UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2007 - 2008 www.nyit.

edu

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Undergraduate Division

For information, contact us at 800.345.NYIT.
Old Westbury campus Northern Boulevard P.O. Box 8000 Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000 516.686.1000 Manhattan campus 1855 Broadway (at 61st Street) New York, NY 10023-7692 212.261.1500 Ellis College of NYIT 800.405.5844 Other sites: Central Islip, NY Bahrain (Manama) Canada (Vancouver) China (Nanchang and Jiangxi) Jordan (Amman) UAE (Abu Dhabi) www.nyit.edu

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

No person is authorized to make any representations or promises on behalf of the college other than those contained in this official catalog. NYIT does not discriminate in admissions or access to its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, creed, disability, age, marital status, gender, sexual orientation or veteran status. NYIT provides reasonable accommodations to any person who has a temporary or permanent disabling condition. If you need to discuss an accommodation or a barrier to your full participation in programs and services please contact: disabilities compliance coordinator, Theobald Hall, room 401, Northern Boulevard, P.O. Box 8000, Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000, 516.686.7976. New York Institute of Technology is an equal-opportunity/affirmative-action employer and does not discriminate against any person because of race, color, religion, gender, age, marital status, sexual orientation, national origin, or disability, except as such conditions may constitute bona fide occupational or assignment qualifications. New York Institute of Technology reserves the right to delete any course described in this catalog for any reason and cannot guarantee enrollment into specific sections of desired courses. The college also reserves the right to effect any other changes in the curriculum, administration, tuition and fees, or any other phase of school activity without notice. The college expects each student to know and understand the information presented in this catalog. THE NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CATALOG 2007-2008 is published by NYIT’s Office of Publications and Advertising, Northern Boulevard, P.O. Box 8000, Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000. Cover design by Diego Rios. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents
Page

Fast Facts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 Sponsored Programs and Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYCOM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 New York Campuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Library Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Programs of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Hegis Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Accrediting Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Academic Calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-33 Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Academic Enrichment Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Enrollment and Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Academic Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Student Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Honors and Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 School of Architecture and Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 College of Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 School of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 School of Engineering and Computing Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 School of Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 Global Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps—Aerospace Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Army ROTC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 Vocational Independence Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 Faculty and Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Campus Directions/Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371-378 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 3

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“As a 21st-century model of higher education and professional excellence, NYIT prepares students for an increasingly competitive and global workplace while instilling solid values, self-confidence, and self-respect.” Edward Guiliano, Ph.D. President

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F A S T F A C T S

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F A S T F A C T S

University Snapshot
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Campuses Sites

Old Westbury and Manhattan, NY Central Islip, N.Y.; Amman, Jordan; Manama, Bahrain; Abu Dhabi, UAE; Nanchang, Jiangxi, China; and Vancouver, Canada Edward Guiliano, Ph.D. 1955 Private, independent, nonsectarian, coeducational Blue and gold Bears NCAA I and II, ECAC I and II
Mission

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President Founded Institution type Colors Nickname Athletic conference affiliations

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To provide career-oriented professional education To offer access to opportunity to all qualified students To support applications-oriented research that benefits the larger world
Accreditation

NYIT is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, and:
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Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. American Culinary Federation Accrediting Commission American Osteopathic Association The American Dietetic Association Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education Council for Interior Design Accreditation National Architectural Accrediting Board, Inc. The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education of the American Occupational Therapy Association National Council for Accredition of Teacher Education 7

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Schools and Colleges
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School of Architecture and Design School of Education School of Engineering and Computing Sciences School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences School of Management College of Arts and Sciences Ellis College of NYIT New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYCOM)

Enrollment

(All locations, domestic and global; fall 2006 data)
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Undergraduate (including VIP) Graduate

8,454 5,737
14,191

Total

Ethnicity of Undergraduates

(Domestic locations)
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American Indian or Alaskan Native Asian or Pacific Islander Black/Non-Hispanic Hispanic Nonresident aliens White/Non-Hispanic

less than 1% 9% 12% 9% 6% 37%

Race/Ethnicity Unknown/Unspecified 27%

Financial Aid

(full-time undergraduate for 2005-2006 year)
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Percent of students receiving any financial aid Average aid package

89% $15,981

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F A S T F A C T S

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Student-Involved Businesses
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Advertising agency Health care centers Newspapers Public relations agency Radio station Television station

Honor Societies
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Alpha Epsilon Rho (communication arts and broadcasting) Chi Alpha Chi (culinary arts) Delta Mu Delta (business) Golden Key International Honour Society Phi Eta Epsilon (occupational therapy) Phi Eta Sigma National Freshman Honor Society Psi Chi (psychology) Tau Alpha Pi (engineering and technology) Tau Sigma Delta (architecture) Upsilon Pi Epsilon (computer science)

Athletic Teams
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Baseball (NCAA Division I) Men’s and women’s basketball (NCAA Division II) Men’s and women’s cross country (NCAA Division II) Men’s lacrosse (NCAA Division II) Men’s and women’s soccer (NCAA Division II) Softball (NCAA Division II) Women’s volleyball (NCAA Division II)

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F A S T F A C T S

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Internships

NYIT student internships have resulted in real-world career experiences for thousands of students. NYIT students are regularly placed in leading industry corporations and organizations such as Disney, CBS, General Electric, Merrill Lynch, Bovis Architects, Pepsico, Eats Magazine, Bertelsman Inc., The Rights Group, the United Nations, Ernst & Young, National Grid, JP Morgan Chase, Shearman and Sterling, Verizon, Paragon Engineering Services, and the Metropolitan Transit Authority.
Libraries

(Domestic locations)
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Books and other printed materials E-books and online databases Audiovisual materials Current serial subscriptions Microforms

167,079 12,243 43,860 1,245 805,357

Technology
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Dedicated video conferencing rooms Distance learning facilities Open-access facilities PCs and laptops available in libraries Teaching computer labs Technology-enhanced classrooms Wireless network capabilities in all student areas

Employees

(Domestic only, fall 2006, based on most recent federal IPEDS data) Faculty
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Full-time Part-time

262 634

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Staff
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Full-time Part-time Graduate assistants

768 170 150

Graduation Statistics

(all locations, domestic and global, for 2005-2006; based on most recent federal IPEDS data) Associates Bachelor’s Master’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Certificates
Alumni

45 1,215 1,473 30 13

Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine 246

(All locations, domestic and global) Alumni 73,000 Alumni donors 16% (of those graduates successfully contacted)

Retention Rate

(Freshman retention rate for all first-time, full-time bachelor’s seeking undergraduates, domestic and global) First year to second year 72%

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Freshman Class

(Entering fall 2006, domestic) Applications Offers of admission Enrolled freshman Math Verbal 630 580 4,073 2,797 1,083

Percent offered admission 69% SAT scores (25 percent scored at or above)

Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC)

Air Force ROTC Army ROTC

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New York Campuses
Capturing the essence of each of its New York locales, NYIT’s campuses offer students diverse learning environments in a choice of urban or suburban settings. Students have the option of attending our Old Westbury campus on Long Island’s North Shore or our Manhattan campus, conveniently located in the heart of midtown near Columbus Circle. Represented at all NYIT locations are students from other states and countries, fostering a truly diversified educational experience for all NYIT constituents. Those interested in touring NYIT’s campuses are encouraged to call our admissions office (1.800.345.NYIT).
The Dorothy and Alexander Schure Old Westbury Campus – Long Island

