where both expressions are used they may be written in the form ―decision altitude/height‖ and abbreviated ―DA/H‖. — The required visual reference means that section of the visual aids or of the approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the pilot to have made an assessment of the aircraft position and rate of change of position.— Minimum descent altitude (MDA) is referenced to mean sea level and minimum descent height (MDH) is referenced to the aerodrome elevation or to the threshold elevation if that is more than 2 m (7 ft) below the aerodrome elevation. — For convenience when both expressions are used they may be written in the form ―minimum descent altitude/ height‖ and abbreviated ―MDA/H‖. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Note 3. in a non-precision approach or circling approach below which. and the latter b) varies with the background illumination. Note 2. situated near the ground.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Note 2. . Note 3. Minimum descent altitude (MDA) or minimum descent height (MDH) A specified altitude or height. to the observations of prevailing and minimum visibility reported in METAR and SPECI and to the observations of ground visibility. in relation to the desired flight path. — The two distances have different values in air of a given extinction coefficient. The former a) is represented by the meteorological optical range (MOR). Note 1.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. can be seen and recognized when observed against a bright background. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Visibility Visibility for aeronautical purposes is the greater of: a) the greatest distance at which a black object of suitable dimensions. A-7-8 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. A minimum descent height for a circling approach is referenced to the aerodrome elevation. In the case of a circling approach the required visual reference is the runway environment.

 By PICs (For pilots on 1st command or change of aircraft type) till they have gained command experience of 100 hours on type.3. Normal AOM is to be applied by scheduled operators. IndiGo complies with this requirement by providing adequate pictorial presentation depicted in approach plates and subsequent briefings as given in Company Operations Manual (PartC).4. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA 7.  By non-scheduled and general aviation operators. - Normal Aerodrome Operating Minima and - Restricted Aerodrome Operating Minima. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 7. Restricted AOM consists of additives of height and visibility to the normal AOM and is to be applied in the following cases. Part II Para 9.Approved VIS/RVR + 400 meters.DA(H) or MDA(H) + 100 ft ii.  By PICs when operating first flight to a destination aerodrome or where recency requirements are not met as per the CAR Section 8 Series O. Note:  Visibility increment will not be considered beyond 5000m A-7-9 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. There are two sets of Aerodrome Operating Minima for application by Indian operators and at Indian aerodromes.1 GENERAL To enable operations safely at an aerodrome under limiting weather conditions. Aerodrome Operating Minima (AOM) are established. Following are the Additives of height and visibility to the normal AOM: i.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.2.2 .3( where the requirement of restricted minima is obviated by qualifing the Pilot in command to land at aerodrome concerned by means of an adequate pictorial representation).

f) The obstacles in the approach. missed approach and the climb-out areas required for the execution of contingency procedures and necessary clearance.3 clearance altitude/height for the instrument approach ADDITIONAL CRITERIA TO BE ENSURED: a) The PIC and Co-pilot must hold an instrument rating for flights under IFR and meet the requirements for recent experience. the approach. d) The adequacy and performance of the available visual and non-visual ground aids. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 7.2. h) The means to determine and report meteorological conditions. 7. the landing. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07  A conditional captain on release to unconditional command will be restored to normal minima  Conditional Captains will not exercise Low Visibility Take ff Minima. g) The obstacle procedures. their competence and experience. b) The composition of the flight crew. during the take-off.FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and i) The flight technique to be used during the final approach. A-7-10 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. CONSIDERATIONS FOR OPERATING MINIMA: ESTABLISHING THE AERODROME In establishing the aerodrome operating minima which will apply to any particular operation.2. performance and handling characteristics of the aeroplane. e) The equipment available on the aeroplane for the purpose of navigation and/or control of the flight path. following considerations are taken full account of: a) The type. roll-out and the missed approach. instrument approaches and operations to the lowest Cat-I/II/III minima as applicable. c) The dimensions and characteristics of the runways which may be selected for use. as appropriate. the flare. b) All flight crew members should be qualified and trained for take-off.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .

printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) . e) A system of records is maintained to ensure that the necessary qualifications of the flight crew members are being met on a continuing basis. providing that the resulting RVR/CMV value does not exceed 5000 m.1 GENERAL Take-off conditions and application of take-off minima: Before commencing take-off.3 TAKEOFF OPERATING MINIMA 7. A take-off alternate aerodrome shall be selected and specified in the operational & ATS flight plan if either the meteorological conditions at the aerodrome of departure are below the operator’s established aerodrome landing minima for that operation or if it would not be possible to return to A-7-11 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.3. 7. When calculating the minima the applicable minimum RVR is increased by 400 m for Cat C/D aeroplanes for approaches not flown using the CDFA technique. g) All approaches shall be flown as stabilized approaches unless otherwise approved by DGCA for a particular approach to a particular runway. the weather at the aerodrome and the condition of the runway intended to be used should not prevent a safe take-off and departure. d) The Operational procedures reflect the mandatory procedures and/or limitations contained in the Flight Manual. h) All non-precision approaches shall be flown using the continuous descent final approaches (CDFA) technique unless otherwise approved by the Authority.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 The flight crew members should have completed all necessary proficiency checks including demonstration of proficiency using the relevant types of instrument approaches. a commander must satisfy himself that:  According to the information available to him. and f) The PIC must have gained command experience of 100 hours in the relevant aeroplane type with restricted AOM before using normal AOM.  The RVR or visibility in the take-off direction of the aeroplane is equal to or better than the applicable minimum.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

 Aeroplanes engaged in extended diversion time operations (EDTO): where an alternate aerodrome meeting the distance criteria of (e) is not available.  Any limitation related to one-engine-inoperative operations is duly taken into account. determined from the aircraft operating manual. Note: To be ―engaged in EDTO operations‖ means that the aircraft have been approved for EDTO operations and the aircraft has been dispatched in accordance with applicable EDTO requirements. altitudes which provide suitable obstacle clearance and navigation signals en route to a take-off alternate aerodrome. The take-off alternate aerodrome should meet the following criteria: .  The available information shall indicate that.2 VISUAL REFERENCE The take-off minima must be selected to ensure sufficient guidance to control the aeroplane in the event of both a discontinued take-off in adverse circumstances and a continued take-off after failure of the critical power unit. at the estimated time of use. A-7-12 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07  Weather conditions and facilities should be suitable for landing the aeroplane in normal and non-normal configurations pertinent to the operation. printed from e-manual / Company Portal the aerodrome of departure for other reasons. and in any case not lower than Cat I minima. and maintaining.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 7.  The take-off alternate aerodrome should be located within the following distances from the aerodrome of departure: One hour of flight time at a one-engine inoperative cruising speed. the conditions will be at or above the established aerodrome operating minima for that operation. calculated in ISA and stillair conditions using the actual take-off mass. the first available alternate aerodrome located within the distance of the operator’s approved maximum diversion time considering the actual take-off mass.3.  In the non-normal configuration the aeroplane should be capable of climbing to.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

wind components. A-7-13 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.5. etc. haze. precipitation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4 for LVTO procedures. including programmes for assurance of the necessary reliability and integrity. h) Availability of alternate courses of action in the event of emergency situations. obstruction clearance. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 REQUIRED VISIBILITY/RVR a) Flight characteristics and cockpit instrumentation typical of multi-engine turbine aircraft. e) Availability of air traffic services to ensure separation of aircraft and timely and accurate provision of weather.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. fog. b) Comprehensive programmes for crew qualification which address use of the specified minima.7. d) Availability of specified facilities for the respective minima. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The take-off minima established must be expressed as RVR/Visibility values not lower than those given in the Table-1. g) Routine low visibility weather conditions (e. Use of these minima is based on the following factors: . c) Comprehensive programmes for airworthiness. Refer OM-A 7. NOTAM. with any necessary equipment operational (MEL).3. airport. surrounding terrain. IndiGo is authorized for LVTO minima of up to 125 m. i) Low visibility take-offs in less than 400 m RVR shall not be carried out unless approved by DGCA. and other safety information.) which do not require special consideration.g. and other characteristics typical of major facilities serving scheduled international operations. f) Standard runway.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE-1: RVR/VISIBILITY FOR TAKE-OFF (COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT AEROPLANES) .Adequate Visual reference means. Note 3 . B.point and stop-end/roll-out).For night operations at least runway edge lights or centre line lights and runway end lights are available. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Take-off RVR/Visibility Facilities Adequate Visual reference (Day only) 2 RVR/VIS 1 Cat A. that a pilot is able to continuously identify the take-off surface and maintain directional control.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Note 2 .4). Note 4 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. C & D 500m Runway edge lights or Runway centre line 3 markings 400 m Runway edge lights and Runway centre line 3 markings 300 m Runway edge lights and Runway centre line lights 200 m Runway edge lights and Runway centre line 4 lights and relevant RVR information 150 m High intensity Runway edge lights and Runway centre line lights (spacing 15 m or less) and 4 relevant RVR information 125 m Note 1 – The TDZ RVR/VIS may be assessed by the pilot by counting number of edge/centre line lights (Ref 7. The governing RVR shall be the lowest of the reported RVRs A-7-14 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.The required RVR must be achieved for all relevant RVR reporting points (touchdown. mid.3.

7.3. snow on transmissometer causing erroneous readings).2 Calculating Method for Pilot Assessment of equivalent TDZ RVR RVR is typically assessed at a height of 15 ft (Cockpit eye height) above the centre line of the runway and the flight crew should count runway lights ahead of the aircraft. A-7-15 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. 3) Pilot assessment of touchdown zone RVR is to be made only when the mid and roll out zone RVR are reported and both these are not less than 200m. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Note 5.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. then 150 m will be the reckoning RVR and as the RVR is below 200 m all three RVRs are required).. If the RVR is 300/150/Not Reported. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 7. and to dispatch to facilitate other operations and timely distribution of meteorological information.4.1 Considerations for establishing THE Pilot Assessment of equivalent TDZ RVR For take-off circumstances where TDZ RVR is inoperative or is determined by the pilot to be significantly in error (e.3.g. An assessment of TDZ RVR can be done by the pilot based on any of the following visual cues. 2) When pilot RVR assessment is made.The facilities and conditions of Table 1 required will be as per the lowest RVR reported in any zone (e.4. It is not intended to be a verification of minima or limit or restrict minima for the aircraft making the report.g.g.3. the result of the assessment should be provided to any pertinent air traffic facility when practical. then the 300 m will be the RVR for reckoning facilities and conditions of Table 1. if the RVR is 400/300/300 representing the three zones. not applicable to intersection takeoffs). a pilot assessment may be made in lieu of RVR subject to the following.. patchy fog obscuring a transmissometer but not the runway. 1) RVR assessment is applicable only at a runway threshold where runway identifying markings and number(s) are visible from the takeoff position (e.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4 Pilot Assessment of equivalent TDZ RVR 7. .

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. APV AND NON-PRECISION APPROACHES 7. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  .e. may be used. from an altitude/height at or above the Final Approach Fix altitude / height to a point approximately 15 m (50 feet) above the landing runway A-7-16 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. unless accepted by DGCA. i.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. with a MDH or DH not lower than 250 ft and an RVR/CMV of not less than 750 m.4 APPROACH CAT I. Similarly other reference distances. APV AND NON-PRECISION APPROACH OPERATIONS Non-precision approach (NPA) A non-precision approach (NPA) operation is an instrument approach using any of the facilities described in Table 3 (System minima). 6 centre line lights (at 15m interval) should be visible. 7. for a minimum visual segment of 90m. Refer OM-D for LVTO Training. Continuous descent final approach (CDFA): A specific technique for flying the final-approach segment of a nonprecision instrument approach procedure as a continuous descent.4.. 10 + (6x15)90 = 100m. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Runway Centerline Lights (15M/30M apart)  Runway Edge Lights (60M apart) Ex. without level-off.1 Cat I. as above.

GLS (GNSS/GBAS) or PAR with a decision height not lower than 200 ft and with an RVR not less than 550 m (and visibility of not less than 800m).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . or 200 ft for Category I approach operations. with a DH not lower than 250 ft and a runway visual range of not less than 600m unless approved by the DGCA. but does not meet the requirements established for precision approach and landing operations. or The lowest decision height specified in the Aeroplane Flight Manual (AFM) or equivalent document. and whichever is higher. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Approach with Vertical Guidance (APV) An APV operation is an instrument approach which utilises lateral and vertical guidance. if stated.2 DECISION HEIGHT (DH) Cat I. or the system minimum in Table 3. MLS. Category I: A Category I approach operation is a precision instrument approach and landing using ILS. MINIMUM DESCENT HEIGHT (MDH) Non-Precision Approach operations – MDH The minimum descent height for an approach is not lower than: a) The OCH for the category of aeroplane.3 the minimum height to which the approach aid can be used without the required visual reference. printed from e-manual / Company Portal threshold or the point where the flare manoeuvre should begin for the type of aeroplane flown. 7. or the OCH for the category of aeroplane. or A-7-17 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.4. APV . or b) The system minimum in Table 3. or the published approach procedure decision height where applicable.4.DH The decision height to be used for an approach is not lower than following: a) b) c) d) e) f) 7.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

c) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.4 SYSTEM MINIMA The minima given in the following table shall not be used as they are without changes. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The minimum descent height specified in the Aeroplane Flight Manual (AFM) if stated. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 7. the aerodrome operating minima. TABLE-3: SYSTEM MINIMA VS INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURES SYSTEM MINIMA Instrument Approach Procedure Lowest DH / MDH ILS/MLS/GLS CAT I 200 ft RNAV with approved vertical guidance 200 ft RNAV with Baro-VNAV/LNAV 250 ft Localizer with or without DME 250 ft SRA (terminating at ½ NM) 250 ft SRA (terminating at 1 NM) 300 ft SRA (terminating at 2 NM or more) 350 ft RNAV without vertical guidance (LNAV) 300 ft approved VOR 300 ft VOR/DME 250 ft NDB 350 ft NDB/DME 300 ft VDF 350 ft A-7-18 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. This table only gives the lowest limit that shall never be transgressed.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The flight crew shall also take into account the aircraft capability. company minima and the crew minima.4. . and whichever is higher.

The systems described are basically the ICAO systems as described in Annex 14. The following table describes the types of approach lighting systems which are acceptable for calculation of the aerodrome operating minima. g) the touchdown zone or touchdown zone markings. b) the threshold.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the table also contains shorter systems which are acceptable for operational use.5 VISUAL REFERENCE Cat I.6 a) elements of the approach light system. i) runway edge lights. e) the threshold identification lights. APV and non-precision approach operations .4.Visual references: A pilot may not continue an approach below MDA/MDH unless at least one of the following visual references for the intended runway is distinctly visible and identifiable to the pilot: 7. This is concurrent with the fact that approach lighting systems may sometimes be adjusted to the conditions existing before the threshold. d) the threshold lights. c) the threshold markings. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Note : A lowest DH of 200 ft for RNAV with approved vertical guidance approaches shall only be used if full SBAS capability is available. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 7.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. However. f) the visual glide slope indicator. (Refer next page) A-7-19 Effective 09-Jul-14 . APPROACH LIGHT SYSTEMS Not a controlled copy. h) the touchdown zone lights. Otherwise a DH of 250 ft is required.4.

where the facilities are: a) ILS/MLS/GLS/PAR. configuration and intensity approach lights .7. APV and non-precision approach operations Criteria for establishing RVR/Converted Met Visibility (Ref Table 5) In order to qualify for the lowest allowable values of RVR/CMV detailed in Table 5(applicable to each approach grouping) the instrument approach shall meet at least the following facility requirements and associated conditions: (i) Instrument approaches with designated vertical profile up to and including 3. barrette BALS (basic approach light system) Any other approach lighting (HIALS. (ii) Instrument approaches flown using the CDFA technique with a A-7-20 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.4. barrette centerline IALS (intermediate approach light system) Simple approach lighting system (HIALS 420-719m) single source. or b) RNAV with SBAS.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.77° for Category C aeroplanes.1 Cat I.7 system RVR/CMV/Visibility Minima RVR: Runway Visual Range CMV: Converted Meteorological Visibility 7. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 of FALS (full approach light system) Precision approach CAT I lighting system (HIALS > or =720m) distance coded centerline. and where the final approach track is offset by not more than 5° for Category C aeroplanes. MIALS or ALS < 210m) or no approach lights 7.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. MIALS or ALS 210-419m) NALS (no approach light system) Any other approach lighting system (HIALS.4. printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE 4: APPROACH LIGHTING SYSTEMS Class of facility Length. unless other approach angles are approved by DGCA.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal nominal vertical profile.2 DETERMINATION OF RVR/CMV/VISIBILITY The minimum RVR/CMV/Visibility is governed by the DH and the approach lighting and runway lighting/marking availability. VOR. The minimum RVR/CMV/Visibility shall be the highest of the values derived from Table 5 or Table 6 but not greater than the maximum values shown in Table 4 where applicable.00 degrees increasing in steps of 0.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4.3048)/tanα] – length of approach lights (m) Note: α is the calculation angle. Cat I.77° for Category C aeroplanes. 7. LLZ.10° for each line in Table 5 up to 3. the distance from FAF to THR is < 8 NM.77° and then remaining constant. with a final-approach segment of at least 3NM. VDF. 2. or c) distance to THR is available by FMS/RNAV or DME. 400 metres to be added to the minimum RVR/CMV/Visibility value resulting from the application of Tables 5 and A-7-21 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. being a default value of 3. VOR/DME. SRA or RNAV/LNAV. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 a) The final approach track is offset by not more than 5° for Category C aeroplanes. LLZ/DME. and b) The FAF or another appropriate fix where descent is initiated is available. up to and including 3. The values in Table 6 are derived from the formula below: Required RVR/visibility (m) = [(DH/MDH (ft) × 0. 3.7. For Non-CDFA approach. unless other approach angles are approved by DGCA where the facilities are NDB. which also fulfil the following criteria: . NDB/DME. APV and nonprecision approach operations: 1. and d) If the MAPt is determined by timing. APV and non-precision approach operations Determination of RVR/CMV/Visibility minima for Category I.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.runway touchdown zone lights (RTZL) and runway centre line lights (RCLL). or when conducting a coupled approach or flight-director-flown approach to the DH. printed from e-manual / Company Portal (a) Category I operations to runways with FALS (see Table 3). or . RTZL and RCLL when using an approved HUD. threshold lights. or equivalent approved system. 5. An RVR of less than 750 m as indicated in Table 6 may be used for: (b) Category I operations to runways without RTZL and RCLL when an approved HUDLS. The approach light configurations acceptable are classified and listed in the table: (Refer next page) A-7-22 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. runway end lights and in some cases also touch-down zone and/or runway centre line lights). or (c) RNAV with approved vertical guidance approach procedures to runways with FALS. The visual aids comprise standard runway day markings and approach and runway lighting (runway edge lights. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 4.

4. Max 1200 ft A-7-23 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. LOC/DME. SRA.1 For NDB. RNAV without approved vertical guidance: - Not fulfilling the criteria in paragraph 7. NDB/DME.7. NDB/DME.PAR. LOC. VOR. VOR/DME. VDF. if flown using the CDFA technique. VOR/DME. RNAV without approved vertical guidance with a procedure which fulfills the criteria in paragraph 7.4. otherwise an add-on of 200/400 m applies to the values in Table 6 but not to result in a value exceeding 5000 m.VDF. and RNAV with approved vertical guidance NDB. or - With a DH or MDH ≥ RVR/CMV (M) Aeroplane Category A Min B C D According to Table 6 Max 1500 1500 2400 2400 Min 750 750 750 750 Max 1500 1500 2400 2400 Min 1000 1000 1200 1200 According to Table 6. SRA.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. LOC. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Facility/Conditions ILS/MLS/GLS. LOC/DME.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1. VOR. printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE 5: MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM RVR FOR INSTRUMENT APPROACHES DOWN TO CAT I MINIMA .7.

4.2 4) for RVR < 750 m 550 550 550 550 550 600 600 650 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1500 1600 1700 750 1000 800 1000 800 1000 800 1000 800 1000 800 1100 900 1100 900 1200 1000 1200 1100 1300 1200 1400 1300 1500 1400 1600 1500 1700 1600 1800 1700 1900 1800 2000 1800 2100 1900 2100 2000 2200 Class of Lighting Facility FA LS IAL S BAL S 1200 1200 1200 1200 1300 1300 1300 1400 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000 2100 2200 2300 2400 2400 NALS (meters) 541 561 581 601 621 641 - 560 580 600 620 640 660 1800 1900 2000 2100 2200 2300 See para 7.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4.7. printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE 6 : LOWEST STRAIGHT-IN APPROACH MINIMA FOR INSTRUMENT APPROACH ND LANDING OPERATIONS OTHER THAN CAT II OR CAT III .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.7.2 4) for RVR < 750 m 2100 2300 2500 2200 2400 2600 2300 2500 2700 2400 2600 2800 2500 2700 2900 2600 2800 3000 A-7-24 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 1 Class of Lighting Facility FA LS IAL S BAL S NALS (meters) DH 200 211 221 231 241 251 261 281 301 321 341 361 381 401 421 441 461 481 501 521 DH or (ft) - MDH or (ft) MDH 210 220 230 240 250 260 280 300 320 340 360 380 400 420 440 460 480 500 520 540 See para 7.

LOW VISIBILITY OPERATIONS (CAT II. A-7-25 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.7. APV AND NON-PRECISION APPROACH OPERATIONS A lighting system is deemed to be on outage when: 7.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.3 OUTAGE OF LIGHTING SYSTEM. human observer RVR system shall be used for minima values less than 800m. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 680 700 720 740 760 800 850 900 950 1000 1100 1200 2400 2500 2600 2700 2700 2900 3100 3300 3600 3800 4100 4600 2700 2800 2900 3000 3000 3200 3400 3600 3900 4100 4400 4900 2900 3000 3100 3200 3300 3400 3600 3800 4100 4300 4600 5000 3100 3200 3300 3400 3500 3600 3800 4000 4300 4500 4900 5000 5000 5000 5000 5000 Note-1: Minima values in table 6 may be RVR/CMV/Visibility. more than 15% of the lights become unserviceable.g. However.- FLT. b) In the case of a lighting system comprising more than 13 lights. or two adjacent lights become unserviceable. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 661 681 701 721 741 761 801 851 901 951 1001 1101 1201 and above INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . threshold lights) more than 2 lights become unserviceable or 2 adjacent lights become unserviceable.4.5 a) In the case of a lighting system comprising 6 to 13 lights (e. 7. LVTO) Flight Crew Responsibilities for LOW VISIBILITY OPERATIONS: The PIC shall satisfy himself/herself that: (a) The status of the visual and non-visual facilities is sufficient prior to commencing a low visibility Category II or III approach. for Values below 800m the reported value should derived from an instrumented RVR system. CAT IIIA/B. In the absence of an instrumented RVR system.CAT I.

. printed from e-manual / Company Portal (b) Appropriate LVPs are in force according to information received from Air Traffic Services. Note- Flight crew to follow ―RA‖ values for CAT II approaches. 7. and (c) The flight crew members are properly qualified and trained prior to commencing a low visibility take-off (in an RVR of less than 400 m). Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Note. The decision height for Category II operations is not lower than: a) The minimum decision height specified in the AFM.1.Supervised take-off and landing is not permitted during CAT II/III operations or LVTO. These values are published in on. and ii) A runway visual range of not less than 300 m.Category II or III approach.1 PRECISION APPROACH – CATEGORY II OPERATIONS 7. or e) 100 ft.5. or b) The minimum height to which the precision approach aid can be used without the required visual reference.5.5. before commencing a low visibility take-off.2 DECISION HEIGHT.(A320-232) Whichever is higher.1.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. if stated.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-7-26 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. or d) The decision height to which the flight crew is authorized to operate. Category II or III approach. or c) The OCH for the category of aeroplane. 7.1 GENERAL A Category II operation is a precision instrument approach and landing using ILS with: i) A decision height below 200 ft but not lower than 100 ft.board company AOM tables and caters for pre-threshold terrain criteria if exists in CAT II approaches.

5. for example.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.e.120 ft 300 m 121ft .140 ft 400 m 141 ft – 199 ft 450 m Note1 .1.2 PRECISION APPROACH – CATEGORY III OPERATIONS 7. 7. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A pilot may not continue an approach below either the Category II decision height determined in accordance with Para 7.1.The reference to ―Coupled to below DH‖ in this table means continued use of the automatic flight control system down to a height which is not greater than 80 per cent of the applicable DH is met as per AFM. TABLE 7: RVR FOR CATEGORY II OPERATIONS MINIMA Decision Height Category II operations minima (RVR) coupled to below DH1 RVR/ Aeroplane Category C 100 ft .5. . an approach lighting crossbar or the landing threshold or a barrette of the touchdown zone lighting. If it is necessary to increase DH due to. then a corresponding increase in minimum RVR will be required as shown in Table 7.5.5.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4 REQUIRED MINIMUMS The lowest minima to be used for Category II operations are 300 m for a DH of 100 ft.7.1.1 GENERAL Category III operations are subdivided as follows: A-7-27 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. or runway edge lights. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 VISUAL REFERENCE 7. or a combination of these is attained and can be maintained.2 above unless visual reference containing a segment of at least 3 consecutive lights being the centre line of the approach lights.5. facility limitations or an increased OCH. or runway centre line lights. or touchdown zone lights. This visual reference must include a lateral element of the ground pattern. i.2.

7. and (b) the approach aid and the aerodrome facilities can support operations A-7-28 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.5. or no decision height. A precision instrument approach and using ILS with: landing (i) a decision height lower than 100 ft. the RVR will determine in which Category the operation is to be considered. A precision instrument approach and landing using ILS with: (i) a decision height lower than 100 ft or no decision height. or (c) the decision height to which the flight crew is authorised to operate.2.3 NO DECISION HEIGHT OPERATIONS Operations with no decision height may only be conducted if: (a) the operation with no decision height is authorised in the AFM. printed from e-manual / Company Portal (a) Category III A operations . Note 2: Flight crew to follow ―RA‖ values for CAT III A approaches. the decision height is not lower than: (a) the minimum decision height specified in the AFM. These values are published in on. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 2 (ii) a runway visual range not less than 175 m.5.board company AOM tables and caters for pre-threshold terrain criteria if exists in CAT IIIA approaches.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Note 1: Where the decision height (DH) and runway visual range (RVR) do not fall within the same Category.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. if stated. 7. (b) Category III B operations. or (b) the minimum height to which the precision approach aid can be used without the required visual reference.2. and .2 DECISION HEIGHT For operations in which a decision height is used. and (ii) a runway visual range lower than 175 m but not less than 75 m(AFM limitation).

5. above. or runway edge lights.2. above unless a visual reference containing a segment of at least three consecutive lights being the centreline of the approach lights.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.2.4 VISUAL REFERENCE (a) For Category III A operations.2.2.2. and (c) an approval for CAT III operations with no decision height. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Note: In the case of a CAT III runway it may be assumed that operations with no decision height can be supported unless specifically restricted as published in the AIP or NOTAM.5 REQUIRED MINIMUMS The lowest minima to be used for Category III operations depend on the decision height and aeroplane systems as shown in Table 8 below: A-7-29 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.5. 7.2. (b) For Category III B operations conducted either with fail-operational flight control systems or with a fail operational hybrid landing system using a decision height a pilot may not continue an approach below the decision height. unless a visual reference containing at least one centreline light is attained and can be maintained. there are no requirements for a visual verification prior to landing. (c) For Category III B operations conducted either with fail-operational flight control systems or with a fail operational hybrid landing system without a decision height. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. or runway centreline lights.5. or a combination of these is attained and can be maintained. and for Category III B operations conducted either with fail-passive flight control systems a pilot may not continue an approach below the decision height determined in accordance with Para 7. 7. determined in accordance with Para 7.5. printed from e-manual / Company Portal with no decision height. or touchdown zone lights.

TABLE 9 . A-7-30 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. the midpoint and stop-end RVR are also controlling.5. the minimum RVR value for the mid-point is 75 m.2.REPORTED AND RELEVANT RVR RVR Type of operation Cat I Cat II Cat IIIA CAT IIIB Touch-down zone 550m Mid zone Roll-out zone 125m 125m 300m 125m 125m 175m 125m 125m 75m 75m 75m Note 1: Minimum RVR of 75m corresponds to AFM roll-out guidance system limitations.6 RVR 175 m 150 m 125 m 75 m RVR. If reported and relevant. Note 2: The values underlined are required for the type of operation. and 75 m for the stop-end. printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE 8: RVR FOR CATEGORY III OPERATIONS MINIMA Roll-out Category Decision Height control/guidance system IIIA Less than 100 ft Not required IIIB Less than 100 ft Fail-passive IIIB Less than 50 ft Fail-passive IIIB Less than 50 ft or no DH Fail-operational .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.REPORTED AND RELEVANT The touch-down zone RVR is always controlling. The minimum RVR value for the midpoint is 125 m/75m or the RVR required for the touch-down zone if less. For aeroplanes equipped with a stop-end (roll-out) guidance or control system. The values underlined are required for the type of operation. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 7.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 APPROACH The lighting system for a precision approach runway category II and/or III is deemed to be on outage when.7.5. (a) More than 5 % of the lights are unserviceable in each of the following particular significant elements. Note: When any two consecutive lights are unserviceable in any of the significant elements.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. IndiGo is authorized for LVTO minima of up to 125 m. runway threshold lights. runway centre line lights. the inner 450 m.1 GENERAL  Low visibility take-off (LVTO).5.4 LOW VISIBILITY TAKE-OFF –LVTO 7.5.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 1) 2) 3) 4) precision approach category II or III lighting system. A term used in relation to flight operations referring to a take-off on a runway where the RVR is less than 400 m and is applicable whenever the reported RVR in any zone (touch-down/mid/roll-out) is below 400 m. (e) Two adjacent lights of the taxiway centre line lights are unserviceable. and More than 25 % of the lights are unserviceable in the runway end lights. This requires that a 90 m visual segment shall be available from the cockpit at the start of the take-off run. and Runway edge lights. A-7-31 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. (b) More than 10 % of the lights are unserviceable in the touchdown zone lights.4. (c) More than 15 % of the lights are unserviceable in the approach lighting system beyond 450 m. printed from e-manual / Company Portal OUTAGE OF LIGHTING SYSTEM-PRECISION RUNWAY CATEGORY II AND/OR III . 7. the system is deemed to be on outage. (d) More than two lights or two adjacent lights of a stop bar are unserviceable.  Low visibility take-offs shall not be carried out in less than 400 m RVR unless approved by DGCA.

7.  Full thrust take off rating is to be used for LVTO and its use to be logged in FRB. before commencing a low visibility take-off.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. after obtaining permission from ATC.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4.3 Table-1 7. provided the following conditions are met :a) Cloud ceiling is higher than the Circling MDH or higher altitude at which request has been made to ATC for visual circuit. A-7-32 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.2 REQUIRED MINIMUMS Refer OM-A 7. and c) The flight crew members are properly qualified and trained prior to commencing a low visibility take-off (in an RVR of less than 400 m).6 CIRCLING APPROACH MINIMA Circling approach may be carried out at Circling MDA or at higher altitude. b) The reported visibility or Runway Sector Visibility meets the Circling Minima requirement.3. The PIC shall satisfy himself/herself that the status of the aeroplane and of the relevant airborne systems is appropriate for the specific operation to be conducted. Windshield wipers for both PIC and Co-pilot 2. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 The PIC shall satisfy himself/herself that: a) The status of the visual and non-visual facilities is sufficient prior to commencing a low visibility take-off. 1.5. Anti-skid system 4.  Low Visibility Operations – Minimum Equipment (Aircraft) Following aircraft systems equipment listed as applicable/installed which are critical for LVTO Operations shall be fully serviceable. Window heat system for all heated cockpit windows 3. Thrust reversers for all engines 5. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . b) Appropriate LVPs are in force according to information received from Air Traffic Services.

e) In the event of a go around. Table-10 considers the number of navigational facilities providing precision or non-precision approach capability. It also considers the number of different runways available for use at an aerodrome. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Visual contact with the runway has been established while approaching the facility. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) . If visual approach is requested for a runway which has only a circling approach.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 7.8 OPERATIONAL CRITERIA FOR MINIMA APPLICABILITY 7. d) Runway is kept in visual contact at all times during visual circuit. higher of the associated non. 7. or while making an Instrument Approach. appropriate incremental values as described in Table-10 for height of cloud base and visibility should be added to the operator’s established aerodrome operating minima.7 VISUAL APPROACH For a visual approach. CAUTION: Circling approach and the associated minima when used should be authorized by Flight Standards Directorate as per the training programme implemented. the missed approach procedure flown will be for the runway for which the instrument approach had been carried out.precision approach minima or minimum visibility/RVR of 3200 m for Category C aeroplanes is applicable. NOTE- A-7-33 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. It is applicable for computing planning minima for destination & en-route alternate. 7.2 ALTERNATE AERODROME PLANNING MINIMA FOR DISPATCH To ensure that an adequate margin of safety is observed in determining whether or not an approach and landing can be safely carried out at each alternate aerodrome.8.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the ground visibility shall not be less than 5 Km.1 LANDING MINIMA The Company establishes Aerodrome Operating Minima as per the criteria given in CAR & ICAO All Weather Operations Manual (DOC 9365-AN/910) for use by pilots and flight dispatchers.8.

the authorized DA/H or MDA/H for the approach and associated visibility/RVR may be used. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Alternate aerodrome operating minima is to be used only as a planning tool for dispatch of a flight. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 In the context of Table-10. After commencement of flight. (Refer next page)  A-7-34 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. a “different runway is any runway with a different runway number and can be different ends of the same runway.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. .

3 BELOW MINIMA CONDITIONS The Met conditions are considered as Below Minima for an Instrument Approach Procedure. a visibility of at least RVR 550 m 7. a visibility of at least RVR 1200 m or. Cat II. when: i) the reported RVR is less than the RVR specified in the approved minima A-7-35 Effective 09-Jul-14 . printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE-10: ALTERNATE (Destination and Enroute) AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA FOR DISPATCH Ceiling DA/H or MDA/H RVR airports supporting one approach and landing operation. a ceiling of at least 300 ft.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. suitable runways Cat II procedures. Authorized DA/H or MDA/H plus an increment of 400 ft Authorized visibility plus an increment of 1500 m For airports supporting at least two approach and landing operations. each providing a straight-in approach and landing operation to different. a ceiling of at least 200 ft. each providing a straight-in approach and landing operation to different.8. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Approach facility configuration For Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. or for Cat III procedures. and at least two approach and landing operations. suitable runways Authorized DA/H or MDA/H plus an increment of 200 ft Authorized visibility plus an increment of 800 m For airports with a published Cat II or Cat III approach and landing operation. for Cat III.

7. at least one destination alternate aerodrome will.5 COMMENCEMENT OF INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE Refer chapter 27 for more guidance on commencement. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 or Cloud Ceiling when measured by instruments is below MDH/DH If instrument RVR is not available then manual RVR will be taken. general visibility/RWY direction visibility is not to be considered to determine whether operating minima requirements are being met or not.8. A-7-36 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.8. In case RVR value is available. at the estimated time of arrival. be at or above the aerodrome operating minima. printed from e-manual / Company Portal ii) . continuation or discontinuation of approaches. 7.4 DISPATCH OF FLIGHT / CONTINUATION OF IFR FLIGHT A flight to be conducted in accordance with instrument flight rules shall not be commenced unless available current meteorological reports or a combination of current reports and forecast indicates that conditions at the aerodrome of intended landing or.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. If neither is reported then the reported sector visibility towards the take-off or landing direction will be taken to determine the minima required. Such higher minima are NOT applicable for inflight functions.6 TAKE-OFF FROM AERODROME HAVING MORE THAN ONE INSTRUMENT RUNWAY Take-off from aerodrome having more than one instrument runway or an airport having an instrument approach at one end and is not limited to unidirectional operation. Operating minima for Alternate Airports is kept higher than the normal minima for the purpose of dispatch of flights. 7. and is suitable for landing in the event of an emergency necessitating immediate landing after departure. where a destination alternate is required.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.8. a runway can be used for take-off even if the reported weather conditions are below minima for that particular runway provided the other runway meets the landing minima requirements.

No airplane shall commence an approach to landing at an aerodrome if the reported visibility /RVR is below minima except as stated in Part A chapter 27. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 HAVING NO The aerodrome operating minima pertains to specific instrument approach procedures and not to aerodromes as such. As RVR and meteorological visibility A-7-37 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8.8.7 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. An RVR is a better representation of the expected distance that the pilot may acquire visual cues on approach.e. The reported visibility has inherent limitations due to the fact that it is reported at a site that is removed from the point at which a pilot makes the approach to land and is expected to acquire the visual reference to continue the approach.10 CONVERSION OF VISIBILITY TO RVR/CMV REPORTED METEOROLOGICAL Horizontal visibility reported by the meteorological office could be different from the slant visibility observed by the pilot due to factors such as low lying haze and a smoke layer. at an aerodrome where the Instrument Approach Procedure is not in existence.8 COMMANDERS’ RESPONSIBILITY It is the Commander’s responsibility to evaluate through his own observations that the actual conditions at the time of take-off/ landing are at least equal to or better than the filed minima even though. In such cases a report shall be made to Vice President Flight Operations within 24 hours. Therefore. 7. there is no aerodrome operating minima. the reported visibility is above minima and ATC has given him clearance. printed from e-manual / Company Portal TAKE-OFF AND LANDING AT AERODROME INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE .9 PROHIBITION OF LANDING BELOW MINIMA All operations below the filed minima are strictly prohibited. VFR criteria has to be satisfied. These aerodromes are termed as VFR aerodromes. i. the Commander may use his discretion to delay a takeoff or a landing if the weather has deteriorated or is likely to deteriorate. Landing below the minima is only permissible in an emergency. 7. Visibility not below 5 KM and cloud ceiling not below 1500 ft. For training flights special VFR can be requested & applied if approved by ATC. For operating to such aerodromes. 7.7.8.8. Even if Met conditions meet the minima required.

a ratio can be identified between the two. e.If the RVR is reported as being above the maximum value assessed by the aerodrome operator. When converting meteorological visibility to RVR in all other circumstances than those in sub-paragraph above. it is not considered to be a reported value for the purpose of this paragraph.  for take-off.  for visual/circling approaches.  or when reported RVR is available.  when the minimum length of approach lights is less than 420m.  when the reported visibility is less than 800m. ―RVR more than 1500 metres‖. Visibility x Day Night 1·5 2·0 Any type of lighting installation other than above 1·0 1·5 No lighting 1·0 Not applicable HI approach runway lighting and A-7-38 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Effect of lighting intensities and background luminance play a role when establishing an RVR. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 It should be ensured that a meteorological visibility to RVR conversion is not used. Note-CMV is meant to be used by pilots in flight and not as a planning tool for dispatch of a flight. a pilot may derive RVR/CMV by using a mathematical conversion depending upon the type of approach lighting and day/night conditions.g. TABLE 11: CONVERSION OF METEOROLOGICAL VISIBILITY TO RVR Lighting operation elements in RVR = Reported Meteorological. printed from e-manual / Company Portal are established differently. Table 11 below to be used: Note. The RVR/CMV derived from the table below may be used to commence or continue an approach to the applicable DA/MDA.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. In cases where the RVR is not reported.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. .

If the AOM is specified as visibility/RVR 1600m for a runway and reported visibility is 1200m(1600/1. It is however not expected that the PIC would consult such instructions after passing 1 000 ft above the aerodrome. 4. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Case 1-If the AOM is specified as visibility 800m/RVR 550m for a runway and reported visibility is 700m and RVR is not reported or available. Conditions applicable to Table 12: 1. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Example for CMV computation- Case 2.8.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Category II or III operations. The table has instructions intended for use both pre-flight and in-flight. their effect on the approach should be considered as described in Table 12 which might result in discontinuation of the approach. 7.11 FAILED OR DOWNGRADED LANDING MINIMA: EQUIPMENT - EFFECT ON Table 12 contains instructions concerning failed or downgraded equipment and consequential effect on landing minima. 2. Deficiencies in equipment are not permitted. the approach could be continued at the PIC’s discretion. then CMV cannot be applied against the reported visibility. Deficiencies of approach and runway lights are treated separately. If failures of ground aids are announced at such a late stage. Failures other than ILS affect RVR only and not DH. If failures are announced before such a late stage in the approach.5=1100) and RVR is not reported or available during daytime. Multiple failures of runway lights other than indicated in Table 12 are not acceptable. then CMV can be applied against the reported visibility depending on conditions of runway lighting. A-7-39 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

Not applicable NPA with FAF: No effect unless used as FAF If FAF cannot be identified (e.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-7-40 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. no method available for timing of descent). otherwise RVR 750 m No effect Minima as for IALS No effect The required visual reference for different types of approach operations consist of aerodrome lighting systems and facilities. Note: The use of gooseneck flares as main or alternative/standard lighting systems are not authorized. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 Failed or downgraded equipment1 Effect on landing minima or ILS standby transmitter No effect Cat I Outer marker No effect if replaced by height check at 1 000 ft Middle marker No effect APV. threshold lights and runway end lights No effect Day: no effect Night: Not allowed No effect if F/D or auto land. NPA cannot be conducted No effect unless used as MAPt RVR assessment systems No effect Approach lights Minima as for NALS Approach lights except the last 210 m Minima as for BALS Approach lights except the last 420 m No effect Standby power for approach lights Edge lights. these visual references (lighting or marking) are expected to be fully serviceable and available.EFFECT ON LANDING MINIMA . Any one of the specified visual references if acquired and maintained are adequate to continue the approach to landing. For the purpose of AOM application. line lightsNo effect otherwise RVR 750m Centre line lights Centre line lights spacing increased to 30m Touchdown zone lights Taxiway lighting system No effect No effect if F/D or auto land.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.g. NPA standby transmitter APV .FAILED OR DOWNGRADED EQUIPMENT . printed from e-manual / Company Portal TABLE-12 .

8.7. Proc.12 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Aerodrome operating minima (Take-off & approach/landing) are provided for all airfields by the company. are placed in separate minima folder on-board.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. DA (H) / MDA(H) ft Visibility /RVR (M) FALS IALS BALS NALS 23 ILS (Z) 430(241) 550 800 1000 1300 23 GP INOP (Z) 730(541) 1800 2100 2300 2400 23 ILS (Y) 430(241) 550 800 1000 1300 23 GP INOP (Y) 730(541) 1800 2100 2300 2400 23 VOR 730(541) 1800 2100 2300 2400 23 NDB 730(541) 1800 2100 2300 2400 05 VOR 630(450) 1700 1900 2100 A-7-41 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. These minima. Company minima are presented in the format as shown below: . with an IndiGo logo on the top. The landing and take-off minima depicted on the Jespersen Charts are not applicable. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 PRESENTATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA COMPANY AOM (Approach/Landing): Procedure Airport RWY Ahmedabad (VAAH) 189FT Inst.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-7-42 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 DETERMINATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA CHAPTER 07 1 COMPANY AOM (Take-off Minimums ): RWY 16 Amritsar (VIAR) 34 RVR/Visibility minimums for Take-off Take-off (m) Alternate VIDP 300 VIJP VIJU VIDP 200 VIJP VIJU Alternate Minima(m) 550 550 550 550 550 550 Note -List of take-off alternates are depicted along with the usable minima in tabular format as shown above for respective stations.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Departure Airport .

.........................1 Fuelling Of Aircraft and Safety Precautions ........ printed from e-manual / Company Portal 8......................5 8.....................................3 8..2 GENERAL PRECAUTIONARY AND SAFETY MEASURES IF DEFUELING WHEN PASSENGERS ARE EMBARKING........... 5 8...........3.......................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.....................2 Re-fuelling and De-fuelling ...................... 5 8...............3..... ON BOARD OR DISEMBARKING ............9 A-8-1 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy.................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT................3 DESCRIPTION OF FUELLING PROCEDURE......... ON BOARD OR DISEMBARKING .............1 GENERAL PRECAUTIONARY AND SAFETY MEASURES IF REFUELING WHEN PASSENGERS ARE EMBARKING...........4 Precautions against Mixing Of Fuels . ...............3 Evacuation / Disembarkation ........................3............... 3 8..................... 8 8................................ 8 8. Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 TABLE OF CONTENTS SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELLING / DEFUELLING ..............3.......

Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-8-2 Effective 17-Aug-11 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

or any other hazard arises. the cabin crew. two way communication shall be maintained by airplane inter A-8-3 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. h) When refuelling with passengers embarking. in the rare case that a fire may occur. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Para 4. and the flight crew: a) At least two step ladders are available at the doors b) For departures from major bases. the ground engineer (qualified ground crewmember). e) Seat Belt Sign must be switched off and passenger must be instructed to keep the seat belt unfastened. It does not necessarily require the deployment of integral airplane stairs or the opening of emergency exit as a prerequisite to refuelling. precautions must be taken to ensure that they can be evacuated.3. on board or disembarking. Part II. These precautions must be taken by the ramp agent.7 GENERAL PRECAUTIONARY AND SAFETY MEASURES IF REFUELING WHEN PASSENGERS ARE EMBARKING. Series H. ON BOARD OR DISEMBARKING When passengers are on board the aircraft. on board or disembarking unless it is properly attended by qualified personnel ready to initiate and direct an evacuation of the airplane by the most practical and expeditious means available. The cabin attendant shall ensure that No Smoking takes place nor other source of ignition is allowed to occur. d) “No Portable Device” and „EXIT‟ signs shall be illuminated during fuelling with passengers on board. the presence of fuel vapour is detected in the airplane interior. The Cabin attendants will man the exits for any emergency evacuation. Para 22 / CAR Series O. all cabin attendants or at least the above number of cabin attendants shall remain on duty in the cabin of the aircraft. f) If during fuelling.8. fuelling should be stopped.1 . Airport Services must ensure that full complement of cabin attendants should be on board failing which at least two cabin attendants should be on board before passenger boarding is permitted in the absence of the Commander. Part II. c) At transit stations. Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELLING / DEFUELLING CAR Section2.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 8. g) An airplane shall not be refuelled when passengers are embarking.

their routes should avoid areas where fuel vapours are likely to be present and be under the supervision of Engineering Official.  Brief and order the cabin attendant to commence passenger evacuation in case of an emergency. either a cockpit crew or a qualified engineering personnel will be on board i) ii) If cockpit crew member on board the cockpit crew shall  Maintain two-way communication with ground personnel who is supervising the refuelling.g. A-8-4 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. the lead cabin attendant shall initiate and order the other cabin attendant to carry out evacuation by the most practical and expeditious means available including opening usable doors in ARM position after assessing outside conditions. catering & cleaning) should be conducted in such a manner that they do not create a hazard or obstruction exits. printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) . k) Access to and exit from the areas where airplane escape chutes may be deployed should be kept clean. During refuelling. “NO SMOKING” should be enforced strictly during such passenger movements. Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 communication system or other suitable means between the ground personnel supervising the refuelling and the qualified personnel on board the airplane. If qualified engineering personnel on board The qualified engineering personnel on board will maintain two-way communication with the ground personnel supervising the refuelling and shall inform the lead cabin attendant on board in regard to : Commencement and completion of refuelling  Discontinuation of fuelling operations for any reason  Any emergency requiring passenger evacuation  On receiving information requiring evacuation. j) Ground servicing activities and work within the airplane (e. l) When passengers are embarking or disembarking during fuelling.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

it shall not be restarted until the flow of fuel has ceased and there is no risk of igniting fuel vapours. p) Photographic equipment shall not be used within three metres of the refuelling equipment. Part II The Indian Aircraft rules in rule 25A lay down the requirements for fuelling of aircraft.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 1937. 8.2 not be connected.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-8-5 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. 8. a) No person shall fill or replenish the fuel tanks of an airplane from vehicles or vessels containing petroleum in bulk or from fuel hydrant installations except from vehicles or installations of a type approved by the Chief Inspector of Explosives or from barges licensed under Petroleum Rules. operated or GENERAL PRECAUTIONARY AND SAFETY MEASURES IF DEFUELING WHEN PASSENGERS ARE EMBARKING. External battery charges shall disconnected. ON BOARD OR DISEMBARKING Defueling with passengers on board. embarking or disembarking is allowed subject to the applicable conditions in Para 8.3.1 Fuelling Of Aircraft and Safety Precautions CAR Section 2.. s) It must be ensured that No HF transmission (including HF transmission via the HF DATA LINK ) is performed t) Over wing gravity refuelling is not permitted with passengers on board. printed from e-manual / Company Portal n) . Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 m) Airplane Ground Power generators or other electrical ground power supplies shall not be connected or disconnected. o) If auxiliary power unit (APU) is stopped for any reason during refuelling. q) All cell phones are to be turned off while refuelling.3 DESCRIPTION OF FUELLING PROCEDURE 8.1 above and if all procedures given on FCOM PER (PER-LOD-FUL) are followed. r) Refuelling shall be immediately suspended when there are lightning discharges within the vicinity of airport. Series H.

 They shall be located outside the Danger Zone. Such switches.  minimum amount of cabin lighting. Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 During fuelling operations. Provided that this clause shall not apply to electrical switches controlling the following circuits: power and light essential for fuelling operations.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. however.  The units. printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) . shall not be operated during the refuelling operations. tractors and similar equipment shall be permissible subject to compliance with the following conditions:  Flexible trailing cables suitable for use in hazardous areas shall be used. “Danger Zone” is defined as the area within the largest polygon obtainable by joining point 3 metres away from the wings and the fuelling vehicle. iv) Aircraft engines shall not be started and ignition switches shall be placed in the “OFF” position. ii) A “NO SMOKING” notice shall be prominently displayed.  steady parking lights. otherwise they shall be stationed at a distance of not less than 6 metres in the case of straight kerosene. which may include filling or draining of fuel tanks.b) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. shall be flame-proof and of a type approved by the Chief Inspector of Explosives. from the aircraft and the fuelling vehicle. v) Aircraft electrical radar and radio systems shall not be operated and the switches relating thereto shall remain in the “OFF” position. including the associated electrical equipment. vi) The use of ground power supply units. air-conditioning units. iii) Smoking or use of an appliance employing naked flame or use of an appliance capable of producing a spark or in any other way igniting fuel vapours shall not be permitted within 30 meters of the aircraft or fuelling equipment. the following precautions shall be observed:Fuelling of aircraft shall be done outdoors and not less than 15 meters from any building. A-8-6 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy.

Customs and Police. In the event of fuel being spilled. approved by the Director-General shall be available for immediate use near the aircraft. x) xi) xii) xiii) xiv)  An attendant shall remain on duty in the cabin of the aircraft. disembark. Fire extinguishers of adequate capacity and of suitable type. printed from e-manual / Company Portal vii) The fuelling equipment and the aircraft shall be bonded to each other and both shall be earthed. Prior to recommencing fuelling. or remain in the cabin subject to the following conditions:- . but the electrical circuits and switches should on no account be touched except for the purpose of stopping the power unit. Fuelling operations shall cease when a turbo-jet aircraft manoeuvres so as to bring the rear jet outlets within 43 metres of the fuelling equipment or the aircraft. The attendant shall ensure that no smoking takes place or other source of ignition is allowed to occur and shall assist in the removal of passenger in the event of fire. Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 They shall not be switched “ON” or “OFF” during fuel transfer. A-8-7 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. shall be permitted within 15 meters of the aircraft. action must be taken to clean the spilled fuel. fuelling must cease and the engine of the ground power supply units must be stopped. No aircraft maintenance shall be conducted which may provide a source of ignition for fuel vapour during fuelling operations.  The passenger loading ramp shall be correctly positioned at the cabin exit door and adequate provision shall be made to maintain the equilibrium of the aircraft in case of all passengers attempt to leave by one exit. The handling of freight and baggage in and around the aircraft shall not proceed simultaneously with fuelling unless adequate precautions have been taken to eliminate fire risk.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. ix) Passengers may be permitted to embark. fuelling company and officials of the Civil Aviation Department. Fuel must not be washed into sewer or drains. viii) No person other than the staff of the operator.

However. Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 Note:-The requirements of clause (vi) of sub-rule (b) above shall not apply to the use of ground batteries as an auxiliary source of electric supply to the aircraft provided they are not connected or disconnected during fuelling operations Re-fuelling and De-fuelling Refuelling and defueling with APU running is permitted as long as the procedures laid down in the FCOM PER (PER-LOD-FUL) are followed.3 Evacuation / Disembarkation In the case of a fire resulting from fuelling operations. catering. a precautionary disembarkation or an emergency evacuation may be performed. A responsible person should be positioned at each door in order to supervise evacuation of passengers. the aerobridge handling agent is responsible for the passengers while they are in the tunnel. If the step ladders are against the aircraft.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Chapter 9. boarding passengers. it should also be used for evacuation/disembarkation. the same recommendations apply. unlike the escape slides. if needed. or from a large fuel spillage. and enables passengers to be rapidly be far away from the fire. etc). it is very important to verify that there are A-8-8 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. In both cases. If an aerobridge is used for boarding. In case.2 . For refuelling with one engine running refer to Para 9. if escape slides are used. This is for the reason that before deploying escape slides.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. baggage handlers. It is possible to use the escape slides to rapidly evacuate the aircraft. and any contact with these obstructions or with personnel during escape slide deployment may make the situation worse.3. the remaining door should be closed and in DISARMed position. Aerobridge and/or step ladders are not provided at any of these doors. Aerobridge provides a safe and efficient way to evacuate an aircraft.g. In this case. However. it is necessary to ensure that the area outside the aircraft is clear of obstructions. there may often be obstacles surrounding the aircraft (e. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 8. Provision is to be made for safe evacuation of passengers via at least two of the main passenger doors in the event of the emergency.3. „Refueling With One Engine Running‟ 8. it is better that passengers use them instead of escape slides. fuel truck.11.

before arming the escape slide and opening the aircraft doors. it may be necessary to wait for equipment. grade.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal no obstacles in the area where the escape slide will be deployed.3. personnel. or vehicles to move away from the deployment area. In some cases.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-8-9 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. the desired information on type of fuel. specific gravity and mixing of fuel is given. . Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 8.4 Precautions against Mixing Of Fuels The pilot is to refer to the Limitation chapter in FCOM LIM-28 wherein.

Rev 00 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS DURING REFUELING WITH PASSENGERS ON BOARD CHAPTER 08 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-8-10 Effective 17-Aug-11 .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

.... 14 SIZE AND WEIGHT OF BAGGAGE AND PASSENGERS SEATING .....................................................3 Passengers without Passport ...... 12 9...............5.1.......3....6 9.................2 Persons with Reduced Mobility (PRM) ...................... 14 9....................3.. 12 9...4 Deportees .......6 9........................5 9......................... 14 9........................3.........................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.................................5 Disabled Passenger with Intellectual Or Developmental Disability Needing Assistance (DPNA) .............. SICK PASSENGERS AND PERSONS WITH REDUCED MOBILITY UNACCOMPANIED MINORS ..............1 Prisoners ................... 13 9...... 12 9.4 MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION (MEDA) ....2.....................1 9.. 11 9........... 14 A-9-1 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.....................6 LIMITATIONS FOR TRAVEL ....................... Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 TABLE OF CONTENTS GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS AND PROCEDURES .............6...2.................. 11 9.....................3 Ground Handling Procedures ...........5 9.............................6 9...........3........9 9...............4 Stretcher Patients ...................................................................................3 Passengers Requiring A Wheelchair (WCHC) ..............7 9..........5 TRANSPORTATION OF DEPORTEES OR PERSONS IN CUSTODY...........1 Infants...........5..........................................................1 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS ...........INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT................3....2 9.....2 Blind And / Or Deaf Passengers (BLND/DEAF) ............5................................. INADMISSIBLE PASSENGERS ...........................................2 Inadmissible Passengers.............................5..1 Carriage Of Persons With Reduced Mobility (PRM) ............. 13 9......................5 HANDLING CHILDREN/INFANTS........... 13 9....... ....1 Carry On Baggage .... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 9.......

..............................11 SAFETY ON RAMP .............3 Maximum Number Of Passengers ...........8 POSITIONING OF GROUND EQUIPMENT .....................13.7................13...............12...............................3 Multiple Occupancy Of airplane Seats ......1 REFUSAL OF EMBARKATION........... 17 9...................................................................... DEPARTURE AND ARRIVAL PROCEDURES ..........1 Loading Cargo and Mail ... 31 9........................... 15 9...... Ammunition......... 31 9.......1 Diversion Procedure .........................3 Carriage Of Religious Staff / Wooden Sticks / Kirpans Etc ..............1 The Procedure .....................13 9.............................. 15 9............FLT....1 Servicing Of Airplanes ............12........................ 32 9.......2 Arms.......... 22 9................................12..............10 REFUELING WITH ONE ENGINE RUNNING .......... Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 9........4 Exit Row Seating ........... 32 DISORDERLY / UNRULY PASSENGERS ................................11.....................................7 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD ........... 35 9....................................................... 33 FLIGHT DIVERSIONS ................6.....6........................ 23 9......................................... 24 9......... 22 9.....14..................... 15 9....7......................................................... 35 A-9-2 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy....11.. 31 9...1 Engines Blast and Suction Areas .................2 Fire Prevention ........... Weapons Etc..6............ 16 LOADING AND SECURING OF ITEMS ..OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II......................................... 16 9..........6.......... 22 9................ 28 START UP....................................... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 9...................9............ ....9 OPERATION OF AIRPLANE DOORS ...................................................5 Passenger Weight ............................7. 27 9...2 Airplane Handling Documents ............................ 22 9.............12 9.. 27 9..........................14 9.......... 32 9...........ENROUTE OFF LOADING ....2 Unruly Behaviour Passengers .2 Checked In Baggage .........................

.... 36 ILLNESS / INJURY DURING FLIGHT ......................15 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD ..14.............4 Overflying Of Stations ................14.................... 37 DEATH INFLIGHT / GROUND ..........2 Crew Responsibility At Airports Of Diversion..................... 37 9........ printed from e-manual / Company Portal 9...................... 36 9.......3 Unscheduled Landing/Diversion Of Aircraft ..16 FLT......2 On Board .......1 Serious Passenger Illness.............3 On Ground.......... 37 9......................14.........................9...................... Injury In Flight.............OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II... 35 9........... 38 A-9-3 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.................... 37 9.........15............ Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 9....................................................15.............15..............................................................

printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-9-4 Effective 04-Dec-12 . Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

1. the checking-in of passengers. freight and mail. The responsibility for correct and safe handling. It is also responsible to load the airplane within the mass and balance limits. with appropriate equipment is the responsibility of the Ground Operation. baggage identification.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.e.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 9. GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS AND PROCEDURES 9. printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) . In addition also responsible for passenger deplaning. ii) Ground handling of all company airplanes is undertaken by the Airport Services Department of the airline or their agents. freight and ensuring their security check.1 Ground Handling Procedures A-9-5 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 9. transportation to the airplane and orderly boarding / loading. Ground Handling Procedures are to be laid down in the Airport Services Manual. their transportation to the terminal and the delivery of all passenger baggage.1 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS Airport Services is responsible for the intake and outgo process i. baggage.

2 Persons with Reduced Mobility (PRM) CAR Section 3.9. Pilots must ensure that the number of infants. Infants are not allocated any seat in the passenger cabin.2. Series M. does not exceed the number of infant jackets on board. no passenger carrying an infant shall be seated near any emergency exit / row with an emergency exit. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 HANDLING CHILDREN/INFANTS. Airports Service is required to provide all relevant details of unaccompanied minors on a flight to the Lead Cabin Crew. Lead Cabin Crew is responsible to ensure that the child is properly handed over to airport services staff at the arrival station. and whose situation needs special attention. illness. even if this is only required on ground. 9. an intellectual deficiency. . age.1 Infants Children below the age of 2 years are considered Infants as per IndiGo policy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Issue II Carriage of persons with reduced mobility (PRM) is regulated due to applicable safety regulations.2. Note: The term PRM is a generic term used for any passenger who needs assistance. Maximum number of infants on IndiGo aircraft is limited to a maximum of one in each row. Persons with reduced mobility (PRM) include BLND Blind DEAF Deaf A-9-6 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. or any other cause of disability when using transport. However. on a flight on which floatation devices are required. 9. Persons whose mobility is reduced due to physical impairment (sensory or locomotor).2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Children below 5 years are permitted to travel on IndiGo flights only when accompanied by an escort. Part I. SICK PASSENGERS AND PERSONS WITH REDUCED MOBILITY UNACCOMPANIED MINORS Children aged between 5 & 12 years are permitted to travel unaccompanied subject to complying with all the requirements that are mentioned in Ground Operations Manual.

the PRMs can be divided into three main categories: - Those who always shall travel with an escort. responsible ASSISTANT for the comfort and well being of a PRM during embarkation/disembarkation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. elderly passengers. cannot ascend/descend steps. his/her general safety during flight and necessary evacuation assistance. for example STCR. can ascend/descend steps and make own way to/from cabin seat. As the term PRM is a generic term used for any passenger who needs assistance. but is able to make own way to/from cabin seat WCHR requiring wheelchair for distance to/from aircraft i. at least 18 years of age. and who needs help to move about in the aircraft by means of an on board wheelchair WCHS passenger required wheelchair for distance to/from aircraft or mobile lounge and must be carried up/down steps i. along passenger loading bridges or to/from lounge.e.3 LIMITATIONS FOR TRAVEL A PRM must never be refused carriage. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 PRM with an intellectual or developmental disability needing assistance MEDA requiring medical assistance on board aircraft or unable to appropriately comprehend or respond to safety instructions from the crew STCR Stretcher Case WCHC Passenger completely immobile i.g. except when they cannot be safely carried and cannot be physically accommodated.e. printed from e-manual / Company Portal DPNA . 9. across ramp.e. ABLE-BODIED (ABA/Escort): A person.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. BLND/DEAF or DPNA A-9-7 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. as applicable MASS PRM not covered under any of the above definitions e. needing assistance to embark/disembark.) or any other cause of injury. temporary injuries (broken legs etc.

WCHS. as long as seating restrictions are followed. this notification is given in connection with the reservation. The following general rules apply: - PRM are responsible for identifying their needs. - When the PRM is travelling with an escort they shall be seated together. it may be advisable to suggest seats with moveable armrests for their comfort. inform the airline of their requirement. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Those who need assistance on ground and necessary evacuation assistance on board aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . The evacuation assistance shall be given by Cabin Crew or an escort. Note: Although the PRM have equal choice of seat allocation as all other passengers (subject to safety requirements). MAAS. for example BLND. WCHR. A-9-8 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. provided such persons or their representatives. are set according to number of minimum crew and aircraft type. BLND/DEAF. DEAF. No limitations of number on board. - If the PRM declares independence in feeding. - WCHC. communication with reasonable accommodation. seating restrictions etc. - A PRM who wishes to travel alone without an escort shall always be provided necessary assistance. A PRM may not be seated in the Emergency Exit Row or on vacant crew seats.- FLT. MEDA. for example WCHC. - A PRM will have equal choice of seat allocation. Normally.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. escorts and guide dogs including their presence in the cabin is not refused transportation. toileting and personal needs. Limitations on the number of their carriage. MEDA and STCR shall preferably be seated near a exit. - PRM and their assistive aids/devices. DPNA. Those who need assistance on ground and limited safety assistance on board. the airline shall not insist for the presence of an escort. at the time of booking and/or check-in for travel. subject to safety requirements.

the Captain and Lead Cabin Crew member shall be informed by Airport Services about the total number and seating of WCHC.g. the Captain may request a medical examination by company doctor wherever available / a qualified physician. - Some special categories PRM (e. if deemed necessary. - Since PRM are allowed to travel without prior notice of the disability (except for large groups). - The Commander should satisfy himself that the carriage of such passengers will not cause inconvenience / discomfort to other passengers and that emergency evacuation and safety during the flight will be guaranteed. all other passengers. STCR. DPNA and BLIND/DEAF passengers prior to boarding. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Prior to flight.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. - The table on next page is a summary of the different codes to identify PRM and the number that can be carried on-board escorted or unescorted. 9.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. In case the Company Doctor is not available. unless the reservation refers to a large group. A-9-9 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. - A PRM shall generally be boarded before. which had been filled out at the time of reservation/Check-in and approved by Company Doctor. MEDA.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - . and disembarked after. the Captain can make individual decisions regarding acceptance of the PRM. etc) must present a filled out MEDA Form/Indemnity Form.1 Carriage Of Persons With Reduced Mobility (PRM) PRM are not required to provide advance notice about special service. MEDA/STCR/WCHC.

duly signed by the pilot in command. The 5th and above PRM is self-sufficient (i. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Passenger code . MEDA and (unaccompanied Minor) does not exceed Four (4) on the flight. 1 In case the number of MEDA / WCHC PRM is upto 4. special assistance required A-9-10 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. are travelling.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. provided that: a) The total number of unescorted WCHC and MEDA does not exceed the number of minimum cabin crew. On these flights. capable of taking care of his/her needs onboard) or unescorted travel has been authorized by Company Doctor or Captain. the number of PRM must never exceed the number of escort. etc. a Special Assistance Form. cabin attendants th are to provide evacuation assistance.e. One escort each is required for 5 and above MEDA/WCHC PRM. containing information about PRMs including nature of incapacitation. b) The total number of unescorted WCHC. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Is ABA (Escort) required? BLND DEAF BLND/DEAF DPNA MAAS 1 MEDA No No Yes Yes No May be required (See below for details) Yes May be required (See below for details) No No STCR 1 WCHC WCHS WCHR Is the number on board limited if unescorted? 4 4 N/A Yes No Yes N/A 4 No No Note: N/A means “Not Applicable” since these categories always shall be escorted.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. special schools. UMNR Note: Exemption regarding the maximum total number of PRM may be obtained from Vice President/Director (Flight Operations) when wheelchair sport teams. The ground staff shall hand over to the Lead cabin attendant.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. they shall be A-9-11 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. 9.  Blind or deaf: Unaccompanied blind or deaf passengers who want assistance from check-in to arrival shall be assisted.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.  Blind and deaf: A both blind and deaf passenger shall travel with an Able Bodied Assistant (ABA). Handling of BLND and DEAF is always free of charge.3 Passengers Requiring A Wheelchair (WCHC) a) Airlines shall ensure that at all stations. before departure. during intermediate stops and on arrival wheel chairs are available without any extra charge and that advance arrangements made with other concerned agencies like Airport Management where necessary to ensure that movement of persons with disabilities and persons with reduced mobility within the airport is not restricted. The passenger and the guide dog will normally be seated at a bulkhead seat.3. b) Passengers who intend to check-in with their own wheelchair shall be given the option of using a station/airport wheelchair. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Special attention shall be paid to blind and/or deaf passenger when informing passengers about delays or irregularities. . Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 etc. No additional handling fees shall be charged. A trained guide dog may be carried in the cabin if it accompanies a passenger who is dependent upon it and if it is properly harnessed. 9.. for boarding / disembarking purposes.2 Blind And / Or Deaf Passengers (BLND/DEAF) The assistance codes are used in the reservation and check-in systems and will automatically be included in a service message in order to identify the passenger(s). to be further handed over to the ground staff on arrival at the destination for necessary action. where there is sufficient floor space for the dog. signs or posters/hear announcements. since they cannot read the information on monitors.3. If the passengers prefer to use their own wheelchair within the airport.

The patient must be secured by an adequate harness to the stretcher or aircraft. nursing materials and privacy curtains.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. or in the late stages of pregnancy. The Medical Information Form (MEDIF) is a standardised form for medical clearance and handling.g. All medical transports must be requested through. the passenger‟s wheel chair should be returned to him to enable him to transfer himself from the aisle seat directly into his own wheel chair. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 9. and during emergency evacuation.4 Stretcher Patients Carriage of any person on stretcher or incubator is subject to the approval of the patients physician and should be accompanied by an able bodied adult attendant. Upon advance request. 9. A DPNA shall always be accompanied by an ABA. available for passengers who cannot use the standard airline seat in a sitting or reclining position. on stretchers/in incubators.4 MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION (MEDA) Medical transportation is applicable for passengers whose medical conditions demand different degrees of assistance and/or escort at embarkation/disembarkation and/or during the flight. who are infected with contagious diseases. A-9-12 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. The information in the MEDIF is used by Company Doctor to decide whether a medical transport can be accepted or not. The stretcher must be secured to the aircraft. the airlines shall make stretchers and associated equipment. and authorised by Company Doctor. who will be responsible for them and their needs of embarking. such as passengers: - with broken/plastered legs. e. . The required number of seats for such travel must be reserved in advance at applicable fares. At the time of disembarking. sheets.5 Disabled Passenger with Intellectual Or Developmental Disability Needing Assistance (DPNA) A DPNA is a passenger with an intellectual or developmental disability needing assistance. blankets. and with a charge for such material as may be levied. during flight. printed from e-manual / Company Portal permitted to use it up to the aircraft. disembarking.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. pillows.3. whereupon it may be stowed at an appropriate place in the aircraft. 9.3.

as he may specify in the permit. 9. which may not be revealed to unauthorised parties and involved personnel are obliged to observe complete and absolute discretion.2 Inadmissible Passengers No person shall knowingly carry or permit to be carried.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. or connive at the carriage of. The form shall be kept with the ticket for possible use during the flight. a Deputy Director General.5.5 TRANSPORTATION OF DEPORTEES OR PERSONS IN CUSTODY. and in addition: a) has not taken or used any alcoholic drink or preparation within 12 hours of the commencement of the flight. the Director of Regulations and Information or any other officer of the Civil Aviation Department authorized by the Central Government in this behalf and subject to such conditions. No prisoner shall be taken aboard or carried on an airplane except under and in accordance with a permit in writing issued by the Director-General. during the flight and stops en route: and c) is accompanied by an attendant. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 9. provided that this prohibition shall not apply if the person to be carried is certified by a registered medical practitioner to be fit to travel by air without being a risk to other passengers or to the aircraft.1 Prisoners The term “prisoner” means a person who is confined in any prison and includes a person who is arrested under any law for the time being in force.5. if in a state of excitement. he shall be accompanied by a registered medical practitioner and adequate escort who shall individually and collectively be responsible for ensuring that no alcoholic drink or preparation is taken by the person in their charge and that such person is kept suitably sedated during the flight and stops en route. provided that in case he has been in a state of excitement requiring sedation within the two weeks preceding the date of commencement of the flight. a person suffering from any mental disorder or epilepsy in any aircraft. INADMISSIBLE PASSENGERS 9.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-9-13 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. b) is kept under proper sedative. . if any. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The form contains confidential information.

to insist on the DEPO being escorted during the flight by a State Official provided by the deporting Authority.5. The number of deportees that can be carried on one flight will be defined according to the BCAS regulations on the subject. 9. or otherwise be refused transportation. 9. and the owner. or otherwise arrange for the immediate removal from India of the person or persons without valid passports. Because of their responsibility for the safety of their passengers. The State Official must purchase a ticket at the applicable fare. airlines are entitled to be informed by the deporting Authority of the reason for the deportation and.6 SIZE AND WEIGHT OF BAGGAGE AND PASSENGERS SEATING 9. any authority empowered by the Central Government generally or specially in this behalf may direct the owner or the person in-charge of the airplane to take on board and remove from India.9. A-9-14 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Passengers without Passport Where an airplane is brought into India in contravention of above.4 Deportees They are foreigners being subjected to enforced removal from the country by authorities for such reasons as under: a) b) c) d) Failure to leave the country after expiry of their visa Refusal to extend or renew a residence permit Illegal entry into the country Offences or criminal acts committed within. if necessary.6.1 Carry On Baggage The size of carry-on baggage should be such that the sum of the length. or as the case may be. A deportation may be ordered at the request of the Authorities of another country in compliance with an existing extradition agreement between the two countries.5.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal No person-in-charge of any airplane shall allow such airplane to enter India from a place outside Indian unless all persons on board the airplane are in possession of valid passports as required by rules for the time being in force. .3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. of the airplane shall comply with such directions. width and depth of the baggage should not be more than 115 cms or 45 inches and not weigh more than 7 Kgs. the person in-charge.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. - Comprehend the instructions for operating the emergency exit. 9. Maximum Number Of Passengers It is airline policy that no passenger or crew member shall travel unless he has been provided a seat with a safety belt. c) Persons who are not able to read and understand instructions related to emergency evacuation provided in printed.3 - . - Operate the emergency exit. A-9-15 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Our present seat configuration as authorised by the DGCA we can carry 180 passengers. b) Persons below 15 years of age.6.6.9.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. handwritten or graphic form or do not have the ability to understand oral crew commands. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 9.4 Exit Row Seating As per Civil Aviation Requirements. - Stow or secure the emergency exit door so that it will not impede use of the exit. if called upon. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Checked In Baggage The rules governing the `Free Baggage Allowance' on all company flights operating on domestic routes are as follows: “Free Baggage Allowance' under the 'Weight Concept' is uniform irrespective of the fare level or type of aircraft. The seat near the exit row should not be allotted to – a) Persons who are invalid/disabled. In the event of an emergency in which a crew member is not available to assist a passenger occupying an exit seat. - Recognize the emergency exit opening mechanism. a passenger should not be allotted seat near exit row unless he is able to perform the applicable functions.6. Each passenger shall comply with instructions given by a crew member. - `Free Baggage Allowance' under the `Weight Concept' refer Chapter 14. - Follow oral directions and hand signals given by a crew member. may be required to perform the following functions: - Locate the emergency exit.

5 Passenger Weight Refer Chapter 14 9. the weight of the emergency exit shall also be specified. The format and mode of transmission of a digital signature may need regulatory approval. 12. Airline has designated authorised representatives to fulfil this task. The weight and balance check shall be the sole responsibility of the Commander of the aircraft. and - Assess. d) 9. The passenger occupying the exit row seat be properly briefed by the cabin attendant regarding the emergency exit procedures. It may be either conventional or digital and may be transmitted electronically. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 - Pass expeditiously through the emergency exit. and follow a safe path away from the emergency exit. the same may be brought to the attention of the Airport Services personnel for the necessary change.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. .7 LOADING AND SECURING OF ITEMS The airplane loading is the sole responsibility of the Airport Services. 13 ABC and DEF Exit Rows are: All the Cabin attendants are to check the compliance of the above restrictions before closing the doors.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.6. Description of Load sheet is given in Chapter 14. select. - The weight at which performance requirements can be met for the flight concerned. Wherever applicable. their signatures on the weight and balance sheet (trim sheet) may be accepted in good faith as proof of the task having been done. If there is any deviation. The Commander will ensure: a) The load is such that the gross weight of the airplane before take-off does not exceed: - The maximum certified take-off weight. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Before taxi or pushback crew member should verify that no exit seat is occupied by a person who may be unable to perform the applicable functions. A-9-16 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. landing weight and the zero fuel limits as shown in the Airplane Flight Manual.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. shall be physically checked by the security staff mentioned above and a security sticker indicating the procedure of security check applied shall be affixed on each consignment. A-9-17 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.b) FLT. c) After security check of the cargo consignments. - It cannot damage the airplane or otherwise en-danger its operations. laid down in the Airplane Flight Manual are satisfied. The stowage of the load is such that: - It is secured and cannot shift or break loose. If the Commander suspects that an airplane is not loaded in accordance with the laid down procedure and limitation he may order weighing of all Commercial load.7. - It does not obstruct aisles. In such cases the Commander shall file a report to the Vice President/Director (Flight Operations). If the airplane is found overloaded it shall be re-loaded as per the Commander‟s instructions.1 Loading Cargo and Mail a) All cargo consignments. 9. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 The distribution of load is such that: - The structural loading limitations for each load location are not exceeded. - The limitations on location of the centre of gravity(C of G) of the loaded aircraft. security stickers as per the specimen given below shall be pasted / affixed by the security staff of the air operator on each cargo consignments / baggage/ unitized pallets. newspapers and mail shall be subjected to X-ray screening by trained and BCAS certified screeners of the airlines. volume or contents of the consignments. or those passage ways of the holds that needs to be left clear in order to permit a crew member access to emergency equipment in-flight. doors or emergency exists. b) The consignments which cannot be screened through X-ray due to size constraints.

Packing should be sufficiently strong to ensure transportation with ordinary care in handling. In such case the airline operators may transport such consignments only after observing 24 hours cooling off period e) As an Airline Policy. lashed and secured. the airline operators shall certify in each case that a particular consignment intended for carriage by air can neither be x-rayed nor physically checked. not more than 75 Kgs.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Any suspect / disputed cargo shall be dealt with according to the Commander's instructions. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - . the Flight Release will include a special mention to advise crew about such carriage. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 d) In case of cargo consignments which can neither be x-rayed nor can be physically checked on account of the nature of the consignments.1. 9. As a Rule. Carriage of Engineering Goods that come under the Dangerous Goods Regulation (DGR) will be governed by the following process:  Whenever Engineering Goods that fall under Dangerous Goods classification are being carried on a flight. It however. A-9-18 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. The company as a policy does not carry Dangerous Goods commercially though authorised. of weight shall be placed on any passenger's seat in the cabin. will carry all types of Engineering Spares including those which are classified as Dangerous Goods as COMAT.1 COMAT – Company Material Engineering spares are sometimes required to be carried on company flights.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Some of these spares may be classified under Dangerous Goods. Such load should be properly netted. any cargo or baggage carried in the cabin should be weighed and found fit for carriage by air.7.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . Crew will not refuse carriage COMAT whether classified under the DGR or not.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 9. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 A Special Load Notification (SLN) shall be provided to crew along with the Load & Trim sheet.7.  Airport Services are responsible to ensure that the material is properly packed & security cleared and is not damaged during loading / offloading. i) Company Stores/mail ii) Free Passengers iii) Ordinary Cargo iv) Excess baggage v) Short shipped cargo vi) Valuable Cargo vii) Perishable Cargo viii) Newspapers ix) Post Office Mail x) Staff on Duty except crew required for operation of flight / training xi) Dead Bodies xii) AOG spares xiii) Paying passengers and their baggage xiv) Passengers with Reduced Mobility / Incapacitated Passengers and their escorts xv) Diplomatic Mail A-9-19 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.1.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The Commander has the authority to decide on the order of priority.2 Off Loading Priority The following are the guideline for off-loading to meet load and trim requirements. The SLN will indicate the location and UN Number of the DG COMAT.

3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.4 Carriage of Mails (Postal) In accordance with Rule 10 of Indian Aircraft Rules 1937: “No person shall carry mails or allow mails to be carried in any airplane except with the consent in writing of the Director General of Posts and Telegraph.5 Company Mail X-rayed and security cleared company mail is loaded along with normal cargo in the cargo compartment. OCC should inform the Commander by a suitable note on the flight release.9. any other material not covered under standard classification of cargo etc.1.7. 9.” Carriage Of Diplomatic Mail Category "A" Category "A" Diplomatic Mail bags are to be carried under the supervision of the Commander and will be handed over to the Commander or his nominee against signature. 9. Any such load will be signed for by the Commander. dead bodies. weapons.7. Airport Services will be responsible for the necessary communications to destination stations about the company mail and its retrieval. Dead bodies may only be carried as freight in the baggage holds in accordance with conditions laid down by the DGCA. The carriage of dead bodies shall be only under special arrangements and is subject to furnishing A-9-20 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. The Airport Services will ensure that the conditions laid down by the DGCA are complied with before accepting such carriage. kirpans etc are permitted in the cabin by Airport security subject to laid down conditions.7. ammunition.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1. 9. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Special Loads Wooden Staff for religious heads. Special loads include carriage of arms. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Airport Services shall give prior intimation to OCC of Special Loads and their location whenever goods requiring special load notification are intended to be carried.1.6 Carriage of Dead Bodies Dead bodies shall not be carried along with passengers in the cabin or in any holds accessible to the passengers. .1.7.

7.9 Carriage of Animals In Passenger Compartments No animals other than trained guide dogs may be carried in the passenger compartments provided that: a) Not more than one guide dog is carried at a time.1.7. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 of a death certificate. d) Other passengers do not object to the presence of the guide dog in the passenger compartment.7. 9.1. Carriage of live cargo in the hold is not permissible. if any. except under and in accordance with a general or special permit in writing issued by the Director General in this behalf. Carriage of Animals In The Airplane Hold IndiGo aircraft do not have provision for temperature regulation in cargo holds. When any animal/bird/pet etc.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. b) The guide dog is not allowed to occupy a passenger seat. from and within India. is carried. and subject to such conditions. The Commander shall be informed of such carriage. as may be necessary.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8 Carriage of Animals In Passenger Aircraft All carriage of pet animals in the cabin of an airplane shall be with the prior permission of the Commander subject to a general or specific permission from DGCA in accordance with Rule 24C . printed from e-manual / Company Portal In accordance with rule 24C of the Indian Aircraft Rule 1937: . e) The guide dog is properly restrained and muzzled.1. 9. police clearance. f) 9. Birds And Reptiles In Aircraft “No animal. bird or reptile shall be taken aboard or carried on any aircraft to.7 Carriage Of Animals. A-9-21 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. a special load notification shall be sent to OCC/Commander.7. c) A moisture absorbent mat is placed under the guide dog. 9.10 Pets other than such dogs are not permitted in the passenger compartment. as may be specified therein”.1. Aircraft Rules 1937. This notification shall be approved and signed by the Commander.

9. The cockpit crew will confirm this on the DOOR/OXY page on the ECAM. Weapons Etc. 9. 9. Refer chapter 35. The permission of such carriage is based on the appearance & size of these symbols. are permitted by BCAS to be carried on person on board an aircraft. as given below: Sr.7. The commander shall announce “CABIN ATTENDANTS A-9-22 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Ammunition. airport services shall notify it to the Captain under a NOTOC. all DOORS/SLIDES shall be closed/armed on command from cockpit through the aircraft PA. The doors must not be opened without disarming and without the concurrence of the Commander.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal (BCAS Circular 14/2005) . Prior to engine start / push back.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. No Restricted Item Carried on person 1 Kirpan carried on person 2 Wooden Staff as Hand Baggage Conditions of Carriage Max Length of Kirpan :9 Inches Kirpan Blade : 6 inches Subject to Specific permission of In-Charge Airport Security Authorised person Sikh Passengers Known heads of religious sects Whenever such items are being carried.7. Kirpans (Small dagger carried by baptized Sikhs in India) etc.9 OPERATION OF AIRPLANE DOORS The Door Closing/ Opening & Slide Arming/Disarming are two different actions for Cabin crew and are to be executed under two separate Cockpit Crew commands. 9.3 Carriage Of Religious Staff / Wooden Sticks / Kirpans Etc Various types of religious symbols which include religious staff. Cabin attendants are to close/arm DOORS/ SLIDES respectively and cross-check.8 POSITIONING OF GROUND EQUIPMENT Positioning of ground equipment for servicing is indicated in the Airport Handling Manual. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Arms.