Nestled among more than a hundred wooded and landscaped acres, NYIT’s Dorothy and Alexander Schure Old Westbury campus looks and feels like a private estate. In fact, the campus comprises the former C. V. Whitney estate as well as several former estates on Long Island’s North Shore. As the property’s original buildings were reconstructed for educational use, special attention was given to retaining their exterior charm. To further preserve the natural beauty of the landscape, NYIT’s newer buildings are clustered in low, modern structures surrounded by trees and open vistas. Classroom buildings and parking fields are connected by walkways through woods and meadows. A spacious plaza connects classroom buildings and acts as an “outdoor room” for students and faculty. Concerts, lectures, and informal recreational events are frequently scheduled on campus. The campus includes:
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David G. Salten Hall, home to a 600-seat auditorium as well as the college bookstore, student lounge, library storage area, and lecture rooms Harry J. Schure Hall, a 90,000-square-foot, three-level structure that houses classrooms, engineering laboratories, a 125-seat auditorium fully equipped with modern audiovisual facilities, and faculty and administrative offices Midge Karr Fine Arts Design Center, which includes a 9,300-square-foot, bi-level addition with six studios, print shop, auditorium, digital sculpture lab, and a gallery corridor that serves as a floor-to-ceiling display of student artwork. A separate sculpture studio for large-scale projects is nearby. George and Gertrude Wisser Memorial Library, one of NYIT’s major educational resources, brings together students and faculty members in a unique technological setting. The library houses state-of-the-art laboratories and equipment, as well as a broad array of workstations, personal computers, and broadband Internet services for easy student and faculty access. In addition, Wisser Library is home to some of NYIT’s radio and television facilities, which simulate the operation of large commercial broadcasting stations and give students the real-world experience they will encounter in their future careers. Not surprisingly, the Student Activity Center at Old Westbury—which is used for dining, recreation, athletics and social events—is the hub of student life. A recreation center with field house, workout room, and locker rooms adjoins the student center.

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The nationally recognized de Seversky Center houses NYIT’s Department of Communication Arts and culinary arts programs. Built in 1918 as a grand mansion for corporate legend Alfred I. Du Pont, de Seversky Center affords visitors gourmet cuisine in elegant rooms that reflect the mansion’s original architecture and décor. The center was named for Major Alexander P. de Seversky, a world-famous aircraft designer, who was also a trustee of the college.

Manhattan Campus

Located at Columbus Circle, NYIT’s Manhattan campus was designed with today’s busy students in mind. Comprising four buildings between West 60th and 61st streets, NYIT’s Manhattan campus is within walking distance of Lincoln Center and Central Park, easily accessible via subway and bus, and close to the city’s best concert halls, theaters, museums, libraries and restaurants. With a full complement of college facilities, NYIT’s Manhattan campus affords students a wealth of learning and work-related opportunities. Here, traditional classrooms share space with high-technology distance learning rooms and specialized computer facilities. In stateof-the-art laboratories, students have access to laser and fiber optics, digital processing, chemistry, physics, and computer graphics. Rounding out the college environment are radio, television, fine arts, and architecture studios. One of the college’s major libraries is housed on campus, as well as a college bookstore. NYIT’s Manhattan campus also supports a student activities building with a student lounge and recreation area, as well as the offices of the Student Government Association and other student clubs and organizations.
Central Islip

Our Central Islip campus reflects NYIT’s unique community service model, which supports academic programs while providing local residents and businesses with valuable community support. Located in the heart of Suffolk County on Long Island, the sprawling campus features Georgian-style brick buildings in a beautiful wooded setting and bordered by a lush golf course and a bustling developing suburb. This campus is home to NYIT’s Vocational Independence Program for students with learning disabilities, the family health-care center of NYIT’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, and the Technology-Based Learning Research Center, as well as BOCES and Head Start programs. At NYIT’s Epicurean Room restaurant, world-class chefs instruct students in the art and science of creating memorable dining experiences. Medical students acquire real-world experience at the health care center, where more than 3,500 patients from the local community are treated each year.

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NYIT Online
Ellis College of NYIT Living up to the “technology” in our name, NYIT is proud to offer working adult students the opportunity to earn their degrees fast, fully online, and according to their own personal schedules. Through our innovative, virtual campus — Ellis College of NYIT — we have combined state-of-the-art technology with use of the Internet to create fully accredited, world-class degree programs taught by internationally renowned faculty members. Ellis programs feature career-focused areas of study across a broad spectrum, including: behavioral sciences, business, communications arts, computer science, english, finance, hospitality management, human resources management, international business, labor relations, management, managerial accounting, marketing, accounting, small business and entrepreneurship, social sciences, technical writing. Visit ellis.nyit.edu for more information.

Real-World Research
Committed to practical, applications-oriented research that will benefit the greater global community, NYIT is particularly pleased with the breakthrough results of its faculty and students on a wide variety of important issues in the technology (nanotechnology, cutting-edge computer graphics), health care (Parkinson’s disease, Lyme disease), and architecture (solar energy) arenas. Further, we support faculty research and scholarship as an integral part of academia that enriches students’ classroom experience, contributes to the body of knowledge in cutting-edge fields, and provides students with opportunities to test theories and gain technical skills through hands-on experimentation and research. Our Sponsored Programs and Research (SPAR) office works with faculty members and administrators to identify and apply for funding to support research programs in all of NYIT’s schools and colleges. SPAR also facilitates proposals for funding to support student development and institutional programs that provide a wide range of services to students and strengthen NYIT’s infrastructure. To date, NYIT faculty members have received funding from public, private and government agencies, including:
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National Geographic Society National Institutes of Health National Science Foundation New York State Department of Health New York State Education Department US Department of Defense

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Library Resources
NYIT libraries are a major educational resource in support of instruction and research. They include: the George and Gertrude Wisser Memorial Library at Old Westbury and the Manhattan Campus Library. Additional libraries offer special collections on the Old Westbury campus: the NYCOM Medical Library and the Education Hall Library for architecture, interior design, and fine arts. The Wisser Library also houses the Curriculum Materials Center (CMC), a print and non-print resource center for the teacher education programs. The Manhattan library includes a special architecture collection. The Central Islip collection supports the culinary and vocational independence programs. The NYIT libraries offer research materials in a variety of formats and media. In addition to books, periodicals, microforms, and audiovisual materials, the libraries also provide access to electronic indexes, full-text databases, and e-books via the Internet. Access to the libraries’ electronic collections are available on or off campus. The libraries maintain a Web site that may be accessed directly at www.nyit.edu/library or through NYIT’s home page, www.nyit.edu. All of the libraries offer wireless access as well as computers and, in some libraries, laptops for patron use. Using our online catalog, students and faculty can access the records of the holdings of all the NYIT libraries. Through intercampus loans, they may request circulating books at any of our campuses. Through interlibrary loans, books, journal articles, and other resources can be requested from other libraries. In addition to participating in the freshman College Success Seminars, staff from all the libraries work with faculty to conduct information literacy classes for students’ research needs. Librarians are available for one-on-one and small group teaching of library research skills, as well as, by appointment or at the reference desk of each library. With the exception of recognized holidays, the libraries are open throughout the year. Each library posts its regular, holiday and summer schedules. Check the library Web site for further information.

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Wisser Library, Old Westbury campus Circulation: 516.686.7633 Reference: 516.686.7657, 7658 Periodicals/interlibrary loan: 516.686.7624 Curriculum Materials Center: 516.686.7625 Education Hall, Art and Architecture, Old Westbury campus Circulation: 516.686.7579 Reference: 516.686.7579, 7422 Periodicals: 516.686.7422

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Medical Library, Old Westbury campus Main Number: 516.686.3743 Interlibrary loan: 516.686.3944

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Manhattan Campus Library, Second floor, Main Building Circulation: 212.261.1526 Reference: 212.261.1524, 646.273.6062 Periodicals: 212.261.1524

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Central Islip Collection, First floor, Building 66 Culinary arts: 631.348.3290 Vocational Independence Program: 631.348.3354

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New York College of Osteopathic Medicine

NYIT offers those interested in careers in medicine a rare educational opportunity through its medical school, the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYCOM), located on the Old Westbury campus. Founded in 1977, when NYIT received a charter from the New York State Board of Regents, NYCOM was the first college of osteopathic medicine in New York State and is the only medical school in Nassau County. NYCOM’s mission is to train students to become capable and compassionate osteopathic physicians who approach the practice of medicine with professional competence and confidence coupled with respect for the patient, the patient's body, and the ability to contribute to the overall healing process. NYCOM offers a rigorous, fully accredited, four-year Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program leading to the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree. In addition, students can obtain dual degrees with the D.O./Master of Business Administration or D.O./Master of Science in clinical nutrition. Foreigntrained physicians who wish to retrain as physicians leading to the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine are encouraged to apply for NYCOM’s program for émigré physicians. For those who seek to combine a B.S. with a D.O. degree, NYCOM collaborates with a group of select colleges to offer students this seven-year program. In addition, NYCOM students have access to advanced training in anatomy, osteopathic manipulative medicine, and basic and clinical research through a fellows program. NYCOM students enjoy state-of-the art facilities. More than a thousand wired, high-performance network drop-off points are available, as is access to Lapland, a student lab with wireless laptops. Anatomy, pathology, and osteopathic manipulative medicine labs, as well as four major auditoriums, are all wired as “smart’’ classrooms, and Web conferences are employed as a major mode of interaction between students and faculty on and off campus. NYCOM is nationally recognized as an innovator in osteopathic medical education, as well as for its integration of leading-edge technology into the academic process. And, it is proud to participate with the World Health Organization on issues of occupational health and the exploration of variables that may ultimately lead to healthier workplaces worldwide.