The doors will be opened only after the seat belt sign is “off”. “Arm Slides”. Disarm Slides.1 S. the escape slide / raft re-armed and the door opened from inside.9. 9. cross check and verify on the FAP. On arrival PM to announce – After the aircraft has turned into the gate/bay and still in motion. cross check and verify on the FAP.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The commander shall confirm this on the DOOR/OXY page. Opening a door or emergency exit from the outside automatically disarms the escape slide / raft. . Cabin Attendants will ensure that the SLIDES are disarmed. SLIDES must be disarmed before opening the Doors.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The Procedure Scenario Pilot Action Lead/Cabin Attendant Action Pre departure. the door must be first closed. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 When escape slide deployment is not required. no cabin differential pressure should exist. Cabin doors are fitted with a cabin differential pressure indicator and / or a warning light. (The activity should not be done during the turn) A-9-23 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Should the slide / raft. 2. Passengers to remain seated”.No 1. “Cabin Attendants. PF to announce – When all paper work and ground personnel have deplaned “Cabin Attendants. at any door location be required for evacuation. Close Doors”. Arm All slides. printed from e-manual / Company Portal DISARM SLIDES”. Disarm All Slides. Before opening the doors. if armed. Close Doors and verify on the FAP When the ramp or step ladder has been removed to a safe distance Cabin Attendants.

will be followed by Flight Crew. Also Refer FCOM for operation of the doors. The pilots must consider the time constraint and command the arming of the slide ASAP so that demo by Cabin Crew is completed prior to take off.10 REFUELING WITH ONE ENGINE RUNNING A serviceable APU either not starting after landing or auto-shutting may become a problem at airports where Ground electrical/pneumatic starter is not available and which would normally result in AOG. 3. Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual (SEP) for the cabin doors and cargo loading manual of the aircraft for cargo doors. Note: The applicability of this provision is NOT authorised for dispatch with APU unserviceable.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. There should be a clear communication between the pilots and the cabin crew for managing the time available during taxi. 2. Procedures and Precautions given below. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Note: The terms “Open/Close” pertain only to the Door. These terms shall not be interchanged. The refuelling procedures with one Engine running is laid down in the FCOM PER-LOD-FUL and is acceptable to the DGCA provided the procedure below is strictly adhered to. is not available. as required. while the terms “Arm/Disarm” pertain specifically to the Slides. The aircraft will not be dispatched with an unserviceable APU (either Bleed/electrical or both) to stations where ground pneumatic and / power. If the pilots does not make any announcement. . 9.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1. preferably in chronological order. the lead will get in touch with the pilots on the interphone. Aircraft Maintenance Manual provide for refuelling with one engine running. Ground Engineer and Airport Services Personnel in order to refuel the aircraft with one engine running: a) When the crew become aware that APU is not going to be available on ground then: A-9-24 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. This procedure is applicable only if the APU becomes unserviceable on arrival at the destination.

d) Once the ground communication has been established. Chapter 2. flight crew will i) ii) Set the parking brakes ON Shut down the No. iv) No ground activity will be permitted during refuelling. . crew will contact company operations on VHF company channel and inform them about the APU failure and the requirement of GPU / Air Starter and if not available the requirement for refuelling with one engine running.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Part B. At all other airports. 1) engine running. The Airport Fire Services be requested to remain standby at the aircraft during the entire refuelling procedure. flight crew will advise the engineer that : i) ii) Fuelling is required to be done with one (No. 2 engine A-9-25 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. iii) Cargo holds will not be opened until fuelling has been completed. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 i) b) As soon as possible. e) On confirmation from the engineer. iii) ATC will be requested to authorise refuelling with No. Flight Crew will advise ATC to inform company about non-availability of APU and engineer to contact crew on arrival.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. ii) Crew will also advise ATC for a parking position where the aircraft can be parked into the wind and where the slope is negligible. R1 passenger door will be opened for disembarkation of all passengers. flight crew will signal the ground personnel to establish ground-cockpit headphone communication as per procedure given in Operations Manual. printed from e-manual / Company Portal At stations where Company Communication is available. will be done from the RHS Doors only iii) No passenger will remain on-board while the fuelling is in progress c) On arrival at bay.1 engine running. v) Passenger Emplaning will only commence once refuelling is completed. flight crew will also advise the lead cabin crew that: i) APU is unserviceable and fuelling will be done with one engine running ii) Passengers disembarkation / boarding and airplane servicing etc.

m) During refuelling the cockpit seat shall be occupied by one of the flight crew who will be monitoring all systems and the running engine. shut down engine n° 1 or attempt to start the APU before all fuelling operations have been completed. All passengers will be advised by cabin crew to disembark.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 iii) Advise cabin crew to disarm all slides. g) Marshaller will signal the flight crew about the chocks being in place. iii) Deplaning will be monitored on ground and it must be ensured that no passenger strays towards the side of the running engine. A-9-26 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. 2 engine is has spooled down. iv) The Anti-collision light will remain ON. All other doors will be closed with escape slide disarmed. Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-08 ii) Dedicated persons (2) must guard the left side of the airplane so that no one enters the area front or rear of the running engine.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. airport services personnel will approach the aircraft from RHS and place the chocks. The parking brake will be kept on unless the brakes are extremely HOT. k) Only the RH fuel couplings can be used for refuelling l) Over wing gravity filling is not permitted. After the No. printed from e-manual / Company Portal f) . h) Flight crew will advise the cabin crew to open the front RHS door (R1). o) Do not start engine n° 2. j) All Cabin Attendants on-board the aircraft. n) Engine n° 1 will be run at ground idle with its generator connected. (Passenger deplaning will only commence once ground personnel have given the „All Clear‟ indicating that all safety precautions below have been carried out) i) Prior to Passengers deplaning i) The area in front of the running engine must be secured by placing Cones and Chains and caution is to be displayed while doing so by avoiding entering the Danger zone in front of the running engine. p) Follow manual refuelling procedure. shall position themselves near the RHS (R1) door. which will be kept open with passenger ramp in place.

11.1 Engines Blast and Suction Areas Normally engines are not running when passengers are embarking or disembarking. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 During the entire refuelling procedure. v) Monitor the refuelling closely and be prepared to close the refuel valves in order not to exceed the fuel quantities given in FCOM PER-LOD-FUL vi) Departure Engineer will be responsible to maintain overall supervision on the refuelling and airplane servicing activities.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. s) After the second engine start the crew will: Reset the 3 DMCs in order to reinitialize the fuel used values: DMC1 SPLY C/B (E11 on 49 VU) ……………………PULL DMC2 SPLY C/B (Q8 on 121 VU) ……………………PULL DMC3 SPLY C/B (Q9 on 121 VU) ……………………PULL DMC3 SPLY STBY (E10 on 49 VU) …………………PULL After 5 seconds: All C/Bs ………………………………………………… PUSH Note: The T. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Position the fuel truck under the extremity of the right wing. the engineering staff will monitor the operation: i) r) After all the ground activities are completed and doors are closed. A-9-27 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.q) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. iv) Have a qualified ground crew member at the fuelling station to operate the refuel valve switches. 9. Flight Crew will take positive clearance from the Engineer before starting No. Its pressure should not exceed 30 psi.11 SAFETY ON RAMP 9. ii) Monitor the fuel truck shut off valve iii) Ensure that the fuelling company is keeping permanent control of the emergency fuel shut off device. 2 engine.O MEMO does not appear automatically since one engine is kept running. .

11.11. including during aircraft walk around. In case a Safety Jacket is not available. do not go near the area around the wheel for about one hour.2 Brakes overheat / Fire - - In case of smoke.1 Ramp Safety Jackets These Safety jackets are available in the cockpit. . In case of severe brake overheat.1. Carbon brakes and steel brakes are to be treated using same techniques and agents. printed from e-manual / Company Portal All crew members are required to wear Ramp safety Jacket while on the tarmac. Carbon fibres and other composite materials used in airframe structure and cabin furniture require the use of a protective breathing equipment whenever fighting any aircraft fire. When you do go near. These danger areas are defined in FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-08 9.2.11.2 Fire Prevention 9.1 Protective clothes / Protective breathing equipment Hydraulic fluid leakage under high pressure (3000 psi) may result in serious injury and contamination. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 The path for embarking or disembarking passengers should avoid blast and suction areas.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 9. The captain is responsible for his Crew‟s compliance.11.2. fuse plugs melting should result in tyres deflating and should prevent tyres burst. one can be requested from the ground staff 9. protective breathing equipment should be worn since the dense smoke generated by tyre rubber fire results in major and irreversible lung damage. A-9-28 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. If a tyre is inflated. go from the front or rear and not from the side of the wheel.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. flight delays and being not available to fly will be attributed to the pilot. In such a case. The use of protective clothes and protective breathing equipment is recommended whenever fighting an aircraft emergency. in coat hanger area. Airport Operators have advised that crew found on the Tarmac (including Walk around) without a Ramp Safety Jacket may be fined and/or have their AEP‟s confiscated.

Put a warning notice in the cockpit to tell persons not to operate the landing gear control lever. do not use CO2 as this has a strong cooling effect which is not the same in all areas. Put the wheel chocks in position Clean all the parts if extinguishing agents were used. This can cause thermal shock to the stressed parts. Extinguishing agent on hot wheels can: o increase the time necessary for the fuse(s) to melt. Especially. It can cause an explosion in the stressed parts.) with a spray gun onto a hot tyre if it is inflated.- FLT. do not apply the extinguishing agent (liquid. This can cause permanent structural damages at the brake. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . 9.2. or o prevent operation of the fuse(s). Come near the wheel only from the front or from the rear. - Use blowers or air conditioning equipment only after: - o the temperature of the fuses decreases (more than one hour after the aircraft stops) or o the fuses are melted. Cargo Compartment Fire The appropriate flight crew procedures are given in FCO PRO-ABN-26 A-9-29 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. mist.11. Note: It is not recommended to use multi-purpose powders as they may form into solid or enamelled deposit.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. immediately stop the fire. In the event of fire. the wheel or wheel axle. Must not use these if you can see flames or burning ambers.3 Do not apply the parking brake. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Unless there is a fire. water. - Let the brakes cool by itself for at least one hour and use the cooling fans (if installed). These agents stop the fire but they decrease the heat dissipation speed. foam etc. Do not apply the extinguishing agent directly into the heat pack of the brake or into the wheel. Do not wait until the tyres are deflated.

However.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 If the smoke warning is displayed on ground with cargo compartment door open.11. does not require discharge of the engine fire-extinguishing agent. - APU: access panels on LH side only for A320 9. as a function of the burning cargo material (as known) should be used. do not use powder afterwards.11. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In case cargo compartment smoke warning occurs with cargo door closed.Abnormal procedures. There is no requirement of having a fire extinguisher on ground before starting of Engines/APU. 9. If powder is used first. If foam is used first. foam may be used in addition. the aircraft extinguishing agent should not be discharged. Ground crew should be requested to investigate and to fight the smoke source. Halon or CO2 should be sprayed in engine exhaust nozzle. IDG and other service panels.4 Engine Or APU Compartment Fire The appropriate flight crew procedures are given in FCOM PRO-ABN-26. Multi-purpose or specific foam or type B or type C powder or water. The appropriate flight crew procedure is given in FCOM PRO ABN . if an extinguisher is available and if fire persists. the ground crew should be informed not to open the door of the affected cargo compartment unless passengers have disembarked and fire fighting services are present. External fire agents can cause severe corrosive damage and therefore should only be considered if fire persists after flight crew procedure application or if no bleed air source is available to motor the engine. The agent has an effect on the nacelle fire only.2. Engine motoring by the flight crew is the normal and most effective action. if required. A-9-30 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. In such a case.5 Engine Tailpipe Fire Engine tailpipe fire being an internal engine fire.2. ground fire fighting using a Halon or CO2 spray gun is possible through the following external access: - Engines: Oil tank. .

9.12 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. In case of Push back stipulated procedures are to be followed. anti collision to be placed off. . Minimum power is to be used to avoid jet blast damage. parking brake set ON. In case parking brake is required ON for any reason then it must be cycled OFF and ON. Ground staff must be on ground interphone connect.12. Parking brakes to be set OFF only after one main door is opened and chocks are in position. Captain will then call for the shut down check list and on its completion he will position himself at the forward entry door to thank and bid our customers good bye.2 Airplane Handling Documents Airplane handling documents required are stipulated in the airport handling manual for Airport Services and the Maintenance Manual for maintenance staff. After the aircraft comes to a halt. Once ATC has cleared and ground staff have given clearance FCOM stipulated engine start procedures are to be followed. cargo doors closed. ATC permission is required to start engines.1 Servicing Of Airplanes Guidance on this is available in: i) Airport Handling Manual ii) Maintenance Manual 9. Cockpit crew must be in possession of the following mandatory documents prior to the flight: i) Passenger manifest ( with lead cabin attendant) ii) Crew Manifest A-9-31 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 START UP.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Prior to engine start all airplane doors must be closed and slides armed normally. marshalling signals / automatic parking directions are to be followed. On arrival.12. wheels chocked and engine vicinity cleared. 9. DEPARTURE AND ARRIVAL PROCEDURES Prior to taxi ATC clearance has to be obtained and also clearance from ground. the Engines to be shut. Seat belt sign are to be switched OFF once Doors are disarmed as confirmed on ECAM Door/Oxy Page.

9.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 iii) Load and Trim Sheet iv) Special Load notification v) Multiple Occupancy Of airplane Seats The airline policy does not permit multiple occupancy of airplane seat except in the case of infants in arms. Also Refer Chapter 36.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. considering assistance of local law enforcement officers.3 DGR notification ( if carried) .12. in turn. the flight crew shall inform the local company representative who. Whenever it becomes necessary to remove a passenger from an aircraft.13. to property or to the aircraft - he fails to observe instructions of the crew Such persons could include those who are obviously under the influence of alcohol or drugs. status. intoxicated and/or abusive passengers should only be accepted on board with the permission of the commander. shall take the necessary actions. the conduct. in his opinion. 9.1 REFUSAL OF EMBARKATION. Passenger who has been refused embarkation or disembarked are left with the airport authorities.13 DISORDERLY / UNRULY PASSENGERS Disorderly.ENROUTE OFF LOADING The Commander is allowed to refuse to carry or to off-load at any aerodrome any person if.12. However this does not apply to persons under the influence of drugs who are subject to such condition following emergency medical treatment after commencement of the flight or to persons under medical care and accompanied by personnel trained for that purpose. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 9. A-9-32 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. age or mental or physical condition of the person is such as to: - render him incapable of caring for himself without special assistance of cabin attendant - cause discomfort or make himself objectionable to other passengers - involve any hazard or risk to himself or to other persons.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A disruptive behaviour (level 1) is when the passenger is very aggressive and/or refuses to comply with regulations (refuses to fasten Seat Belt/switch off his mobile). A-9-33 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. handling agents and check-in personnel. a written warning be issued to the offender. then there is no requirement to declare the passenger „unruly‟ / follow up actions like filling up of FSF . the lead will still read out the content to the passenger and the witness form(s) needs to be filled.13. Therefore to ensure that unruly passenger understands the serious consequences of his behaviour. the witness form (available in the cockpit) should also be filled and details of two witnesses recorded. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Responsibilities of persons other than the Commander 9. of wilful violations like smoking. A verbal warning is to be given clarifying that if he continues to behave in the same way. all company personnel engaged in passenger handling and loading. should alert the Commander if at any time they consider that the condition of a particular passenger could jeopardise the safety of a flight. red color card will be shown to the passenger with a reminder that “he is responsible for his behaviour and its consequences”. this warning card will be issued to the passenger directly without any verbal warning. including other crew members. consumption of alcohol. In case. .014 or handing over the passenger to the security. The captain must be notified immediately about the incident.2 Unruly Behaviour Passengers The cases of unruly behaviour of passengers travelling by air are unavoidable due to variable human factors and are likely to be experienced by the crewmembers sometime or the other. a written warning will be issued. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In order to assist the Commander in the proper exercise of his authority. If the passenger changes his behaviour after the issue of the card. In the event the passenger refuses to accept the warning. Once the red card is shown to a passenger. when dealing with a disruptive behaviour (level 1) and Physically Abusive behaviour (level 2). If the passenger does not change his behaviour.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

The passenger will be Unrestrained in the following emergency situations: a) b) c) Planned / unplanned emergency evacuation Ditching Any confirmed serious medical condition.12 is also relevant.13. Use of restraint should be judicious and ONLY as a last resort when the passenger becomes physically violent. Chapter 36. A-9-34 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. The crew depending on the severity and the situation should intimate the cockpit. III or IV. It should be ascertained that all other feasible means of pacifying the passenger have exhausted or the urgency of the situation demands immediate restraint and an effort to restrain the passenger is not likely to affect the safety of the aircraft. there will be no requirement to follow the sequence. . Medical issues related to him. Para 36. if any should be promptly attended to. The restraint should be applied on hands behind his/her body such that it is not too tight (affects the blood circulation) or too loose (rendered useless).014 and handover the passenger to security on arrival. The passenger should be relocated to a window or middle seat (preferably closer to a bulk head) and avoid over-wing exit row seats. The commander must be kept informed at all times. The commander and the lead cabin attendant will sign and the original copy will be handed over to the passenger.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.3 Restraining the Passenger Restraining devices may be required especially while dealing with passenger‟s unruly behaviour level II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal However. In instances of physically abusive behaviour by any passenger. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 The lead CA will fill the FSF – 014 form in duplicate. say breathlessness etc. and does not comply with the instructions given by cabin crew even after the warning. consider restraining the passenger (as a last resort only). fill up form FSF 014 and handover the passenger to the security on arrival. if the passenger continues with his disruptive behaviour. the lead must readout contents of the form to the passenger. An Inflight Witness Form and FSF-014 are available and kept with the on board documents in the coat hanger storage area of the cockpit. 9. Before handing over.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. then the lead must fill FSF .

The Commander may divert to any suitable aerodrome if in his opinion it is prudent to do so. Hand over the passenger to the IndiGo Security on arrival.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Take witnesses and gather enough evidence (if any article was thrown etc. Under normal circumstances company has designated alternates for each airport which are chosen based on availability of IndiGo airports services or signing of agreements with other airlines / aircraft handlers. adequate support services shall be made available.14. Over-riding considerations of weather prevalent in the area may require the Commander to choose another suitable aerodrome. .1 Diversion Procedure Diversions may be effected from any point in-flight whenever the Pilot-inCommand assesses the probability of not being able to land at his destination.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Flight dispatch does not designate an airport as alternate unless it is confirmed that in case of diversion. airport services and passenger facilitation A-9-35 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. technical or commercial reasons. OCC will be responsible for mobilising all support services including engineering. crew will contact OCC using available means of communication.14 FLIGHT DIVERSIONS General Policy Alternate airports to be used for diversions due to weather. (2) Details of location and procedure to use restraining device is explained in the IFS document. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Note: (1) All cabin attendants have been trained according to Inflight circular No: IGA-IFSTRG-156 which covers the use of Restraining device called Tuff Tie and an unrestraining device called Tuff Cut available on board all aircraft.2 Crew Responsibility At Airports Of Diversion As soon as possible after landing. 9. its availability etc. 9. are specified in the Operational Flight Plan.14. 9.). will have to be weighed. Considerations of fuel on board. In case of a diversion the Commander will endeavour to inform the station of his intended landing about his future action and his requirements directly or through OCC / flight dispatch. as it is a common attention gaining tactics. weather parameters.

The company representative shall liaise with the OCC.4 Overflying Of Stations Airport Services will deal with the passengers who have been over carried due to any reasons whatsoever.14. A-9-36 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.14. The Commander and Crew shall render all assistance that may be required by the ground staff in such circumstances. Commander and the Engineering before fixing subsequent departure of the flight. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Crew will be responsible for the safety of the airplane till the station qualified maintenance and ground staff arrives to perform their designated function. The standard of the hotel shall be as per the company Policy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 9. of the fact and may offload them at the originating/last station in consultation with OCC in case of an inordinate delay to a flight. at the earliest. .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. All efforts should be made to fly the airplane out after rectification. The Commander shall maintain a close liaison with the company representative regarding serviceability / rectification of the grounded aircraft.3 Unscheduled Landing/Diversion Of Aircraft In case of an unscheduled landing and grounding of an aircraft: all air crew shall remain at the airport until the company decides the status of the aircraft. 9. When the Commander of a flight is aware that he will not be able to land at the next station he should advise the passengers destined for that station. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 a) Airport where company staff is available b) Airport where company staff is not available The Flight Crew shall look after all aspects of ground handling of the airplane under instructions of the commander. In the case of an unscheduled night stop it is the responsibility of the company representative to arrange transportation and hotel accommodation for the Crew of the grounded aircraft.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal Any action must be taken in case of serious illness. nurse and ambulance. as necessary. As long as the ill person is on board. When a passenger falls ill suddenly. Such a situation can be considered as an "Emergency". The ill person should be isolated for the comfort and the safety of the ill person and of the others passengers. first aid must be given by cabin attendants or competent passengers. to attend to the passenger. Injury In Flight It is the Commander‟s responsibility to decide if an immediate landing is to be made. 9.1 Serious Passenger Illness. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 9. The ill person should be isolated for his and others passengers comfort and safety.2 On Board All action must be taken in case of serious illness.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.15.15. 9. the cabin attendant will give first aid and assistance and will look out for any doctor amongst the passengers on board. divert to an en-route airport or continue to the planned destination. A-9-37 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. On receipt of such a message. . Depending upon the criticality of situation Commander may decide to return to departure airport. The commander will send a message to OCC regarding the conditions on-board and intended course of action.15.3 On Ground If a passenger falls sick on ground or is unable to continue his journey. injury or death in flight. The Cabin attendants will keep the Flight crew informed of any medical emergency in the cabin. to avoid contagion for the other persons on board. as necessary before the flight lands at that place. arrangements will be made for a doctor / nurse.15 ILLNESS / INJURY DURING FLIGHT 9. it is necessary for stations to ensure that such cases are promptly reported to OCC. to avoid infection to other persons on board. Whenever a passenger(s) sustains injuries in flight or any other incidents on board the flights by which the passenger could claim compensation from the company. injury or death in flight. OCC will advise the concerned Airport Manager who will make available the services of a doctor.

a passenger decides not to continue his journey. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 9. witnessing the death will furnish necessary information regarding the time. when entering their airspace. if required.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. other crew and passengers. the commander will immediately send a message to the next en-route station.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The name and address of next of kin can be looked from the passenger reservation record / deceased‟s belonging.16 DEATH INFLIGHT / GROUND In case death has occurred on board an aircraft during flight. The cabin baggage. nationality. of the State's airspace in which the death occurred and also the destination State's authorities. The deceased passenger will not be moved unless it is necessary for the convenience of other passengers or for the safety of the aircraft. Health and other public authorities. . The Airport Manger will inform OCC and the station of destination of the passenger to enable them to inform the relative or friends. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In case. if different. etc. The local Police must be assisted in taking further action according to local laws. The Commander. This message will also state the cause of death if known or suspected. All such baggage will be sealed and kept in safe custody either with the local authorities pending disposal instructions or collection by the passenger‟s family members. location and registration A-9-38 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. Commander will ensure that Airport Services have off loaded his checked-in baggage and cabin baggage. checked-in baggage and all other personal belonging of the passenger must be taken charge of and an inventory made in the presence of Indigo Security and the police authorities. A revised security release certificate may be considered as a means to ascertain that all necessary actions have been completed. the time of the death. In the event of a death in flight the Commander must advise the relevant ground authorities. the Airport Manager at the airport of landing will advise the local Police. through ATC. The commander must complete a report which records the name of the deceased person. circumstances of death. On receipt of such a message.

Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 of the aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-9-39 Effective 04-Dec-12 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Not a controlled copy. One copy of this report is to be given to ground authorities at destination and another to the Vice President/Director (Flight Operations).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 01 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS & PROCEDURES CHAPTER 09 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-9-40 Effective 04-Dec-12 .

....OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.........4 10..................... Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 TABLE OF CONTENTS PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT ... ........................................1 ICAO ANNEX 12 PROCEDURE .....7 A-10-1 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy..................................4 10.........1 Signals With Surface Craft ......................................4 10........5 10..................................... 3 10..4..3 COMMUNICATIONS ............................................6 SEARCH AND RESCUE ORGANISATION .........................................................4 SEARCH AND RESCUE SIGNALS ................. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 10.....2 Ground Air Visual Signal Code .............4................2 PROCEDURES FOR A COMMANDER INTERCEPTING A DISTRESS TRANSMISSION ................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.............................................. 3 10.................................................5 10........................................................................

printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-10-2 Effective 17-Aug-11 . Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

 number of persons observed.1 ICAO ANNEX 12 PROCEDURE OBSERVING AN i) keep the craft in distress in sight until compelled to leave the scene or advised by the rescue coordination centre that it is no longer necessary. iii) as appropriate. Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 10. if possible and unless considered unreasonable or unnecessary: . PROCEDURES ACCIDENT FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND 10. it shall. ii) determine the position of the craft in distress.  time of observation expressed in hours and minutes Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). report to the rescue coordination centre or air traffic services unit as much of the following information as possible: iv)  type of craft in distress.  its position.  apparent physical condition of survivors. such aircraft is unable to establish communication with the appropriate rescue coordination centre or air traffic services unit.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. hand over to an aircraft capable of establishing and maintaining such communications until the arrival of the first search and rescue aircraft.  whether persons have been seen to abandon the craft in distress. by mutual agreement. If the first aircraft to reach the scene of an accident is not a search and rescue aircraft.  apparent best ground access route to the distress site. its identification and condition. If. printed from e-manual / Company Portal When a Commander observes that either another aircraft or a surface craft is in distress. and act as instructed by the rescue coordination centre or the air traffic services unit.  on-scene weather conditions. in the meantime. expressed in geographical or grid coordinates or in distance and true bearing from a distinctive landmark or from a radio navigation aid. A-10-3 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. the pilot shall.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. it shall take charge of on-scene activities of all other aircraft subsequently arriving until the first search and rescue aircraft reaches the scene of the accident.

10.5 MHz is guarded continuously during their hours of service at all area control centres and flight information centres. Series S. For communications during search and rescue operations. COMMUNICATIONS Transmission and reception of distress messages within the Indian Search and Rescue Areas. call signs. Section 9. the aircraft shall indicate whether the signal has been understood or not by making the appropriate visual signal.3 at his discretion. Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 PROCEDURES FOR A COMMANDER INTERCEPTING A DISTRESS TRANSMISSION Whenever a distress transmission is intercepted by a commander of an aircraft. while awaiting instructions. giving all available information. A-10-4 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy.1 portion of AIP (INDIA). All Coastal Stations guard the international distress frequencies. 10. proceed to the position given in the transmission. iii) take a bearing on the transmission iv) inform the appropriate rescue coordination centre or air traffic services unit of the distress transmission. Rescue aircraft belonging to permanent Search and Rescue Units use the call sign ZIGZAG.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. frequencies. If more than one aircraft is engaged on Search and Rescue duties. a serial number is added to the basic call sign. Other Aeronautical Stations will on request.4 SEARCH AND RESCUE SIGNALS (Appendix to CAR. Part 1) When a ground signal has been displayed. printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) .2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. if feasible: acknowledge the distress transmission. ii) record the position of the craft in distress if given. are handled in accordance with Annexure 10 to convention of International Civil Aviation. guard this frequency. and v) 10. The frequency 121. and hours of operation of Indian Aeronautical Stations are published in ENR 4. Information concerning positions. ICAO (DOC 8400) codes and abbreviation are used. if two-way communication is not available. he shall.

Note : Due to high noise level on board surface craft. i) rocking the wings. when used.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . printed from e-manual / Company Portal Upon observing any of the signals given below aircraft shall take such actions as may be required by the interpretation of the signal given therein. have the meaning indicated therein. c) heading in the direction in which the surface craft is to be directed. Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 The signals given below shall.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. b) for acknowledgement receipt of signals i) the hoisting of the “code pennant” (vertical red and white stripes) close up (meaning understood) ii) the flashing of a succession of “Ts” by signal lamp in the Morse code: iii) the changing of heading to follow the aircraft. or ii) opening and closing the throttle. A-10-5 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. or iii) changing the propeller pitch. or iii) changing propeller pitch.4.4. 10. i) rocking the wings. Note : The following replies may be made by surface craft to the signal in 10.2 . The following manoeuvres by an aircraft means that the assistance of the surface craft to which the signal is directed is no longer required: a) crossing the wake of the surface craft close astern at a low altitude and. or ii) opening and closing the throttle.1 Signals With Surface Craft The following manoeuvres performed in sequence by an aircraft mean that the aircraft wishes to direct a surface craft towards an aircraft or a surface craft in distress: a) Circling the surface craft at least once. They shall be used only for the purpose indicated and no other signals likely to be confused with them shall be used. b) Crossing the projected course of the surface craft close ahead at low altitude and. the sound signals in b(ii) and (iii) may be less-effective than the visual signals in b(i) and are regarded as alternative means of attracting attention.

2. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 10. 1 2 3 Message 1 Require Assistance 2 Require medical Assistance 3 No or Negative 4 Yes or Affirmative 5 Proceeding in this direction 5 V X N Y  Ground Air Visual Signal Code For Use By Rescue Units Message Code Symbol LLL Operation completed We have found all personnel We have found only some personnel 4 Code Symbol We are not able to continue. Each proceeding in direction indicated 6 Information received that aircraft is in this Direction 7 Nothing found.2 No.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Ground Air Visual Signal Code 10. 10.4. Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 for indicating inability to comply: i) the hoisting of the international flag “N” (a blue and white checkered square): ii) the flashing of a succession of “N’s” in the Morse code.4.2. Returning to base L L ++ XX Have divided into two groups.4.1 Ground Air Visual Signal Code for Use By Survivors No.c) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Will continue to search A-10-6 NN Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy.2 .

ii) during the hours of darkness: flashing on and off twice the aircraft's landing lights or. Note: 1. Lack of the above signal indicates that the ground signal is not understood 10. by switching on and off twice its navigation lights. which are generally collocated with the Flight Information Centres. which has the responsibility of making the necessary facilities available. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Symbols may be formed by any means such as: strips of fabric.4.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. etc. Attention to the above signals may be attracted by other means such as radio. etc. Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 Symbols shall be at least 2. reflected light.3 Air to Ground Signals The following signals by aircraft mean that the ground signals have been understood: i) during the hours of daylight: by rocking the aircraft's wings. pieces of wood.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 2. parachute material. flares.5 SEARCH AND RESCUE ORGANISATION The Search & Rescue service in India is organised in accordance with the Standards and Recommended Practices of ICAO Annex 12 by the Airports Authority of India in collaboration with the Ministry of Defence. stones or such like material. The Search & Rescue service is responsible for entire Indian territory including territorial waters as well as airspace over high-seas encompassed by Chennai. if not so equipped. smoke. Kolkata and Mumbai FIRs. or staining with oil. Refer AIP (INDIA) GEN 3.5 meters (8 ft) long and shall be made as conspicuous as possible.2. 10. A-10-7 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy.6 for details of various Indian Search and Rescue (SAR) centres. . marking the surface by tramping.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-10-8 Effective 17-Aug-11 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 00 PROCEDURES FOR PILOT-IN-COMMAND OBSERVING AN ACCIDENT CHAPTER 10 Not a controlled copy.

.................................4.............................3 11................... 16 11................4 Other Operations Personnel .........................2 Crew Medical Examination .......6 11.....................4 11............ 4 11....6 11...............3 PRE-FLIGHT MEDICAL ..............................4 11........5............ 24 Intentionally Left Blank ...............1 Pairing Of Two Foreign Pilots ................4........................................................ 34 A-11-1 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy...3 11...............................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT..................4 QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENT ..........................1.......4................3 Training..4.............................................................................................2 Cabin Attendants ..............................3 11.............................4 Flying Two Captains .....................................1 Flight Crew .................................................7 11......1 Guidance Concerning Health ......................1.... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 11.........1....................... 16 CREW HEALTH PRECAUTIONS ................................5 Maximum age limit ..........2 11. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 TABLE OF CONTENTS FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION AND SUCCESSION OF COMMAND................1.... 16 11....................................... 23 .....................................................2.................................................... 12 11......................................... ...................1..............6 11.......5 11..................3 Augmented flight crew ...........................1 Supernumeraries ......................................................................................5 SUCCESSION IN COMMAND ....................5 11......................2 Minimum Cockpit Experience ..........................................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II........ Checking And Supervision Personnel ......................................... 24 11...........................3 OPERATION ON MORE THAN ONE TYPE ............5...... 16 11.........5..........................1 CREW COMPOSITION ..........

Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-11-2 Effective 09-Jul-14 .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

Storm. With regard to the pairing of two foreign line pilots the Airline will decide on a case to case basis depending on the experience the foreign Captain has with IndiGo and his proficiency in the English language. required for emergency evacuation and be able to evacuate the airplane in the stipulated period of 90 seconds. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH SUCCESSION OF COMMAND 11. Cabin attendant for ferry flights No Cabin attendant shall be carried on a “damaged ferry/substandard flight”.1 Pairing Of Two Foreign Pilots The Company has regulatory approval to pair two foreign pilots together without any need to have an Indian Pilot on board. The names of foreign Pilots who can be paired together will be notified by Flight Operations from time to time. ICAO RT procedures etc. All foreign TRI/TRE (IndiGo. As a result it is permissible to schedule two foreign pilots on board. Airbus.1 CREW COMPOSITION TYPE OF OPERATION AND Flight Crew/Cabin Attendant Commander Co-Pilot Minimum Cabin Attendant One One Four Note: The cabin attendant should be positioned so as to ‘man’ the Passenger entry/exit doors. A-11-3 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1. engineer or flight crew member can satisfy this requirement.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. If any revenue passenger is carried the minimum stipulated Cabin attendants are required.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 11.) can be paired without any restriction. Jetways etc. Crew scheduling will pair foreign pilots using the above guidelines. A qualified mechanic. For normal ferry/relief flights if no passengers are carried at least one cabin attendant shall be on board. 11. . Foreign Captains permitted by the Airline will only be paired with other foreign Captains or with foreign CoPilots who have at least 100 hours operating experience with IndiGo.

International The operating crew shall have following experience before being planned for international flights.3 - Captain : 500 hours as PIC - Co-Pilots : 300 hours as total experience on type.  Flight with 3/4 sectors: First two sectors by Senior Captain and the rest by the other Captain. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Domestic . b) Training flights (refer OM-D 2.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. On a flight the distribution of the sectors will be as follows. 11.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Both pilots are authorised to log the flight time as Pilot-in-Command and will share sectors as given below and fly from the left seat. Pilot flying a sector from the Left Seat will discharge all functions related to PF and the pilot in the right seat will discharge all functions related to PM. it may be required to roster two Captains (authorised to operate from either seat) for a flight or a series of flights.1. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Minimum Cockpit Experience The company defines the minimum cockpit experience for the crew as under. Crew scheduling is responsible to ensure: The operating crew shall have minimum 500 hrs total cockpit experience on type wherein PIC hours are considered from release on type and Co-pilot hours are considered after endorsement on type.27) 11.in.1. Augmented flight crew As and when required augmented flight crew may be carried to meet a) Scheduling requirement.11.4 Flying Two Captains Due operational exigencies. However the „Trainers‟ can fly as PIC from either seat.Command will be responsible for the safety of aircraft operation for that sector.1. The company nominated Pilot.  Flight with 2 sectors: First sector by senior Captain and the second A-11-4 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal Post Lay over the sectors will be treated afresh as above. . Any Pilot who so assumes Command shall not handle the controls if he does not hold a current endorsement on type. if on board. may be instructed to assume Command. 1937. Also. shall act as Pilot-in-Command or Co-pilot of an aircraft engaged in commercial air transport operations. no person holding a pilot's license issued under these rules and having attained the age of sixty years . „No person. iv) Lead Cabin Attendant/ Cabin Attendant Note: A pilot with a current command endorsement on type. holding a pilot's licence issued under these rules and having attained the age of sixty-five years. the maximum age limit for a commercial pilot is defined as 65 years. Director (Flight Operations) and Chief Pilots will always be in Command in that order.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. shall act as Pilot-in-Command or Co-pilot of an aircraft engaged in commercial air transport operations unless it is operated in a multi-crew environment and the other pilot is less than sixty years of age. Name of the PIC for each sector will appear on the FRC.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.1.2 SUCCESSION IN COMMAND The following shall be the immediate succession in command in the event of incapacitation/death of the Commander until instructions are received from Vice President/Director (Flight Operations): i) Co-pilot ii) ACM/Company Pilot iii) Cabin attendant with pilot licence.5 Maximum age limit In accordance with Rule 28 A of Aircraft Rules. Alternatively. The age of the flight crew member is tracked by flight crew scheduling (OCC) 11. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 by the other Captain   Flight with 1 sector: By the Senior Captain 11. the Vice President/ Director (Flight Operations) may instruct any senior pilot on board to assume command. On normal line / non-training flights Vice President (Flight Operations). A-11-5 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

but shall not interfere with qualified crew members in the performance of their duties.1 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. they must be aware of their safety roles. training. but is on board a cargo or passenger aircraft during commercial or non-commercial operations.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and is not classified as a passenger. checking and recency for operations personnel to conduct their duties are provided in part D Training Manual. b) Cabin attendant Scheduling Cabin attendant will not be scheduled on more than three different airplane types.3 OPERATION ON MORE THAN ONE TYPE a) Flight Crew Scheduling The airline policy does not permit operation on more than one type for flight crew. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Supernumeraries Note: A person in addition to the flight crew that is not a cabin crew member or passenger. The Captain is to brief such persons on their duties and responsibilities related to safety.11. Recurrent training and checking The company will ensure that each crewmember undergoes recurrent training and checking as required by DGCA. qualification/competency. 11. rating(s). A-11-6 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. responsibilities and duties. 11. experience. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Whenever supernumeraries are required for the safety of operations on board an aircraft during commercial or non-commercial operations. A 320 will be considered as one airplane type.4 QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENT Licences / Qualification / Competency Details of the required licences.2. . Conversion course A crewmember is required to complete an operator's conversion course before commencing unsupervised flying on commercial flights when:  Changing operator flying a different airplane type. A 320 will be considered as one airplane type. The Supernumeraries should be prepared to assist.

The validity of the licence is determined by the validity of the ratings therein and the medical certificate. Pilots are required to have.4. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The conversion training is conducted in accordance with the training programs approved by DGCA.1 Licences All flight crewmembers shall hold an applicable and valid licence acceptable to the DGCA and shall be suitably qualified and competent to conduct the duties assigned to them. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Assigned to another airplane type. All Medical limitations/restrictions imposed on the class 1 License medical are required to be complied with while exercising privileges of the license. 11. A-11-7 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. a first officer (co-pilot) must have an Airline Transport Pilot Licence. . Prior to commencement of Captain (Command) training. The amount of the training required for the conversion course can vary. These programs are available in Part D Training Manual. taking into account the crew member's previous training and experience.1 Flight Crew 11.4. a) Commanders He / She shall hold an Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL) and Instrument Rating privileges.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A licence holder shall not exercise the privileges granted by any licence or rating unless the holder maintains competency by meeting the relevant requirements. The holder of licence or rating shall not exercise privileges other than those granted by that licence or rating. on board the aircraft. the applicable licences as detailed below.1.

Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 First officers (co-pilots) He / She Shall hold a valid Commercial Pilot Licence (CPL) or higher category licence and Instrument Rating privileges. unless the holder has a valid and appropriate type rating. or o When a change of equipment and/or procedures on types or variants currently operated Proficiency Checks Each flight crew member undergoes proficiency checks as stipulated in Company Operations Manual Part D. which requires the acquisition of additional knowledge: o When operating another airplane of the same type or variant.3 Differences training.1.1. or o When a change of equipment and /or procedures on types or variants currently operated.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. which requires additional knowledge and training on an appropriate training device: o When operating another variant of an airplane of the same type or another type of the same class currently operated. A flight crewmember completes a Type Rating / Transition course which satisfies the applicable DGCA requirements when changing from one type of airplane to another type for which a different type rating is required.4. There is no limit to the number of ratings that may be held at one time. Familiarisation training . except as a pilot undergoing skill testing or dual training. Type Rating The holder of a pilot licence shall not act in any capacity as a pilot. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 11.b) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A flight crewmember shall complete:   11.4.2 . A-11-8 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. but there are restrictions concerning the number of ratings that can be exercised at any one time.

4 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. This training will include at least the following: d)  an engine failure during take-off  a one engine inoperative approach and go-around  a one engine inoperative landing Line Flying Under Supervision (AIC 6/2011) Refer Company Operations Manual Part D A-11-9 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1.1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 11. c) Pilot Qualification To Operate In Either Seat Pilots whose duties also require them to operate in the other seat.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. will complete additional training or simulation as specified in the part D Training Manual. Recent experience: The experience shall be same as required for Pilot-in-command or copilot depending on the relief duty. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Line Checks Each flight crewmember will undergo line checks as stipulated in Company Operations Manual Part D Recent Requirement a) Pilot-in-command and co-pilot The company shall not assign a pilot-in-command or a co-pilot to operate at the flight controls of a type or variant of a type of aeroplane during take-off & landing unless that pilot has operated the flight controls during at least three takeoffs & landings within the preceding 90 days on the same type of aeroplane or in a flight simulator approved for the purpose. b) Relief Pilot : Qualification: Captain or co-pilot depending on the relief duty.4.4.5 .11.

Refer Company Operations Manual Part D A-11-10 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. The simulator part of the course must be completed on a flight simulator approved for CAT II/III training and checking. . Refer Company Operations Manual Part D iv) RVSM The RVSM is an academic knowledge and is fully integrated in the type rating course. Refer Company Operations Manual Part D vi) Dangerous Goods Training All flight crew members are required to undergo Dangerous Goods Training as per DGCA requirements. Flight crewmember with Category II or III experience with another DGCA approved operator will require fresh DGCA approval for CATII or III operations. ii) ETOPS : Refer Company Operations Manual Part D iii) TCAS/GPWS : The TCAS/GPWS course is an academic knowledge and is fully integrated in the type rating course.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Qualification for AWO is specified in Company Operations Manual Part D. Refer Company Operations Manual Part D v) RNAV/RNP All flight crew members are required to undergo RNAV/RNP training before undertaking such operations.e) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Other Qualifications Requirements i) All Weather Operations (AWO)/LVO Flight crewmembers with no category II or III experience must complete the full training programme.

(Refer Chap 2) Flight crew is prohibited to undertake any flight for which they are not qualified/ current as above for a specific flight requirement. Refer Company Operations Manual Part D .4. (each check report must be counter signed by the pilot) vii) Refresher & SEP training certificate A-11-11 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. i) Flying License along with FATA (Pilot on a validated license) ii) FRTO Licence iii) COP RTR (A) iv) Class I medical v) Log book ( optional ) vi) Copies of most recent License route check. 11. Refer Company Operations Manual Part D ix) Airports and route competence (Including special airports) Refer Company Operations Manual Part D x) Instructor/evaluator/line check airman qualification. printed from e-manual / Company Portal All flight crew members are required to undergo AVSEC Training as per BCAS requirements. IR check.1.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 vii) Security Training viii) CRM/ HUMAN FACTORS : The CRM course is fully integrated in the type rating and recurrent courses.6 Carriage of Documents Cockpit Crew All crew members have to carry with them. while on flight duty all of the following personal documents. the required licences/certificates to exercise their duties (as issued/agreed by DGCA) Each operating crew member must ensure that he has in his possession. LR check report. Refer Company Operations Manual Part D xi) Flight Duty Time Limitation/Fatigue Risk Management.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

 Passport/OCI/PIO cards.1 Qualification Requirements i) Minimum requirements A cabin attendant shall meet the following requirements:  be at least 18 years old  has passed an initial medical examination or assessment and be found medically fit for the duties A-11-12 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1. and  AEP Additional to above document Expat Crew shall carry. renewal etc. the crew is required to be in possession of a receipt of documents submitted. 11. 11.  Work Permit  Business Visa  FRRO Register details.7 Travel Documents for International Operations It is mandatory for all flight crew to carry valid.4.2. In case any of the pilot‟s licences have been submitted to DGCA for endorsement.  Company ID Card.. All crewmembers are responsible for the renewal of their licences/ ratings/approvals.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal If desired by the DGCA inspector.4.4.2 Cabin Attendants 11. issued by DGCA / regional DAW. the log book is to be produced within 24 hours.  FATA If a designated crew member reports for duty without documents mentioned above and as a consequence there is any flight delay then he will be considered “Not Available to Fly”. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 viii) DGR certificate ix) Serviceable torch with luminosity capable of reaching the tail plane Any crew found not in possession of the above can be deemed by the flight inspector to be acting in violation of Rule 7 of Indian Aircraft Rules.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. . 1937.

Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11  ii) remains medically fit to discharge the duties specified in the operating Manual. each cabin attendant shall have passed the prescribed checks in order to verify proficiency in carrying out normal and emergency safety duties. Details of the programmes are included in Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.2 Dangerous Goods Training Each cabin attendant will receive training that covers at least the following:  General philosophy  Limitations on dangerous goods in the air transport  Classification and list of dangerous goods  Package marking and labelling  Loading. The Lead cabin attendant has responsibility to the commander for the conduct and co-ordination of cabin safety and emergency procedures specified in the Operations Manual 11. Training and checking requirements  initial training  conversion or difference training  familiarisation flights Following training.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. before undertaking assigned duties. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Each cabin attendant must have completed appropriate training as specified below.4. . restrictions on loading and segregation  Provision of information to the commander  Recognition of undeclared dangerous goods A-11-13 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. iii) Lead cabin attendant A Lead Cabin attendant will be nominated whenever more than one cabin attendant are assigned to a flight.2.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4 Recurrent Training and Checking Cabin attendant will undergo recurrent training every 12 months to ensure continued proficiency with all equipment and application of procedures relevant to the airplane types/variants operated.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The recurrent training and checking program includes theoretical and practical instruction. the period of validity will extend from the date of issue until 12 calendar months from the expiry date of that previous check. portable oxygen and protective breathing equipment (PBE)  first aid and the content of the first aid kits  stowage of articles in the cabin  dangerous goods procedures  security procedures  incident and accident review  crew resource management A-11-14 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.4. The period of validity of the recurrent training and associated checking is 12 calendar months in addition to the remainder of the month of issue. If issued within the final 3 calendar months of validity of a previous check. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Each cabin attendant will undergo the security training as specified by Bureau of Civil Aviation Security. . including oxygen systems and the donning by each cabin attendant of lifejackets.4. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11  Dangerous goods in passengers' baggage  Emergency procedures 11. Emphasis on special subject will change every year.2.2.3 Security Training 11. The annual recurrent training covers:  emergency procedures including pilot incapacitation  evacuation procedures including crowd control techniques  touch-drills for opening normal and emergency exits  location and handling of emergency equipment.

except that instead of halon an alternative extinguishing agent will be used o the donning and use of protective breathing equipment by each cabin attendant member in an enclosed simulated smoke-filled environment  use of pyrotechnics (actual or representative devices)  demonstration of the use of the life-raft or slide-raft where fitted 11.6  emergency exit operation  location and type of portable safety equipment.  This training will include: o each cabin attendant extinguishing a fire characteristic of an airplane interior fire. A-11-15 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . including protective clothing representative of that carried in the aircraft. and  type specific emergency procedures Refresher Policy In Case Of Flight Interruption Any cabin attendant who has been absent from all flying duties for more than 6 months shall complete refresher training as specified in the Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.5 Operation On More Than One Type Or Variant No cabin attendants will fly more than 3 types of airplanes.4.2.4. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Every 24 months the recurrent training will also include: the operation and actual opening of all normal and emergency exits for passenger evacuation in an airplane or representative training device  demonstration of the operation of all other exits (including flight deck windows)  realistic and practical training in the use of all fire-fighting equipment. In this context.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.2. variants of airplane type are considered to be different types if they are not similar in all the following aspects: 11.

including oxygen systems and the donning by each cabin attendant of lifejackets.2 Quarantine Regulations When a passenger on board shows symptoms which might indicate the presence of a major disease.4.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. On arrival of the aircraft.4 emergency procedures including pilot incapacitation  evacuation procedures including crowd control techniques  the operation and actual opening of all normal and emergency exits for passenger evacuation in an airplane or representative training device  demonstration of the operation of all other exits (including flight deck windows)  the location and handling of emergency equipment.5. crew and passengers is necessary.1. It is the responsibility of the airport medical or health authority to decide whether isolation of the aircraft.5. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 11.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.5 CREW HEALTH PRECAUTIONS 11.4. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Normally cabin attendant must undergo refresher training that includes at least: 11.1 Guidance Concerning Health 11. portable oxygen and protective breathing equipment (PBE) Training.1.3  .5. Checking And Supervision Personnel i) For Flight Crew – refer Company Operations Manual Part D ii) For Cabin attendant .1 International Regulations -Intentionally Left Blank- 11. nobody shall be permitted to board the aircraft or A-11-16 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. the Commander of an arriving flight must ensure that the airport medical or health authority have been informed.refer Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual Other Operations Personnel Refer Company Operations Manual Part D 11.

There is a greater affinity between carbon monoxide (CO) and haemoglobin than between oxygen and haemoglobin. .1. 11. is prohibited. if it is not possible to persuade crew members to stop smoking definitely.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.5. Therefore. Through the action of nicotine. c) Narcotics The consumption of narcotics is not allowed for crewmembers unless approved by the medical department. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The DGCA prohibition on consumption of intoxicating and psychoactive substances is stipulated in Rule 24 of the Aircraft Rules.3 Consumption Of Intoxicating And Psychoactive Substances a) Alcohol Under no circumstances may any crew member consume alcohol in any form 12 hours prior to a flight duty or have detectable alcohol in his blood before commencing flight duty and until the end of the flight duty. it is eliminated very slowly. Furthermore alcohol of any type may not be consumed while in uniform in public places.3.1 below. Consequently. refer to 11. A-11-17 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. can cause a relative hypoxemia.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. which is a vasoconstrictor.5. particularly on the flight deck. and because of its affinity to haemoglobin. including the cockpit. smoking is believed to be a contributing factor to elevated blood pressure in hyper reactive cases. It has been proven that carbon monoxide in the blood can lower altitude tolerance by as much as 5000 ft. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 disembark or attempt to off load cargo or catering until such time as authorized by the airport medical or health authority. 1937. b) Tobacco Many crew members smoke and some are heavy smokers. Company Policy Smoking on any IndiGo aircraft. cigarette smoking. it would be desirable that they refrain from smoking when on duty and for at least eight hours preceding the flight.

 Hypnotic (Sleeping Tablets) Use of hypnotic must be discouraged. Antidepressants and Psychotic Drugs All these types of drugs preclude crewmember from flight duties because of the underlying condition for which they are being used as well as the possible side effects resulting from them. hay fever and allergic rashes or reactions. fatigue and dryness of the mouth. Certain antihistamines are considered safe. When in doubt.  Tranquilliser. Flight duties should not be resumed until treatment with these types of drugs has been discontinued and until the effects of the drugs have entirely worn off. The following are some of the types of medication in common use which may impair reactions. and re-instatement to such duties will be reviewed A-11-18 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. . cause confusion and slow reactions. There are many others and when in doubt a pilot should consult the medical advisor. Pilots should know that many commonly used drugs have side effects which may impair judgement and interfere with performance. Check with the medical advisor. This can take several days in some instances. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 d) Drugs.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Any person who is identified as engaging in any kind of problematic use of psychoactive substances shall be removed from all safetycritical functions. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Crewmembers should not undertake flying duties while under the influence of any drug that may adversely affect performance. Quite commonly they are included in medication for treatment of the common cold.  Sleeping Tablets And Pharmaceutical Preparations Ideally crewmember should not fly on duty whilst taking any medication. Some nasal sprays and drops may also contain antihistamines. They may dull the senses.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.  Antihistamines Usually antihistamines produce side effects such as sedation. pilots should contact the medical advisor to establish whether medication being taken precludes flight duties or not.

Obviously. and sufficient time must be allowed to assess suitability and freedom from side effects before resumption of flight duties.  Anti-malarial Most anti-malarial preparations used for prevention and taken in recommended dosage are considered safe for flight duties.) Use of steroids. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The underlying condition for which antibiotics are being taken may prevent a pilot from flying. blurring of vision. They should be prescribed only by a doctor experienced in aviation medicine. where any hypersensitivity is feared.  Appetite Suppressants These preparations can affect the central nervous system and should not be taken during flight duties. A pilot should have previous experience of the antibiotic prescribed. However. great care must be exercised in their usage by crew members.  Anti-diarrhoea As a lot of medications used in treating symptoms of gastritis and enteritis (diarrhoea) may cause sedation. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 after cessation of the problematic use and upon determination that continued performance is unlikely to jeopardize safety. with few exceptions. In most cases grounding for a time may be necessary. etc. etc.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.  Antibiotics  Analgesics (Pain killers) With a lot of analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents.  Steroids (Cortisone. the suspect antibiotic must not be used. . Ideally doctor‟s advice should be sought before using them. have a trial of it for at least twenty four hours on the ground before using it during flight duties. precludes flight duties. there is risk of gastric irritation or haemorrhage. or. Anti-hypertensives (Drugs for treating blood pressure) Certain therapeutic agents are compatible with flying activity.. most antibiotics are compatible with flying. alternatively. A-11-19 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. combined with most of the types of medication is a most undesirable and dangerous combination. abdominal cramps. diarrhoea and varying degree of prostration may be experienced.1.5. Immunisation Medical advice is to be sought concerning the period to be observed before returning to flying duties following immunisation All crewmembers are responsible for the validity of their vaccination certificates. nausea. vomiting. Crewmembers should not volunteer as blood donors whilst actively flying. intestinal gurgling. Bed rest with convenient access to bathroom.6 Symptoms And Treatment Of Poisoning The character and severity of the symptoms depend on the nature and dose of the toxin and the resistance of the patient.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Malaise.1. anorexia. All crewmembers shall present their vaccination certificates to the appropriate authorities when required to do so. All data concerning the period of validity of a vaccination are given in the respective document. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Alcohol Alcohol. No flight assignment should be undertaken within 24 hours of diving to a depth less than 10 meters. A crewmember should not practice deep diving to depth 10 metres or more within 48 hours before a flight assignment.5 Blood Donation Following a blood donation the volume of blood lost is made up in a matter of some hours but the cellular content can take some weeks to return to the previous level. Onset may be sudden.5. printed from e-manual / Company Portal e) . 11. commode.5.1.4 Deep Diving Flying in pressurised airplane after deep diving can result in the bends (decompression sickness). or A-11-20 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. A crewmember should not donate blood within 24 hours before a flight assignment. 11. 11.

pilots should never use full lens spectacles while flying .because the pilot's task requires frequent changes from near to distant vision and the latter is blurred by reading glasses. Half moon spectacles or lower segment lenses with a neutral upper segment should be used in these circumstances. The examination for the prescription of a spectacle correction should ideally be carried out by an examiner with some understanding of the problems of vision in aviation. the instrument panel range and distant vision.5.7 Vision Correction Spectacles.1. then specialist advice is required. printed from e-manual / Company Portal All flight crew members who are required by the licensing authorities to wear corrective lenses in order to satisfy visual requirements laid down for granting of licences. Coffee and especially black coffee. either corrective or anti-glare.5.8 Humidity The relative humidity of cabin air is much lower in flight than that to which we are accustomed. 11.1. 11.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Severe cases should be hospitalised. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 bedpan is desirable.  Near and distant vision correction Where correction for both near and distant vision is required. are required to carry a spare pair of spectacles with them on all occasions whilst exercising the privileges of their licences. being a diuretic (kidney stimulant) can exacerbate / aggravate the effects of reduced humidity.  Near vision correction Where the only correction necessary is for reading. Treatment is mostly symptomatic and all cases should be seen by a medical doctor. bifocal lenses are essential and pilots should discuss with their medical examiner the shape and size most suitable for each segment. . Symptoms A-11-21 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. when worn by flight crew during flight should be of a type of frame that allows maximum peripheral vision. Where triple correction is necessary for reading.

9 Diurnal Rhythm To minimise the tiring effects of interruption due to day-night biological cycle following should be adhered to:  when away from home adhere as much as possible to home time for sleeping. However. Any food. mouth and throat and general tiredness. and is low during normal sleep hours.1. eating and bowel function  take adequate rest before flight  eat light snacks at three or four hourly intervals to increase alertness 11.5.m when aircraft fly across time zones that are either easterly or Westerly. gastro-intestinal disorders pose by far the commonest threat to flight safety. The re-heating process usually used in airplane for the main course of a meal rarely destroys food poisoning organisms and the toxins they produce. They reach the lowest point at about 4 a. should be regarded with extreme suspicion. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 resulting from low humidity are dryness of the nose.5. psychological and physiological activity is high during normal waking hours. which is commonly part of a set airplane meal. which has been kept in relatively high ambient temperatures for several hours after preparation. thereby immediately and severely endangering a flight. as food poisoning. A-11-22 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. 11. This applies particularly to the cream or pastry. printed from e-manual / Company Portal It is a well-established fact that human bodies have a diurnal cycle or rhythm. which may interrupt human diurnal cycle. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. These toxins are tasteless and cause no unpleasant odours.1. No other illness can put a whole crew out of action so suddenly and so severely.10 Meal Precautions Prior To And During Flight Cases of acute food poisoning in the air continue to occur sporadically and surveys of incapacitation of flight crew in flight show that of these cases. there is no proof that this is harmful to human health. This means that chemical.

9 Blood sugar . DLC b) Urine .1 Medical tests Medical Boards generally require certain medical tests that pilots should undergo before a medical renewal. mayonnaise.9 or WHR > 0.9 for men and 0. 11. before and during flight it is essential to avoid eating easily perishable foods and drinks.85 for women Blood sugar. sauces. This is most important with milk and cream products. It is recommended that one hour elapse between the meal times of the two operating crew members.9. .RE / ME c) ECG d)  Every alternate year by crew between 30 and 40 years of age  Every year for crew above the age of 40 years Over Weight Crew i) For Crew who are over-weight based on BMI 25-29.Fasting and PP Lipid profile once in 2 years. Pilots at the controls should have meals of different types and eaten at separate intervals. salads. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Since the most acute forms of food poisoning frequently come on suddenly 1-6 hours after contaminated food is eaten. These tests include: a) Blood .5. TLC. common sense rules should be observed as far as practicable in respect of meals taken within 6 hours of a flight.Fasting and PP A-11-23 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.2. meat pies and other meat products.2 Crew Medical Examination Flight crew medical requirements are given in Para 2. OM D 11. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 For any crewmember.5.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Chapter 2. in addition to mandatory tests at specified age ii) For Crew who are over-weight based on BMI 30-34.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.Hb.

etc.85 for women by more than 30% . at their respective bases before proceeding for the medical renewal examination. 11. printed from e-manual / Company Portal iii) For Crew who are over-weight based on BMI 30-34. Public Sector companies under Centre and State Government. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Lipid profile once a year in addition to mandatory tests at specified age Blood sugar – Fasting & PP Lipid profile once in six months in addition to mandatory tests at specified age Pilots are required to have their test reports countersigned by the company doctor. 11.3 PRE-FLIGHT MEDICAL (CAR Section 5 – Air Safety Series „F‟ Part III.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.9 or WHR > 0. Issue II) This Civil Aviation Requirement lays down the procedure to be followed for the breathalyser examination of the crew members for consumption of alcohol and actions to be taken by the operators. b) Indian Non-scheduled/private institutes. mail or cargo. It is advisable that all required tests are done at least7 days prior to the date of medical. crew are advised to undergo those tests and carry all the test reports to the medical centre.1 APPLICABILITY It is applicable to: a) Indian operators engaged in scheduled air transport services for carriage of passengers. A-11-24 category operators/ flying training Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. additional tests are recommended by the company doctor. c) Central Government and State Government Civil Aviation Departments.5. In case.5.9 for men and 0. It also dwells on the procedure for medical to be followed by the authorities concerned in the event of an accident.3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

sedative. ii) No operator operating a domestic air transport service in India shall serve any alcoholic drink on board such an air transport service and no passenger traveling on such a service shall consume any alcoholic drink while on board. and no other person while in a state of intoxication shall enter or be in aircraft or report for duty. or carried in aircraft for the purpose of acting as pilot.11. iii) The holders of licences / authorization / approval shall not exercise the privileges of their licences / authorization / approval and related ratings while under the influence of any psychoactive substance which might render them unable to safely and properly exercise the privileges of the licences and ratings. cabin crew or other operating member of the crew thereof. A-11-25 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. while so acting or carried. his capacity so to act is impaired.2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. shall have taken or used any alcoholic drink.3. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 REGULATION (Rule 24 of The Airplane Rules 1937) i) No person acting as.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. narcotic or stimulant drug or preparation. urine or blood alcohol analysis or in a state in which by reason of his having taken any alcoholic. navigator. and no such person shall. sedative. iv) The holders of licences shall not engage in problematic use of substances. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The aircraft rule states that: .5. narcotic or stimulant drug or preparation within twelve hours of the commencement of the flight or take or use any such preparation in the course of the flight. commander. engineer. be in a state of intoxication or have detectable blood alcohol whatsoever in his breath.

Pre-flight Breathalyzer Examination Test conducted on crew member before departure of a flight to measures alcohol in his/her exhaled air so as to determine the concentration of alcohol in the blood.5.3. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 DEFINITIONS A person assigned by an operator to duty on an aircraft during a flight duty period.11.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 11. Cabin Crew Member A crew member other than a flight crew member. Post-flight Breathalyzer Examination Test conducted on crew member after arrival of a flight to measures alcohol in his/her exhaled air so as to determine the concentration of alcohol in the blood. It is important to intensify the awareness for crew members regarding the inherent dangers of flying after consumption of alcohol.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Maintenance Personnel Aircraft Maintenance Engineer or any other technically trained person authorized to carry out taxiing of aircraft. A-11-26 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Crew Member .4 GENERAL The level of blood alcohol compatible with safe flying is „Zero‟. Flight Crew Member A licensed crew member charged with duties essential to the operation of an aircraft during a flight duty period.5. which is also recommended by ICAO.3.

which is mainly due to congeners.5 REQUIREMENT: MEDICAL EXAMINATION PERSONNEL FOR ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION OF AIRCRAFT The Company /crew member /maintenance personnel shall ensure that there is no contravention of Rule 24 of the Aircraft Rules. The amount of alcohol in a can of beer is approx the same as in a single mixed drink. Alcohol present in body even in small quantities jeopardizes flight safety on several counts and is likely to adversely affect an aviator well into beyond the hangover period. when blood alcohol level indicates zero. Alcohol also interferes with the enzymatic cellular process or oxidation.post-flight on arrival in India.3. Even 12 hours after a bout of drink. champagne. 11.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. visual and cortical reaction. In case of diversion of flights. Every flight crew and cabin crew shall be subjected to Pre / Post flight breathalyzer examination for all scheduled flights as follows: a) Originating from India . the crew member under the influence of alcohol will not be fully capable of dealing with the situation. Consumption of alcohol results in significant deterioration of psychomotor performance and decreases the amount of mental capacity available to deal with many essential tasks involved in the conduct of safe flight. Should an emergency occur in-flight. 1937 by conduct of breathalyzer examination before operation of flights in India as well as outside India.Pre-flight. . due to unforeseen circumstances. to an airport A-11-27 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. It is known that a low alcohol blood level between 30 mg % to 50 mg % disturbs the sensor motor.5. causes hypoxia and reduces individual tolerance with increase in altitude. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Two ounces of whiskey raises the alcohol level to 50 mg.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. These congeners may take 15 to 18 hours to get dissipated and produce ill effects up to 36 hours depending upon the amount of alcohol consumed. there is decrement in task performance. b) Originating from destinations outside India . though the concentration of alcohol varies from one beverage to the other. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Even when the blood alcohol levels are zero in the body. ale and other alcoholic beverages have same effects as liquor. Wine. there could be some effect of hangover.

A representative of Air Safety Directorate/DMS (CA) of DGCA at his discretion may order a breathalyzer examination of any of the crew members prior to or on completion of a flight.3. Company policy Air Crew will first sign the pre-flight book in the presence of the Doctor who in turn shall do clinical evaluation prior to carrying out a breath Alco-test.6 EQUIPMENT USAGE At least two serviceable breathalyzer equipment. which are required to be kept serviceable & calibrated. The date of the last calibration shall be appended on the instrument.5.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. No crew member shall consume any drug/formulation or use any substance mouthwash/tooth gel which has alcoholic content. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 where facility for pre-flight breathalyzer examination is not available. 11. . Every IndiGo crew Base/Station is provided with two serviceable Alco Sensors. The “Manual” facility is provided in the Alco Sensor for resetting the local time and for scrolling back to monitor previous medical A-11-28 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.000 blows/six months/at a frequency as recommended by the equipment manufacturer from an agency having ISO certification to undertake the calibration activity.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Preflight/ Post flight medical test is to be done only in the “Auto” mode of Alco Sensor (IndiGo Flight Safety Circular 2 of 2012 also relevant). the flight crew and cabin crew shall undergo post-flight breathalyzer examination at first landing. The preflight breath test will be carried out by ALCO-SENSOR type breath analyzer equipment at a designated pre-flight room. capable of giving accurate digital value up to three decimal places with a memory to store and recall at least last 1000 records shall be made available at all times. At least one serviceable printer for the breathalyzer equipment shall be available at all times. The breathalyzer equipment shall be used only in auto mode attachable to a printer. The breathalyzer equipment shall be calibrated after 10. Record of such calibrations and continued serviceability of the breathalyzer equipment shall be maintained. printed from e-manual / Company Portal All maintenance personnel shall be subjected to breathalyzer examination for alcohol consumption before undertaking any taxi operation of the aircraft. At no time “Manual” mode of the Alco Sensor shall be used to carry out the Preflight/Post flight medical checkup of the crew. Any crew member who is undergoing such medication shall consult the company aero medical doctor before undertaking flying assignment.

Before the second test is carried out. The personnel approved to travel at the last minute shall inform the doctor of their inclusion to travel in the cockpit and captain shall confirm whether the individual has completed the PFMC or not. a control test must be taken with the same equipment to verify the serviceability and A-11-29 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. . The doctor on duty is to confirm that all personnel so approved have completed the pre-flight medical test. if desired. The Doctor/Paramedics/EMT shall also carry out a control test on daily basis and keep a record of printout to ensure serviceability of both the breathalyzer equipment and the printer.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Pre-flight. During this time.7 PROCEDURE FOR PRE-FLIGHT BREATHALYZER EXAMINATION AND POST-FLIGHT The company shall employ a full-time Doctor holding MBBS degree/trained Paramedic/Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). a crew member does not report for pre-flight medical until 30 min prior to estimated time of departure of flight. d) The pre-flight and post-flight breathalyzer examination records shall be kept separately in a bound volume with all pages serial numbered. doctors shall be provided crew roster and any changes thereof.000. Breathalyzer examination record shall be maintained as per the format given in Appendix I. The time consumed in the post-flight breathalyzer examination shall not be counted towards duty. the Doctor/Paramedics/EMT shall run an „air blank‟ on the instrument and obtain a reading of 0. In case. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 11.5. Scheduled airlines may maintain breathalyzer examination records as per the format given in Appendix II. b) Post-flight breathalyzer examination shall be carried out preferably in the aircraft after its arrival. c) Before each test. a) Pre-flight breathalyzer examination shall be conducted at a designated place. the subject crew may be permitted to wash his face and rinse his mouth. printed from e-manual / Company Portal records only‟. e) If the breathalyzer examination result is positive. The details of additional personnel such as Observers and AME travelling in the cockpit shall also be sent to the doctor on duty at the respective stations. a repeat test shall be carried out after an interval of maximum 15-20 minutes. doctors must immediately inform OCC for follow up action.3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

8 ACTION ON POSITIVE TEST The action on positive testing will be as follows: a) Any crew member who tests pre-flight breathalyzer examination positive for the first time/refuses to undergo the pre-flight breathalyzer examination/refuses to undergo the pre-flight breathalyzer examination second time upon tested positive during the first test/operates the aircraft without undergoing pre-flight breathalyzer examination/attempt to evade the pre-flight breathalyzer examination by leaving the airport premises shall be kept off flying duty and his/her license approval be suspended for a period of three months. In such case. the crew member may be cleared for flight.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. it shall be recorded and the concerned crew member shall not operate the flight. printed from e-manual / Company Portal f) . b) In case of a repeat violation of the provisions contained in Sub Para a) above. Under no circumstances third test shall be conducted. 11.3. action against the crew member shall be taken in accordance with Para below (action on positive test). g) If the second test is satisfactory. If the crew member refuses to undergo the second test. The second test shall be carried out in the presence of a witness either from flight dispatch or operations department. h) Additional crew member travelling as a passenger on completion of duty or for positioning to operate flight from the destination may not undergo pre-flight breathalyzer examination. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 correctness of the breathalyzer.5.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. All the breathalyzer examination positive cases shall be promptly reported but not later than 24 hours of occurrence to the concerned Regional Air Safety Offices of the DGCA and Director of Air Safety (HQ). the license/approval of the crew member shall be suspended for a period of three years. serial number and calibration status of the breathalyzer shall be recorded in the event the crew member/maintenance personnel is detected positive for alcohol consumption. Such crew member shall be subjected to pre-flight breathalyzer examination from where he/she undertakes the flight. The make. A-11-30 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Both the readings so obtained shall be recorded and print out taken. who shall countersign the test report.

In addition. the punitive action shall be in accordance with Para 11. the license/ authorization/ approval of person shall be suspended for a period of one year. 11. ratings and approvals shall be immediately submitted along with original licence/ authorization/ approval to the Director of Air Safety (HQ). the license/approval of the crew member shall be cancelled. b) In addition to action indicated in Sub Para a) above. All such violations shall be endorsed on the individual‟s license by DGCA.9.3. A-11-31 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. d) An Instructor/Examiner/Check Pilot/ Cabin Crew In-charge detected positive for alcohol consumption during pre-flight breathalyzer examination will lose such ratings/authorisation for a period of three years in addition to the action mentioned in Sub Para a) and b) above. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The details such examination. Sub Para (f). Penal action on such cases shall be taken as per the provisions of Para a) and b) above. It shall be the responsibility of Chief of Flight Safety/Accountable Manager to submit the license/ authorisation to DGCA for necessary endorsement. DGCA. the FATA shall be cancelled and the expatriate pilot shall never be considered for issue of the FATA. e) Maintenance personnel detected positive for alcohol consumption during breathalyzer examination shall be off-rostered. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 In case of a second repeat violation of the provisions contained in Sub Para a) above. operating in India is detected positive for alcohol consumption during pre-flight breathalyzer examination.5.3. f) Whenever an expatriate pilot.5.Flight breathalyzer examination: a) Any crew member who tests positive for alcohol consumption in a postflight breathalyzer examination shall have contravened Rule 24 of the Aircraft Rules 1937. licenses. In case of an expatriate pilot. the concerned license issuing authority of the country shall be informed.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Action on such cases shall be taken in accordance with the CAR on the subject and the involved crew member shall surrender the licenses forthwith.9 POST-FLIGHT MEDICAL EXAMINATION Following shall be applicable for the Post.

In case where accident is at a location far away from the airport and the police authorities are able to reach the site before the aerodrome authorities and the crew members are alive. the procedure for collection of blood/urine samples shall be performed by the police at the nearest hospital.11 PRESERVATION OF RECORDS The Company shall maintain separate records of pre-flight and post-flight breathalyzer examination for the flight crew. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 An Instructor/Examiner/Check Pilot/Cabin Crew In-charge detected positive for alcohol consumption during post-flight breathalyzer examination. Monthly data of pre-fight and post-flight breathalyzer examination shall be submitted to Director of Air Safety (HQ). wherever available. etc. Aerodrome Officer In. In case where medical centers are not available at the airports or when the condition of crew members requires immediate hospitalization.5. etc. the Officer Incharge of the airport shall ensure that the crew members are immediately subjected to medical check-up for consumption of alcohol. urine. will lose such ratings/ authorisation for a period of three years in addition to the action mentioned in Para (a) above.10 MEDICAL EXAMINATION AFTER ACCIDENT In the event of an accident at an airport or in its near vicinity.9. For the purpose of chemical analysis. the sample may be forwarded to local forensic laboratory giving the details of tests to be conducted. Such examination and collection of samples shall be done at the Airport Medical Centre.5. 11.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.up shall take samples of blood. All the relevant records must be preserved for a period of one year. Such samples shall be properly preserved. DGCA by 10th of following month. is taken at the nearest hospital. required for detailed chemical analysis.3. These checks should be expeditiously carried out without any loss of time. urine. The doctor conducting such check.5.charge shall ensure that the sample of the blood.3.3. Sub Para (a). cabin crew and maintenance personnel. etc. names of flight/cabin crew. 11. printed from e-manual / Company Portal c) . d) In case of a repeat violation of the provisions contained in Para (a) above or Para (a) above in combination with Para 11. A-11-32 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. the license/approval of the crew member shall be cancelled.

5. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.12 AWARENESS A-11-33 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Crewmembers/maintenance personnel shall be made aware of the provisions of the CAR during the annual refreshers and records maintained with the acknowledgement from each crew member.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 11.3.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Intentionally Left Blank A-11-34 Effective 09-Jul-14 . Rev 04 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION & SUCCESSION OF COMMAND CHAPTER 11 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

................ 10 12.....5 COST INDEX ...............5.............1 AIRPLANE FUEL .11 BLOCK FUEL.......................5 Contingency Fuel .............................................................................................1 Company Policy – Cost Index ..................................................2 Minimum fuel to be carried by an airplane ..........6 12................... 13 A-12-1 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.......4 Minimum Fuel and Oil Required As Per Regulation .................3..... 12 12..8 12....7 12.................................... 9 12..................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT................13 FUEL ADVISORY.........................................................................................9 12........9 12......................5 12....3..........6 12........................................8 CREW DISCRETIONARY FUEL ........................................5................................................................................... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 12........................................3 Destination Alternate Aerodromes .....5 12.....................3 12..........8 12..........8 PERF FACTOR ................4 12....turbo jet aircraft .............6................................... 11 12......3.....3........................3................................................3 COMPUTATION OF MINIMUM FUEL TO BE CARRIED BY AIRCRAFT4 12....3 12...................................12 FUEL CONSERVATION AND ECONOMY ...................1 Company Policy – Perf Factor .......10 FUEL TANKERING ......................................4 12..................... Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 TABLE OF CONTENTS COMPUTATION OF QUANTITIES OF FUEL AND OIL TO BE CARRIED ........................1 Flights with no alternate available .................. 13 12......2 Cost index advisory by central flight dispatch / OCC ...................................9.............................................................. .......................................................2 FUEL AND OIL REQUIREMENTS ....................1 Fuel and oil supply ..........7 12................................. 11 12.......................................7 EXTRA FUEL ....................3 12............................4 DISPATCH FUEL POLICY ............OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II..................9 DETAILS OF MINIMUM FUEL TO BE CARRIED ...................

...... 13 12......................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.15 POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR INFLIGHT FUEL MANAGEMENT 14 Not a controlled copy....................14 FUEL MONITORING ... Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 12. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-12-2 Effective 09-Jul-14 .........................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.....

is where the pilot‟s skill comes in. It will be the responsibility of the Commander to ensure that there is sufficient fuel and oil on board as per the company Fuel Policy. The plan must be prepared by a DGCA approved Flight Dispatcher and accepted by the Pilot-inCommand.1 AIRPLANE FUEL Howsoever skilful a pilot may be. printed from e-manual / Company Portal It is essential for the safe operation of airplane that a continuous supply of fuel is available during all its phases of flight. Fuel has always been vital in the air because of the consequences of running out of it.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Fuel Management for the pilot is essentially fuel conservation. It is fuel that sustains a flight. In preparing the operational flight plan. Using it well instead of just using it. Engineering Department will be responsible to ensure that the correct quantity as per fuel chit given by pilot / airport services and the type of fuel and oil is on board the airplane before any flight. and it is just as precious now on the ground because of what it costs to obtain it. an operational flight plan is required to be completed for every intended flight. there will always be a finite amount of fuel in his aircraft‟s tank.2 FUEL AND OIL REQUIREMENTS As part of the flight preparation. Conservation should continue all the way to shut down. 12. since fuel consumed can never again be conserved. That means careful flight planning and then alertly monitoring fuel consumption. Fuel management begins on the ground with a careful assessment of actual quantity on board and a verification of the proper fuel type. COMPUTATION OF QUANTITIES OF FUEL AND OIL TO BE CARRIED 12. Adequate fuel is essential but correct fuel is vital. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 12. The quantity of the fuel required will be intimated to the Engineering Department by Flight Operations and or the commander during transit halts. Conservation begins from engine start-up.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . The Fuel Policy of the Company is for strict compliance. the alternate A-12-3 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Fuel forms a major percentage of the aircraft‟s direct operating cost and should be managed efficiently consistent with safety of operations and economy.

3. fuel & oil supply should be considered. the required fuel and oil supply which is directly affected by the availability of suitable alternates.3 COMPUTATION AIRCRAFT OF MINIMUM FUEL TO BE CARRIED BY Fuel computation for each flight in accordance with the Airline Policy. (which is with aircraft specific data provided by the manufacturer and operating conditions for the planned operation) will be worked out by Flight Dispatch. must also be considered.3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.). the airplane must be able to continue the flight to an aerodrome and make a landing. In addition. 12. in the case of Extended Range Operations by airplanes with two engines. The operating limitations require that. The Flight Despatcher/PIC should also take into account individual aircraft fuel consumption. This pre-computed fuel shall be cross checked by the Flight Dispatcher and the Commander for accuracy. A-12-4 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal aerodromes weather conditions. In addition. the availability of a suitable aerodrome to which the airplane can divert following an engine failure. taking into account both the meteorological conditions and any delays that are expected in flight. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 12.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Series „O‟ Part II stipulates the minimum fuel to be carried by an airplane. alternate aerodromes and their operational suitability.2 Minimum fuel to be carried by an airplane A flight shall not be commenced unless. Furthermore. NOTAMs. a reserve shall be carried to provide for contingencies. following one engine becoming inoperative. . the airplane carries sufficient fuel and oil to ensure that it can safely complete the flight. de-icing. the aircraft performance. 12. MEL/CDL adjustments and anticipated operational constraints (weather.1 Fuel and oil supply . etc.turbo jet aircraft CAR Section 8. operating limitations requirements are also to be considered. slots. Block fuel required for each flight is pre-computed and is indicated in the navigation flight plan. firstly. and secondly. Operational flight planning can be considered under two broad headings.

or b) 12. at least one destination alternate aerodrome shall be selected and specified in the operational and ATS flight plans. and for a reasonable period before and after such time.4 The aerodrome of intended landing is isolated and there is no suitable destination alternate aerodrome.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1 shall.1 When a destination alternate aerodrome is required Either a) to fly to and execute an approach.4. be at least the amount sufficient to allow the airplane: 12. at the estimated time of arrival at the aerodrome of intended landing. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 Destination Alternate Aerodromes For a flight to be conducted in accordance with the instrument flight rules. Or A-12-5 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.12. and a missed approach. Minimum Fuel and Oil Required As Per Regulation The fuel and oil carried.3. and approach and land.5.3.3. unless: The duration of the flight and the meteorological conditions prevailing are such that there is reasonable certainty that. at the aerodrome to which the flight is planned. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) . in order to comply with 12.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and then ii) to fly for 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft (450 m) above the alternate aerodrome under standard temperature conditions. and iii) to have an additional amount of fuel sufficient to provide for the increased consumption on the occurrence of any of the potential contingencies specified in 12.3. the approach and landing may be made under visual meteorological conditions or separate runways are usable with at least one runway having an operational instrument approach procedure. and thereafter: i) to fly to the alternate aerodrome specified in the operational and ATS flight plans.3. in the case of turbo-jet airplanes.

3. due provision having been made for an additional amount of fuel sufficient to provide for the increased consumption on the occurrence of any of the potential contingencies specified in 12. provided that fuel shall not be less than the amount of fuel required to fly to the aerodrome to which the flight is planned and thereafter for two hours at normal cruise consumption. to fly to the aerodrome to which the flight is planned and additionally: a) to fly 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft (450 m) above the aerodrome to which the flight is planned under standard temperature conditions.4.3. c) for IFR flight.3 b) The aerodrome of intended landing is isolated and there is no suitable destination alternate aerodrome.3 a) The duration of the flight and the meteorological conditions prevailing are such that there is reasonable certainty that. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 to fly to the alternate aerodrome via any predetermined point and thereafter for 30 minutes at 450 m (1500 ft) above the alternate aerodrome.3. When a destination alternate aerodrome is not required: In terms of 12.2 at least the following shall be considered: a) meteorological conditions forecast.5.3.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 12. and b) to have an additional amount of fuel. at the estimated time of arrival at the aerodrome of intended landing.b) FLT. sufficient to provide for the increased consumption on the occurrence of any of the potential contingencies specified in 12. A-12-6 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. to fly to the aerodrome to which the flight is planned and thereafter for a period of two hours at normal cruise consumption. b) expected air traffic control routings and traffic delays. one instrument approach at the destination aerodrome.3.3.5 Contingency Fuel In computing the fuel and oil required in 12. the approach and landing may be made under visual meteorological conditions].2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . 12. and for a reasonable period before and after such time.5 and In terms of 12.

provided that the requirements of Para 12. The flight planning software used by the airline computes optimum cost A-12-7 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.b) must be considered keeping in view the forecast meteorological conditions enroute and at destination at the expected time of arrival and for a period of Two hours thereafter will assure a safe landing.5 COST INDEX As the cost of fuel is continuously changing. 12. depending on the COST INDEX inserted in the FMS.4 DISPATCH FUEL POLICY It will be the policy of the company to carry fuel over and above the minimum regulatory requirement to provide for a level of protection for the unforeseen.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the procedures prescribed in the FCOM for loss of pressurization. printed from e-manual / Company Portal d) .4 can be complied with from the point where the flight has been replanned.3. Port Blair) when a suitable destination alternate is not available then the requirement laid down in 12. . Note. 12.4. All company aircraft will normally be dispatched under the destination alternate required condition. flight level. and e) any other conditions that may delay the landing of the airplane or increase fuel and/or oil consumption. trip distance.2. rule-of thumb based Cost Index. There is no guess work required since the Flight Management System is able to compute the most economic flight profiles to be flown. hourly operating costs. Cost Index is a function of aircraft weight. it is imperative that we operate our aircraft economically.4 precludes amendment of a flight plan in flight in order to re-plan the flight to another aerodrome. In order to achieve the most economical operation each flight will have a unique dynamic Cost Index instead of an average. or failure of one engine while en-route.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. However. Although a suitable aerodrome may not be available.Nothing in Para 12. fuel costs etc.3. an adequate aerodrome must be identified within One hour from the destination to cater for any emergency.3. there may be instances ( e. where applicable. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 including a missed approach.g. In this regard flight crew have the prime responsibility of controlling the operating cost. efficiently while being safe at all times.