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Board of Trustees Linda Davila*†
Chairperson of the Board Vice President, Wealth Management Advisor Merrill Lynch Global Private Client Group

Deborah Verderame Marciano †
Partner Landy Verderame Arianna Architects

Cristina L. Mendoza, Esq. Bharat B. Bhatt*
Vice Chairperson of the Board President and COO (Retired) GreenPoint Financial Corporation General Counsel Florida International University

Michael J. Merlo*
Chief Credit Officer Signature Bank

Paul F. Amoruso
Managing Director Oxford and Simpson Realty

Richard Torrenzano*†
Chairman and Chief Executive The Torrenzano Group

Rory J. Cutaia †
Executive Director Corinthian Capital Group, LLC

Eli Wachtel †
Senior Managing Director Bear Stearns and Co. Inc.

Richard J. Daly †
Chief Executive Officer Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc.

Robert E. Evanson †
President (Retired) McGraw-Hill Education

Trustees Emeriti James E. Cheek, Ph.D.
President Emeritus Howard University

Peter A. Ferentinos
Chief Executive Officer Qualco, Inc.

Philip G. Munson
Restaurateur

Edward Guiliano, Ph.D.*
President and CEO New York Institute of Technology

Matthew Schure, Ph.D.
President Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
* Member of the Executive Committee † New York Institute of Technology graduate

G. Bruce Leib
Vice President, Investments Morgan Stanley

Frank Liguori*
Chairman and CEO (retired) Olsten Corporation

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NYIT Academic Senate

The Academic Senate of NYIT is an assembly of faculty and administrators that advises NYIT’s president and board of trustees on a variety of issues related to the operations of the college. Senators represent each academic school and related administrative offices, and are elected by their colleagues at the beginning of each fall term to serve for the academic year. Senate officers are elected at the first meeting of each academic year. Standing committees include admissions and academic standards; assessment; budget, finances and resource allocation; calendar; communication; constitution; curriculum; educational technology; executive; institutional development and library systems.

Programs of Study
NYIT’s academic components are organized into several schools, each administered by a dean who is responsible for programs leading to associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, Doctor of Physical Therapy and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degrees. At NYIT, we believe that grouping related curricula into coordinated schools facilitates interdisciplinary study. The curriculum requirements outlined in this catalog are to be followed by those students enrolling for the first time (or readmitting) in the 2006-2007 academic year. Except in rare circumstances, subsequent curriculum modifications will not affect a student in continuous attendance.
Associate Degree Programs

Programs leading to an associate’s degree in applied science are available in accounting, architectural technology, business administration, communication arts, electrical technology, environmental technology, mechanical technology, telecommunications management and four majors within the area of occupational education. A two-year degree in culinary arts leads to the associate’s degree in occupational studies. For details, see program descriptions in this catalog or visit our Web site www.nyit.edu.
Baccalaureate Degree Programs

NYIT prepares undergraduates for careers in education and in the professional and operating ranks of business and industry. Programs expose students to basic principles and encourage development of management and leadership qualities. A core of humanities and social sciences courses extends throughout all programs and each major course of study allows pertinent electives. Students may use electives to follow special interests or to expand knowledge in subjects related to their major courses.
Graduate and Professional Programs

Graduate programs lead to advanced certificates, master’s degrees, doctoral degrees or professional diplomas in a wide range of professional fields including: architecture in urban and regional planning, business, childhood education, clinical nutrition, communication arts, computers in education, computer science, counseling, distance learning, educational leadership and technology, energy management, environmental technology, instructional technology for educators and for professional trainers, human 24

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relations, human resources management and labor relations, mental health counseling, multimedia, occupational therapy, osteopathic medicine, physical therapy, and school counseling. They are professionally oriented and of particular interest to those currently employed in one or another of the several fields represented. Programs are open to qualified holders of a bachelor’s degree who wish to return to the academic setting, as well as to recent college graduates. The graduate bulletin specifies admissions requirements and course listings.
Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS)

NYIT's courses of study are registered by the New York State Education Department, Office of Higher Education and the Professions, Cultural Education Center, Room 5B28, Albany, New York 12230 (Phone: 518.474.5851) under the Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS) listed below.
HEGIS Code Directory

Program Accounting Accounting Accounting Professional Accounting Adolescence Education: Biology Adolescence Education: Chemistry Adolescence Education: English Adolescence Education: Mathematics Adolescence Education: Physics Adolescence Education: Social Studies Advertising Aerospace Technology Architectural Technology Architectural Technology Architectural Technology Energy Management Architectural Technology Management Architecture Urban and Regional Design Behavioral Science Bus Admin - Mgt of Information Systems Business Administration Business Administration-Finance Business Administration-Management Business Administration-Marketing Business and Marketing Business: Accounting Business: Finance Business: International Business Business: Management Information Systems

Degree Code No. AAS 5002.00 BS 5002.00 BS/MBA 5002.00 BS/MBA 0502.00 BS 0401.01 BS 1905.01 BS 1501.01 BS 0401.01 0701.00 BS 1902.01 BS 2201.01 BS 0604.00 BS 0925.00 AAS 5602.00 BS 0299.00 BS/MS 0299.00 BS/MS 0599.00 BS/MBA 0299.00 BS/MBA 0506.00 B ARCH 0202.00 M ARCH 0205.00 BS 2201.00 BS 0599.00 5004.00 AAS BS 0504.00 BS 0506.00 0509.00 BS BS 0838.01 ADV CERT 0502.00 ADV CERT 0504.00 ADV CERT 0513.00 ADV CERT 0599.00

Campus* 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1 1 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 25

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Business: Marketing Childhood Education Childhood Education Clinical Nutrition - Clinical Option Clinical Nutrition - Management Option Comm Arts--TV-Radio Programming & Prod Communication Arts Communication Arts Computer Graphics Computer Science Computer Science Counseling Counseling: Mental Health Criminal Justice Culinary Arts Graphic Design Distance Learning District Leadership and Technology Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical & Computer Engineering Tech Electrical Technology Electronics and Information Security Employee and Labor Relations Energy Management Energy Technology Engineering Management English Environmental Management Environmental Technology Executive MBA Facilities Management Fine Arts Health Occupations Subjects Health Occupations Subjects Health Occupations Subjects Hospitality Management Human Relat: Alcohol & Substance Abuse Human Relations: Clinical Counseling Human Relations: General Counseling Human Relations: Gerontology Human Relations: Industrial Counseling Human Resources Management Human Resources Mgmt and Labor Relations Information Technology Information, Network & Computer Security ADV CERT BS MS MS MS BFA AAS MA MFA MS BS MS MS BS AOS BFA ADV CERT ADV DPL BS MS B TECH AAS BS ADV CERT MS ADV CERT BS BA ADV CERT MS MBA ADV CERT BFA BS AAS CERT BPS MPS MPS MPS MPS MPS ADV CERT MS BS MS 0509.00 0802.00 0802.00 0424.00 0424.00 0603.00 5008.00 0605.00 1009.00 0701.00 0701.00 0826.01 2104.10 2105.00 5404.00 1009.00 0799.00 0827.00 0909.00 0909.00 0925.00 5310.00 0799.00 0516.00 0599.00 0925.00 0913.00 1501.00 0599.00 0420.00 0506.00 0599.00 1001.00 0839.07 5608.00 5608.00 0508.00 2104.10 2104.10 2104.10 2299.10 2104.10 0515.00 0516.00 0702.00 0799.00 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1 1 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1 1 3 1, 2 1, 2 1 1, 2 1 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2