A variance analysis of the engine parameters under prevailing stable cruise conditions vis-a-vis the manufacturer defined values of these parameters is considered to be a good indicator of the extent of deterioration. In case of a diversion. For flights cruising above FL300.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 index for each flight. the performance descent page will be modified to M.2 Cost index advisory by central flight dispatch / OCC In order to reduce holding due to congestion or to avoid airport curfews etc Central Flight Dispatch / OCC may advise a different speed so as to achieve a specific ETA. 12. all aircraft demonstrate deterioration in Specific Range.5. ATC mandated speeds are to be maintained in terminal areas. Cost Index Computed Econ climb. PERF FACTOR is also required to be entered into the FMS to enable it to make correct fuel A-12-8 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. cruise and descent speeds will be maintained above FL100.6 PERF FACTOR With ageing. Crew will enter the Cost Index in the FMS as indicated on the flight plan. 12. or to fly the recommended Turbulence Speeds when required. The Cost Index for each flight is printed on the first page of each flight plan. Pilots are authorised to comply with ATC instructions to fly a particular Mach/speed to manage traffic flow & maintain separation.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The result of this analysis is an adjustment factor that needs to be applied to all fuel burn calculations for a specific aircraft and is called PERF FACTOR Flight Planning software also make use of PERF FACTOR to compute the fuel burn and fuel requirements for the flight plan. Company Policy – Cost Index The Cost index indicated on the flight plan will only be used for the flight.1 .5. alternate sector will be flown at system default Cost Index 0. 250 Kts IAS shall be maintained below FL100. unless a higher flight level for reduction to 250 Kts IAS is notified by ATC.76/300Kts so as to avoid MMO/VMO exceedence. Crew must comply with such requests subject to ATC‟s approval. due to an increase in the airplane drag and the deterioration of the engine performance. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 12.

standard instrument departure and arrival procedures. 12. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 calculations and predictions. 12. Extra fuel may be different for various flights operating on same city-pair considering the time of the day at which the flight is being operated. Alternate + Final Fuel.8 CREW DISCRETIONARY FUEL The Commander is permitted to uplift fuel over and above the block fuel shown on the flight plan. if required. the value of PERF FACTOR entered in the FMS needs to be verified with the value given on the flight plan and.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. It is also mentioned on the top portion on the first page of computerised flight plan. airport capacity constraints. The amount of EXTRA FUEL for each flight is arrived at after extensive analysis to include all probable delay factors (such as extended taxi times. The PIC and the Flight Dispatcher shall ensure operating limitations are not exceeded and sufficient fuel is on A-12-9 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.7 EXTRA FUEL Ideally. if such fuel is required for the safe conduct of the flight and will not cause operating limits to be exceeded. 12. modified accordingly. . The loading of Discretionary Fuel is authorized.6. barring any significant unforeseen situations but including minor deviations or „contingencies‟. holding over destination due congestion and/or weather.1 Company Policy – Perf Factor Prior to a flight. and as per regulations. Fuel policy at Indigo aims to provide sufficient EXTRA FUEL to cater for anticipated delays beyond minor contingencies. and other realtime factors prevailing for a particular flight). printed from e-manual / Company Portal Each aircraft in the fleet may have a different level of performance deterioration and hence same PERF FACTOR may not be applicable to each aircraft. The PERF FACTOR is computed by Flight Operations every month and is notified to all crew through a Company NOTAM. a flight should not land at destination with fuel below Min Destination FOB. The company recommended Extra Fuel is updated regularly and is an important controlling parameter in the flight planning software.

d) Alternate Fuel . c) Route Reserve (RTE RSV) /Contingency fuel . Extra Fuel: Extra Fuel . 2) An additional amount of fuel.An average minimum taxi time for each flight. b) Trip Fuel . Similarly.5% of the trip fuel or 200 Kg minimum. Crew is expected to mention adequate reasons on the fuel chit for the additional fuel uplift. The Captain has the final authority for fuel uplift. climb to the expected cruising altitude to fly the expected route from destination to alternate and fuel for Standard Instrument Approach and Landing at alternate. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 12.to cater for longest Departure Procedure (DP) / Standard Terminal Arrival Route (STAR) and average holding / additional taxi / ATC delay time for each flight. . The PIC should have sufficient reasons to justify this additional uplift.9 DETAILS OF MINIMUM FUEL TO BE CARRIED Minimum Fuel: a) Taxi Fuel .Includes fuel for take-off. climb & cruise at cost index.Includes Missed Approach. it is not recommended to reduce the amount of extra fuel provided in the flight plan as it can decrease the holding capability over destination and increase the chances of diversion. alternate fuel planning shall be for the farthest. sufficient to provide for the increased consumption on the occurrence of any potential contingencies which may occur at critical point provided this A-12-10 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. descent to 1500 ft above destination and fuel for Standard Instrument Approach & Landing at Destination. e) Final Fuel .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.30 minutes holding over alternate at 1500 ft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal board to complete the planned flight safely. Flights with no alternate available Note: 1) Where two destination alternate aerodromes are considered.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal 12. Flight release also gives the maximum amount of fuel that can be tankered. descent to 1500 ft above destination and fuel for Standard Instrument Approach & Landing at Destination.10 FUEL TANKERING Depending on operational requirements (no fuel at destination and / or the fuel cost differential). Landing weight limitations or the fuel requirement for the subsequent sector. The amount of fuel that can be tankered as per Planned ZFW is reflected on the Flight Release and also on the CFP. .9.to cater for longest Departure Procedure (DP) / Standard Terminal Arrival Route (STAR) and average holding / additional taxi / ATC delay time for each flight.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.to include the fuel for take-off. d) Fuel for missed approach at Destination e) Fuel for 2 hours at Normal Cruise Consumption Extra Fuel: Extra Fuel . 3) Flights with no alternate available Minimum Fuel: a) Taxi Fuel . in case the actual ZFW is below the planned ZFW. The actual amount of fuel tankered will depend on the under load available. The Commander does not have the authority to uplift more fuel than maximum stipulated under any conditions.an average minimum taxi time for each flight b) Trip Fuel . Any uplift above the maximum recommended by flight dispatch will result in an additional fuel burn without any operational advantage. climb & cruise at cost index.5% of the trip fuel or 200 Kg minimum. the company will stipulate the amount of fuel that can be tankered on a specific sector based on MTOW.1 The Minimum Sector Fuel required to be carried on board for all flights will be Minimum Fuel + Extra Fuel. 12.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. c) Route Reserve (RTE RSV) /Contingency fuel . Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 amount of fuel is not less than the fuel required to fly to the aerodrome to which the flight is originally planned. A-12-11 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

descent from cruising level to 1500 ft above destination airport. 12. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 Note: Commercial payload is not to be off loaded to accommodate tankered fuel. Normally it will be „Minimum Fuel + Extra fuel‟. Example: Minimum Fuel: 8700 kg. Tankering Fuel: 1800 kg.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Tankering Sector: 8700 + 700 + 1800 = 11200 kg a) Trip Fuel as per CFP This will include the fuel required for take-off. f) g) A-12-12 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. 2) In order to ensure that a normal flight does not touch down above the Max landing weight. however for a Tankering sector it shall be „Minimum Fuel + Extra Fuel + Tankering fuel‟. the take-off weight should not exceed Max landing weight + CFP Trip fuel. The Block Fuel will be: Normal Sector: 8700 + 700 = 9400 kg. b) c) d) e) Fuel for Standard Instrument Approach and Landing at Destination Fuel for Overshoot at Destination Fuel for 2 hours at Normal Cruise Consumption Contingency fuel will be 5% of the trip fuel or 200KGs minimum. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 1) . climb & cruise at selected cost index.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Extra Fuel: 700 kg. It is shown as Route Reserve (RTE RSV) on CFP to conform to FMGS FUEL PRED page. Taxi out Fuel based on average minimum taxi time for each flight EXTRA Fuel to cater for longest Departure Procedure (DP)/Standard Terminal Arrival Route (STAR) and average holding/taxi/ATC delay time for each flight.11 BLOCK FUEL Block Fuel (Total fuel rounded off to next hundred) will be the amount of fuel at chocks off.

12.13 Optimum take-off. while being safe at all times.12 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Planning of the flight at optimum altitude. Performance Bias Factor This data. Uplift is to be limited to essential Flight requirement. it is imperative that we operate our aircraft economically and efficiently. is released every month and is also updated on the OFP. Cruise Mach number and Cost Index should be strictly adhered to. A-12-13 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Flight crew has the prime responsibility of controlling the operating cost. Use of GPU wherever available. This meets the regulatory requirement vide CAR Section 8. Series „O‟ Part II. Accurate descent planning to ensure a descent at economic descent speed schedule / as laid down by the company from time to time. climb.14 FUEL MONITORING Fuel forms a major percentage of the aircraft‟s direct operating cost. Company Fuel Policy is laid down in Chapter 12 of this Manual. Fuel consumption should be managed efficiently.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. consistent with safety of operations and economy.12. FUEL ADVISORY The fuel advisories are based on the following assumptions a) b) Station wise fuel quota/price and actual uplift is being monitored continuously by the company. which has to be carefully analysed. The quantum of additional fuel should be such that the landing fuel at destination is not more than the minimum fuel required for the next sector. As fuel cost constitutes over 50%of operational cost. if required. Pilots are provided with a dynamic cost index for every sector. the following fuel conservation measures may be adopted: d) e) 12. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) b) c) . Cost Index: Objective of the company fuel policy is to optimise fuel consumption. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 FUEL CONSERVATION AND ECONOMY With a view to economising on fuel consumption. Avoid up lift of extra fuel except when circumstances warrant. cruise and descent schedules. Crew should match the updated Performance Bias factor mentioned in the OFP with Performance Bias factor in the FMS and correct this figure. for each aircraft.

the company will designate the amount of fuel that can be tankered on a particular sector. .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The consumption pattern is reviewed. The flight crew is to record on the OFP the fuel quantity and time at a regular interval and / or over waypoints. as required. which may need immediate action. flight crews must monitor flight time and fuel burn for the purposes of identifying trends and for comparison to the OFP. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Fuel conservation and economy with a view to economise on fuel consumption. all possible fuel conservation measures as specified in chapter 12. An additional amount is added. Company‟s flight plans calculates fuel based from take off to 1500ft. etc which give rise to IRROPS. Actual Taxi fuel consumption is monitored against the planned taxi fuel. This would cover arrival/departure delays for different times of the day due traffic pattern and seasonal delay patterns due to fog.  For every station. An extra fuel is added to cater for IAP/SID/STARS 12. If the crew finds any discrepancies the fuel and time data may be reported/ recorded through FMS. Remember that there is a cost involved while tankering fuel.15 POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR INFLIGHT FUEL MANAGEMENT During the flight. a trend is drawn for extra fuel requirements for every station.12 may be adopted. Regulation mandates that Pilot-In-Command should continually ensure that the amount of usable fuel remaining on board is not less than the fuel required to proceed to an aerodrome where a safe landing can be made with the planned final reserve fuel remaining upon Landing.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. ACARS or other automated methods. The pilot will cross check the fuel remaining and fuel consumed at each check point so as to monitor fuel consumption and be alerted to any fuel leakage. This is then compared against the planned figure. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 Tankering Fuel Depending on the fuel cost differential and other factors. Based on the above. to check for any variations or alarming trend. This is based on Landing Weight limitations or the fuel requirement for the subsequent sector. Monitoring Fuel consumption for every sector is recorded. every ten days. weather. Therefore a diversion should be initiated at a A-12-14 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

. A-12-15 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Note — The declaration of MINIMUM FUEL informs ATC that all planned aerodrome options have been reduced to a specific aerodrome of intended landing and any change to the existing clearance may result in landing with less than the planned final reserve fuel. (450 m) is available at the alternate.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 1) PIC shall request delay information from ATC when unanticipated circumstances may result in landing at the destination aerodrome with less than the final reserve fuel plus any fuel required to proceed to an alternate aerodrome. the pilot calculates that any change to the existing clearance to that aerodrome may result in landing with less than the planned final reserve fuel. when the calculated usable fuel predicted to be available upon landing at the nearest aerodrome where a safe landing can be made. It is also recommended that while declaring “Minimum Fuel” pilot should report endurance in minutes. This is not an emergency situation but an indication that an emergency situation is possible should any additional delay occur. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 time such that minimum of 30 minutes holding fuel at 1500 ft. Procedures for fuel management are laid down in the normal and supplementary procedures in the FCOM PER-FPL-GEN-MFR. 3) PIC shall declare a situation of fuel emergency by broadcasting MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY FUEL.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 2) PIC shall advise ATC of a minimum fuel state by declaring MINIMUM FUEL when. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Consequent to adoption of Amendment 36 to ICAO Annex 6 Part I. This is primarily to enable ATC to conduct efficient sequencing. is less than the planned final reserve fuel. a three step process has been introduced whereby the Flight crew notifies ATC of the progression of their Fuel State when it has been determined by the crew that they are nearing a critical Fuel situation. having committed to land at a specific aerodrome. Each situation mentioned in one of below steps is different and may be resolved at any stage in the process.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 04 FUEL AND OIL CHAPTER 12 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-12-16 Effective 09-Jul-14 .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

.........................2...........9 A-13-1 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.....................3 13. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 TABLE OF CONTENTS CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH OXYGEN SHALL BE USED AND THE AMOUNT OF OXYGEN DETERMINED ......2...3 13...... ....................................................2............2 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS – CREW AND PASSENGERS ................4 13................................................1 CONDITIONS FOR OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS.........................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.............3 Crew protective breathing equipment ..........5 13...........................2...............OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II........ printed from e-manual / Company Portal 13.......6 13.1 Equipment requirement and usage ....4 13..............4 Precautions for use of portable oxygen cylinder .2 First aid Oxygen .....5 Deactivation/Removal of the Oxygen Generators in the Lavatories .........6 13........7 TIME OF USEFUL CONSCIOUSNESS (TUC) ........................3 13...........................2.................................

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-13-2 Effective 04-Dec-12 .

For flights planned below 10. CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH OXYGEN SHALL BE USED AND THE AMOUNT OF OXYGEN DETERMINED 13. printed from e-manual / Company Portal All flight crew members.000 ft the oxygen demonstration need not be carried out. Approximate altitude in the standard atmosphere corresponding to the value of absolute pressure used in the text is as follows: Absolute Pressure Meters 700 hPa 3000 620 hPa 4000 13000 376hpa 7600 25000 A-13-3 Feet 10000 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. in exceptional cases or when taxi time is short the demonstration may be carried out after take off but before the airplane reaches 10000 ft. shall use breathing oxygen continuously whenever the circumstances prevail for which its supply has been required.1 CONDITIONS FOR OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS Before take off the Commander will ensure that the Oxygen system on board the airplane is serviceable and that sufficient oxygen is on board for the flight as outlined in the FCOM. All Flight Crew/Supernumerary Crew shall check their respective Oxygen masks and ensure that their Oxygen System is functioning normally. A briefing on the location and use of the Passenger Emergency Oxygen System shall be carried out by the Cabin Attendants before take-off.000 ft unless a higher cabin altitude is stipulated in FCOM or it is required to fly a higher altitude for safety reasons or maintain the minimum safe altitude charted for the route. In this case the time spent at these altitudes of above 10000 ft must meet the passenger oxygen stipulated below. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 13. when engaged in performing duties essential for the safe operation of an airplane in flight. In the event of a Cabin decompression when flying at a higher altitude the airplane will be immediately descended to maintain a Cabin Altitude not above 10.

shall not be commenced unless sufficient stored breathing oxygen is carried to supply: .2.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. in the event of loss of pressurisation. A flight to be operated with a pressurised aeroplane shall not be commenced unless sufficient quantity of stored breathing oxygen is carried to supply all the crew members and passengers as is appropriate to the circumstances of the flight being undertaken.2 - - all crew members and 10% passengers for any period in excess of 30 minutes that the pressure in the compartment occupied by them will be between 700 hPa and 620 hPa. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS – CREW AND PASSENGERS 13. there shall be no less than a 10-minute supply for the occupants of the passenger compartment. In addition.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-13-4 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. or if operated at flight altitudes where the atmospheric pressure is more than 376 hPa and cannot descend safely within four minutes to a flight altitude at which the atmospheric pressure is equal to 620 hPa.1 Equipment requirement and usage An aeroplane intended to be operated at altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is less than 700 hPa shall be provided with oxygen storage and dispensing apparatus capable of storing and dispensing the oxygen supplies required in Para above. The minimum quantity of oxygen required for passengers and crew are laid down in FCOM PRO/LIM/OEB/FCBUL (LIM-35) 13. and the crew and passengers for any period that the atmospheric pressure in compartments occupied by them will be less than 620 hPa. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A flight to be operated at flight altitude where the atmospheric pressure in personnel compartments will be less than 700hPa. for any period that the atmospheric pressure in any compartment occupied by them would be less than 700 hPa. when an aeroplane is operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is less than 376 hPa.

The total number of oxygen dispensing units shall exceed the number of passenger and cabin attendant seats by at least 10 per cent.2. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.2 First aid Oxygen The quantity of oxygen required as first aid must be enough to provide 2% of passengers and no less than 2 passengers with undiluted oxygen at a flow A-13-5 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.2. An aeroplane intended to be operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is less than 376 hPa. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 Pressurised aeroplanes which are intended to be operated at flight altitude at which the atmospheric pressure would be less than 376 hPa. All flight crew/supernumerary crew shall check their respective oxygen masks and ensure that the oxygen system is functioning normally. shall be equipped with the device to provide positive warning to the pilot of any dangerous loss of pressurisation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal An aeroplane intended to be operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is less than 700 hPa but which is provided with means of maintaining pressures greater than 700 hPa in personnel compartments shall be provided with oxygen storage and dispensing apparatus capable of storing and dispensing the oxygen supplies required in Para 13.. Use of oxygen masks by flight crew All flight crew members. All aircraft are equipped with quick donning oxygen masks for each flight crew member in the cockpit. when engaged in performing duties essential to the safe operation of an aeroplane in flight shall use breathing oxygen continuously whenever the circumstances prevail for which its supply has been required and provided. cannot descend safely within four minutes to a flight altitude at which the atmospheric pressure is equal to 620 hPa shall be provided with automatically deployable oxygen equipment to satisfy the requirement. The equipment description for oxygen supply required for passengers and crew are laid down in FCOM GEN/DSC (Chapter 35) 13. or which if operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is more than 376 hPa.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 13. turn head away from inflammable material. Pressure/ & Dry) for the part of the flight above 8. Means may be provided to decrease the flow to not less than 2 litres per minute (STPD) at any altitude. nose and mouth of each crewmember while on duty and to provide oxygen for a period of not less than 15 minutes. point cylinder away from body or person and hold at lower end. put cylinder into an empty sink or container not containing grease or water.  In case of fire at the control head do not turn oxygen off. This quantity of oxygen must be added to the required oxygen quantity for the case of emergency descent. The oxygen required for breathing protection can be included in oxygen required for sustenance.2.4 Precautions for use of portable oxygen cylinder  When turning oxygen „ON‟.3 Crew protective breathing equipment An easily accessible quick donning type of breathing equipment for immediate use is required for each cockpit crewmember. for depressurisation and in first aid oxygen. This equipment must protect the eyes. .  Turn oxygen „ON‟ before entering passenger cabin.2. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 rate of at least 3 litres per minute (Standard Temperature. This equipment fitted on the company aircraft allow the flight crew to communicate using the aircraft radio equipment as well as to communicate by interphone with each other while at their assigned duty stations A portable protective breathing equipment is available in the cockpit at each cabin attendant station and in galleys. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The first-aid oxygen equipment shall be capable of generating a mass flow to each user of at least 4 litres per minute (STPD). 13.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A-13-6 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.000 ft following a depressurisation.

With immediate effect there shall be no provision of oxygen in the lavatories and hence the following will be the procedure to be followed in the event of a decompression.2.5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-13-7 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. .13. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 Deactivation/Removal Lavatories of the Oxygen Generators in the In compliance with the same. This was initiated to mitigate a safety hazard posed by the current oxygen generator. IndiGo has removed the oxygen chemical generators from all the three lavatories in our aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The DGCA has adopted an advisory issued by the FAA which requires the oxygen chemical generator in the lavatories rendered non-operational either by removal or by expending the chemical inside.

Sit down immediately (if no seat is available then grasp and hold on to any fixed object).Decompression Stage On reaching Safe Altitude (10.Carry MRT and portable oxygen bottle.The cabin attendants can give oxygen from the PSU in the cabin to the passengers who require it for first-aid purposes.Get up from their seats to do a walk around in the cabin.Grab the nearest Oxygen mask. Switches ON the seat belt sign which includes the “Return to Seat” sign in the lavatory PA “SAFE TO REMOVE OXYGEN MASKS” “AFTER CABIN INSPECTION LEAD TO COCKPIT PLEASE” In case of a Slow Decompression or when requested by the cockpit crew Advise cabin crew of the situation and advise them if they have time to check the occupancy of lavatories and ask their occupants to return to their seat immediately. and give oxygen and first aid as necessary.The cabin attendants can give oxygen from the PSU in the cabin to the passengers who require it for first-aid purposes. A-13-8 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. and give oxygen and first aid as necessary. if any.Secure self.Remain seated until safe altitude is reached. . .A – “SAFE TO REMOVE OXYGEN MASKS” “AFTER CABIN INSPECTION LEAD TO COCKPIT PLEASE” . printed from e-manual / Company Portal At the onset of a RAPID Decompression INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD . .Carry MRT and portable oxygen bottle. DO NOT STAY IN LAVATORIES” . breathe and shout commands. .The lead should report the cabin conditions to the cockpit crew. . . check the occupancy of the lavatories and ask their occupants to return to their seat immediately. if any. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 Cockpit Crew Action Cabin Crew Action The Captain announces “EMERGENCY DESCENT. DO NOT STAY IN LAVATORIES” . .000 ft) FLT. . .000 ft) Announce on the P. .Check the condition of lavatory occupants. Remain seated till the time the aircraft has reached a safe altitude.Get up from their seats to do a walk around in the cabin.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.The lead should report the cabin conditions to the cockpit crew.Check the condition of lavatory occupants. . and occupy their jump seats.A – “RETURN TO YOUR SEAT.Any crew with access to the P. All cabin attendants should secure the aircraft cabin in their respective zones. The fasten seat belt sign will come on in the cabin. On reaching Safe Altitude (10. .

The TUC reduces dramatically with increase in flight altitude.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. essential safely related tasks can still be performed effectively. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 TIME OF USEFUL CONSCIOUSNESS (TUC) Altitude (FT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.) Approximate TUC 22 000 5 minutes 25 000 2 minutes 28 000 1 minute 30 000 35 seconds 35 000 20 seconds 40 000 12 seconds A-13-9 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. from the occurrence of the oxygen deficiency. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The “Time of Useful Consciousness” is the time in which. The average TUC is: .13.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS CHAPTER 13 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-13-10 Effective 04-Dec-12 .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

...........................................3 CENTRAL LOAD CONTROL .............2 Electronic (Automated) Trim Sheet ...............8 14.. ....................3 A) MASS AND CENTRE OF GRAVITY ............................................................2..... 9 A-14-1 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy......... Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 TABLE OF CONTENTS INSTRUCTION FOR MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL .........2..........................1..3 COMPANY POLICY ..............................................1 14......7 14...............................................................2 General Principles Of Mass And Centre Of Gravity ..5 FUEL CHIT ......................................................3 14.8 14......3 ACARS Trim Sheet .................................................................................8 14...2.........................7 14...OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.........................................4 RTOW & FUEL NOTIFICATION BY CAPTAIN..1 Manual Trim Sheet ...............7 14.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT..................... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 14......

printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-14-2 Effective 09-Jul-14 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 Not a controlled copy.

documents.14. Operating Empty Weight (OEW): The manufacturer’s weight empty plus the operator’s items. It is essentially a “dry” weight. Operational Empty Weight plus items specific to the type of flight. unusable fuel. emergency equipment. etc… Dry Operating Weight (DOW): The total weight of an airplane ready for a specific type of operation excluding all usable fuel and traffic load. furnishings. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 INSTRUCTION FOR MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL A) MASS AND CENTRE OF GRAVITY 14. catering.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. these quantities are published as weights in accordance with the common language.1. pantry equipment. catering equipment. Since the use of term “weight” does not cause any problem in the day to day handling of airplanes. Takeoff Weight (TOW): The weight at takeoff at the departure airport. are expressed in units of mass (kg). seats.g.e.1 General Principles Of Mass And Centre Of Gravity 14. i. a weight is a force rather than a mass. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. including only those fluids contained in closed systems (e.1. However. the fuel load etc. engine oil. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In accordance with ICAO Annex 5 and the International System of Units (SI).e. toilet chemicals and fluids. the actual and limiting masses of airplanes. hydraulic fluid).1 Definitions Manufacturer’s Empty Weight (MEW): The weight of the structure.1. the payload and its constituent elements. or to the zero fuel weight plus the takeoff fuel (fuel needed at the brake release point including reserves). extra crew etc… Zero Fuel Weight (ZFW): The weight obtained by addition of the total traffic load and the dry operating weight. power plant. i. In the SI system. galley structure. systems and other items of equipment that are considered an integral part of the aircraft. Landing Weight (LW): The weight at landing at the destination airport. A-14-3 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. newspapers. It is equal to the landing weight at destination plus the trip fuel (fuel needed for the trip). in most approved flight manuals and other operational documentation. It is equal to the Zero Fuel Weight plus the fuel reserves. . the flight and cabin attendant and their baggage. its continued use in operational applications and publications is acceptable.

Trip fuel: The weight of the fuel necessary to cover the normal leg without reserves.2 Methods procedures and responsibilities for preparation and acceptance of mass and centre of gravity calculations For weight and balance instructions and loading of cargo and fuel refer to: FCOM PER (PER-LOD-GEN) The Load & Trim Officer is responsible for the loading and to ensure that the weight and balance is within the permissible performance limitations. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Traffic load: The total weight of the passengers.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1. Potable Water Dry Operating Weight (DOW) Cabin Equipment. Flight Dispatch will inform the Ground Ops. the Block Fuel and Trip Fuel. Additional A-14-4 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. . The commander shall verify the weight and balance and ensure that the airplane is loaded so as to be in the permissible limits for take-off. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 Take-off fuel: The weight of the fuel on board at take-off.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.1. TOW = DOW + Traffic load + Reserve fuel* + trip fuel LW = DOW + Traffic load + Reserve fuel* ZFW = DOW + Traffic load *Reserve fuel = Contingency + alternate + final reserve + additional fuel AIRPLANE WEIGHTS Taxi Fuel Taxi Weight Trip Fuel Take Off Weight (TOW) Reserve Fuel Landing Weight (LW) Traffic Load Zero Fuel Weight (ZFW) Catering. baggage and cargo. including non-revenue loads. Crew Operating Empty Weight (OEW) Propulsion System Manufacturer’s Empty Weight (MEW) Structure 14.

85 Kg - Adults ( Male and Female) .1.1. 14. printed from e-manual / Company Portal a) Standard weights for passengers and crew .4 Domestic International Infants 7 kg 7 Kg Adult/Child 20 Kg 20 Kg (30 Kg For Muscat & Dubai) Method for determining applicable pax baggage and cargo mass For passenger mass standard weights will be used. destination. 14.3 Policy For Using Standard Weights The following weights stipulated in DGCA Air Safety Circular No.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.6 Verification of various types of mass and balance documentation The load and Trim officer shall recalculate the Load and Trim sheet considering possible last minute changes (LMCs) paying particular attention to:      the flight number.1. For calculating baggage and cargo mass actual weights of baggage and cargo will be used. He will be responsible for the load & trim sheet if not done by the crew under LPC. 14.5 Passenger baggage masses for various operations The standard and principle laid down above will be used for all type of operations.10 Kg Note: The above weights include hand baggage b) Free Baggage Allowance Type 14. 4 of 1993 will be applied for preparation of load and trim sheet: - Crew .1.1.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 information is provided under Loading in Chapter 9. airplane registration the date and time of the flight the correct DOW and index the number and the distribution of passengers the cargo loading which should be in accordance with the cargo manifest A-14-5 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.35 Kg - Infant (less than 2 years) .75 Kg - Child (less than 12 years) .1.1.

Check fuel imbalance is within prescribed limits.1. signature. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. -  the MTOW. TOW & LW are not exceeded No loading limitation is exceeded ZFW CG and TOW CG remain within allowed limits Only one LMC change is permitted. computation is assumed to be correct. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 the fuel quantity and distribution.7 On the Load and Trim sheet Last Minute Change (LMC) procedures Last Minute Change means any change concerning Crew Count & Traffic Load: passengers. Fresh Load and Trim sheet is required for second change. Unless passengers indicate a seat preference at the time of booking the A-14-6 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.  14. .1. approval number along with the Commander’s name. A Last Minute Change is permitted only if the changes of the load are no greater then 500Kg and is within prescribed limits:    MZFW. above data should be checked. The Commander shall sign the Load and Trim sheet after having checked it.1. 14. ATPL number and time (UTC) of signing. Commander is to ensure that the Load and Trim Officer’s name. signature.  In case a computerised Load and Trim sheet is produced. LMCs will be signed by the Load & Trim Officer and countersigned by the commander to ensure that he has been made aware of the changes. are clear and legible on the Load and Trim sheet. cargo occurring after the issuance of the Load and Trim sheet.8 Seating policy / procedures Passenger seating policy and procedures are ground handling function. baggage. In case of any last minute change in fuel will warrant issuance of a new load and trim sheet.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - The fuel index given by the Load and Trim sheet takes into account the fuel specific gravity and assumes that the fuel is loaded normally (as mentioned in the AFM) and does not apply in case of unusual loading. MZFW and associated CG  the expected landing weight below MLW.

1. 14.2. number of passengers.785kg/lt) is used in the Load & Trim Sheet for computing weight & Index of fuel and oil. The computation of the Centre of Gravity and the THS position are done using a graph.2 6 Electronic (Automated) Trim Sheet This format is used whenever automated systems are operational.2. The computation of the Centre of Gravity and the THS position are done by using formulae / algorithms provided by Airbus. limiting RTOW.2. 14.1.785kg/ltr) 14.1 Manual Trim Sheet 14. . This format is based on check-in data from airline’s reservation/Check-in system.9 Specific gravity of fuel and oil (0.1 General This is the basic format in which the Load and Trim staff are expected to annotate the DOW.2. However. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The specific gravity of the fuel and oil is provided by the Oil Vendor prior to refuelling. The commander will cross check that the weight of fuel indicated in the cockpit gauges are in conformity with that indicated in the tech log. Standard Specific gravity (0. More information is available in part A Chapter 9.1. The specific gravity is indicated in the fuel uplift section of the tech log.1. These include: - Manual Trim Sheet Electronic (Automated) Trim Sheet ACARS Trim Sheet 14.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.2 Description of Manual Load & Trim sheet Refer Annexure 14.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. their baggage and cargo distribution to arrive at the ZFW and under load / overload.2 COMPANY POLICY DGCA has approved various formats of Load & Trim sheet depending upon the applicable process at any airport. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 computerised check-in procedure computer allocates seats so as to maintain a centre of gravity within limits. A-14-7 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

Chennai. Mumbai. pilot-incommand must ensure that during transit at Delhi.2. Pilot-in-command is to return one signed copy of the load & trim sheet to airport staff prior to departure. Hyderabad. as applicable. will be provided. ACARS connectivity is not available. In order to ensure that the receipt of ACARS load & trim is successful. 14.2. Trivandrum.2. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Whenever automated systems are operational and ACARS connectivity is available on ground. The take-off weight of the aircraft must be the lowest of the following limiting weights: A-14-8 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.1 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. computerized or manual load and trim sheet. Centre of Gravity and the THS. . Central Load Control Cell which will operate from Gurgaon / Delhi will be responsible for transmitting electronic Load & Trim sheet to respective airports via available communication means or to the aircraft via ACARS. Two copies of load and trim sheet will be sent to aircraft printers prior to departure. this format is used to provide information about distribution of cabin / cargo load.1 Description of ACARS Trim sheet Refer Annexure 6 14.3 CENTRAL LOAD CONTROL As and when the computerised (automated) load sheet becomes available at all airports. Kolkata.2. In case.14. 14.G. Singapore & Bangkok. runway and structural limitations for safe operation. VHF3 is kept on DATA and HF is at override.4 RTOW & FUEL NOTIFICATION BY CAPTAIN The pilot in command is responsible to determine the correct limiting weight of the aircraft for take-off based on air density. the Central Load Control cell will be established. position and THS setting are done by using formulae / algorithms provided by Airbus.3 ACARS Trim Sheet The computation of the C.3. Bengaluru. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 Description of electronic (automated) trim sheet Refer to Annexure 6 14. HF override is selected only when refuelling is not in progress.

i) FLT.000kg) The Most restricting of the above three weights is to be entered into the fuel chit along with the fuel required for the flight. take-off performance can be limiting in high and hot conditions. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 Aircraft performance limited weight to execute a safe take-off. and to execute a go around at destination Maximum certified Take-off weight Maximum certified Landing weight + Trip Fuel Zero fuel weight + Fuel on Board – Taxi Fuel Runways less than 6000 ft long and those having obstacle in take-off path. in case of a reject take-off.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.    Performance limited take-off weight. Before each departure.( RTOW Charts/ FCOM PER) Max Landing weight limited take-off weight (Maximum landing weight + Minimum trip fuel in the flight release) Maximum structure limited take-off weight (73. Pilots are also required to confirm Trip Fuel & Block Fuel and mention reasons if the Block Fuel required is more than what has been provided for by Flight Dispatch.5 FUEL CHIT The format for ‘Fuel Chit’ and filling instructions is given as under: A-14-9 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. the Captain is responsible for determining the take-off weight from the lowest of the following 3 weights. Trip Fuel and Block Fuel (planned) to the crew on a fuel chit. Load & Trim staff will provide the ZFW. However. 14. as per the Performa given below. for other airports too. and to stop. at times. Patna and Dibrugarh are prime examples. can be performance limiting. printed from e-manual / Company Portal ii) iii) iv) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .500kg/77. and to land and stop within available landing distance at destination.

Items 9(a-c).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and fill in the ‘Reason for Extra Fuel’ in the space provided (point 15). printed from e-manual / Company Portal PAX BOOKED . In case the Captain changes Fuel or Block Fuel he needs to strike through the stated amount. c) 73500/77000 10 FLIGHT PLAN TRIP FUEL11 FLIGHT PLAN BLOCK FUEL 12 EXTRA FUEL 13 REVISED BLOCK FUEL 14 REASON FOR EXTRA FUEL 15 LOWER WEIGHT (a) or (c) to be used in MTOW column of Load & Trim Sheet LOAD & TRIM OFFICER CAPTAIN DATE/TIME DATE/TIME AME DATE/TIME 1st Copy AME/2nd Station File /3rd Captain [ALL WEIGHTS IN KG] [ALL TIMINGS IN LOCAL] Note: i) ii) iii) Item 01 to 08. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 Fuel Chit FLIGHT NO DATE 1 2 3 A/C REG ORIG 4 DEST 5 CREW MANIFESTED (COCKPIT/CABIN) 6 / 7 8 ESTIMATED ZERO FUEL WEIGHT a) PERFORMANCE LIMITING TOW FROM b) RTOW /FCOM LANDING WEIGHT LIMITED TAKE-OFF WEIGHT MAX LANDING WEIGHT + TRIP FUEL c) 9a STRUCTURE LIMITED TAKE-OFF WEIGHT 9b 9c LIMITING TAKE OFF WEIGHT LOWEST OF(a.a) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. enter the required amount.In case of no change in block fuel. Captain must strike through item 13 to 15.& 11 will be filled by airport services staff based on information provided by Centralized Flight Dispatch to ground staff of respective station. 10 and 12 to 15 will be filled by the Captain. b. A-14-10 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

after signing on the Fuel chit. . Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 Process for transmitting Fuel Chit to the AME i) A-14-11 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. iii) Third copy will be retained by the crew along with other flight documents.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. ii) The ground staff will retain one copy and the AME will collect his copy from the Captain at aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The fuel chit will be prepared by the ground staff and will be counter signed by the Captain after entering the final fuel figure.b) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL CHAPTER 14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-14-12 Effective 09-Jul-14 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

.................. .............3 A-15-1 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy..........ICING OPERATIONS CHAPTER 15 TABLE OF CONTENTS INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONDUCT AND CONTROL OF GROUND DEICING/ANTI.....OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.ICING OPERATIONS.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 00 CONDUCT AND CONTROL OF GROUND DEICING/ANTI......... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 15.......

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 00 CONDUCT AND CONTROL OF GROUND DEICING/ANTI. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-15-2 Effective 17-Aug-11 .ICING OPERATIONS CHAPTER 15 Not a controlled copy.

Icing operations refer  FCOM /PRO/SUP-91-30 (Operations in Icing conditions)  FCTM SI-010-(Cold Weather Operations and Icing conditions)  AMM INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-15-3 Effective 17-Aug-11 Not a controlled copy. .ICING OPERATIONS CHAPTER 15 INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONDUCT AND CONTROL OF GROUND DEICING/ANTI.ICING OPERATIONS For De-Icing/Anti.15.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Conduct and control of ground de-icing operations are not required at any aerodrome on the current network of the airline. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 00 CONDUCT AND CONTROL OF GROUND DEICING/ANTI.

ICING OPERATIONS CHAPTER 15 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-15-4 Effective 17-Aug-11 . Rev 00 CONDUCT AND CONTROL OF GROUND DEICING/ANTI.

.......... 11 16.....2.............4 Sample Flight Delay Message ..3.....3.......................3 Sample Flight Plan Cancellation Message ...................... ..................2 FLIGHT RELEASE ........ 12 16...................3 16....3 Computerised Operational Flight Plan .................................. 12 16..... Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 TABLE OF CONTENTS SPECIFICATIONS OF THE OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN ...........................5 Sample Flight Plan Change Message .....8 DESCRIPTION OF AN ATC FLIGHT PLAN (ICAO MODEL) ........... 4 16..... 13 A-16-1 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.........3 16.....1 GENERAL .....9 16.......................................................6 16.........2.................................. 3 16............................4 Manual Fuel Calculations – Sample ..............3 16........3 16.....2 Filed Flight Plan Message ...................................................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT........3............................................................2 Operational Flight Plan .... 10 16............1 Self-Dispatch ...........OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II................................................................1 Example Of A Completed Flight Plan .........................3..2...............................2..... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 16..........3........

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal -INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK- A-16-2 Effective 04-Dec-12 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Not a controlled copy.

16.2. Sample Flight Release is placed at Annexure 2. ii) Flight plan is filed with the local ATC.2 FLIGHT RELEASE The Flight Release constitutes of following documents: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) Flight Release Operational Flight Plan Met Summary Met Folder NOTAMS FIR NOTAMS Frequency List Watch Hours List of revision status of effective documents Any Miscellaneous Documents The Flight Release is signed by Captain and First Officer. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 16. Operational flight plans will be issued for all flights including test and training. The Commander will ensure that: i) A copy of the print out of FMS generated operational flight plan is provided to load & trim staff at the departure airport and advise load & trim staff to file such flight plans along with the station copy of signed load & trim sheet.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 16. as their acceptance.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1 Self-Dispatch During those times when the normal communications system fails a pilot may self-dispatch.1 GENERAL Company adheres to an operational flight plan (OFP) which provides such information to the crew that is considered vital for the completion of his flight. iii) The Commander will establish timely communication with the operational A-16-3 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. . Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 SPECIFICATIONS OF THE OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN 16.

vii) type of flight (IFR or VFR) viii) pilot-in-command's name. xi) destination aerodrome. ii) date. 16.2 Operational Flight Plan The Minimum Required Content of an Operational Flight Plan is: i) air operator's name. printed from e-manual / Company Portal iv) . xiv) routing to alternate aerodrome (as applicable). x) departure aerodrome. including enroute alternates where required. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 control facility as soon as possible after commencement of the flight. xvi) planned cruise altitudes to destination and alternate (as applicable). A-16-4 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. v) aircraft type and model (as applicable).). iv) aircraft tail number (as applicable). xvii) planned cruise true air speed. etc. xiii) routing to destination by successive navigational way points and a method to obtain associated tracks for each. xii) alternate aerodrome (as applicable). ix) flight dispatcher's name (as applicable). vi) flight number (as applicable).2. v) A written report outlining the circumstances will be forwarded to Flight Operations as soon as possible after the termination of the flight.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The Commander will advise the contents of the flight plan to operational control. iii) aircraft registration. xv) specification of any way points enroute to satisfy special operations requirements (ETOPS.