26

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Infrastructure Security Management Instructional Tech - ED Tech Specialist Instructional Tech - Professional Trainer Instructional Technology 2199.00 0799.00 0799.00 0799.00 0802.00 0823.00 BPS 4999.00 BA 4999.00 BS 4999.00 BFA 1009.00 BS 0401.00 BS/MS 1299.00 BS/MS 1208.00 BS/DO 0401.00 BS/DO 1210.00 BS/MS 1201.00 BS/MS 1299.10 BS/DPT 1201.00 BS/DPT 1212.00 BS/MS 1201.00 BS/MS 1212.00 MBA 0506.00 BS 0910.00 BS/MS 0910.00 BS/MS 0599.00 B TECH 0925.00 AAS 5315.00 ADV CERT 0799.00 MS 1207.00 BS 1203.10 BS 1203.00 BS 1299.00 MS 1208.00 BS 1208.00 DO 1210.00 DPT 1212.00 MS 1212.00 BS 1299.10 MS 1299.10 BS 2207.00 MBA 0502.00 BS 2001.00 ADV DPL 0828.00 BS 0839.02 AAS 5608.00 CERT 5608.00 ADV CERT MS MS MS 1 1, 2 1, 2

Interdisciplinary Studies Interdisciplinary Studies Interdisciplinary Studies Interior Design Life Sciences Life Sciences Occupational Therapy Life Sciences Osteopathic Medicine Life Sciences Physician Assistant Studies Life Sciences Physical Therapy Life Sciences Physical Therapy Management Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Energy Management Mechanical Engineering Technology Mechanical Technology Multimedia Neuromusculoskeletal Sciences Nursing Nursing Nutrition Science Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy Osteopathic Medicine Physical Therapy Physical Therapy Physician Assistant Physician Assistant Studies Political Science Professional Accounting Psychology School Leadership and Technology Technical Subjects Technical Subjects Technical Subjects

1, 2 1, 2 1 1, 2 1 1, 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1, 2 1 1 1 1 1, 2 1, 2 1 1, 2 1, 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1 1, 2 1 1, 2

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Technical Writing Technical Writing Technology Education Telecommunications Technology Telecommunications Tech-Verizon Telecomunications Network Management Trade Subjects Trade Subjects Trade Subjects Visual Arts BS CERT BS AAS AAS BS BS AAS CERT BFA 0601.00 5008.00 0839.01 5310.00 5310.00 0599.00 0839.03 5608.00 5608.00 0831.00 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2

*Campuses: Old Westbury=1, Manhattan=2, Central Islip=3
Enrollment in other than registered or otherwise approved programs may jeopardize a student’s eligibility for certain student aid awards. All the above programs are registered according to the indicated Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS) code.

28

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Accrediting Agencies
Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools 3624 Market St. Philadelphia, PA 19104-2680 Tel 215.662.5606 Fax 215.662.5501 American Culinary Federation Accrediting Commission (ACF) 10 San Bartola Drive St. Augustine, FL 32080 Tel 800.624.9458 Tel 904.824.4468 Fax 904.825.4758 Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET) 111 Market Place Suite 1050 Baltimore, MD 21202 Tel 410.347.7700 Fax 410.625.2238 National Architectural Accrediting Board, Inc. (NAAB) 1735 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 Tel 202.783.2007 Fax 202.783.2822 Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) 60 Monroe Center, N.W. Grand Rapids, MI 49503-2920 Tel 616.458.0400 Fax 616.458.0460 Commission on Accreditation/Approval for Dietetics Education (CADE) The American Dietetic Association 216 West Jackson Blvd. Chicago, IL 60606-6995 Tel 312.899.4876 American Osteopathic Association (AOA) 142 E. Ontario St. Chicago, IL 60611 Tel 312.280.5800 Fax 312.280.3860 The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) 4720 Montgomery Lane Bethesda, MD 20824 -1220 Tel 301.652.2682 The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA) 100 N. Oak Ave. Marshfield, WI 54449-5788 Tel 715.389.3785 Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) 1111 North Fairfax St. Alexandria, VA 22314 Tel 703.706.3245 National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) 2010 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Suite 500 Washington, DC 20036 Tel 202.466.7496

The New York Institute of Technology is chartered by the Board of Regents of The University of the State of New York. Accredited by: Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools; Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. for programs in Electrical, Computer and Mechanical Engineering, Old Westbury Campus and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Manhattan Campus; Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. for Electrical Engineering Technology; National Architectural Accrediting Board for Bachelor of Architecture; Council for Interior Design Accreditation programs, Old Westbury Campus; Commission on Accreditaion. Approval for Dietetics Education (CADE) of the American Dietetic Association for preprofessional program in graduate Clinical Nutrition; American Osteopathic Association for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; American Culinary Federation Accrediting Commission; The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) of the American Physical Therapy Association; The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA).

The School of Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation and advanced educator preparation programs. NCATE is recognized by the US Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation to accredit programs for the preparation of teachers and other professional school personnel.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Academic Calendar 2007-2008
New York, Canada, and China Locations Fall 2007
Aug. 27 - Aug. 31, Sept. 4 Sept. 5 Sept. 5 - 18 Sept. 12 - Oct. 23 Registration for Fall, Cycles A and B 2007 and Intersession 2008. Register online at NYITConnect. Fall and Cycle A classes begin Fall late registration and program changes. Cycle A late registration and program changes through second class meeting Cycle A withdrawal period. W grade is assigned through eight (8th) class meeting. Beginning the ninth (9th) class meeting the W or WF grade may be assigned. Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form. Fall withdrawal period. W grade is assigned through Oct. 30. Beginning Oct. 31 the W or WF grade may be assigned. Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form No day classes scheduled. Evening classes meet. Administrative offices closed Cycle B registration. Register online at NYITConnect Cycle A final exams Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Cycle D 2007 Cycle B classes begin. Cycle B late registration and program changes through second class meeting Fall withdrawal period. W or WF grade may be assigned. Cycle B withdrawal period. The W grade is assigned through the eighth (8th) class meeting. Beginning the ninth (9th) class meeting the W or WF grade may be assigned. Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Last day to apply for December 2007 graduation. Students must apply online at NYITConnect Priority academic advisement for Spring, Cycles C and D and Intersession 2008 Priority online registration for Spring, Cycles C and D and Intersession 2008 No classes scheduled. Administrative offices closed. Fall and Cycle B classes resume. Administrative offices open Make-up days for day classes only. Evening classes meet Fall final exams Cycle B final exams Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Summer 2007 Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Spring 2007

Sept. 19 - Dec. 15

Oct. 8 Oct. 22 - 27 Oct. 24, 25 Oct. 25 Oct. 29 Oct. 31 - Dec 15 Nov. 2 - Dec. 18

Nov. 2 Nov. 5 - 16 Nov. 12 - Dec. 2 Nov. 21 - 25 Nov. 26 Dec. 11 - 14 Dec. 16 - 22 Dec. 19, 20 Dec. 20 Dec. 22

Intersession 2008
Jan. 3

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Intersession classes begin. Intersession late registration and program changes through second class meeting

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Jan. 5 - 17 Intersession withdrawal period. W or WF grade may be assigned after the 2nd class session. Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Intersession final exams

Jan. 18

Spring 2008
Jan. 14 - 18 Jan. 22 Jan. 22 - Feb. 4 Jan. 29 - Mar. 11 Registration for Spring, Cycles C and D 2008. Register online at NYITConnect Spring and Cycle C classes begin Spring late registration and program changes. Cycle C late registration and program changes through second class meeting Cycle C withdrawal period. The W grade is assigned through the eighth (8th) class meeting. Beginning the ninth (9th) class meeting the W or WF grade may be assigned. Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Spring withdrawal period. W grade is assigned through March 25. Beginning March 26 the W or WF grade may be assigned. Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form No classes scheduled. Administrative offices closed Monday classes meet, day and evening. Tuesday classes do not meet on this date. Cycle D registration. Register online at NYITConnect Cycle C final exams Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Cycle A 2007 Spring recess. No classes scheduled Spring classes resume and Cycle D classes begin. Cycle D late registration and program changes through second class meeting. Spring withdrawal period. W or WF grade may be assigned. Cycle D withdrawal period. The W grade is assigned through the eighth (8th) class meeting. Beginning the ninth (9th) class meeting the W or WF grade may be assigned. Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Priority academic advisement for Summer, Fall, Cycles A and B 2008 and Intersession 2009 Last day to apply for May 2008 graduation. Students must apply online at NYITConnect. Priority online registration for Summer, Fall, Cycles A and B 2008 and Intersession 2009 Make-up days for day, evening and graduate classes Spring final exams Cycle D final exams Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Cycle B 2007 and Intersession 2008 Commencement

Feb. 5 - May 10

Feb. 18 Feb. 19 Mar. 12 - 14 Mar. 12, 13 Mar. 13 Mar. 15 - 23 Mar. 24

Mar. 26 - May 10 Mar. 28 - May 13

Mar. 31 - Apr. 11 Apr. 4 Apr. 7 - 20 May 7 - 9 May 11 - 17 May 14, 15 May 15 May 18

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Summer 2008
May 21 - June 13 Summer Session I - Four (4) Week Courses 05/21 - 05/24 05/25 - 06/4 06/05 - 06/12 May 21 - June 27 Late registration and program changes Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned) Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Late registration and program changes Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned) Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Late registration and program changes Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned) Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned)

Summer Session I - Six (6) Week Courses 05/21 - 05/26 05/27- 06/11 06/12- 06/26

May 21 - Aug. 29

Summer Session III 05/21 - 06/03 06/04 - 07/16 07/17 - 08/28

May 26 July 4 July 7 July 7 - July 31

No classes scheduled. Administrative offices closed No classes scheduled. Administrative offices closed Last day to apply for August 2008 graduation. Students must apply online at NYITConnect. Summer Session II - Four (4) Week Courses 07/07 - 07/10 07/11 - 07/21 07/22 - 07/30 Late registration and program changes Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned) Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Late registration and program changes Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned) Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned)

July 7 - Aug. 15

Summer Session II - Six (6) Week Courses 07/09 - 07/14 07/15 - 07/30 07/31 - 08/14

Aug. 31

Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Fall 2007 and Cycle C 2008

Academic Calendar 2007-2008
Middle East Locations: Bahrain (Manama), Jordan (Amman), United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi) Fall 2007 - Middle East Locations
Aug. 31 Sept. 30 Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Fall 2006 and Winter 2007 Last day to apply for October 2007 graduation Fall classes begin Fall late registration and program changes

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Sept. 30 Oct. 1 - 13

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Oct. 14 Oct. 31 Nov. 2 Nov. 12 Dec. 31 Dec. 31 Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned). Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Spring 2007 Last day to apply for December 2007 graduation Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Fall classes end Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Summer I 2007 and Summer II 2007

Winter 2008 Middle East Locations
Jan. 6 Jan. 6 - 19 Jan. 20 Feb. 18 Feb. 28 Mar. 29 Winter classes begin Winter late registration and program changes Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned). Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Last day to apply for March 2008 graduation Winter classes end

Spring 2008 Middle East Locations
Mar. 30 Mar. 30 - Apr. 12 Apr. 4 Apr. 13 May 12 June 19 Spring classes begin Spring late registration and program changes Last day to apply for May 2008 graduation Withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned). Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Spring classes end

Summer 2008 Middle East Locations
June 22 June 22 - 28 June 30 June 29 July 7 July 13 Aug. 4 Aug. 5 Aug. 5 - 11 Aug. 12 Aug. 26 Aug. 31 Sept. 18 Sept. 30 Summer I classes begin Summer I late registration and program changes Last day to apply for July 2008 graduation Summer I withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned). Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Last day to apply for August 2008 graduation Summer I withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Summer I classes end Summer II classes begin Summer II late registration and program changes Summer II withdrawal period (W grade may be assigned). Student and instructor signatures required on withdrawal form Summer II withdrawal period (W or WF grade may be assigned) Last day to complete work for incomplete grades earned for Fall 2007 and Winter 2008 Summer II classes end Last day to apply for October 2007 graduation

33

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Admissions
Jacquelyn Nealon, Ed.D., Vice President for Enrollment Services, 516.686.7520 Because our approach to education is inclusive, we seek to extend educational access to members of all groups and are proud of the diversity that has become synonymous with NYIT. No other college in the area has the global reach that is reflected at NYIT, which includes students from every state and more than 97 countries worldwide. Whether an applicant is admitted to NYIT is based on his or her educational preparedness and ability to be academically successful. We conduct a comprehensive evaluation of each applicant’s previous school records, essays and recommendations. In addition, freshmen applicants are required to submit the results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT). And while a personal interview is not required for most majors (it is required by some of the health professions programs), we do encourage you to visit our beautiful campuses and make arrangements to meet with an admissions officer.
Admissions Procedures

Students are admitted to NYIT for the fall or spring semesters. Newly enrolled students are eligible to take courses during summer sessions usually scheduled for early June and late July. An application for admission can be obtained by mail or in person from the Office of Admissions at any of our campuses. Also, you can access our online application by visiting our Web site at www.nyit.edu. Following is the order of admissions procedures for undergraduate students (special procedures may apply to international applicants):
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An admission application form should be submitted to the Office of Admissions in Old Westbury for all campuses. Applications are considered in the order received as long as space in the program of your choice is available. A nonrefundable application fee of $50 is required with the application form. It is important that you arrange for scholastic records, including official copies of transcripts from all schools and colleges previously attended to be forwarded directly to the admissions office in Old Westbury. Scores from the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT) exams are also required and should be forwarded directly to the admissions office in Old Westbury. Applicants can request the proper forms from their high school guidance counselors. The NYIT college code for the SAT is 2561 and for the ACT is 2832.

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Candidates for admission to NYIT receive written notification of the decisions made by the admissions office on a rolling basis; as files are completed, decisions are made and sent. Upon acceptance of an offer of admission, candidates are required to pay a $400 nonrefundable deposit, which will be credited toward the first term’s tuition. Admitted students also are required to submit completed health forms prior to registration and recommended to furnish the college with a Social Security number for identification purposes. Applicants for all colleges and universities in New York state who were born on or after Jan. 1, 1957, must provide written evidence of immunity against mumps, measles and rubella or demonstrate that they are entitled to an exemption from this legal requirement. 34

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Admission of International Students