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and c) planned maximum take-off weight. xxiii) time from destination to alternate (as applicable). and e) additional requirements or enroute reserve including approach at destination and alternate xxviii) Weights: a) total fuel on board. xxii) estimated time enroute: if broken down into way point time components.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. b) zero fuel weight. and xxx) number of persons on board. printed from e-manual / Company Portal xix) winds at planned cruise altitude: these may be expressed in terms of direction/velocity or as a component/drift angle. xxvi) fuel burn enroute and from destination to alternate. a total shall be specified. xxix) Signature of pilot-in-command and the flight dispatcher (as applicable) or alternate means of certifying acceptance. crew and passengers. . or mach number (as applicable). d) holding reserve. xxv) distance from destination to alternate (as applicable). xxiv) distance to destination: if broken down into way point distance components. xx) temperature at cruise altitude. as amended by A-16-5 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. b) destination. c) alternate. xxi) ground speed or wind component during cruise. a total shall be specified. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 xviii) planned cruise indicated air speed. xxvii) fuel required for the type of flight plan for (as applicable): a) Taxi.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal (For Sample Computerised OFP Refer Annexure 3) . The format of the full operational flight plan shall allow the crew to record the fuel state and the progress of the flight relative to the plan. dispatchers will use company approved manual flight plan form. Manual flight plans if sent to enroute stations by Fax or other means must display the dispatcher’s signature in the appropriate box. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 final load figures. All discrepancies must be resolved by the Commander and dispatcher prior to the signing of the flight plan. The dispatcher's name will appear on the computerised flight plan indicating the dispatchers acceptance. The Commander will sign the flight plan after thoroughly checking its contents.3 Computerised Operational Flight Plan Indigo uses a computerised flight planning system to produce an operational flight plan for each flight. It uses navigational data which is based on the AIPs and NOTAMs issued by appropriate regional authorities. A-16-6 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. by either the flight dispatcher or the flight crew. The signing of the flight plan/release indicates the Commander's approval and acceptance.2. When an operational flight plan is prepared manually.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. working from charts and tables. 16. The weight schedule and other route specific limitations are stored in the flight planning database. The flight plan service provider uses fuel tables provided by Airbus Industries. Dispatchers are required to provide following inputs to the flight planning system to generate a computerised flight plan:      Flight plan sector & preferred alternates Aircraft Registration & Expected Time of Departure Expected Zero Fuel Weight Any flight level restrictions Any specific fuel uplift requirement When computerised operational flight plan is not available it may be produced manually.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the following procedures will be implemented: . e) The max performance take-off weight for the flight will be calculated ensuring that the max landing weight and /or the max structural take-off weights are not exceeded. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Manual Flight Planning a) Dispatcher will use the process given in FCOM PER (PER-FPL-GENFPL) to compute a flight plan using calculation tables. From the upper air data the average enroute temperature and wind components will be calculated. c) The normal selection of alternates and additional fuels will be calculated using the method above. reserve. (refer 16. Post flight. all such print outs will be placed in the flight folder. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In the event of a Flight Dispatch not having access to computerised flight planning system. (Refer next page) A-16-7 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.2. crew will take a print out of the FMS flight plan and use it to monitor / record the progress of flight. g) After building the flight plan in the FMS. d) A total fuel required for the flight will be provided to the pilot-in-command which will include trip fuel. alternate and extra fuel and will constitute the minimum fuel required for the flight.5). b) Dispatchers will select the optimum altitude for the route and aircraft using the appropriate upper air data. f) The details of the computed flight plan will be provided to crew via Telephone / ACARS / FAX etc.

2. printed from e-manual / Company Portal UNITS USED. Fuel on Board(FOB)+MZFW (b) 70400 Performance Limited Weight (c) 77000 -Computed from RTOW Chart Final RTOW – Lowest of a. Kts as applicable ROUTE DEP . NM.16. Trip + MLW (a) 69440 MTOW. b &c above 69440 M05 Fuel Summary Taxi Out (DEL) 300 Trip fuel(DEL-HYD) 4940 05% Contingency 247 10 min(extra due metropolitan HYD) 429 Alternate 2154 30 min holding 1200 Total FOB 9300 A-16-8 includes IFR approach includes Go-Around at destination and IFR approach Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy. HH:MM. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Manual Fuel Calculations – Sample VIDP DEST VOHY ALT VOMM Planned Altitude 330 310 Temperature ISA+15 ISA+10 TAS 474 Wind Component M02 Ground Speed 467 Distance 727 285 Time 01:43 00:46 Fuel Burn 4940 2154 Max Zero Fuel Weight 61000 Max Landing Weight 64500 Max Structural Weight 73500 MTOW.Kgs.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.4 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.3 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 DESCRIPTION OF AN ATC FLIGHT PLAN (ICAO MODEL) Not a controlled copy.16. printed from e-manual / Company Portal (Refer Annexure 4) A-16-9 Effective 04-Dec-12 .

printed from e-manual / Company Portal A-16-10 Effective 04-Dec-12 .3.16.1 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Example Of A Completed Flight Plan Not a controlled copy.

Aircraft Identification Number – Flight Rules..33 channel spacing capability A-16-11 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.3. VOR.2. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Filed Flight Plan Message 16. .2 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the flight plan can be submitted in the form of a Flight Plan message.3.1 Sample Filed Flight Plan Message (FPL-IGO001-IS -A320/M-SDFGE1HIRWY/S -VIDP1500 -N0450F330 DCT DPN L759 LIBDI/N0451F350 L759 PUT R325 VIH A464 SJ DCT -WSSS0521 WSAP -PBN/A1B1D1O1S1 DOF/130214 REG/VT-INW EET/VABF0038 VECF0058 VYYF0238 VOMF0242 VYYF0305 VTBB0328 WMFC0409 WSJC0506 SEL/DQBK RMK/RT DESIGNATOR IFLY -E/0649) 16. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In accordance with the provisions of ICAO Doc 4444.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Flight Type Line 2 – Aircraft Type 10a/b……Equipment….2. / Wake Turbulence Category – Item Item 10a S-VHF RTF. PANS-ATM. Procedures for Air Navigation Services.2 Explanation Of Filed Flight Plan Message Line 1 .3. ILS D-DME F-ADF G-GNSS E1-FMC WPR ACARS H-HF RTF I-Inertial Navigation R-PBN approved W-RVSM approved Y-VHF with 8.Filed flight plan Message Identifier .16.

3.Destination Aerodrome. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Item 10b Line 4 .1 Explanation Of Flight Plan Cancellation Message Cancel flight plan message identifier – Aircraft Identification Number – Departure Aerodrome – Destination Aerodrome 16. Requested Flight Level. Line 5 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1 Explanation Of Flight Delay Message Flight Delay message identifier – Aircraft Identification Number – Departure Aerodrome and revised estimated off-block time – Destination Aerodrome) A-16-12 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.4. 16. Estimated Off-Block Time 1500UTC. Route Description.3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.3.3 Sample Flight Plan Cancellation Message (CNL-IGO001-VIDP1500-WSSS-DOF/130214) 16. Total Flying Time.Cruising Speed. then entry is mandatory under PBN in Item 18.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal S-Mode S transponder including both pressure altitude and aircraft ID capability Line 3 .Departure Aerodrome.3.4 Sample Flight Delay Message (DLA-IGO001-VIDP1600-WSSS-DOF/130214) 16. Alternate Aerodrome Line 6 – Item 18PBN /Date of Flight in YYMMDD Format/ Registration of Aircraft /Elapsed Time to FIR/ SELCAL/ Remarks PBN (RNAV and/or RNP capabilities) A1-RNAV10 B1-RNAV 5 D1-RNAV1 O1-RNP S1-RNP APPCH When R is filed in 10a. .

printed from e-manual / Company Portal 16. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Sample Flight Plan Change Message (CHG-IGO001-VIDP1500-WSSS-DOF/130214-16/WSSS0521 WMKJ) Explanation Of Flight Plan Change Message Change flight plan message identifier – Aircraft Identification Number – Departure Aerodrome – Destination Aerodrome.16.1 .3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.3.5.5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.Identification of changed flight plan field (Destination & Alternate) – New Alternate is WMKJ. A-16-13 Effective 04-Dec-12 Not a controlled copy.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK A-16-14 Effective 04-Dec-12 .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Rev 01 OPERATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN CHAPTER 16 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

.........................10..4 Description of an ATC flight plan (ICAO Model) ..........7 Sample Flight Plan Delay Message .. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17. 10 17..14 17........1...1............20 A-17-1 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy......10....................... 14 17............................................1.......................................... 14 17...1.................1...1..........1.......1..........5 En-Route Operating Minima for VFR Operations ............1................8 Determination of Quantities Of Fuel And Oil Carried ..........1.........OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II............................ 13 17.........10................................. 18 17........ 12 17.2 Criteria for Determining the Usability of Aerodromes ......................1...............................................................................9 Mass and Balance Control ...10..................8 Sample Flight Plan Change Message ...........................10..................1.......10.........10.....................1.....................18 17..INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT................... ..........1...10 ATS Flight Plan ....................20 17..............1......1 FLIGHT PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS .....1 Filling and Filing ATC Flight Plan .20 17.......1.............................2 Procedure for filing normal flight plan.5 Filed Flight Plan Message...10.....1................ 14 17...........................................10.............1.......7 Interpretation of Meteorological Information ..6 Sample Flight Plan Cancellation Message....... 18 17......20 17.....4 Methods for the Determination of Aerodrome Operating Minima .....9 Pilot and ATC agreement.......6 Presentation and Application of Aerodrome and En-Route Operating Minima .19 17....19 17. 12 17..............6...1 Minimum Flight Altitude .1 Presentation of Aerodrome Minima .19 17..........................19 17............................... 18 17...............................3 Selection of Aerodromes .... 14 17........1............. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 TABLE OF CONTENTS STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR EACH PHASE OF FLIGHT...............1....3 Procedure for filing repetitive flight plan ......................9 17............

.........3 FLIGHT PROCEDURES ............ 34 17..OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II..... 30 17.3 Recording and reporting of airplane defects .................2 Responsibility and use of FRB .................................................3.........................3...........12.....4 Altimeter Setting Procedure ...................3......................................... Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17...1 Visual flight rules .......... 33 17..12........2 VFR / IFR Policy ..2...... 33 17....................5 Altitude Alerting System Procedures ..... 34 17................................. 34 17........ 29 17.6 Weather monitoring .................1..1 ATS Air Space in India ...........1.......................................................2...............3......................13 List of documents forms and additional information to be carried 27 17......Precautions...................................2.... 23 Revised FRB ............3....3....3.......................................3.10 ATC Clearance ..1.1 ..... 25 17...... 25 17. 23 17........4 Rules applicable to IFR flights within controlled Air Space .... 27 17.................. 27 17....11 Operational Flight Plan .........1 Adverse Weather/ Monsoon Operations....1...2 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS AND PROCEDURES ..............1 Altimetery errors ................2..........3 Navigation Procedures..............................10....... 24 17..............12 Airplane Flight Report Book (Tech Log) ............................ printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17................... 30 17................ 27 17....................2 Instrument flight rules ...................... 21 17.......................................4..................................3............ 32 17.......1.................................8........... 27 17....3................................... 27 17......7 Policy and Procedures for Inflight Fuel Management .........1.................8 Adverse and Potentially Hazardous Atmospheric Conditions ....................12..... 34 A-17-2 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy........... 32 17.......3..... Guidance and Requirements ......3 Change from IFR flight to VFR flight................3......3................1............3.....INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT..................................

58 17...10 Crew members at their stations .........8.3..............................69 17...........................3.................8........................... slush or water ...............................21 Significant Temperature Inversions ...................18 Nor‘ Westers ...............3.................73 17...3..13 Wind Shear ...............8...........8...........................................3......3...3....48 17...............................................8..42 17................................45 17.............8......................8....54 17......................3...76 17.8..........3 Aquaplaning (Hydroplaning) .................................47 17.....9 17.......................................................10 Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) .....22 Report on hazardous flight conditions ...........12 Icing and Freezing Precipitation General ..................5 Hail.3..................... Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Operations from runways contaminated with snow.......14 Volcanic Ash ....55 17...................3.........................3...66 17.....11 Squall Lines and Wind Shifts ...............19 Tornadoes.......................3.........3.57 17......3........9.8 Circumnavigation of Weather......8.......................8.........3.68 17.........................62 17............47 17..................72 17.............. 81 A-17-3 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.................71 17..............3..................7 Weather Radar ..............8........................................3...........................3...........8..................8...................38 17.....................3... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17.....3.....3..................................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT................17 Jet Streams......................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II......8..............2 ......................................8.......8.20 Hot Weather Operations ....73 17.......3............8............8....8............16 Mountain Waves ................8.8.......53 17..................... 77 Wake Turbulence: Super Heavy Aircraft Type .................3...1 Wake Turbulence ..3.............4 Thunder Storms .......................................65 17...9 Turbulence ....79 17..15 Dust / Sand Storms .6 Static Electric Discharges .........................................

........ 88 17..............3........17......................................................... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17...........2 Dead Heading Crew – Pre-Embarkment Security Compliance .12... 100 17.3...1 Flight and Simulator duty travel ................... 82 17........3.3.............OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II....11.........................................................................12........................... 105 A-17-4 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy..............3.....15 No Contact Period ..........3................ 97 17........ Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17...........17................12..........11 Use of seat belts for crew and passengers ... 84 17........ 101 17.........2 Flight Operations Inspectors .....................................12..........................14 Seat Belt and No Portable Electronic Device Signs ... 91 17....... 102 17............ 87 17........5 Cockpit Entry Procedure ... 94 17.......17 Allocation Of Cockpit & Cabin Jump Seats To Cockpit Crew While On Personal Domestic Travel As Additional Crew Member (ACM) ...18 Use of Vacant Crew Seats .......................................INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT....................... 96 17......3...................19 Incapacitation of Crew Members ...3................................................3.............4 Airport Entry Pass ..........................1 Procedure for cockpit familiarisation.4 Dead Bolt Procedures ............2 Seat Belt Guidance ................... 99 17..........3.........20 Cabin Safety Requirements ....................12 Admission to Flight Deck ....................1 Three Crew Cockpit... 91 17... 100 17..3......3..........3.................16.3...........................................3.........................3............ 94 17... 85 ..3........................3.......12......3................................. 97 17..............11.....17....1 Fasten Seat Belt Sign......3 Adherence to Airport Security Requirements .3 Cockpit Door .................................16 Procedure when one pilot leaves the cockpit (2 Crew Cockpit) 96 17.....3.....17........ 86 17. 83 17..3..............3..... 100 17............................................13 Before Take-off Communications Procedures .

7 Low Visibility Approach and Landing Operations ................3......21..................3.....4.......................21.3....23 Procedures For Airplane Operations Requiring Cosmic/ Solar Radiation Detection Equipment ...............3.....107 17.......3..4 LOW VISIBILITY OPERATIONS.......................................4 Universal Precaution Kit................................................3.....105 17..3.....................OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II...............107 17.....4 Electronic Devices ....................22....21 Emergency Medical Kits ...........114 17.......5 Periodic examination of the kit: ...... 126 17.........3...115 17................................20...................................................21.........1 Passenger safety announcements .............2 Passenger Information Announcements ......22... Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Cabin preparation and passengers seating ..........20...4......... 127 A-17-5 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy...............117 17...3.... 117 17...3......... Embarking or Disembarking ............4................20...............................2 First Aid Kit ........113 17............. 122 17.......................................1 ..4 Minimum Approach Break-Off Height (MABH) .......................................................................21....111 17....4.....4..........21..112 17..22 Passenger Briefing Procedures .. 127 17........................21...................6 Company Procedure for CAT II / CAT III Operations ...2 Fuelling with Passengers on Board..6 General requirements: ....................3.......118 17..........5 Concept of Operating Minima (Including required RVR).......3............1 Category-II and Category-III Approaches ........3...........3...4...3 Medical Kit .......7 Procedures and Checklist System ......2 Decision Height (DH) and Alert Height (AH) .............INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT..21....114 17.. 127 17............4......3.....1 Requirement for Carriage of First Aid and Medical Kit .......20............ 119 17..............3 Runway Visual Range ......... 120 17...116 17....................3 Evacuation / Disembarkation .. 121 17.............. 111 17.....3.... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17..............107 17..... 125 17......................

151 17.. 129 17. 163 A-17-6 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy...................... 127 17........................8 17............3 Runway Incursion Prevention .. 150 17................5 Low Visibility and Confusing markings ..............4..........................3 Operational Requirements .. 140 17............ 150 17...1 Pilot Qualification and Authorisation ...........4........ Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17........................9................................................8...6 LOW VISIBILITY TAXI .........................4...5... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17....2 Automatic Landing in CAT I Or Better Weather Conditions ................................... 141 17.....................................................................4..4....... 150 17... 142 17................. 129 17........Take Off .......................4...........9........ 142 17....9..8...3 Flight Parameters Deviation Calls ...4.... 159 17................6 Failures and associated actions ...8.....2 Pilot in Command Responsibilities .........9 Aerodrome Operating Minima.................................4......7.. 158 17......4 Call-Outs CAT II/III ...5 Approved Take off/ LVTO minima for various airports....................................4.......................8.........8.4..4 General Conditions...........9.....4. 151 17...............FLT.8............4........5. 153 17...............4........................................................2 Record Keeping ..........................9...1 Flight Crew Procedures ................................5...............7........OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II....5.....................5............7 Practice Approaches ...................... Landing and Roll Out) ......3 Flight Dispatch Actions ......2 Good Taxying Practices ............5 Required equipment for CAT II/ III ..........1 Airline...... 132 17............................................ 162 17.8... 128 Landing Categories ...........................7.... 154 17.4................... 127 17............1 Aircraft and Operating Limitations (Automatic Approach.....5 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD ................ 152 RUNWAY INCURSIONS ...4..........4...........4 Cockpit Procedures ........................................ Aircraft and Aircrew Qualification .........4......... 151 17....9....4........... 152 17...............................

..... 168 17...173 17...........................................9...8 Total Communication Failure...........................8.................................10.....................3 Time System ................................................................................................... Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17...............INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT............10.7 USE OF MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST .................................. 169 17...............T....................................3 Receiver Failure ................8............................1 General Radar Phraseologies ......1 RT Call Sign ....................................2 Air-Ground Communications Failure ........6 EDTO – DESCRIPTION OF EDTO OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES ..... 163 17.............................11........1 Performance Considerations ..... Discipline ................................................................10....................................................................10................... 166 17................ 171 17.....9....... 167 17..............................................................10....................10...............10.................... 163 17...........................................................................8.. 170 17........T. 168 17....................2 Secondary Radar Phraseologies ................4 Transponder Procedures — Radio Communication Failure .......................... 174 17.....10...... 168 17.... 163 17...........10.............. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17....................9 17........6 Safety Issues .....2 Fuel Planning and weight Considerations ..174 17.......2 Air / Ground Company Communication ..............1 .....................173 17....... 166 17.......4 Language to be used ....................................... 174 17.10.....................10......... 167 17....9 RT Terminology ... 174 A-17-7 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy..10 Weather Considerations ......................8 NON-REVENUE FLIGHTS .......1 General ICAO Procedure ...5 R.........................10..... 167 17..................10....OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II........8........8....171 17.....................11 OPERATION UNDER RADAR CONTROL .. 166 COMMUNICATION ....................... 174 17........11..................... Operating Technique ...................... 165 PRE-FLIGHT PLANNING .........................7 R.........

......11..........OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.......1 Policy ...............................12 CRITICAL PHASES OF FLIGHT (STERILE COCKPIT) ......12..................... 182 17............. 177 17.............4 Controlled Rest on the Flight Deck: ....... 177 17......... 176 17..14...13.....2 Fatigue Management .................... 174 17.. 183 17..............12...13 USE OF AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU) .........12....12....................................................................4 Phraseologies For Use With Precision Approach Radar .. 175 .......... 174 17.... Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17............... 175 17..6 CLEARANCES .............1 Activities Prohibited During Critical Phases Of Flight ..............................................5 Position Reports To ATC ............11..................................................14 PILOT LOG BOOK ....................... 183 A-17-8 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy..........5 Interaction log .... 177 17...11...........INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT........12.......... printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17.......................................................................... 180 17........3 Phraseologies For Use With Surveillance Radar ......... 182 17..11..............................................1 Logging Flight Times – Company Policy ... 176 17...............3 Management of crew fatigue during flight .........

aircraft systems and supporting facilities etc) to achieve safe and efficient operations. .17. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR EACH PHASE OF FLIGHT Framing of SOPs is a process involving deliberation and safety assessment. Deviation from SOPs is often the starting point of contributory factors that culminate into an incident or accident. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Standard operating procedures (SOPs) have been evolved out of the need to operate aircraft within a defined framework with a desired level of safety. Most incidents and accidents do not occur because of a single event but are because of a series of events that are often linked to non-adherence to SOPs as the common thread. SOPs are inherently well defined and structured. Crew Resource Management Crew Resource Management is the effective utilisation of all available resources (crew members. strict adherence to them is essential for safe operation of aircraft.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. but retain the need for responsiveness and flexibility to incorporate changing operational scenarios. The objective of CRM is to enhance the communication and management skills of pilots. Once SOPs are framed. The basic elements of CRM to be understood and applied during the line operations are as under but not limited to:  Teamwork  Communications  Workload and automation management  Situational awareness  Aeronautical decision making  Conflict resolution  Leadership and team management A-17-9 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. SOPs mature as result of amalgamation of manufacturer‘s checklists. Emphasis is also placed on the non-technical aspects of flight crew performance. operational requirements and the interface of human factors. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

vi) Terminal and en-route navigation aids.  Precluding a flight from departing until any defect affecting airworthiness is processed in accordance with the MEL/CDL. ii) The OFP. Field conditions.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. vii) Determination of weather minima viii) Crew qualification required ix) Flight planning x) Flight operations risk assessment After an aerodrome or route is determined feasible and clear for operations. iii) Weather information to include en route and departure. Runways. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Commencement . iv) Aircraft weight/mass and balance. to the extent possible. that conditions and ground facilities required for the flight are adequate for the type of operation.  Approach charts including STARs and SIDs where applicable.1 FLIGHT PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS The feasibility of all flight operations is the responsibility of the Vice President/ Director (Flight Operations). the Director of Flight Operations Support will ensure the availability of the following for the guidance of flight crew:  If required a Company navigation flight plan with fuel required . Part D for CRM training) 17. taxiways. (Navaids. A-17-10 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. v) Airplane operations feasibility with respect to airplane performance. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Fatigue and stress management (Refer Operations Manual. ramp areas. Lighting etc) Flight preparation will consist of: i) The Aircraft Technical Log (ATL) and the MEL/CDL for:  Determining the airworthiness status of the aircraft.time and distance information to destination and alternate including carriage of contingency fuel as required by airline policy. No flight will be scheduled without his concurrence. Complete Company Flight Plan will be provided by the Flight Dispatch. No flight will be commenced unless it has been ascertained. destination and alternate airports.

are made available to them. Reports on malfunctioning radio aids & landing aids. inadequate runway markings. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . Pilot Reports It is the responsibility of all pilots to promptly report inadequacies in any facility required for safe operations of flights.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. - FOD A-17-11 weather. - Braking Action or other irregularity in navigational or ground facilities. In the absence of a flight dispatch / handling agent the captain is responsible but may designate the co-pilot for obtaining ATC clearance. - Inadequacy of navigational facilities or undesirable navigational aid performance. severe Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. will be made as applicable for debriefing to fltops@goindigo. charts etc.  Tabulated charts for take-off / landing performance  Availability of relevant NOTAMs  Weather minima Pre-flight preparation of the above requirements is the responsibility of the central flight dispatch who will be responsible for filing and obtaining the ATC clearance and briefing the operating crew on the above aspects and ensure that the required information. inadequate weather reporting etc. severe - Volcanic ash observed or encountered - Air Piracy or other hostile acts that threaten the safety of the aircraft or its passengers.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The events which need to be reported but not limited to: - Un-forecast or Turbulence. icing.in and in the ‗Commander‘s Trip Report‘ so that necessary corrective action can be initiated with the concerned agency. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Special arrival departure procedure if required. wind shear. - Birds or large animals in the vicinity of the airport or runways. Report to ATC The PIC shall report any hazardous flight condition to the appropriate ATC facility without delay.

1. an aerodrome is suitable if:  The available runway length is sufficient to meet airplane performance requirements (required take-off and landing distance). sufficient lighting. it should be anticipated that. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Such report shall also be included in the Commander‘s trip report as above. An adequate aerodrome can be used for an emergency diversion and not planned as an alternate aerodrome b) Suitable Aerodrome A suitable aerodrome is an adequate aerodrome which is considered to be satisfactory.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. . refuelling and emergency services and at least one let down aid (ground radar would so qualify) will be available for an Instrument Approach. communications. taking account of the applicable performance requirements and runway characteristics.Rescue and fire fighting).1 Minimum Flight Altitude Refer Chapter 6 Criteria for Determining the Usability of Aerodromes a) Adequate Aerodrome An adequate aerodrome is an aerodrome that meets the safety requirements for take-off and landing for aircraft operations. In addition. In particular.Airplane performance. It should be anticipated that at the expected time of use: i) ii) The aerodrome will be compatible with the performance requirements for the expected landing weight and will be available and equipped with necessary ancillary services such as ATC.Part 1: Airport Services Manual . A-17-12 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. 17.  Rescue and fire fighting aerodrome category is compatible with the airplane (Refer to ICAO Doc 9137-AN/898 . navigation aids. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17. at the expected time of use. weather reports or forecast or any combination thereof indicate that the weather conditions are at or above operating minima as specified in the operations specification and the field condition report indicates that a safe landing can be accomplished at the time of the intended operations.2 . weather reporting.1.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.

Selection of Aerodromes An aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed. City standby - Landing and over flying permission has been obtained. step.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.  En-route alternate. air starter. ground power unit.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Two destination alternate aerodrome shall be selected and specified on the OFP and the ATS flight plan when for the destination aerodrome A-17-13 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. An alternate aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed should it become impossible or inadvisable to land at the aerodrome of intended landing. - The flight crew has the required qualification.1. Attachment B: Aerodrome Design and Operations and ICAO Doc 9157-AN/901 . tow bar. the aerodrome is equipped with the necessary ramp handling facilities: refuel. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . An alternate aerodrome at which an aircraft can land should this become necessary shortly after take-off and it is not possible to use the aerodrome of departure. - At the expected time of use. cargo loading. when it becomes either impossible or inadvisable to proceed or to land at the aerodrome of intended landing. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Minimum Aerodrome fire fighting category required is cannot be considered for this purpose. catering water & toilet services etc.  The pavement strength is compatible with airplane weight (Refer to ICAO Annex 14.  Destination alternate.  Furthermore. Note: The aerodrome from which a flight departs may also be an en-route or a destination alternate aerodrome for that flight. Alternate aerodromes include the following:  Take-off alternate.Pavement) or permission is obtained from airport authority.Part 3: Aerodrome Design Manual . the following items should be considered when necessary: 17. experience and documentation including up to date approach and aerodrome charts for each pilot. An aerodrome at which an aircraft would be able to land after experiencing an abnormal or emergency condition while enroute.3 6.

Note: Altitudes between which phenomena and any associated cloud are expected are indicated by flight levels. 17.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.1. or o When meteorological information is not available.1. top over base or top followed by base.6.7 a) Interpretation of Meteorological Information Symbols for significant weather. 'XXX' means the phenomenon is expected to continue above and/or below the vertical coverage of the A-17-14 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK – 17. Methods for the Determination of Aerodrome Operating Minima Refer chapter 7.FLT.1.4 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD .5 En-Route Operating Minima for VFR Operations .6 Presentation and Operating Minima Application of Aerodrome and En-Route Refer Chapter 7 17.1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal 17. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 o meteorological conditions at the estimated time of use will be below the applicable aerodrome operating minima .1 Presentation of Aerodrome Minima Refer Chapter 7. 17.1. Tropopause and freezing level etc.

speed in kts or km/hr & height in flight levels The vertical extent to the jet stream is indicated (in flight levels) e. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 chart.g.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) . c) MODEL SWH and SWM – Significant weather charts(high and medium) Scalloped line = demarcation of area of significant weather Heavy broken line Heavy solid line Interrupted by wind Arrow and flight level = delineation of area of CAT = position of jet stream axis with indication of wind direction. FL270 accompanied by 240/FL 290 indicates that the jet extends from FL240 to FL290 Figure on arrow = speed in kt or km/h of movements of frontal system A-17-15 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. while bars indicate it is a weakening feature (frontolysis). for example light aircraft icing or drizzle.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Dots inserted at intervals along the line of a front indicate it is a developing feature (frontogenesis). moderate or severe icing and/or turbulence. The thunderstorm symbol implies hail. Symbols For Fronts And Convergence Zones Note: An arrow with associated figures indicates the direction and the speed of the movement of the front (knots). Phenomena of relatively lesser significance. are not usually shown on charts even when the phenomenon is expected.

i.0 º C level is at an altitude of 6000 ft Figure on arrows speed in kt or km/h of movement of frontal systems.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. 340. depressions or anticyclones Figure inside the state of the sea Symbol Total wave height in feet or metres. printed from e-manual / Company Portal location. Low and High points of the tropopause topography are indicated by letters L or H. . e. inside a pentagon with the height in flight level. feathers and pennants Arrows indicates direction. Figure inside the sea surface temperature symbol sea surface temperature in º C Figure inside the strong surface wind symbol wind in kt or km/h Arrows.g. respectively. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 = height in flight levels of tropopause at spot Flight Levels inside small rectangle Display explicit FL or JET depths and tropopause height even if outside forecast bounds d) MODEL SWL – Significant weather chart(Low level) MODEL SWL – Significant weather chart (Low level) X position of pressure centres given in hectopascals L centre of low pressure H centre of high pressure Scalloped lines demarcation of area of significant weather Dashed lines altitude of 0º C isotherm in feet/ metres Note: 0º C level may also be indicated by 0º :060 . Number of pennants and / or feathers corresponds to speed A-17-16 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.e.

OVC = Overcast (8 Octas). top over base. When XXX is used. SC= Stratocumulus. A-17-17 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. EMBD= thunderstorm clouds contained in Layers of other clouds (embedded) HEIGHTS Heights are indicated on SWH & SWM charts in flight levels(FL).e) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. MON= Above mountains. . ST = Stratus. CC = Cirrocumulus. AS = Altostratus. LAN=Inland. CB = Cumulonimbus AMOUNT Clouds Except CB. AC = Altocumulus. VAL=In Valleys. SKC = Clear SKY. BKN = Broken (5 to 7 Octas ). CS = Cirrostratus.NS = NimbostratusCU = Cumulus. EW = FEW (1 to 2 Octas). Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Weather Abbreviation Used On Charts CLOUDS = LAYER or layered (instead of cloud type) TYPE CI = Cirrus. LOC =Locally.  The abbreviation SFC is used to indicate ground level.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. SCT = Scattered (3 to 4 Octas) CB ONLY ISOL = individual CBs (isolated). printed from e-manual / Company Portal LYR . Heavy Broken Lines = delineation of clear air turbulence. Scalloped Lines = demarcation of areas of significant weather. OCNL= well-separated CBs (occasional) FRQ= CBs with little or no separation (frequent). tops or bases are outside the layer of the atmosphere to which the charts applies: In SWL charts: f)  Heights are indicated as altitude above mean sea level. SIGINIFICANT WEATHER CHARTS COT=At the coast.

1.10 ATS Flight Plan All Flights with passengers shall be operated on an instrument flight rules plan. non-revenue) may be dispatched under visual flight rules. .3 and chapter 6) 17.17. 17. Except when other arrangements have been made for submission of repetitive flight plan.9 Mass and Balance Control 17.8 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Determination of Quantities Of Fuel And Oil Carried Refer Chapter 12. The conditions for IFR/ VFR flights must be satisfied in accordance with the ICAO/ state regulations. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Refer Chapter 14. (Also refer Para 17. The flight plan should be amended or a new flight plan submitted and the old flight plan cancelled. the flight plan should be submitted to the unit serving or designated to serve the departure aerodrome. a time slot should be requested early enough. The dispatcher on duty or if not the flight crew is responsible to file the ATC flight plan and request a departure slot when needed. the ATS unit must be informed of the expected operation before each flight.1. .10.1 Filling and Filing ATC Flight Plan The procedure to fill an ATC flight plan is defined in Annex II of ICAO PANS-ATM (DOC 4444). The ATC flight plan must be filed at least 1 hour before the Estimated Off-Block Time (EOBT) When a flight is subject to flow control measures. Certain short flights (ferry.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and an ATC flight plan must to be filed for each flight (IFR and VFR). and special procedures or manoeuvrability limitation must be indicated. If no air traffic services reporting office exists at the departure aerodrome.1.1. whichever is applicable in the event of a delay for which a flight plan has been submitted:  one hour in excess of the estimated off-block time for a controlled flight  one hour for an uncontrolled flight A-17-18 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

Flight Operations Support is responsible to monitor any long term changes in the commercial flight schedule and submit changes to respective ATS units.5 Filed Flight Plan Message Refer Chapter 16 A-17-19 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. any modifications to the filed flight plan must be given to the Commander and be carried aboard.4 Description of an ATC flight plan (ICAO Model) Refer Chapter 16 and Annexure 04 17.3 Procedure for filing repetitive flight plan Flight Operations has entered into agreement with ATS units at various FIRs to submit Repetitive Flight Plans for schedule flights.1. Test flights Ferry or flights not covered by RPL system.10.10. 17. either in the ICAO format or Flight Plan Message format.1. Another copy signed by the Commander must be kept at the operations department.10. should be submitted. For non-routine flights like Training flights. 17. Flight plans must be submitted in ICAO model flight plan format for nonschedule flights and in FPL message format for flights not covered under RPL. . Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 The Commander is responsible for ensuring that a plan has been filed. This should always be compared to the Computerised Flight Plan routing. in person or via Fax to the local Air traffic Services Reporting office. flight dispatch must submit a flight plan to the respective ATS offices.10. Flight Dispatch is responsible to monitor with respective FICs that FIC/ADC numbers are being generated for all the flights that are filed under RPL system.2 Procedure for filing normal flight plan Completed Flight Plan. 17. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A copy of the accepted ATC flight plan with. Any flight delays and adhoc changes in the flight schedules must be communicated by Flight Dispatch to the respective ATS units. and that he is fully aware of the details including the routing selected.1. Uncontrolled Airspace / Airports Flights into and out of uncontrolled airspace and/ or airports are prohibited.1.

The Commander is the final authority as to the operation of the aircraft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Refer Chapter 16 .10.10.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. An ATC clearance is not an authorisation for a pilot to deviate from any regulation or to conduct an unsafe operation. A-17-20 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. he must request the change and obtain the concurrence of ATC in the form of an amended clearance. the flight is continued under the emergency authority of the Commander. If. Likewise.1. If at any point after take-off the Commander wishes to change the flight plan.10. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17. ATC may initiate an amended clearance for traffic requirement and if concurrence between the Commander and an ATC controller is not possible. A pilot must not accept a clearance with which he cannot safely comply or which exceeds the capabilities of the aircraft. Any request for an amended clearance should be made considering traffic and the planning and co-ordination requirements of the ATC.8 Sample Flight Plan Change Message Refer Chapter 16 17. the pilot‘s emergency authority will be exercised.1.1. This agreement is the current flight plan. due to severe weather.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A pilot should question any clearance or any part of a clearance that he does not understand.10.1.7 Sample Flight Plan Delay Message 17. an immediate deviation is required.6 Sample Flight Plan Cancellation Message Refer Chapter 16 17.9 Pilot and ATC agreement A clearance issued by ATC and accepted by a pilot constitutes an agreement between ATC and the Commander as to the planned execution of the flight. whether or not it is the same as the originally filed flight plan. he is directly responsible for the operation of the aircraft.

10.g. . c) Route of flight If the route of flight is different from that filed. At airports where they are used. that Mach number must be maintained as closely as possible (e.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A flight may be cleared to a point short of the destination if ATC has no assurance that co-ordination with a subsequent area control centre will be accomplished before that flight enters its FIR. At some airports.10 ATC Clearance a) Clearance limits A flight must not continue beyond its clearance limit without further clearance. b) Departure procedure The departure procedure includes the routing and any altitude restrictions during after take-off to the en-route phase. radio fixes. or if a clearance is issued en-route. or latitude and longitude. these SIDs are charted and used routinely to simplify and shorten clearance delivery.1. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17. in MNPS airspace). any change in Mach number must be approved by ATC. A-17-21 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. It is the controller‘s responsibility to furnish further clearance before a flight reaches the clearance limit. In the latter case the controller should provide the pilot with an expected further clearance time. printed from e-manual / Company Portal An ATC clearance issued before take-off normally includes the destination airport as the clearance limit. ETA amendments and/or TAS changes must be reported to ATC.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A pilot is to accept a SID as part of the ATC clearance only if the SID number in the clearance corresponds with his charted information. When ATC includes the Mach number as part of the clearance. the clearance must include a description of the route using airway designations. or if the flight is an oceanic flight. Standard Instrument Departures (SID) have been established which identify each departure procedure with a name and a number. This clearance may change the clearance limit to a point beyond or it may include holding instruction at the clearance limit. Additionally.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. f) Arrival route Clearance for an arrival route is not issued until a flight is approaching the terminal area. and land. A new clearance is required to leave that altitude or flight level. e) Holding instructions If a flight is cleared to hold. They identify each airport arrival route with a name and a number. This is a detailed clearance that fully describes the routing to a point from which the flight will be manoeuvred for the approach to the airport. The clearance does not permit the pilot to descent below the MEA or MOCA unless the descent and landing are made in accordance with Visual reference Flight Rules. the destination clearance authorises the pilot to proceed to the destination airport. Upon receiving a clearance containing altitude information. . At some airports. the Commander must verify that the clearance does not violate any altitude restriction for the route to be flown. descend. ATC holding instructions must be complied with. altitude clearances are based on separation from known air traffic and may not provide separation from terrain and obstructions. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Altitude A cleared altitude means an assigned altitude or flight level including any restrictions. A pilot is to accept a STAR as part of the ATC clearance only if the STAR number in the clearance corresponds with his charted information. In some part of the world.d) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. STARs are charted and used routinely to simplify and shorten clearance delivery. Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STAR) have been established. A-17-22 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal At airport without an approved instrument approach procedure. The Commander is responsible for ensuring that any clearance issued by ATC provides terrain and obstruction separation. These instructions may be issued by the controller or they may be required on the charts.

and all route changes should be recorded on the flight plan log. A-17-23 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. a pilot is expected to comply promptly after acceptance.  Legible. In this case. After a landing on a non-controlled airport the Commander must ensure that the flight plan is cancelled. 17. i) Complying with a clearance When ATC issues a clearance. If the type of approach is not specified.11 Operational Flight Plan Refer Chapter 16.12 Airplane Flight Report Book (Tech Log) The flight crew shall ensure that information entered in the Flight Report Book:  Is up to date. An approach clearance does not include clearance to land. the pilot must announce his intended choice of approach procedure. j) Clearance recording A pilot should make a visible record of each ATC clearance.  Cannot be erased. ATC may use the term ―immediate‖ to communicate urgency and the requirement for expeditious compliance.g) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.1. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Communications h) Approach clearance An approach clearance is authorisation to conduct an approach and missed approach.1.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The frequency of departure control or the next en-route facility may be included with the clearance. 17. . k) Cancelling an IFR flight plan The flight plan is normally cancelled by the ―tower‖. the pilot may execute any type of instrument approach approved for the runway to be used.

o Flight number. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The Flight Report Book (Aircraft Tech Log) has been revised on the basis of operational experience.1. make your own judgement based on your observations and use most appropriate code while filling the FRB. 3. 17. o Flight crew names and duty assignment. A separate column has been added to capture the defects observed by the Certifying Staff and its corresponding rectification.12.1 Revised FRB The significant changes are: a) b) c) d) e) All timings shall be recorded in UTC. block time. 2. Delay due to cargo volumetric reasons exceeding of cargo release load‘ Special cargo difficult to load not notified in advance.* The FRB page has three copies instead of four – o White copy – Aircraft Records o Yellow copy – Departing Station o Green copy – Remains in the FRB Pilots to fill up the grey shaded areas. o Departure and arrival airports. for example the delay is because of ‗exceeding of cargo release load‘. ATA. flight time. o ATD. A-17-24 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. o Date. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Is correctable in the case of an error provided each correction is identifiable and errors remain legible. Please note that the correct way of filling the delay code is.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Pilot will fill 252. CO (25) 1. Delay code reporting: Check with ground staff for the reason of delay. Then. The DGCA approved FRB is placed at Annexure . as this is 2nd reason in 25 category of delay code. The following information is mandatory and PIC is to ensure recording of the following information for each flight: o Aircraft registration.

2 Responsibility and use of FRB The airplane will be certified serviceable for operations within its C of A by the concerned airplane engineer after he has carried out the requirement inspection / rectification. The MEL references must also be confirmed by commander to have been duly mentioned by the AME under ‗Deferred Items‘. work orders and any other maintenance documentation as applicable.1. deferred maintenance and any additional work carried out. just after the RTOW Index.12. 17. for the defects reported by the pilot or observed by the AME himself. where applicable.1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A laminated copy of IATA delay codes will be available on board RTOW folder.3. The Certifying Staff shall log all maintenance activities in UTC on the Tech Log. He will satisfy himself that the conditions as stipulated in Para 4. in-flight and post flight periods. Commander must ensure that the certifying staff (AME) has duly mentioned reference(s) such as the AMM / AMM Task no. Inspection Schedules. 17. The engineer and the commander will ensure that for any deficiency covered under the MEL both (M) and (O) requirements laid down in the MEL are complied with before dispatch.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. This certification will be given by the engineer in the Tech log by appending his signature. .12.1 of CAR Section 2 Series ‗O‘ Part II Issue IV have been met and append the Tech log of his acceptance with signature date and time. date and time. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 * The flight timings shall be logged in UTC by the flight crew.3 Recording and reporting of airplane defects Recording To enable effective monitoring of airplane and engine functioning and to ensure proper rectification of known or suspected defects observed by the crew during pre-flight. authorization number. The commander will review the complete airworthiness state of the airplane by ensuring that all reported defects have been rectified and if not their permissiveness under the MEL reviewed. or the Trouble Shooting Manual (TSM) against the rectification action performed by him.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. flight reports are to be completed as per the procedure given below: a) Flight crew must record all abnormal parameter readings as indicated by the A-17-25 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

A-17-26 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. flight through severe turbulence.) Reporting of defects All defects observed by the flight crew during pre-flight. in-flight and post flight periods must be reported in the FRB. Before accepting an airplane the Commander-must ensure that all previous reports under FRBs have been attended. When required record the required parameter for airplane monitoring (eg. bird strikes.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. In case of training flights. Engineering requires to be informed whenever TOGA power is used for take-off. a ―NIL‘ Report must be entered in the PDR. The columns of the PDR must indicate the necessary details of the defect and the necessary work carried out by the AME under his dated signature with licence number. This must be countersigned by the concerned AME for having ―NOTED‖ the same. signed by the Commander and dated. When the FRB is changed the new book should indicate all the deferred maintenance or a signed statement indicating ‗NO DEFERRED MAINTENANCE‖ from previous book. Pilots are required to make the entry given below in the Tech log whenever they use TOGA power for take-off. If entries are found to be incomplete or not recorded the airplane should not be considered airworthy. In case of training airplane making a series of flights on a single day. engine etc. printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) . Full details and nature of the defects experienced must be given clearly and legibly in the FRB.) c) For the purpose of Engine Condition Monitoring.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. All abnormal occurrences like heavy landing. RVSM. the total number of TOGA take-offs are required to be indicated. fuel. the defects may be recorded after the last flight unless a serious defect occurs requiring immediate action. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 respective instruments in PDR.(It is important to note that such an entry is not to be treated as a defect for which rectification is required. This will be the responsibility of the Commander. If no defect or abnormality during any phase of operation is observed throughout the flight. where a series of take-offs may be conducted on TOGA power. ―TOGA POWER USED FOR TAKE OFF‖ The Engineer will acknowledge this entry by ―NOTED‖. and lightning strikes shall be recorded in the PDR.

must be transferred by the Captain to the Aircraft Technical Log Sector Record page.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.3 FLIGHT PROCEDURES 17.1 a) Visual flight rules VFR flights shall be conducted so that the airplane is flown in conditions of visibility and distance from clouds equal to or greater than those specified in table below: A-17-27 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. and G.2 VFR / IFR Policy All commercial flights shall be conducted under IFR flight plan. F.2.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Passenger Address System.13 List of documents forms and additional information to be carried Refer Chapter 0 17. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 The acceptable deficiencies/minimum equipment list (MEL) as approved by the DGCA is compiled with a view to assist the pilots and engineers to determine where basic installations may be deficient of certain items without affecting the safety and airworthiness of the aircraft. 17. 17. Bulkheads. emphasised that existence of the list in no way absolves the Commander or Engineer from ensuring that the airplane is safe for proposed flight. All aeroplanes operated in accordance with IFR shall comply with instrument flight procedures approved by the state in which the aerodrome is located.2 GROUND HANDLING ARRANGEMENTS AND PROCEDURES This has been covered in part A General Chapter 9. Passenger Warning Signs. Interphone.3. E. Toilets. Refer AIP India for all details. The cabin attendant must report to the commander any defect observed in the cabin before. including but not limited to Emergency Lights. Safety Equipment.3. Doors. 17. Windows. during or completion of the flight and should record the same in Cabin Defect Report.1 ATS Air Space in India The ATS airspace in India is designated and classified into Class D. Seat structures.1. . 17. taking into consideration all the aspects and circumstances of the flight.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal It is however. Any cabin defect items affecting the aircraft airworthiness. Oxygen.

whichever is higher .at or above 3050M (10000‘) AMSL 5 Km Distance from clouds 1500 meters (5000‘) horizontally 5 Km – below 3050M (10000‘) AMSL 300 meters(1000‘) vertically Clear of clouds and in sight of surface. e) Lower flight visibility to 1500 m may be permitted for flights operating:  at speeds that. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Within controlled air space or Outside controlled airspace At or below 900 M (3000‘) AMSL or 300M( 1000‘) above terrain. Note: Local flight is wholly conducted in the vicinity of an aerodrome. or such other period between sunset and sunrise as may be prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority for local flights. in the prevailing visibility. or  when the ground visibility is less than 5 km.Conditions INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Except when a clearance is obtained from an air traffic control unit. VFR flights shall not take off or land at an aerodrome within a control zone. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Outside controlled airspace above 900 M (3000‘ ) AMSL or 300M (1000‘) above terrain. or enter the aerodrome traffic zone or traffic pattern: b)  when the ceiling is less than 450 m(1 500 ft). c) Unless authorised by the appropriate ATS authority.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. VFR flights between sunset and sunrise. will give adequate opportunity to observe other traffic or any obstacles in time to A-17-28 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. shall be operated in accordance with the conditions prescribed by such authority. VFR flights shall not be operated:  above FL 150. whichever is higher Flight Visibility 8Km .  at transonic and supersonic speeds  More than 100NM seaward from the shoreline within controlled airspace d) Authorisation for VFR flights to operate above FL290 shall not be granted in areas where a vertical separation minimum of 300 m (1000 It) is applied above FL290.

g) Except where otherwise indicated in air traffic control clearances or specified by the appropriate ATS authority. submit a flight plan to the appropriate air traffic services unit and obtain a clearance prior to proceeding IFR when in controlled airspace Note: Special VFR flights are not permitted for commercial operation.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-17-29 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. or a higher datum as specified by the appropriate ATS authority. 17. printed from e-manual / Company Portal in circumstances where the probability of encounters with other traffic would normally be low. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 avoid collision. towns or settlements or over an openair assembly of persons at a height less than 300 m(1000 ft) above the highest obstacle within a radius of 600 m from the aircraft. VFR flights in level cruising flight when operated above 900 m (3000 ft) from the ground or water. or  Except when necessary for take-off or landing.2. in areas of low volume traffic and for aerial work at low levels. or  when so required.3.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.2 Instrument flight rules Airplane Equipment Airplane shall be equipped with suitable instruments and with navigation equipment appropriate to the route to be flown.g. at a height less than 150 m (500 ft) above the ground or water. h) An airplane operated in accordance with the visual flight rules which wishes to change to compliance with the instrument flight rules shall:  if a flight plan was submitted communicate the necessary changes to be effected to its current flight plan. a VFR flight shall not be flown: f)  Over the congested areas of cities. shall be conducted at a flight level appropriate to the track as specified in the local AIP or any other applicable regulation.  Elsewhere than as specified above. . e. or except by permission from the appropriate authority.

17. 17. An airplane electing to change the conduct of its flight from compliance with the instrument flight rules to compliance with the visual flight rules shall. if a flight plan was submitted.4 Rules applicable to IFR flights within controlled Air Space IFR flights shall comply with the provisions of 17. is received by the air traffic services unit.2. Chapter 6) Note: Instrument flight rules may be followed in both IMC and VMC.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. that the flight will be continued for a reasonable period of time in uninterrupted visual meteorological conditions. an IFR flight shall not be flown at a level which is below the minimum flight altitude established by the State whose territory is over flown. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Except when necessary for take-off or landing. When an airplane operating under the instrument flight rules is flown in or encounters visual meteorological conditions it shall not cancel its IFR flight unless it is anticipated and intended. or except when specifically authorised by the appropriate authority. to be made to the current flight plan. between two levels or above a level selected from: a) The table of cruising levels as Specified by the state. if any.2.2.2. An IFR flight operating in cruising flight in controlled airspace shall be flown at a cruising level.3. or.3. b) A modified table of cruising levels.1.3.3 Change from IFR flight to VFR flight Change from IFR to VFR is only acceptable when a message initiated by the pilotin-command containing the specific expression ―CANCELLING MY IFR FLIGHT‖ together with the changes. when so prescribed for flight above FL 290 except that the correlation of levels to track prescribed therein shall not apply whenever otherwise indicated in air traffic control clearances or specified by A-17-30 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Minimum Levels (Also refer Para 6. notify the appropriate air traffic services unit specifically that the IFR flight is cancelled and communicate the changes to be made of its current flight plan. if authorised to employ cruise climb techniques. .2 when operated in controlled airspace.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. A table of cruising levels applicable in Indian airspace as per Indian AIP is placed below.

printed from e-manual / Company Portal IFR Flight Altitudes . Magnetic Track From 000⁰ to 179⁰ Magnetic Track From 180⁰ to 359⁰ VFR IFR VFR Flight Altitudes Flight Altitudes Flight Altitudes FL FL FL Feet Feet Feet FL Feet 0 −90 10 1000 20 2000 30 3000 35 50 5000 55 3500 40 4000 45 4500 5500 60 6000 65 6500 70 7000 75 7500 80 8000 85 8500 90 9000 95 9500 100 10000 105 10500 110 11000 115 11500 120 12000 125 12500 130 13000 135 13500 140 14000 145 14500 150 15000 155 15500 160 16000 165 16500 170 17000 175 17500 180 18000 185 18500 190 19000 195 19500 200 20000 205 20500 210 21000 215 21500 220 22000 225 22500 230 23000 235 23500 240 24000 245 24500 250 25000 255 25500 260 26000 265 26500 270 27000 275 27500 280 28000 285 28500 290 29000 300 30000 310 31000 320 32000 330 33000 340 34000 350 35000 360 36000 370 37000 380 38000 390 39000 400 40000 410 41000 430 43000 450 45000 A-17-31 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 the appropriate ATS authority in Aeronautical Information Publication.

OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. QNH (as reference) is to be used as the sole barometric altitude reference for the take-off. 17. systems degradation etc. approach and landing phases of flight.4 Altimeter Setting Procedure It is the company policy that for barometric altimeters. destination weather deterioration. RVSM. These requirements are given in the FCOM (special operations).3.17. RNP any system degradation may infringe the requirements for conducting such conditional flights. e) Systems Degradation In case of conditional flights e.Planning In-flight re-planning may be required for a number of reasons e.3 a) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. f) RVSM Refer Chapter 4. In such instances the flight may have to be re-planned to an alternate airport. ETOPS.g. Fuel requirements for in-flight diversion from any point are given in the FCOM. The change from altitude to flight level and vice-versa is made when climbing at transition altitude and when descending at transition level.3. Pilots must ensure that there is adequate fuel for the re-planned flight. printed from e-manual / Company Portal b) . the alternate is suitable and available and the weather conditions are adequate. The altimeter setting procedure is based on the assumption that en-route vertical separation of an airplane is expressed in terms of flight levels and that in the vicinity of an aerodrome at or below the transition altitude an airplane is flown at an altitude determined by the QNH setting. in-flight weather. d) In flight Re. A-17-32 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.g. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Navigation Procedures Standard Navigation Procedures Refer Chapter 3 and 4 c) MNPS and polar navigation and navigation in other designated areas  Polar Navigation : Intentionally Left Blank  MNPS : Intentionally Left Blank RNAV/PBN Refer Chapter 3.

5 Altitude Alerting System Procedures This has been covered under Altitude Awareness in part A General Chapter 20.3.2HPa Below transition level QNH The altimeter shall be cross checked for accuracy before departure based on the QNH provided by ATC.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. iii) Permissible to meet RVSM limitations. Enroute cruise. (Also refer Para 6.1 Altimetery errors The flight crew is to carry out correction for potential errors in altimetry that considers: a) The effects of Outside Air Temperature (OAT) that is significantly lower than standard temperature.3. GEN/DSC (DSC-34-40-10) A-17-33 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Chapter 4) 17. b) Maximum allowable barometric altimeter errors: i) Referenced to field elevation. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Phase of Flight .4. FCOM. 17. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 The following procedures shall be adopted by all Company Aircraft.4. ii) Compared to other altimeters. Chapter 6 and Para 4. Setting of Altimeter Take off QNH At or above TA.5.8. The pilot must also refer to his FCOM Chapter on system description. QFE is not to be used as a barometric reference for height measurement during the flights. Altimeters shall be cross checked when changing over from QNH to standard setting at transition altitude and when changing from standard setting to QNH on leaving transition level.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. It should read within the limitation and tolerance as laid down in the FCOM with reference to the pre-flight altimeter check location. descent upto TL STD / 1013.

however. General operating conditions i) Minimum total cockpit experience level of the PIC and the Co-Pilot should not be less than 500 hours on type. if applicable.3. It is applicable for all flights including EDTO flights. sleet. The weather may be monitored thorough VOLMET broadcast.17. 17. sleet and other contaminants associated with wet and cold weather. This. other contaminants associated with wet and cold weather.Precautions.  En route alternate airports(s).3. to include current weather and forecasts for: Destination airport. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  .  Destination alternate airport(s). 17. Guidance and Requirements Adverse weather is an integral part of flight operations.3. A-17-34 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. snow.8.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. ACARS. does not apply to PICs flying under supervision. VHF or HF. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Weather monitoring The flight crew must monitor/ obtain meteorological conditions during the en route phase of flight. snow. if applicable.1 Adverse Weather/ Monsoon Operations. Adverse weather may prevail at different times of the year. ii) No assisted take–offs and landings are permitted in actual adverse weather/monsoon conditions.8 Adverse and Potentially Hazardous Atmospheric Conditions Information and limitations for operations from contaminated runways and in potentially hazardous conditions is laid down in the normal.3.7 Policy and Procedures for Inflight Fuel Management Refer Chapter 12 17. supplementary and special procedures sections in the FCOM and QRH. Applicability: The period of adverse weather is reckoned by actual and forecast weather conditions at an aerodrome (departure.6 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. destination and alternate) that could result in degradation of take-off and landing surfaces due to rain. It encompass those operations conducted in weather conditions that could result in degradation of take-off and landing surfaces due to rain.

However. if wind shear on approach is reported or expected a lower flap landing is to be considered. x) Go around procedure in case of wind shear and stall and recovery procedure must be reviewed as per Operations Circular 2 of 2001.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The auto brake DECEL light might not illuminate if at least 80% of the desired deceleration rate is not achieved. A-17-35 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Optimum level of automation should be used. therefore deceleration should be confirmed by the speed trend arrow and the deceleration felt by the crew. vi) PANS-OPS procedures for speed control in terminal areas must be followed. v) Company policy on approach stabilization criteria is emphasised. iii) Use of auto brakes in the appropriate mode is recommended. viii) Go Around procedure in case of wind shear must be reviewed. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 iii) ILS approaches are to be preferred to non-precision approaches.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. emphasis may be given on CDFA. use of full reverse thrust is recommended. ix) When landing in adverse weather conditions Full flaps are recommended. printed from e-manual / Company Portal iv) Don't operate below minimum safe altitudes if uncertain of position or ATC clearance. vii) Flight Manual limitations and Company SOPs must be strictly adhered to. iv) Approach briefing prior to Top of Descent shall include wet/contaminated Landing Distance Required calculation. ii) Full flap landing and adequate usage of Reverse thrust and consideration of extra en-route/ terminal fuel computation shall be adhered to. i) If runways surface is wet / contaminated or if the braking action is reported as poor. . in case of non-precision approaches. Scheduled Operators shall prepare a quick analysis table for wet / contaminated RLD in view of the high cockpit work-load environment.

Single Engine Taxi is not recommended. Mumbai (VABB). Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 a) MEL Requirements The following equipment must be serviceable during adverse weather/ monsoon conditions within India: Weather RADAR ii) Windshield wipers on both sides Note-IndiGo fleet is certificated for adverse weather performance as per Airplane Flight Manual and subsequent limitations have been incorporated in MEL. Udaipur (VAUD) Kolkatta FIR . The following airfields have been identified as high risk. August and September have the highest risk for bird strike. Mumbai FIR . printed from e-manual / Company Portal i) .Ahmedabad (VAAH). d) Bird menace One of the greatest dangers to the safety of aircraft operation during the monsoon is bird menace. Aurangabad (VAAU). Patna (VEPT). A-17-36 Kolkata (VECC). The EXTRACT push button should be restored to AUTO if heavy rain stops or after the aircraft is airborne.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. take off and landing on fluid contaminated runways. An analysis of incidents since 1996 has shown that the months of July. c) Use of predictive wind shear and reactive windshear systems Refer FCOM PRO-SUP-91-20 and FCOM bulletin FCB 2.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. it can take rainwater into the avionics ventilation system via the open skin air inlet valve. As mentioned in FCOM PRO-SUP-30 the EXTRACT push button on the overhead VENTILATION panel should be switched to OVRD and Parking Brakes should be ON( when parked) to prevent rainwater from entering the avionics ventilation system. Khajuraho (VAKJ).Guwahati Vishakhapatnam (VEVZ) (VEGT). Takeoff and landing rolls are the phases during which maximum bird strikes take place. Refer to FCOM PRO-SUP-91-50 for techniques of taxi. b) Ground operations in heavy rain When the aircraft is parked on the ground during heavy rain.

Delhi (VIDP).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Assistance of ATC should be requested to clear the runway of birds. iv) During landing roll. immediately after take-off or on short finals. The radiation is considered effective for bird avoidance. viii) Birds are sensitive to Radar microwaves. soaring birds fly in the thermals below them. below 10. approach and landing.Bangalore (VOBG/VOBL) i) Aircraft speed shall be restricted to 250 knots or less.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. if birds are seen on the runway and the runway length is not limiting it is recommended that minimum reverse thrust is used. v) Pilots to exercise caution especially during sunset/ sunrise and after recent rain when operating to and from the above airfields. iii) A take off shall not be commenced if birds are seen on the runway and or in the takeoff path. vi) Keep clear of flocks or individual birds and do not pass close to them. xi) Do not take violent evasive action near the ground. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Delhi FIR . ii) If the relative angle of the flight path of the aircraft and the bird does not change a bird strike is likely. climb. Jaipur (VIJP). vii) Use appropriate external lights for landing and take-off.000‘ AGL unless safe operations of aircraft dictate a higher speed. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Bird menace avoidance – policy and guidelines e) . The weather radar will be used during take-offs. A-17-37 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. ix) Keep away from the base of convective clouds. Jammu (VIJU). x) Avoid flying over cities and towns at low altitude. Jodhpur (VIJO) Chennai FIR .

xiv) During take-off. This reduces the total stopping force available and increases the landing rollout distance. Depth is reported in millimetres for each third of the runway length. When Birds are not observed in time and a strike is likely in the cockpit area Pilots should duck their heads below the level of windscreen.8.(Refer FCOM PER (PERTOF-CTA-10)  Operational Factors i) The runway surface condition is reported by the following method. to divert to another aerodrome. The reduced tyre/ground friction available when landing on a slippery runway limits the braking and tracking force the tyre can generate.2 Operations from runways contaminated with snow. The depth of snow or slush is measured by a standard depth gauge.3. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 xii) Birds when frightened tend to dive. the direction of the wind should be kept in mind since birds (unlike pilots) always take-off and land into wind. between 5 and 10 m from the runway centre line and clear of the effects of rutting. When this occurs. printed from e-manual / Company Portal xiii) . slush or water Operations from contaminated runways should be avoided whenever possible. Understanding the capabilities and limitations of the systems that aid the Pilot in controlling and stopping the airplane will help prevent overrun accidents by underscoring the need to properly execute the recommended procedures.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. xv) In case of a bird strike incident. xvi) An additional pair of trained eyes in the cockpit scanning the sky when both the pilots are busy is a good policy 17. if birds are observed beyond the runway shoulder. it is mandatory that the bird incident report form to be filled. readings taken at approximately 300m intervals. it is safest for the pilot to alter the course of the aircraft or increase climb rate if a collision is imminent. A subjective assessment is also made of the nature of the surface contaminant (specific gravity) Refer FCOM A-17-38 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the first consideration should be to delay or await improved conditions or if airborne.

Slippery Runways Severe retardation may occur in slush or wet snow.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The two most important variables confronting the pilot. lack of acceleration will be evident early on the take off run. Maximum permissible power must be used from the start. According to the runway conditions the cross wind values indicated in FCOM should not be exceeded for take-off and landing. In most cases. usually containing sand or other anti-skid substances may be thrown into the engines. remember that braking and steering capabilities are greatly reduced with icy airport conditions. are length of runway and crosswind magnitude. Be aware of the possibility of ridges or ruts of frozen snow that might cause difficulties. More power than normal may be required to commence and continue taxi so care should be taken to avoid jet blast damage to buildings. Guidelines For Operations On Slippery Surfaces The use of thrust reversers is mandatory on contaminated runways. request "Follow me" guidance. If in doubt. Tyre cornering capability is reduced during braking or when wheels are not fully spun up. Locked wheels eliminate cornering. Therefore in crosswind conditions. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 The presence of water on a runway will be reported to the pilot at airports where the facility exists. equipment and other aircraft. When executing sharp turns while taxiing or parking at the ramp. The total friction force of the tyres is available for two functions . reduce taxi speed accordingly. printed from e-manual / Company Portal General Consideration . Large quantities of snow or slush. when runway coefficient of friction is low and/or conditions for hydroplaning exist. Take-Off .Slat/flap selection should be delayed until immediately before line up to minimise contamination. static ports and onto the A-17-39 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. some friction force (cornering) is necessary to keep the aircraft on the centreline. a longer distance will be required to stop the aircraft.ii)  INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. If there is a crosswind. The boundaries/edges of manoeuvring areas and taxiway should be clearly discernible.braking and cornering. Taxiing – Slippery Runways Aircraft may be taxied at the Commander discretion on ramps and taxiways not cleared of snow and slush.

there is a high probability of the runway being contaminated. Several may have to be acted upon simultaneously. Pod and engine clearance must be watched when the runway is cleared and snow is banked at the sides of runways or taxiway. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Pilots should be aware that where rain. sleet or snow showers are encountered on the approach or have been reported as having recently crossed the airfield. A-17-40 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Landing on contaminated runways without antiskid should be avoided. longer of the RLD Wet runway and RLD for the applicable contaminated for dispatch must be used. If the surface is contaminated. The shortest stopping distances on wet runways occur when the brakes are fully applied as soon as possible after main wheel spin up with maximum and immediate use of reverse thrust.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. It is the factored landing distance based on maximum manual breaking immediately after main gear touch down.Slippery Runways Use of reverse thrust on landing on dry snow in very low temperatures will blow the dry snow forward especially at low speed. The required landing distance is the regulatory reference to be used for dispatch landing performance computation. all spoilers operative. The factors and considerations involved in landing on a slippery surface are quite complex and depending on the circumstances.  Do not land where appreciable areas of the runway are flooded or covered with 1/2 inch or more of water or slush. Landing . The flight crew should use landing distances published in the QRH as the reference for In flight landing performance computation. hail. prompt selection of reversers. The following list of items summarises the key points to be borne in mind. . Very often a short delay is sufficient to allow the runway to drain or the contaminant to melt. It is strongly recommended to use the auto brake (if available) provided that the contaminant is evenly distributed.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. and regulatory dispatch factor included (Refer FCOM).  Limit crosswind components when runway conditions are poor and runway length short. anti-skid. The increase in temperature may melt this snow and form clear ice on re-freezing on static ports. The runway state should be checked with ATC before commencing or continuing the approach. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 airframe. the pilot may have to make critical decisions almost instinctively.

A-17-41 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.  Excessive braking in crosswinds will lead to the aircraft drifting away from the centreline. An extended flare is more likely to occur if excess approach speed is present. also ensures efficient antiskid braking.  Get the nose of the aircraft down quickly.  Be prepared to Go Around. Do not attempt to hold the nose up for aerodynamic braking. Aim to have the nose wheel on the ground by the time reverse thrust reaches the target level. printed from e-manual / Company Portal o . auto brake mode) o Wind effects on the directional control of the aircraft on the runway o Runway length and slope o Glide path angle  Do not exceed VAPP at the threshold.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Do not decrab completely as the aircraft will yaw on the slippery runway due to its weathercock stability. Avoid build up of drift in the flare and runway consuming float. If however maximum braking is required apply and hold full brake pedal deflection. by facilitating a prompt wheel spin up. A firm landing.  Select reverse thrust as soon as possible.  Consider the many variables involved before landing on a slippery runway. and if remaining runway length permits. Continue to apply rudder and aileron inputs while braking. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17  Establish and maintain a stabilised approach.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.  If the auto brake is not available. The brakes are the primary means for stopping the aircraft but if necessary the full reverse thrust may be maintained until the aircraft is fully stopped.  Flare the aircraft firmly at the 1000 ft aiming point. Landing weather forecast o Aircraft weight and approach speed o Landing distance required o Hydroplaning (aquaplaning) speed o Condition of tyres o Brake characteristics (anti-skid. allow the aircraft to decelerate to less than dynamic hydroplaning speed before applying wheel brakes.

17.  If directional or lateral control difficulties are experienced. full A-17-42 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. regain directional control with rudder. which requires a locked wheel skid on a damp or wet runway. reduce aileron deflection proportionately. b) Viscous aquaplaning which can occur on smooth runways with water depths as shallow as . speeds upto Vp will produce progressively reduced braking effectiveness and directional capability as more and more of the tyre foot print area is lifted out of contact with the runway. During take-off. disconnect the auto brake. reduce reverse thrust levels symmetrically. Vp (Kts) has been determined to be nine times the square root of the main gear tyre pressure in psi. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Caution: Do not allow large deviations from the runway heading to develop as recovery can become very difficult. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Once under control. aileron and differential braking. Use of the nose wheel steering is not recommended. As rudder effectiveness decreases.3 Aquaplaning (Hydroplaning) Aquaplaning is really a loose assortment of three different but related phenomena:  a) Dynamic aquaplaning. reapply manual braking and increase symmetrical reverse levels as required while easing the aircraft back towards the runway centreline. As the airplane accelerates for takeoff. Above Vp. the nose wheels must be closely aligned with the aircraft track or they will scrub. The tyre aquaplaning speed. . Taxi with caution to parking area as flaps extended provides a much reduced ground clearance.3. which occurs with standing water on the runway. Allow ground personnel to clear ice and slush from slats and flaps before full retraction.001.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Use rudder and aileron inputs. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Keep the aircraft aligned with the runway centreline. a fluid wedge forms that progressively separates the tyre footprint area from the runway surface. if necessary.  After landing in heavy slush do not retract the slats and flaps. c) Reverted rubber or steam aquaplaning. Dynamic Aquaplaning Dynamic aquaplaning results from high airplane speeds on flooded runways. Under slippery conditions.8.

which then superheats at temperatures upto 260 degree centigrade and lifts the tyre clear off the pavement. This gummy material creates an excellent seal to enclose the footprint area and trap steam. Always check for correct tyre inflation. Tyre manufacturers recommended pressures are a compromise between braking coefficient and aquaplaning speed (among other things).  Pre-flight Precautions . Steam aquaplaning has been measured to below 20 Kts ground speed in some cases.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. As a result. In fact that would work. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17  Viscous Aquaplaning Viscous aquaplaning occurs on very smooth runways when they are wet. experiments have shown that once aquaplaning has begun it may continue to significantly lower speeds. Landing or decelerating on standing water will produce the same general effects. Even though the ribs may not be as deep as the pooled water on the runway. they will still function to relieve the build up of that A-17-43 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. . although any increase in pressure will also decrease dry runways braking coefficient because over inflation lessens the overall contact area of the tyre which in turn reduces fraction. or touch down areas with heavy coating of rubber from repeated wheel spin ups.Aquaplaning Since Vp is directly related to tyre pressure. very little water is required. In a flight it is possible to experience all three forms in one landing.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. There are several variables that can influence aquaplaning some of which can be controlled by flight crew. Unlike dynamic aquaplaning. Tyres with deep radial ribs give the best protection against the onset of aquaplaning. forms a tenacious film that can completely separate tyres from pavement at speeds at least 35% below Vp. In fact. printed from e-manual / Company Portal dynamic aquaplaning removes all tyre to surface friction and further the vertical component of the fluid wedge produces a spin down moment which slows and eventually stops wheel rotation n the extreme situation.  Steam Aquaplaning When runways are damp or wet. the heat from a locked wheel position produces steam in the tyre footprint area that may revert the rubber to its tacky. the problem is more serious for landing or abort situations. Water on newly surfaced asphalt runways. but in reverse order. uncured state. it might seem logical to increase the pressure and thereby raise Vp for your aircraft.

by providing a low pressure escape route for the water. so check the tyre carefully and use caution when tyre treads are worn out.e.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . He should also be aware that any touchdown above Vp on a wet runway will present a high risk of aquaplaning. These surfaces will also increase the critical fluid depth needed for dynamic aquaplaning by allowing fluid to escape from the tyre footprint area. but it can substantially reduce the exposure and the risk if a few simple cautions are observed. etc. Each surface seems to have its own personality when it comes to braking coefficient. Heavy rain is more effectively drained away by the channelling action of the grooves. climate. the final approach should be made at a speed nearest to Vapp on the most favourable runway. Rough or textured surfaces inhibit viscous aquaplaning by preventing the formation of the smooth and cohesive fluid film. from a variety of materials depending on geography. A-17-44 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. and pumping action between tyres and grooves forces water out of the footprint.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Deep ribs will inhibit steam aquaplaning and provide maximum cornering effectiveness on slick surfaces.Aquaplaning Runways are constructed. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17  Runway conditions . There are some objective reasons for these differences: Runways with the pronounced crown shed water rapidly and prevent the build up of water depth i. Aquaplaning is prevented because the grooves break up on what otherwise might be a smooth surface. Steam aquaplaning cannot develop because steam pressure in the footprint area escape side-ways through the grooves and because the gummy reverted rubber is scrapped from the tyre as it slides across the rippled surface. printed from e-manual / Company Portal fluid wedge which acts to separate tyre and runway. the first pre-requisite for dynamic aquaplaning.  Technique .Aquaplaning Pilot technique cannot remove the possibility of aquaplaning. Runways with lateral grooves provide the best protection against all three forms of aquaplaning. When he is in this situation. the Pilot should know what is the Vp for the aircraft.

Aquaplaning One of the worst control situations occurs when there is a crosswind in conjunction with wet runways. including turbulence. then re-apply brakes judiciously when wheel rotation resumes. Icing is normally not a problem in flight through thunderstorm areas because of its A-17-45 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Sustained heavy braking may induce steam aquaplaning.3. although cautiously. . may cause serious directional control problems so use it early. Reverse thrust on a wet run-way particularly with a brisk crosswind. Any amount of water on a runway creates a potential aquaplaning situation and should be treated with respect. A small amount of anticipation and planning will produce big results when own good judgment and technique is applied under the prevailing conditions.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Generally the centre of pressure of this crosswind acts aft of the centre of rotation (main landing gear) producing a yawing movement which tends to make the airplane weather cock. Flight tests with jet transport airplane have demonstrated a loss in directional control and an approximate doubling or tripling of the dry runway stopping distance (without use of reverse thrust) due to aquaplaning . Ground the nose wheel for maximum directional control and once stabilised on the runway decelerate as rapidly as possible with the following precautions. or weather vane.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. until one has a feel of the situation. These forces are proportional to the square of crosswind velocity. 17. wind shear.  Effect of Crosswind .4 Thunder Storms Thunderstorm activity presents several hazards to flight operations.  Combined Effects .8. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 After touchdown. to transfer the airplane weight on the wheels to aid wheel spin up. These conditions if encountered can produce total aquaplaning. so begin cautiously and be prepared to ease off pedal pressures as soon as a locked wheel condition is detected. make early use of spoiler if available.Aquaplaning Crosswinds act over the entire side area of the airplane and produce side forces which tend to push the airplane off the downwind side of the runway. hail. static electric discharges and tornadoes. into the wind.

it is usually found to lie beneath the saddles that separate the build ups. each of which progresses through the three stages of thunderstorm development. and the dissipating or anvil stage. or higher. particularly at the edges of the strong updrafts. though cloud filled. A cell in the matured stage is the most turbulent. and form the anvil top. or higher.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. It is turbulent. . may be upto a mile and a half in width and if it were possible to accurately locate this area. though it is characteristic of a dissipating cell is usually wide spread over the thunderstorm mass. If practical A-17-46 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. it is probable that most thunderstorms could be circumnavigated with relative ease. The dissipating stage is reached when the down draft spreads over the entire lower portion of the cell. The anvil top. as it contains a strong updraft and downdraft in close proximity. printed from e-manual / Company Portal A thunderstorm mass is usually composed of several individual cells. the cell is composed entirely of updrafts. During the building stage. It can be identified by the presence of a rapidly building icy trough. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 localised nature (in the up-drafts) and the rapidity with which the airplane passes through the icing zones. which can tower upto 45. between the cells. the matured stage. and the absence of cloud to ground lightning. The least turbulence in a thunderstorm mass is found at times.The cumulus building up stage. This space. There is a zone of increased turbulence near the freezing level as both updrafts and down-drafts are accentuated by the freezing and melting of water. A better identification of a dissipating cell is the widespread area of light rain. the presence of cloud to cloud lightning. Weak updrafts remain in the upper portion.. It falls from the cloud and forms a down draft. in less dark areas of the cloud and in the areas of less lightning. Though the position of this area cannot be determined exactly without the aid of a radar.000 ft. It is a rapidly building cumulus cloud from which no rain is falling and in which there is no lightning.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.000 ft. by a predominance of clouds to ground lightning and by heavy precipitation falling from the cloud. Turbulence in a dissipating cell is usually negligible. which in extreme cases reaches 70. The matured stage occurs when the precipitation has grown to the size and quantity that can no longer be supported by the updraft.

ii) Flight in frozen precipitation and particularly in wet snow increases the probability of a discharge.8. 17. The cold frontal or pre-cold frontal thunderstorm is much more apt to contain damaging hail than the air mass or thermal thunderstorm. All incidents of lightning strikes should be reported in the PDR for maintenance action. 17. when the cell has progressed to the matured stage. Hail forms in the thunderstorm cell which is in the building stage and falls from it. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 flight through thunderstorm areas should be avoided. and it is within this area that turbulence is greatest. Flight in either colder or warmer temperatures reduces the probability. Discharges occur only in moist air. radio static etc. reducing the air speed may delay or prevent it.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. .OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.3. Flights well above the zero degree isotherm decrease the risk. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The turbulence in a thunderstorm may be strong enough to force an airplane several thousand feet up or down. i) Static discharges are more common in monsoon conditions at or near the freezing level. Updrafts accelerate to a maximum speed around the middle of the cloud. Hail is at its largest size near the freezing level in the area of heavy precipitation. The earth surface then causes the downdraft to spread out laterally causing areas of violent wind shear. especially at levels at which the outside air temperature is between plus 5 and minus 5 degrees centigrade. and most often near the freezing level. The following points may aid in reducing the number of discharges. Downdrafts start approximately one third way down the cloud and accelerate to almost ground level. and should be avoided when possible.5 Hail Hail damage may occur in any large thunderstorm.3.8.6 Static Electric Discharges Static electricity builds up on the airplane by frictional contact with solid particles present in the air. Flight in the lower two thirds of thunderstorms should be avoided at all times. iii) If a discharge appears imminent as indicated by corona. A-17-47 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.

7 INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.. The farther the pulse travels more it is weakened and radar‘s ability to see diminishes rapidly with distance. Remember. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The art and science of interpreting airborne weather radar is predicted on two basic facts . the strength of the echo is a function of the drop size. composition and amount. clouds. A-17-48 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.8. doubling the distance will reduce the returning signals by a factor of four.. simply because the upward vertical motion that lifted the moisture aloft has ceased and the rain is just falling. In the best case. indirect because those electronic pictures of precipitation must be interpreted with experience. the weather radar is to be used to detect/ analyse/ avoid significant weather. It is not a pilot operable terrain or collision avoidance system.  Attenuation . Turbulence. i) Weather radar can see only precipitation. rain or ice crystals. If the radar paints a heavy concentration of rain there is quite likely to be turbulence associated with it.17. the description available in FCOM DSC-34-60. lightning and wind shear are invisible to the normal airborne radar eye. ii) The returns seen on the scope are only an indirect representation of turbulence. like the earth) will reflect those 3. Only water in form of precipitation (or something more solid than water. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Weather Radar The company aircraft are fitted with weather radar. Moreover. intuition and prior knowledge of weather situation before they can reveal anything to anybody. Radar cannot show turbulence directly.Weather Radar When a radar pulse is transmitted into the atmosphere it is progressively absorbed and scattered. moisture.3.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Attenuation is caused by dust. are NOT detected by radar. There can be a wide area of rain with no associated turbulence. Water particles reflect 5 times as much as ice particles of the same size. Heavy precipitation will greatly increase attenuation and may preclude returns from even strong targets if they happen to be by other strong cells. water vapour. Consequently CLOUDS/FOG/CLEAR AIR TURB/LIGHTHING/WIND.2 cms X-band waves back to the antenna.

If desired. information from the various scans is extracted from memory and merged on the display. like the one fitted on the company aircraft have a revolutionary approach to the way weather information is processed and refined. Weather data from multiple scans at varying tilt angles is stored in memory.. However the analysis of weather or the adjustment of map returns may require a judicious use of Gain. which can be used advantageously. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Automatic features . detection or evaluation of build-up should always start in auto/cal gain mode and if gain is then used A-17-49 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.Weather Radar In manual mode. When operated in automatic mode. However. Varying the sensitivity temporarily can provide useful information on the storm in question. the gain control is the most significant means of regulating radar performance. as the path attenuation compensation (PAC) function is automatically engaged in this setting. at all aircraft altitudes. and at all times without the need for pilots to input tilt or gain settings. these radars significantly reduce pilot work load while at the same time enhancing weather detection capability and passenger/crew safety.  Gain and intensity . INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Most of the weather radars. the display presentation represents an optimized weather picture regardless of the aircraft altitude or the range scale selected..Weather Radar These radars use clutter suppression algorithms to eliminate approximately 98% of ground clutter resulting in the display of threat weather that is essentially free of ground clutter.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. When the flight crew selects a desired range. above FL 150. . The Calibrated (CAL) position sets the radar sensitivity to the standard calibrated reflectivity levels and is the recommended position for normal operation. In fully automatic operation pilots select only the desired range. Since both long and short range weather information is available due to the use of multiple tilt angles. all with an essentially clutter free display. the radar GAIN may be adjusted to increase sensitivity by rotating clockwise from CAL or the sensitivity may be decreased by rotating counter clockwise from CAL. They are fully automatic and display all significant weather at all ranges. It allows manual adjustment of the radar sensitivity for more detailed assessment of weather conditions.

If the Red patch is closer to the black area with minimal yellow and green areas surrounding it. whereas Red indicates areas of strong and very strong return i. the storm is more likely to be turbulent than if the red patch is only in the centre. The tilt control allows you to explore at any desired level and so develops a comprehensive image of the total target. Note the black is also a colour level. The company recommends setting gain to +8° upto FL 150 and to CAL above FL 150 as recommended in the FCOM/ as required by the crew. The red area which is the latest to turn into yellow is the strongest part of the build up. This strongest area has to be avoided by the greatest distance. It simply means that the returns. Maximum precipitation is likely to occur between 18000 and 32000 ft. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 manually for deeper analysis of weather it must be reset to auto/cal once analysis is completed. Remember gradient is the best indicator of turbulence. are very weak indicating a very low or nil rainfall rate. very high rain fall rate and Yellow indicates a rain fall rate in between the two. measures the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. In colour weather radars. Colour display . Green represents a weak rain fall rate. Radar using A-17-50 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. while those at higher altitudes need to search with some degree of down tilt. steeper the gradient more severe the turbulence. while yellow areas turn into green ones. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . The gain reduction also allows the detection of the strongest part of a cell displayed in red on Radar Display. colour Magenta is provided to represent WET turbulent air flow that in essence indicates a large variation in rain drop movement with associated turbulence. the tilt control allows you to select the pitch angle of the antenna and is the most important element in radar interpretation. For instance.Weather Radar Radar in essence.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Airplane flying below that level should search with an appropriate amount of up tilt. It does not mean that weather is not present (although this may be the case). the red areas slowly turn into yellow areas.Weather Radar In manual mode. calibrated gain associates these different amounts of moisture with a particular colour level.  Tilt and ground return .e. if any.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Indeed by slowly reducing the gain. The severity of the turbulence could be assessed by the location of the Red areas. and so that will be the altitude range that usually returns the strongest echo from an active storm. In some radars.

Once the weather targets have been identified.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. While use of MULTISCAN in AUTO mode is recommended. The MAN mode should also be used in the event of excessive ground returns due to a sub system failure. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . AUTO/MANUAL mode. This clutter can be removed by the following procedure. and then re-select the radar system 1. The Radar Rx / Tx controls the antenna tilt and scan by sending elevation and azimuth commands over to the antenna pedestal. the MULTISCAN should be used in MAN mode in order to differentiate between the thunderstorm cells and the rain patches. Resetting procedure in the event of excessive ground returns in AUTO Mode: Pilots have reported excessive ground clutter in the Auto mode. A-17-51 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. A reset should be performed as given below.  Operational Recommendation AUTO mode is recommended for weather detection and target acquisition since it can detect weather targets at a range of 320 NM. The reference tilt angles are also given when the Multi Scan is used in MAN mode. Optimum use of Weather Radar Wx radar operation is available in MULTISCAN. Once within 80 NM range. In AUTO mode. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 zero degree tilt in level cruise at 30. manoeuvring to avoid the targets should not be done until the target is within 80 NM range. Best search tilt at high altitude is achieved with the antenna adjusted just low enough to paint on ground return at the outer edge of the scope.000 ft. MULTISCAN in AUTO has the following advantages: o Optimized weather detection at all altitudes and ranges o Automatic Ground clutter removal. Aircraft above 2400 ft: Deselect the Wx Radar SYS toggle switch to OFF position for more than a second.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the pilot has the discretion to use MULTISCAN in the MAN mode. the tilt is controlled automatically. will be scanning far above any weather 50-80 nm.