NYIT welcomes students from other nations who show promise of profiting from educational opportunities in the United States. The following guidelines are for prospective students residing outside the continental limits of the United States who wish to attend the college:
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The application form, $50 fee and required documents must be submitted to the Office of Admissions in Old Westbury. Applications from international students must be received by NYIT by July 15 for a fall term and Dec. 1 for spring. Applications received after those dates will automatically be considered for the following term. (These deadlines may be waived for applicants who reside in the United States.) Official and complete school records from all previous schools, including certification of high school graduation, colleges, universities, normal or technical schools, must be submitted by the previous institutions. Applicants are required to submit the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) as administered by the Educational Testing Service preferably at an overseas examination center, or an examination deemed to be equivalent by the Office of Admissions of NYIT. The minimum score preferred for undergraduate admission is 550 written based and 213 computer based and 79/80 Web based. Students with scores less than the above scores may need to take English as a Second Language courses prior to beginning major coursework. For all information concerning this test, the candidate should write for the Bulletin of Information: Test of English as a Foreign Language, and send it to Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A. 08540. Students who transfer from American colleges or universities must have their previous schools complete the I-20 Transfer Recommendation Form which can be obtained from the NYIT Office of Admissions. Students must also furnish copies of all previous universities’ I-20(s) and a copy of their I-94 (from passport). For the purpose of assuring NYIT and the United States government that all necessary costs to maintain the student throughout his/her tenure at the college will be met, students must submit: (a) an original notarized Affidavit of Support Form signed by a parent or other bona fide sponsor (form can be obtained from the NYIT Office of Admissions and Web site: www.nyit.edu), and (b) an original bank statement of a parent or sponsor. Upon receipt of all required material, the Committee on Admissions will review the qualifications of each applicant on an individual basis, and a decision regarding admission will be forwarded to the applicant. The I-20 (Certificate of Eligibility for Student Visa) may be given after: (a) the student has sent the application and $50 fee with official scholastic credentials to NYIT; (b) the student has received the admission letter; (c) the student has submitted notarized affidavit of support and bank statements; (d) the student has paid a $400 non-refundable deposit fee that will apply toward the first semester's tuition.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
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Four years of study are generally necessary to acquire a bachelor’s degree or five years for the Bachelor of Architecture degree, but NYIT does not guarantee that any student will complete a program within this time. All international students with F-1 visas must be full-time day students. All students transferring from foreign institutions of higher learning will be required to have their educational credentials evaluated by an agency specializing in reviewing international transcripts. This agency must be acceptable to the standards of NYIT, such as World Education Services or Globe Language Services. There is a fee for this evaluation service. Possible transfer credits will be determined by NYIT after results of the course-bycourse evaluation have been received. Students must provide course outlines and/or syllabi if available to facilitate credit transfer. NYIT offers residential facilities at its Manhattan and Old Westbury campuses. Complete details on available housing for students may be obtained from the college. See housing section for other options.

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Academic Enrichment Programs
Learning Center

The director of academic enrichment programs also coordinates the learning centers on each campus. The learning centers support the mission of the institution by providing high quality academic support services to students in order to maximize their potential for academic success. The learning center provides free individual and small group tutoring, and skills-based workshops to all NYIT students who request academic support. Peer tutoring is offered in a broad range of courses, including, English, math, introductory sciences, core classes, engineering, architecture and business. The most important goals of the learning center are to provide students with the basic academic skills and the personal confidence they need to become self-directed and goal oriented learners. For additional information, contact the Learning Center at 516.686.7661 on the Old Westbury campus or 212.261.1533 on the Manhattan campus.
EduPlus

EduPlus was established to further NYIT’s mission of providing access to opportunity for qualified students. It is a supplemental enrichment program for motivated students who require additional academic and personalized support to maximize their academic potential. Incoming first-year students who demonstrate a strong willingness to learn and work toward their goals but whose grades and test scores do not meet NYIT’s regular admissions criteria, may be admitted to EduPlus at the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses. EduPlus provides a wide range of comprehensive support, academic advising, skill building, academic monitoring, professional individual and/or small group tutoring, software tutorials, personal and career counseling, and access to resources. Upon successful completion of the first year as established by the director, students will be admitted as NYIT students working toward a bachelor’s degree. For more information, contact the director of academic enrichment programs at 516.686.7850.

36

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP)

NYIT sponsors and administers the Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) in conjunction with the New York State Education Department. To participate in the program, students must meet specific criteria for New York State residents whose educational experience and economic status indicate a need for academic and financial assistance to complete a college degree. The program provides a wide range of academic support that includes developmental programs, strengthening of study skills, tutoring, individual and group counseling, and financial assistance. Students begin first-year study with a summer developmental program offering basic coursework, counseling support and tutoring. Grants are renewable each year for a maximum of 10 semesters on the basis of academic progress. Participation requires enrollment in a full-time program. Additional information is available at HEOP offices.
Honors Program

The Honors Program at NYIT fosters the intellectual, social and cultural growth of highability and motivated undergraduate students of diverse backgrounds, with different career interests, from all majors, on all of our campuses. In addition to stimulating and intellectually challenging honors courses and seminars, Honors Program students participate in:
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Lecture series with distinguished faculty/guests; Cultural outings in New York City, Long Island and throughout the metropolitan area; Regular gatherings among honor students, faculty advisers and directors.

For the honors Student Advisory Board, which supports the Honors Program mission, students are generally selected upon admission, based on their exceptional high school records and excellent SAR scores and/or nominated by a faculty member based on outstanding academic performance.
Summer Programs

NYIT offers college-wide summer credit-bearing courses and programs through its individual schools. Students are encouraged to take advantage of summer programs that can give them an extra lead on degree work. Students from other institutions are welcome at all times and will find they can take courses that accommodate their routine fall and spring work at their home schools. Transfer students and pre-freshmen are also invited to study during the summer at NYIT. All students from other colleges will receive official transcripts of credits at the close of a session. The details of summer programs are available by contacting the college.

37

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Transfer Credit Evaluation

Transfer applicants for all campuses assume the responsibility of having previous schools forward official, final transcripts to the Office of Admissions in Old Westbury. The transfer of credits will be considered under the following general rules:
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Transfer credit may be given for courses completed at a regionally accredited college or other qualified institution acceptable to the standards of NYIT. Courses must be appropriate to NYIT curricula. Transfer credit for major courses is granted for equivalent coursework only. Substitutions may be considered in the core curriculum when coursework is from the same discipline. Courses not included in NYIT curricula but relevant to the ultimate educational objectives of the student may be allowed toward a general elective requirement in a specific curriculum. Transfer credit will not be awarded, however, in excess of degree requirements. Students who transfer credits into a teacher education program may be required to submit additional documentation demonstrating achievement of specific knowledge or skills related to the courses made exempt through the transfer of credits. This documentation may include such things as lesson plans, field experience logs, essays, or student work samples. Credit may be granted for Advanced Placement Exams (AP) taken in high school. Grades of 3, 4 and 5 are required for possible credit. An official score report from the College Board (NYIT’s college code is 2561) should be mailed to the Office of Admissions in Old Westbury. Transfer credit is recorded as credit only and is not computed in the cumulative grade point average unless it becomes necessary in determining graduation honors. Credit for challenge examinations taken at a regionally accredited college is granted if recorded on an official transcript with credits and a grade of C- or better. Grades of C- or better are transferable. Grades of D+ and D are acceptable only under the following conditions:
I if the grades were earned in courses at a school where an associate's or bachelor's degree was completed with a 2.0 GPA, or I if the grades were earned in courses at a school where at least 30 credits were completed with a 2.5 GPA.

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Please note: Students may be advised to retake some C, C- or D grades if seeking internships or admission to certain professional schools. D- grades are not transferable.
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Students transferring from an associate’s degree program or two-year school are eligible for a maximum of 70 transfer credits. The maximum transfer credit for students transferring from a bachelor’s program is the difference between the required 30 credits in residency at NYIT (see Requirements for Graduation) and the total credits required for the NYIT degree. For example, if an NYIT degree requires 120 credits, students transferring from a bachelor’s program are eligible for a maximum of 90 transfer credits.

38

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Prior Learning Evaluation Program

This special NYIT program was designed to give students the opportunity to earn college credit for prior college-level learning relevant to their curriculums. All matriculated NYIT students maintaining a 2.0 average are eligible to apply for credit, although transfer students must also have their transcripts officially evaluated before applying for credit. Student knowledge gained outside the traditional college classroom may be evaluated by: proficiency examinations, non-collegiate course evaluations, and portfolio evaluations. Please be aware that evaluation fees are charged. A maximum of 60 credits toward a bachelor’s degree or 30 credits toward an associate’s degree can be earned through standardized proficiency examinations, NYIT challenge examinations and prior learning credits (non-collegiate course work or portfolio). However, any credits earned through these methods cannot be used to fulfill NYIT residency requirements. Counseling is available on an individual basis or at an advisement session. For more information, contact the Office of Prior Learning.