000 Ft And Below) Below 10. Keep GAIN as recommended in FCOM. When outside air temperature falls below -40 °C. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Aircraft below 2400 ft: Deselect the PWS toggle switch to the OFF as well as the Wx Radar SYS toggle switch to OFF.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. An alternate tilt procedure for descent below 10. and reselect them respectively to AUTO / SYS 1 positions. if they are not removed it does not render the Radar unserviceable and it is to be used in the MAN mode.000 feet is to initially set a +2° tilt. as the aircraft descends to lower altitudes. and when a +2° tilt setting and a +7° tilt setting might be appropriate. a +5° tilt angle remains the best compromise for descent if cockpit work load is heavy. Mid Altitude Tilt Control (10. a tilt setting of between +2° and +7° is recommended with +5° being a good compromise setting.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-17-52 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.  Recommended Manual Mode Tilt Settings Low Altitude (10. The two topics that follow (Climb and Descent) explain the logic behind these guidelines. The +5° setting will eliminate most ground clutter and detect the majority of the weather in the immediate vicinity of the aircraft. thunderstorm tops are formed entirely of ice crystals and reflect very little radar energy. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Excessive ground returns should be removed within approximately 30 seconds.000 feet.000 – 25. and then gradually raise it to +5°. It does not require to be written up in the PDR as the radar remains serviceable. This tilt angle will detect most weather while at the same time eliminating the majority of ground clutter. Significant down tilt is required to ensure that the radar beam is picking up the more reflective part of the storm that is at lower altitudes.000 feet.000 Ft And Above) At higher altitudes thunderstorm tops can be all but invisible to radar. However. . for more than a second.000 Ft) For overland operation the best general guideline is to tilt the antenna until a small amount of ground return appears at the outer edge of the display. Descent Below 10. High Altitude (25.

 Avoid areas of Magenta. However. scallops. there are only percentages.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Such returns should be considered strong enough to create severe turbulence and you should consider a detour immediately. Use Weather The following are the classic indication of the severe weather:Scalloped edges and/or fingers and hooks are often associated with hail. Any indication of rapid change from no rain to heavy rain indicates a steep gradient and probably severe turbulence. hooks and fingers should be avoided by approximately 20nm at all altitudes. 17. Any cell whose radar shapes changing rapidly should be regarded with suspicion.8. Similarly severe weather can be found in relatively benign-looking smooth-edged returns. .  If possible avoid green echoes. As the distance reduces examine the storm critically using gain and tilt to get a three dimensional picture. tornadoes and severe turbulence.8 Circumnavigation of Weather  Airborne weather radar is to be used for avoiding severe weather.3. as these represent severe turbulence. Be aware that top of build ups with hail or with small droplets and dry turbulence might not be detected or provide small echoes and can occur up to 5000 ft above build ups. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Search analysis . not for penetrating it  Areas of steep gradient. Horse-shoe shaped echoes are really a variation of the finger shaped pattern and indicate similar severe activity. There are no guarantees in radar interpretation. do not go in between if two major red and magenta are separated by less than 40 nm. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Radar to analyze and actually avoid build ups in addition to visual cues whenever available. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. the radar may be clear between echoes. you can fly through these patterns and encounter no more than a rough ride.Weather Radar An FAA advisory circular regarding thunderstorms (AC 00-24B) provides most valuable guidelines on how to fly with regard to thunderstorms. Moreover. Plan the avoidance early enough between 100 NM to 50 NM from an echo. Ensure A-17-53 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Be aware that the radar may be clear of echoes behind a big echo which masks existing build ups. Very heavy rain will give echoes at ranges of 100 nm or more.

 Frequent and vivid lightning indicates a high probability of severe turbulence.  Outside TMA and below 25000ft.  Storms with tops above 35000 ft must be considered hazardous.  Use turbulence detection to isolate turbulence from precipitation. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  .  Severe turbulence may be encountered up to 5000 ft above a cell. shear. which being super-cooled above freezing level. Remember rate of built up could be as high as 7000ft/min. stay above the top by at least 5000ft. Remember. During departure/arrival/TMA. several tilt angles and probably some gain changes. altimetry).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.8.  Deviate upwind rather than downwind (less chances of turbulence or hail).3. in regions of strong wind or temperatures shear or in sharp trough lines and mountain waves.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 that W+T is selected on weather function. avoid amber and red by around 5nm. This area is likely to have hailstones.  If you are to overfly a mature cell. may not provide a return.  Don't attempt to fly below a storm even visual (turbulence.9 Turbulence Areas of significant turbulence are normally found in and near thunderstorms. Never fixate on one single range scale because you may over look other serious weather.  Do not fly under an anvil. Flight in such regions should avoid turbulence using the following procedures: A-17-54 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. 17.  Above 25000ft avoid amber and red contoured areas by at least 20nm. avoid amber and red areas by at least 10nm. Good technique involves frequent reassessments including two or more range scales. In-adequate clearance can cause jet upset.  Do not under estimate a thunderstorm even if echo is weak (wet parts only are detected).

8. set thrust to hold target speed. then in conditions of severe turbulence the Commander may use his emergency authority and select such courses and altitudes as he considers necessary for safety. If deviation from course and altitude is not possible and the area of turbulence must be penetrated. use engine ignition. the airplane should be accelerated to a speed that is close but does not exceed the flap placard speed. if turbulence is encountered while holding. establish target penetration speed. A-17-55 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Before turbulence penetration the Flight Crew will fasten shoulder harnesses. In this case ATC should be informed.  Holding In Turbulence Holding in turbulence with flaps extended requires a greater protection against stall than normal manoeuvring speeds provide. use the auto-pilot to best advantage. it is recommended that holding be made with flaps up at the turbulence penetration target speed.  Rules Of Thumb For CAT Avoidance Jet streams stronger than 110 KTs (at the core) are apt to have areas of significant turbulence near them in the sloping Tropopause above the core. and on the low pressure side of the core. In these areas there is frequently strong wind shear. When entering areas of known turbulence. follow procedures laid down in FCOM. Use of emergency authority must be immediately reported to ATC. The pilot will determine the best penetration altitude and heading.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. in the jet stream front below the core.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Therefore. the ―Fasten Seat Belt‖ sign must be switched ―ON‖ well in time. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Plan a deviation from course or altitude around areas of significant turbulence.  Severe Turbulence Reporting Pilot shall report all encounters with severe turbulence in PDR for maintenance action. 17.3. printed from e-manual / Company Portal If ATC cannot approve a requested change in route or altitude.10 Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) High level clear air turbulence is potentially hazardous to the safety of the airplane as its presence cannot normally be detected before it is encountered. . If turbulence intensifies to a degree where turbulence in excess of moderate may be encountered.

In areas where moderate or severe CAT is expected. places the airplane in more favourable winds. a climb or descent to the next flight level will usually find smoother air. The spacing of isotherms on an upper air chart is significant. From the winds aloft charts or reports. This area is normally on the pole ward (low pressure) side of the jet stream axis. if the zero degree isotherms are closer together than two degrees of latitude there is usually sufficient vertical shear for turbulence. it may occur on the equatorial side. it is desirable to adjust the air speed prior to encounter. especially jet streams that curve around a deep pressure trough.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. . Curving jet streams are more apt to have turbulent edges than straight ones. if rising climb. there is sufficient horizontal shear for CAT. if it is greater than 5 Kts per thousand feet. If jet stream CAT is encountered with direct head or tail winds. in which case either climb or descend. Wind shifts associated with pressure troughs are frequently turbulent. a change of flight level or course can be initiated since these areas of turbulence are shallow and narrow and get elongated with the wind. Pressure ridge lines also have rough air. the flight is probably close to the level of the core. but in unusual cases.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. If a turn is not feasible due to airway restrictions. If temperature is falling. printed from e-manual / Company Portal CAT is also related to vertical shear. However. either climb or descend after watching the outside temperature. descend. A-17-56 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.  Rules Of Thumb For Minimising CAT Effects In an area where CAT has been reported or forecast it is suggested that pilot should adjust the speed to fly at the recommended rough air speed on encountering the first ripple. compute the vertical shear in Knots per thousand feet. if 20 Kts isotachs are spaced closer together than 60 nm. such as 300 mb. if it desired to traverse the CAT area more quickly. A turn to the right in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the southern hemisphere. Application of these rules will prevent following the sloping tropopause or frontal surface and staying in the turbulent area. as convenient. if the temperature remains constant. turbulence is likely. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 On charts for standard isobaric surface. If jet stream CAT is encountered in a crosswind it is not important to change course or flight level since the rough areas are narrow across the wind.

If not. and allow an extra margin above stall speed when flying in squally conditions in order to allow for sudden variations which may take place in the wind shift zone. A change in flight level is not likely to alleviate the bumpiness. The point of coldest temperature along the flight path will be the tropopause penetration. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17. Turbulence will be most pronounced in the temperature change zone on the stratospheric side of the sloping tropopause.11 Squall Lines and Wind Shifts Pre-frontal squall lines outside the tropics and pre/post monsoon squall lines.  Avoid making sharp turns during squally conditions because of the increased stall speed while in bank and the possibility of encountering a sudden severe roll from a gust.  When approaching a squall line. An airplane passing through the wind shift may momentarily experience a marked change in indicated air speed. watch the temperature gauge. and most often during the afternoon or evening hours. Airplane on the ground should be well secured as instantaneous wind shifts with a gust of 50 to 65 Kts.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. enter at a right angle to the wind shift line because this flight path involves the shortest distance through the zone. They occur mainly in the spring and early summer. westerly disturbance over the sub-continent are the most violent thunderstorms.8.3. To minimise hazards of flying in squally conditions.  If the clouds can be topped. are not uncommon. ON TOP flight is recommended.  Monitor air speed closely at all times. printed from e-manual / Company Portal If turbulence is encountered in abrupt wind shift associated with a sharp pressure trough line. The air speed will increase when the headwind component increases and decrease when the headwind component decreases.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-17-57 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. A flight crossing the wind shift line on a nearly parallel course can be subject to large and rapid change in air speed. establish a course across the trough rather than parallel to it. If turbulence is expected because of penetration of a sloping tropopause. . Wind shifts associated with squall lines are often sharp and sometimes extend ahead of the squall line by as much as 15 miles. consider holding on the ground until the line has passed. pilots should:  Avoid take off and landings during severe wind shift conditions.

it is assumed that the airplane can be flown indefinitely provided de-icing or anti-icing equipment is used. which does not affect the performance of the aircraft. whitish opaque ice consisting of small grains. No flight is cleared or is to be intentionally operated in an adverse icing condition based solely on intended use of this equipment. and frost-like crystals. printed from e-manual / Company Portal De-icing and anti-icing equipment on Company airplane is not intended to permit extended operation in other than light/moderate icing. air space. . Instead. On encountering severe ice. iv) Severe Ice An adverse icing condition. but should be reported by pilots for meteorological purposes (for dispatch purposes considered as non-icing condition). porous.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. these aids are to be used only when conditions warrant.3. in as much as to continue under this condition of icing would render the airplane unairworthy.12 Icing and Freezing Precipitation General Terminology for reporting the Intensity and Type of Icing Intensity of Ice i) Traces Of Ice An ice accumulation of no consequence. iii) Moderate Ice This is an icing condition approaching an adverse icing condition which the aircraft‘s de-icing or anti-icing equipment will safely handle but which for practical purposes can be considered a signal to the pilot that it is time to alter the flight path so as to avoid operation in that condition.8. the Pilot shall change altitude or course or return to a suitable airport and land. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17. Type of ICE i) Rime Ice Pure Rime is hard.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. A-17-58 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. On encountering light ice. ii) Light Ice This is an icing condition which can be handled safely by the normal functioning of the airplane de-icing or anti-icing equipment. which de-icing or anti-icing equipment cannot safely handle.

- Very small deposits on leading edges of wings dangerously eroding performance - Attempting to take off with wet snow on the wings and tail planes which had accumulated after earlier de-icing with diluted fluid. frost is adhering to critical surfaces of an aeroplane which will adversely affect the performance of the aircraft. the maximum liftcoefficient is reduced. the operation of aircraft is prohibited from such airport where conditions conducive to ground aircraft icing exist.3. ice. printed from e-manual / Company Portal It is mixture of rime and clear ice.ii) INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Pilots are prohibited from initiating take off when contamination such as snow. Pilots should be alert for the following: - Ice build-up on engine inlet pressure probes causing erroneous indication of engine power. A-17-59 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. As a result. When the wing is clean. - Severe tail plane icing leading to loss of control when landing flap are selected. Company Policy – Operations in Icing conditions The aircraft shall not operate to the airports where snowfall is forecasted. 17.8. iii) Mix Ice Aircraft performance is certified on the basis of a clean wing. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Clear Ice This is hard clear solid ice. - Thin layers of ice on control surfaces inducing flutter with subsequent structural damage. Since the Company does not have ground De-icing facilities available at any station. the airflow separates from the wing when the Angle-Of-Attack (AOA) increases.12. snow on airplane will adversely affect performance and even small amounts can have disastrous consequences. Therefore. the airflow smoothly follows the shape of the wing. Ice accretion affects wing performance. ice. the aircraft may stall at a lower AOA. When the wing is covered with ice. and the drag may increase.1 Cold Weather Operation Frost.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. .

as this can result in ice contamination of leading edges of the wing. etc. if appropriate. even at OAT higher than 0 C. slats.off power should be monitored on more than one instrument. printed from e-manual / Company Portal The flight crew must keep in mind that the temperature of the wing surface may be significantly lower than the OAT. fuel vents. For the same reason. In no circumstances should an attempt be made to de-ice an airplane by placing it in the wake of the engine exhaust of another aircraft. hinges and gaps may freeze during flight and jam the controls. standing water. keep a good distance away (minimum 750 ft or 230m) from airplane taxiing ahead of you. After take-off. . Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Pre-Flight Preparations . Do not use reduced A-17-60 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. humidity or rain will cause ice accretion on 0 the upper wing and light frost under the wing. and that fuel. Before take-off. the use of reverse thrust on podded engines should be avoided. static ports. snow or rain in door mechanisms and seals is more likely to occur when doors are open. engine anti icing should be switched ON if icing conditions are present. APU inlets. Particular attention should be paid to leading edges. introduce airframe de-icing. Any deposits left on control surfaces may put them out of balance with the consequent risk of flutter developing.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. control surface flaps. The time open should be kept to a practical minimum and a check for contamination made prior to departure. etc. During taxiing. To prevent this possibility.  Start-up / Taxi and Take off Precautions – Cold Weather On some engine types. ice and snow. icing of probes can cause over reading of power gauges. Deposits left in operating mechanism. airframe and engine anti icing controls are appropriately set. Ingress of moisture. Take. and of damage to or flame out of the engine. In such cases. INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. generator cooling inlets. in icing conditions. or the RVR is less than 1000m in fog/mist).Cold Weather Ensure that the whole airplane is free from deposits of frost. slats. ensure that the wings are not contaminated by ice or snow. or possible (in the absence of other guidelines in the Flight Manual engine icing can be assumed to be possible if the OAT is less than 10 degree centigrade and there is precipitation. pressurisation inlets and outlet valves. after a flight at high altitude and low temperature.

Do not hold nose gear off runway.  Descent and Landing . Allowing the speed to decrease with flaps down may increase the risk of the tail plane stalling. lowering flaps may cause a reduction in longitudinal control. - Clouds are considered visible moisture when visibility is less than 1 mile. especially during descent.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. with a consequent loss of control from which recovery may be impossible in the time available. cross check with other compatible parameters. After take-off power has been set. - Observe Airplane Operation Manual minimum N1 limits during descent when anti-icing systems are used. - Anticipate the need for engine/nacelle and/or wing anti-ice at all times. slush or standing water.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The instructions in the airplane flight manual concerning the use of anti and de-icing equipment should be followed. ice.Cold Weather The build-up of ice in flight may be very rapid and pilots should avoid icing conditions for which their airplane are not approved. arm the autobrake and auto-spoiler systems before landing.Cold Weather - Check the landing minima of the aerodrome. it would be prudent not to lower full flaps or immediately reselect a lesser flap. In flight Precautions . An increase margin of speed should be kept during approach. If longitudinal control difficulties are experienced and it is suspected that there is ice on the tail plane. - Deploy speed brakes immediately after main gear contact with the runway. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 thrust for take-off when runway is contaminated with snow. A-17-61 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. In some types of aircraft. When this happens the tail plane can stall. This condition should not be confused with any pitch change associated with the normal operation of the flaps. printed from e-manual / Company Portal  . If available. - Lower nose wheel to the runway immediately. When the minima is below 800 m visibility. landing is not authorised unless RVR information is available. when ice is present on tail plane.

This type of wind shear is not dangerous in itself but may be followed by a shear that will decrease airspeed and degrade airplane performance. A decreasing airspeed is followed by a decrease in pitch attitude as the airplane tries to maintain the last trim speed. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Apply brakes smoothly and symmetrically with moderate to firm pressure until a safe stop is assured. Decreasing airspeed results when the wind is changing faster than the airplane can accelerate. Pitch and thrust must be increased immediately to ensure the best climb performance. Only about 5 to 10 seconds are available for recognising a degrading vertical flight path and resolving the situation. The combination of decreasing speed and pitch produces a high sink rate. Unless this is countered by the pilot a critical flight path control situation can develop very rapidly.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.13 Wind Shear (Refer FCOM-PRO-ABN-80. If unusual control forces are required to maintain the airplane within the stipulated flight path the Crew should be alerted to a possible wind shear encounter.34 . - Let the anti-skid system do its work. Wind shears are more threatening below 500 ft. QRH and FCOM DSC . - Do not use asymmetric reverse-thrust on icy or slippery runways. 17.8. Be prepared for possible downwind drift on slippery runways with a crosswind when using reverse thrust. A-17-62 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The most effective tools for changing flight path directions are pitch and thrust. At these low altitudes there is very little time or altitude available to respond to and recover from an inadvertent encounter. but that he should recognise cockpit indications which signal a change in vertical flight path performance. Unusual control column forces may be required to maintain or increase pitch attitude when airspeed is below the trim speed. - Do not attempt to turn off the runway until speed is reduced to a prudent level.3. Horizontal wind shear may improve or degrade vertical flight path performance. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - . Improved performance will first be indicated in the cockpit by increasing air-speed.60) It is not important that the pilot identify wind shear as such.

while encountering windshear. which use the weather radar to predict windshear. When the airshaft of a microburst reaches the ground. Once the conditions improve. low level wind shear warnings (LLWAS). A-17-63 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. the take-off should be delayed until the conditions improve. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Awareness of the weather conditions which result in wind shear will reduce the risk of an encounter. In fact the FD pitch mode ensures the best aircraft climb performance.Avoidance. Use maximum takeoff thrust and monitor closely airspeed/airspeed trend during the take-off run and initial climb for early signs of windshear. as Airbus 320 FD is certified to have windshear handling capability. obstructions etc). Prevention and Recovery. This forward-looking capability to assess wind variations is carried out through the Predictive Windshear System (PWS).g.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.wind shear To increase the crew awareness some aircraft. The radar is able to measure the droplets speed variations thus assessing wind variations. Use weather radar and select the most favourable runway for landing. Avoidance . are equipped with systems. e. The rotation should be normal and FD command should be followed. it mushrooms outward carrying with it a large number of falling rain droplets. until a thunderstorm has cleared the airport. Make maximum use of autopilot and auto-thrust for more accurate approach and earlier recognition of deviation from the beam. Prevention .wind shear If a windshear encounter is likely. like pilot report. . Select the minimum landing flap position consistent with the field length. delay landing or divert to another airport until the conditions are more favourable.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.wind shear Crew actions are divided into three areas: . During approach if windshear is likely. This explains why the FCOM procedure asks to follow the FD pitch bar and possibly full aft stick so as to obey the FD orders and thus minimizes height loss. Flight crew should also search for other clues to the presence of wind shear along the intended flight path. Studying meteorological reports and listening to tower reports will assist the crew in their assessment of the weather conditions to be expected during take-off or landing. select the most favourable runway (considering location of the likely windshear. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Crew action . predictive wind shear warning etc. runway length.

If predictive windshear warning comes on approach. The aircraft configuration can be changed provided the windshear is not entered. if the approach is continued. The aircraft A-17-64 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. if needed. the high angle of attack protection in fly by wire aircraft allows the PF to pull safely full aft stick. If predictive windshear aural warning is generated on the runway before takeoff. report the encounter to ATC. Windshear aural warning) if available. The PNF should call wind variation and vertical speed and when clear of shear. If the predictive windshear aural warning is generated during take-off roll. take-off must be delayed. the captain should reject the take-off (the aural warning is inhibited above 100 kt). Remember. The PNF should be especially aware of vertical speed/altitude and should call out any deviations from normal. This provides maximum lift with no fear of stalling the aircraft. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Crew coordination and awareness is very important. to follow FD pitch order or to rapidly counteract a down movement. Predictive windshear aural warning is provided -"Windshear Ahead".wind shear . Crew should closely monitor vertical flight path and speed. In case the aircraft enters windshear on approach the PF should set maximum rated thrust and initiate a go around. the captain should initiate a rejected take-off. If the predictive windshear aural warning is generated during initial climb.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. with significant speed/speed trend variations and the captain decides that there is sufficient runway remaining to stop the airplane. the crew should assess the weather severity with radar display and consider a more favourable runway. in case the aircraft is likely to encounter windshear.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. However. or detected by pilot observation. The configuration should not be changed until definitely out of the shear as the operation of the landing gear doors induces additional drag. to minimize height loss. If the aircraft encounters windshear after V1. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Recovery . the crew should apply maximum thrust. the crew should select maximum rated thrust and rotate smoothly at a normal rate towards the target pitch attitude indicated by the FD bar. smoothly but not aggressively and should consider the use of full back stick if necessary. Windshear. either indicated by reactive windshear warning (Windshear. In case aircraft enters windshear before V1. The PF should fly FD pitch orders rapidly. the crew should either delay the approach or divert to another airport. Closely monitor speed/speed trend and ensure that the flight path clears any shear suspected area.

Pilots are required to submit all meteorological reports to ATC units and in AIREP form. increasing EGT.wind shear Airplane not equipped with inertial or other suitable navigational equipment shall report the loss/gain of air speed and the height at which it was encountered. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 configuration should not be changed when in shear. If volcanic ash is encountered. exit as quickly as possible.8. o An acrid odour similar to electrical smoke o Multiple engine malfunctions.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The weather radar is not designed to detect volcanic ash and cannot be relied on to do so. Elmo‘s fire/static discharges. torching from tailpipe. This is particularly important during hours of darkness or daytime instrument meteorological conditions when volcanic ash/dust may not be visible. to follow FD bar to minimise height loss. flameout. Volcanic ash can cause rapid erosion and damage to the internal components of the engines.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Airplane equipped with inertial or other suitable navigational system and encountering wind shear shall report the wind direction and speed and the height at which they were observed. .3. FCOM PRO/LIM/OEB/FCBUL (PRO-SUP-91-40 P 3/4) Flight in areas of known volcanic activity must be avoided. A-17-65 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. etc. The areas are notified by Class 1 NOTAMS and SIGMET messages.14 Volcanic Ash The emergency procedures required in case a flight encounters volcanic ash are laid down in the emergency section of the QRH and FCOM. Full back stick should be used. A 180° turn may be the shortest distance out of the ash. 17. St. such as stalls. accompanied by a bright orange glow in the engine inlets. if required. Pilot reports . o At night. The presence of volcanic ash may be indicated by: o Smoke or dust appearing in the cockpit. Volcanic ash may extend for several hundred miles. Volcanic ash build-up and blockage of the high pressure turbine nozzle guide vanes and the high pressure turbine cooling holes can cause surge. observed around the windshield.

A successful engine start may not be possible until the engine is out of the volcanic ash and the airspeed and altitude are within the air start envelope. Volcanic ash is very abrasive and can cause serious damage to the airplane engines. Further improvement in engine stall margin can be obtained by increasing the bleed air extraction through operation of the engine and wing anti-ice systems. Engines are very slow to accelerate to idle at high altitude. Dust gives a tar or gray tinge to distant objects. If this condition should occur. if unreliable or loss of airspeed indications occur. restricting visibility to 6 statute miles (10km) or less is called blowing dust (BLDU).15 Dust / Sand Storms Dust refers to fine particles of soil suspended in air.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. The sun‘s disk becomes pale and colourless. A-17-66 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. windshields. wing and tail leading edge surfaces. or has a yellow tinge. 17.3. landing light effectiveness will be significantly reduced. operate at idle thrust. Retarding thrust to idle will lower the EGT which will reduce the debris build-up on the turbine blades and improve the engine stall margin. If an engine fails to start. If conditions permit.8. CONSIDER A 18O TURN THRUST LEVERS……………………………………………………………… IDLE Lowers EGT and significantly reduces possible engine damage or flameout. Volcanic ash can cause all of the windshields to become translucent. which may be interpreted as a failure to start or as an engine malfunction. When the dust raised by the wind to a 6feet (2m) or more. Due to erosion damage to the landing lights. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 loss of thrust and/or high EGT. obstructing vision. printed from e-manual / Company Portal It may become necessary to shut down and then restart engines to prevent exceeding EGT limits. a diversion to an airport where an auto landing can be made should be considered. landing lights. CAUTION: EXIT VOLCANIC ASH AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE. The actual source of dust or sand may have occurred far away from the point of observation and the dust may be reported as haze. on airplanes with auto land capability. Volcanic ash may block the pitot system and result in unreliable airspeed indications. repeated attempts should be made immediately. etc. .

In northern India summer dust storms of this type are known by the local name of ―Andhis‖ (blinding storms). Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 When instability conditions occur over desert or semi-arid areas and the humidity conditions aloft are not very favourable. Blowing dust and occur when the soil is loose. Bihar. Punjab.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. and the atmosphere is unstable. Due to low humidity aloft the vertical growth of the cloud is restricted. If the dust layer is deep.) in a severe dust storm/ sand storm. Dust storms are most common in the afternoon of the summer months over the desert and semi-arid areas of north west India. West Bengal and West Assam) Marked heating of the ground and steep lapse rate favour their formation. an elevated haze layer may obscure the horizon which may lead to pilot disorientation.e. During night flight over a very dark surface such as water. A-17-67 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.000 ft. North Madhya Pradesh.m. The up draughts in the cloud are so vigorous that they carry the dust or sand through a large part of the cloud.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. The mechanism of formation of dust storms is essentially the same as that of thunderstorms.) in dust storm/sand storm. Dust storms cause very poor visibility. Haryana. Under the influence of disturbances in the lower levels moisture from the Arabian sea can penetrate in shallow layers into these areas making possible the formation of intense convective clouds. Surface squalls are associated with dust storms. Such clouds can still give rise to storms if their tops extend to a sufficient extend above the freezing level. but it is more ‗localized‘. which give rise to dust storms. convective clouds do not build up to great heights. sometime these squalls are severe. Rajasthan. The echoes are also less intense than active thunderstorms echoes. it can be carried hundreds of miles from its source. . Dust storms can be detected by weather radars but for a shorter duration as compared to thunderstorms. the winds are strong. The down draught is initiated quickly by the fall of super cooled water drops from a level a little above the freezing level. low visibilities will persist. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Visibility is less than 1km (5/8s. (i. These local storms raise loose dust from the ground up to heights of over 10. When the dust extends to high levels and no precipitation is forecast to occur. Uttar Pradesh. The water drops generally evaporate completely before reaching the ground due to the prevailing high temperature and low humidity. Blowing sand (BLSA) is described similarly to blowing dust. and less than 500m (5/16 s. They are hence called dust storms. Adjoining Jammu and Kashmir.m.

If groundspeed is 480kts. that change would occur over a 45second period. mountain lee wave activity may persist for several hours although there are wide variations in lifetime. and oscillate about. in a stable atmosphere. especially below mountain top level and near the tropopause. These phenomena are sonamed because. only to repeat the wave-like oscillation as they are swept downstream with the horizontal winds. When a stable airstreams flows over a ridgeline. Once established in a particular locale. Winds nearly perpendicular to a ridgeline are more effective in the production of lee waves than winds nearly parallel to the ridgeline. lee waves tend to remain stationary despite the fact that the air moves rapidly through them.(half of lee wave length).OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. To appreciate strong lee waves. printed from e-manual / Company Portal When large-scale circulations cause airflow across rugged terrain. They again accelerate back to the equilibrium level and over shoot. Lee waves are important phenomena because they produce vertical motions large enough to affect airplane in flight.m to -1800f. A-17-68 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.. . numerous mesoscale circulations develop over and downwind of the mountains. over a distance only 6n.m. their equilibrium level.p. Downwind of the ridge.3. They arrive at the equilibrium level with some vertical motion and overshoot it.p. you would encounter a change in vertical wind speeds from +1800f. Furthermore. and if the track is perpendicular to the waves.m. they are often associated with turbulence.m. the displaced air parcels accelerate back to their original (equilibrium) level because the air is stable.16 Mountain Waves It is a particular form of an atmospheric gravity wave. Lee waves are relatively warm in the wave troughs where stable air has descended and cold in the crests where stable air has risen. The formation of mountain lee waves requires movement of stable air across a mountain range. The mesoscale wave pattern that they follow is known as a mountain wave or mountain lee wave. we assume that we are attempting to fly horizontally through a typical ―strong‖ lee wave. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 17. The lee wave length is 12 n. gravity (through stability) plays a major role in forcing the parcels to return to.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Because the mountain which initially displaces the air doesn‘t move.( stronger waves tend to be longer). it is displaced vertically. Under these conditions.8.

000 to 50. Typical jet stream speeds range between 60knots and about 240knots. the polar front jet stream and the sub-tropical jet stream. In the atmosphere. it is stronger and farther south in winter and weaker and farther north in summer.000feet MSL). . 250mb (34. roll. these types of air flow (jet stream) occur over known parts of the globe in well known months of year. Constant pressure charts suitable for locating the position of jet streams are 300mb (30.000feet).INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.m. two jet streams are found in the westerlies. However.000ft or more downwind of the ridge line. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Significant vertical motions will occur in lee waves if the winds perpendicular to the ridgeline exceed 20knots at the top of the ridge and the lee wave wavelength exceeds 5n. these observations should not be used to estimate the strength of the vertical motions or associated turbulence. On the average. lens-shaped clouds known as standing lenticular clouds. Jet streams are typically thousands of miles long. and /or cap clouds indicates lee wave activity and locations of wave crests and rotor circulation.3.8. The narrow mouth or a narrow zone is called Jet and flow of fluid/air passing through it is called JET STREAM. The conditions most favourable to wave formation over mountainous areas are a layer of stable air at mountain-top altitude and a wind of at least 20 knots blowing across the ridge. As the name implies. This is especially true when the height of the terrain decreases 3. Note: The presence of lenticular. The subtropical jet stream reaches its greatest strength in the wintertime and generally disappears in summer. hundreds of mile wide. Jet stream is a very important upper-air feature and often embedded in the zone of strong westerlies.000feet) and 200mb (39.17 Jet Streams When a fluid or gas passes through a narrow mouth or a narrow zone its speed increases but static pressure decreases (Bernoulli‘s Theorem). the polar front jet stream is found near the latitude of the polar front. 17. and a few miles thick. printed from e-manual / Company Portal High. broad ridges with steep lee slopes often produce large amplitude lee waves. A jet stream is a narrow band of high speed winds that reaches its greatest speed near the tropopause (24.000feet). Certain A-17-69 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Crests of standing mountain waves may be marked by stationary. The subtropical jet stream has no related surface frontal structure and shows much less fluctuation in position. Similar to the behaviour of the polar front.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II.

especially during climb or descent. Wind direction is mainly westerly but it varies from 250° to 330°. Stable layers near jet streams and within a few thousand feet of the tropopause have the highest probabilities of strong shears. . short wave troughs and ridges produce significant wind shear. A-17-70 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Jan and Feb. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Over Indian subcontinent following two types of jet streams are prominently active: i) Subtropical Westerly Jet Stream (STWJ) occurs in winter season ii) Tropical Easterly Jet Stream (TEJ) occurs in rainy season. Wind speed decreases gradually from March onwards about 80-120 kts in March 60-90 kts and about 60 kts in May and disappear in the end of May with the onset of SW monsoon and shifts north of Himalayas. and 80-150 kts in December. Jet axis lies between 40000 ft to 45000 ft. printed from e-manual / Company Portal patterns of upper level. along with the withdrawal of SW monsoon.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Average associated wind speed is about 60 kts in June. lies between 080 to 110°. Wind maxima can reach unto 180 kts along the core of jet stream Wind maxima are about 110 kts along the core of jet stream. It occurs between 37000 ft to 50000 ft. It occurs from 25000 ft to 40000 ft and jet axis lies between 33000 ft to 37000 ft . 70-80 kts in Nov. 60-80 kts in July and August and 60-70 kts in September. The comparatively salient features of both these jet streams are given below: Sub Tropical Westerly Jet Stream Tropical Easterly Jet Stream It starts to form in the month of October and gains strength gradually as the winter months progress. It starts to form in the beginning of June. Wind direction is mainly easterly (090°). The strongest shears are usually associated with sharply curved contours on constant pressure surfaces and/or strong winds. the shear is strong enough to cause large airspeed fluctuations. with the onset of SW monsoon and becomes prominent in the month of July and August disappears in the month of September. Its variation in direction is comparatively less. Occasionally. Wind speed is 60-70 kts in October.

Jharkhand and North East States are affected by violent thunderstorms which cause considerable aviation hazards and life. printed from e-manual / Company Portal In the month of Jan. adjoining Bihar.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. March and April. Nor‘westers begin generally in March and continue with increased frequency till the time the A-17-71 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. Orissa.18 Nor‘ Westers Every year.8. flying time may be significantly affected. Feb and March it may come down to an altitude of 20000 ft which may cause cold waves or thunderstorm with hail in association with western disturbances over northern adjoining central parts of the country. Its area of occurrence lies between 8°N to 13°N but sometimes it shifts northwards up to17°N. West bound flights are adversely affected. Effect on airplane operations : Effect on airplane operations : Since the occurrence of jet stream lies at jet cruising levels. during the months March to May. it severely affects airplane operations. 17. Even then due to reversal pattern of wind. an easterly wind of 60kts to 70 kts has also been experienced at an altitude of 35000 ft over south India. from 20000 ft to 35000 ft. West Bengal. Occasionally. . These are called Nor‘westers because they often approach a station from North Westerly direction. facing strong headwind resulting in more flying time for a given sector whereas east bound flights gain a privilege of tail wind and less flying time for the same sector.3. The formation of tropical easterly jet stream is connected with the formation of an upper level high pressure system over Tibet. Since its wind maxima lies above the jet cruising levels therefore its effect on airplane operations is comparatively less.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 Also at lower level up to 20000 ft winds are easterly but with less wind speed varying from 10 kts to 30 kts. Its area of occurrence mainly lies between 25°N to 35°N but sometimes in the month of Feb. it may shift to southwards up to 17°N.The northward shift of the jet stream enhances the SW monsoon activity over North India.

These are very rare in India. v) Outflow of cold air from primary thunderstorms over the Chota Nagpur hills. i) Intense ground heating ii) Inflow of moist air from the Bay of Bengal due to a disturbance or cyclonic storm iii) Eastward passage of a Western disturbance iv) Katabatic flow from the mountains to the north. This phenomenon is known as a water spout.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Quite often Nor‘westers moves in the form of a line regenerating other storms in the neighbourhood. Flying through Nor‘westers can be extremely dangerous as they combine some of the most violent features of thunderstorms and can even manifest tornadic development at times. Most of the Nor‘westers are accompanied by high speed squalls and all so by hail. When the air is stable. The funnel cloud usually extends earthward from the base of a well-developed CB clouds. On some occasions tornadoes have also been reported along with them. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 monsoon establishes over West Bengal.3. the air flows partly around and partly over the top-of the hill. A-17-72 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.8. printed from e-manual / Company Portal Nor‘westers are caused by the following: . there is resistance to vertical motion and the air tends to flow around the hill rather than surmount the hill top. However. As a tornado moves the funnel twists and turns uprooting trees and buildings and sucking them and other mobile objects into the air. When conditions favourable for tornado formation occur over the sea. the funnel sucks up sea spray and water which may reach up to the base of the main cloud. 17. Tornadoes travel and cause severs devastation in narrow areas which may not be more than a kilometre wide. They are also known as ‗Kalbaishakis‘. The safest procedure would be avoiding penetration of this type of storms or lines of storms.19 Tornadoes The tornado is the most violent of all instability phenomena. When an isolated hill is an obstacle to the wind.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Circumnavigation would then be difficult. some of the violent Nor‘Westers can be compared to tornadoes and attain such sever intensities. It is seen as a funnel with winds up to several hundred knots revolving tightly round the core.

All along the take off flight path.3.e. air temperature may decrease in a lower way than the standard rule or may be constant or may even increase with altitude. specific meteorological conditions may lead the temperature evolution to deviate from this standard rule. this may particularly affect the lowest layer of the atmosphere near the earth‘s surface. If the speed of wind over the range or ridge is low and the lapse rate is stable. In that way. In this last case. which is reported by Air Traffic Control. .INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. As described below. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17 When the lapse rate is steep. aircraft performance is computed considering the altitude gained. a part of the air stream can surmount the hill top more easily.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. 17. although most of the time temperature will decrease with altitude in quite a standard manner. However.8. which influence air temperature and may lead to a temperature inversion. marked variations of the air temperature from the standard figure may be encountered. air temperature variations mainly result from the effects of:  seasonal variations  diurnal / nocturnal temperature variations A-17-73 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy. temperature is considered to decrease by 2°C for each 1000 ft. From that temperature. the air flow will be comparatively smooth. There are many parameters. With altitude increasing.20 metre (4ft) above the ground. the phenomenon is called a temperature inversion. printed from e-manual / Company Portal If a continuous line of hills in the form of range lies across the path of the wind. Close to the ground. dust/sand storms. the air stream has little chance of skirting around it.21 Significant Temperature Inversions General In meteorology. Nor‘westers and FCOM PRO/LIM/OEB/FCBUL (PRO-SUP-91-40 P 1/4) 17. takeoff performance will be defined.20 Hot Weather Operations For hot weather operations refer to thunderstorms. the speed increase. It therefore passes over it. i.3. but also implicitly considering a standard evolution of temperature. air temperature at the earth‘s surface is normally measured at a height of about 1.8.

The surface inversion may exceed 500 ft but should not exceed 1000 to 2000 ft. the air is very little heated by solar radiation and the earth is very much. in the absence of disturbing influences. air cooling is confined to the lowest levels.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. Morning temperature inversion In the absence of wind or if the wind is very low. printed from e-manual / Company Portal - . wind will mix the air and destroy the inversion. during the day. Schematically. Typically. Rev 04 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES CHAPTER 17  weather conditions (effect of clouds and wind)  humidity of the air  geographical environment such as: mountainous environment - water surface (sea) - nature of the ground (arid. Magnitude of temperature inversion This kind of inversion usually affects the very lowest levels of the atmosphere. But the lower layer of the atmosphere is also heated by contact with the ground. However. ground surface cools down due to the absence of solar radiation and will cool the air near the ground surface. low wind conditions and clear skies at night. which is in contact with a ―cold‖ earth surface will cool down by heating transfer from the ―warm‖ air to the ―cold‖ ground surface. humid) - latitude - local specificity As a general rule. which is more reactive to solar radiation than the air. and by conduction between earth and atmosphere. In quiet conditions. At night. This transfer of heat occurs by conduction only and consequently leads to a temperature inversion which is limited in altitude. This process needs stable weather conditions to develop. will lead to rapid cooling of the earth and a morning temperature inversion at ground level. Similarly. a temperature inversion of about +10°C is considered as quite an important one. A-17-74 Effective 09-Jul-14 Not a controlled copy.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. the air. this effect is the biggest at the early hours of the day and sunshine subsequently destroys the inversion during the morning. The magnitude of the temperature inversion cannot be precisely quantified. valid everywhere.

In any case.OMA OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II. Usually. temperature regularly increases with altitude until it reaches a point where the conduction has no longer any effect. as also mentioned above. In a lower extent. also creating a temperature inversion in the lower levels of the atmosphere below this air mass. this kind of inversion has lower magnitude than the previous case described above. Another important aspect of an inversion is wind change.INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT. For instance. may lead to temperature inversions. of a less frequent occurrence and magnitude. other meteorological conditions. weather reports or pilot reports will be the best way in identifying such weather conditions. Other types of temperature inversion The Morning temperature inversion process is considered as the most frequent and the most sensitive. . in force and direction. this may also occur in temperate climate during winter. However. the displacement of a cold air mass over a cold ground surface may lead to turbulence resulting in a transfer of heat to the lower levels of this mass. pilot experience. the temperature of the ground may considerably reduce and amplify the inversion phenomenon. printed from e-manual / Company Portal This kind of inversion may be encountered world-wide. In some conditions. Effect on aircraft performance and recommendations A-17-75 Effective 09