Proficiency Examinations

Credit for degree requirements and elective courses can be earned by attaining satisfactory scores on proficiency examinations. Excelsior College Examinations the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Support (DANTES) are standardized testing programs that cover numerous academic areas. NYIT is a test center for DANTES. NYIT has developed its own challenge examinations in areas not covered by Excelsior, CLEP, or DANTES. Challenge examination information is available in the registrar’s office.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Non-Collegiate Course Evaluations

The New York State Education Department's Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI) and the American Council on Education (ACE) have evaluated and recommended credit for many noncollegiate courses. NYIT honors these credit recommendations for elective credit and may award prior learning credit for required courses on this basis. Courses that have not been reviewed by PONSI or ACE but meet certain criteria will also be evaluated on an individual basis by the college. Credit for military coursework and Military Occupational Specialties (MOSs) may be granted. ACE has evaluated some of this coursework, and credit toward electives is awarded based upon the ACE recommendation. Certificates of completion and/or official DD214 forms should be sent to the evaluations office for the assessment of military coursework that may be credited toward a college degree.

Portfolio Evaluation

Students may use the portfolio method of evaluation to have their knowledge of a certain course or academic area evaluated. This request for credit must fulfill an elective or course requirement in a student’s degree program. Each portfolio consists of an essay explaining how the student acquired this knowledge and how it relates to course objectives. NYIT does require documentation of such learning, which may be in the form of work samples, detailed job descriptions or licenses. A nonrefundable evaluation fee is charged for each portfolio. A Prior Learning Evaluation Guide containing more detailed information may be obtained from the Office of Prior Learning.
Computer Requirements

All students attending NYIT are required to own or have access to a computer system with connectivity to the Internet and an installed and current version of Microsoft Office. Minimum specifications are: a processor of at least 1GHz (PC or Macintosh), 256MB or more of RAM, 40GB or more of hard disk storage as well as current versions of operating system and Internet browser software. Individual academic programs may require additional hardware or software. Contact your department office for more specific information.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Each NYIT student will receive a systems account giving them access to the Internet and other user services such as NYIT Connect. It is important to note that each account owner and workstation user is solely responsible for the usage incurred through her/his account/workstation. Anyone who intentionally abuses accounts and privileges, degrades system performance, misappropriates computer resources or interferes in any way with the operation of the computer facilities is subject to cancellation of privileges and disciplinary action. Students, other than those receiving approved accommodations for a disability, are prohibited from using electronic recording devices in the classroom without prior permission from the instructor.
Readmission of Former Students

Former students of NYIT who wish to re-enter NYIT will use either the Admissions Office or Registrar’s Office as a starting point.
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Students whose last date of attendance at NYIT was within five years prior to readmission and who have not attended another institution during their time away from NYIT shall re-enter through the Registrar’s Office as a re-matriculated student. Students whose last date of attendance at NYIT was five years or more prior to readmission or students who have attended another institution after leaving NYIT shall re-enter through the Office of Admissions using the re-admission process.

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To ensure proper academic advisement, scholarship and financial aid eligibility, students are required to present all transcripts for evaluation at the time of re-entrance in order to receive any transfer credit for work performed at another institution. Once re-entered to the college, students must fulfill the curriculum requirements in effect at the time of readmission. Those who have not attended NYIT for less than five years, and who are within 30 credits of degree completion, may request—subject to the dean’s approval—to follow the curriculum in place at the time of original admission. The dean’s approval shall be based on, among other factors, compliance with accreditation, federal and state regulations, and degree offerings registered with the state. Note: Former students in teacher education programs may be readmitted; however, because state certification and program requirements have changed, readmitted students will need to complete the current program of study, not the one in place at the time of initial enrollment.

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Special Requirements:
For the School of Engineering and Computing Sciences

Computer science and electrical and mechanical engineering students should have adequate mathematics preparation to permit entry into Calculus I. Students with inadequate mathematics preparation will be required to supplement their course of study so as to strengthen their backgrounds to permit entry into the calculus sequence. Freshmen who wish to be admitted to the programs in engineering must have a minimum 1000 SAT (critical reading and math only) total which includes a minimum 520 math score. Students who do not satisfy these admissions criteria may be accepted to the college and then attempt to complete the necessary requirements. Upon meeting these criteria, students will be evaluated for admission into the engineering program. Upperclass students who wish to transfer into engineering from other schools or other disciplines within NYIT must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.0 and must have completed at least 12 credits of required and advanced mathematics, physics, computer science and engineering with a minimum average of 2.3 in these courses. Students may also satisfy these requirements by passing challenge examinations in these areas as provided for by NYIT policies. Students who have not chosen a specific branch of engineering as a major or who do not fully satisfy the entrance requirements for engineering, may be classified as undeclared status in the School of Engineering and Computing Sciences up to the end of their second year. Transfer students and students who have completed more than two years of course work should check with both their academic and financial aid advisers regarding their status as majors.
For the School of Architecture and Design

Freshmen who wish to be admitted to the architecture and design programs are encouraged to apply early to be considered for admission and scholarship. Freshman who apply by the priority date of Dec. 15 will receive an admission decision by Jan. 15 and, if if eligible, will receive a scholarship offer by Jan. 20. Freshman who apply after our priority date may be placed on a waiting list or may not qualify for a scholarship. Freshman must have a minimum combined SAT (critical reading and math only) score of 1000. Students failing to meet this requirement may be permitted to matriculate with an undeclared status in the School of Architecture and Design, and thereby explore architecture and design and other courses. Students in undeclared status who achieve academic success as evidenced by their academic performance can request to have their status changed to the B.S.A.T. designation. From the B.S.A.T. designation, entry into the B.ARCH program is possible.
For the School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences

B.S./D.O.: Freshmen who wish to be admitted to the combined B.S./D.O. program should provide two letters of recommendation, an essay, have a minimum 90 average in high school, be in the top 10 percent of their class, and have a minimum combined SAT (critical reading and math only) score of 1200 or ACT of 28. Interviews with faculty from both the life sciences department and the New York College of Osteopathic

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Medicine of NYIT may also be required, for those students who qualify. This program does not accept transfer students. B.S./J.D.: Freshmen who wish to be admitted to the combined B.S./J.D. program must have a minimum 80 average in high school, a combined SAT (critical reading and math only) score of 1100 or above, or ACT composite of 26, and an essay detailing a desire to have a career in criminal law. All decisions regarding final acceptance into the Jurist Doctor portion of the program are made by Touro Law Center using the following criteria: cumulative grade point average at NYIT of 3.0 or above, an LSAT score of 152 or above, and a high level of motivation and maturity, as evidenced in a personal statement and any supporting documentation. Nursing: Admission Requirements Pre-Professional Clinical Phase (Freshman and Sophomore Years): Please be advised that admission into the pre-professional clinical phase is competitive. The number of students accepted into this phase depends on available resources, class cap limits and College GPA. Students must meet the requirements for admission into the New York Institute of Technology. In addition, all applicants to the Nursing Program are required to have the following general requirements:
I I I

A personal essay detailing the candidate’s reasons for choosing Nursing as a career Two letters of reference Official transcripts from all schools attended

Recent high school graduates or students with a GED and college transfer students with less than 24 transferable credits must have:
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A minimum combined SAT (critical reading and math only) score of at least 950 One year each of biology and chemistry and the minimum completed level of math is pre-calculus or its equivalent. A grade of C+ or better in each identified science and math course (see list below) A high school GPA of 2.75 Copies of official college transcripts from all colleges attended A grade of C+ or better in each identified science and math course (see list below) A College cumulative GPA of 2.75

College transfer students with 24 or more transferable credits must have:

Academic Criteria for the Professional (Clinical) Phase (Junior and Senior Years): The professional phase of the program encompasses the Junior and Senior Years. Students are required to meet the established criteria listed below for progression into the professional phase. Please be advised that the number of students that can progress to the Professional phase depends on accreditation requirements. Progression will be based on overall highest ranked college GPA and meeting fully the established criteria.
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All nursing students must achieve a cumulative college grade point average of 2.75 for admission and continuation in the Professional Clinical Phase

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Completion of all pre-requisite courses listed as freshman and sophomore courses on the Nursing Degree Map. Students meeting all requirements but having one pre-requisite science or math course left to take after the sophomore year, may start the professional phase provided that they register for and complete the course with the required grade during the summer preceding the Fall professional phase. Students meeting all requirements but having one non-science or math pre-requisite course left to take after sophomore year may start the professional phase provided that they register for and complete the course with the required grade during the summer or fall semester or as soon as the course is offered. Minimum Grade of C+ in all identified and required pre-requisite (Freshman and Sophomore) science and math courses: TMAT 135, CHEM 105, 215; BIO 210, 260, 270, 310, 330; PHYS 115, PSYC 101, PSYC 210, PSYC 221

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Students may repeat a required math or science course that they earn a grade of C or below only once.
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Grade of C+ in all Nursing Courses: NURS 102, 301, 310, 315, 351, 360, 401, 410, 421, 430, 451, 461,470, 480. Students who receive less than a C+ in a Nursing Course or Clinical Rotation can repeat the same course only once. Failure to achieve a C+ or better in a second nursing course constitutes grounds for dismissal from the Nursing Program. Recommendation by Nursing Department Academic Review Committee

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Professional Clinical Phase Requirements: All students are required to complete the following by August 15, prior to entry into the Professional Phase of the Nursing Program. Any student who does not complete this information, with copies of the necessary documentation for his/her file, will not be able to enter the Professional Phase. 1. Health Evaluation Form Annual physical, required lab work and PPD are required. Proof of immunizations must include date, titer and results. 2. Pre-Clinical Checklist This form will be maintained in the student’s file to serve as verification that all the necessary items are completed. 3. Infection Control Class This class will be arranged during the semester the students are taking NURS 102 Introduction to Nursing. A certificate of attendance will be awarded to students upon completion of this class. Fee involved. 4. HIPAA/Patient Health Information Confidentiality This class will be arranged during the semester the students are taking NURS 102 Introduction to Nursing. A certificate of attendance will be awarded to students upon completion of this class. Fee involved. 5. Child Abuse Prevention This class will be arranged during the semester the students are taking NURS 102 Introduction to Nursing. A certificate of attendance will be awarded to students upon completion of this class. Fee involved.

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6. Patient Safety Information This class will be arranged during the semester the students are taking NURS 102 Introduction to Nursing. A certificate of attendance will be awarded to students upon completion of this class. 7. Basic Cardiac Life Support (BCLS/CPR) A copy of the student’s provider status will be maintained on file. Student is responsible for keeping the card current. Fee involved. 8. Malpractice (Liability) Insurance Malpractice (Liability) insurance for RN students should include the minimal amounts of $1,000,000 individual and $3,000,000 aggregate for current policy. This policy must be renewed annually. Fee involved. 9. Uniforms Students are required to purchase and wear the official NYIT Department of Nursing uniforms from the designated uniform company. 10. Student Nurse Lab Package The student is required to purchase a Lab Nurse Pack (approximate initial cost $60.00) to be used throughout the curriculum for clinical practice lab. Additions to the nurse pack will be required as students progress to higher level clinical courses. 11. Total Curriculum Support and Tutorial Program Each student is required to enroll in this on-line support protocol each semester (5 semesters) beginning in NURS 102 and ending with a comprehensive NCLEX-RN Review Course. The approximate cost is $100 per semester. 12. Certified Background Check by Designated Agency Students may be required as part of the requirements for clinical rotations to have a background check performed by a designated agency. Please be advised that an unsatisfactory background check may result in the student having to withdraw from the program. Fee involved of approximately $100. 13. National Student Nurses Association Annual dues $20 per year. Students should be advised that requirements may change during the program and that they will be required to meet current standards for clinical affiliation placements and progression in the major irrespective of date of program admission. Policy: Progression in the Nursing Major In order to continue in the Nursing major, students must earn minimum grades of C+ in all required Nursing courses and maintain a minimum cumulative College GPA of 2.75. Students who earn a grade of C or lower or who fail any segment of a nursing course, clinical nursing course or lab (NURS 102, 301, 310, 315, 351, 361, 430, 401, 410, 421, 430, 451, 461, 470, 480) will be allowed to repeat the course or clinical lab rotation only once. Students who earn a C or lower for a required nursing course or clinical lab rotation for a second time will be dismissed from the Nursing Program. Withdrawal from a course is only permitted in the case of a documented illness, personal emergency or unusual circumstance and not because of a course/clinical/lab rotation failure or anticipated failure. Given the nature of nursing practice, students will not be permitted to use a withdrawal from a course to avoid a failure. Occupational Therapy: B.S./M.S. – Occupational Therapy The combined B.S./M.S. occupational therapy degree program provides preparation for students without a bachelor’s degree to enter the professional program. 45

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To be eligible for admission into the combined B.S./M.S. program, applicants must possess a high school degree or equivalency. To be competitive, students must have an overall GPA of 2.5. Preference is given to applicants with a three to four-year sequence in high school math and science Regents courses. In addition, students are required to provide the following:
I I I I I I I I I

Documentation of 100 hours of volunteer or paid employment under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist; An essay (350-500 words) detailing the desire to pursue occupational therapy as a career; A second professional letter of reference (the first letter is the letter from the licensed occupational therapist documenting the volunteer hours); Official transcripts from high school and all post-secondary schools attended; A personal interview (for qualifying candidates); An on-site essay on an assigned topic; Competence in written and spoken English and computer skills (preparation of documents, spreadsheets, graphs, databases, research and presentations); To be competitive, applicants should have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, with no science or math grade below C and a combined SAT score of 850; The Department of Occupational Therapy Admissions Committee will review completed applications and render the final admission decision for review by the NYIT Office of Admissions.

Physician’s Assistant: B.S./M.S. In addition to general admission requirements, all applicants to the preprofessional program are required to have a minimum combined SAT score of 1100 or an ACT of 24 and a high school minimum cumulative average grade of 90. Students may qualify for admission into the professional phase of the program upon submission of verification of 100 hours of direct patient health care experience, two professional letters of recommendation, at least one from a DO, MD, or PA, a one-page type written narrative on reasons for wanting to be a PA, an interview and approval by the PA Admissions Committee, and have met the technical standards of the physician assistant program (technical standards are available in the PA program office and on the program web site). A GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale and a grade of C+ or better in all required science and math courses are required. Required math or science courses with grades lower than C+ may be retaken once. The NYIT PA program participates in the Centralized Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA). All applicants to the NYIT PA Program must submit a CASPA application. Information about the CASPA application can be obtained online at www.caspaonline.org. It is recommended that applicants in the preprofessional program begin

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the CASPA application process during the Fall of their junior year. The completed application must reach CASPA and be received by the program by February 1st. Please allow a minimum of 3 weeks for CASPA to transfer the information to the program. In addition to college tuition costs and fees, housing, food, and transportation, physician assistant students will be responsible for costs associated with books, medical equipment, laboratory jackets, medical liability insurance, and the basic and advanced cardiac life support certification course. The total estimated additional cost is $3,000. Physical Therapy: B.S./D.P.T. In addition to general admissions requirements, to be competitive applicants should have a combined SAT score of at least 1000 or an ACT of 24, and a high school average of 90 with Regents units in biology, chemistry, and sequential mathematics. In addition, we require 100 hours of volunteer time (with a physical therapist), two professional letters of recommendation, an essay detailing desire to pursue a career in physical therapy, and an interview for those who qualify. Acceptance into the professional phase of the program requires a cumulative GPA of 3.0 during the first three years, no science grade below C+, and recommendation by the NYIT Physical Therapy Admissions Committee.
Graduate Admission

Academic requirements for admission to graduate programs are contained in a separate bulletin. Inquiries should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Admissions by calling 516.686.7520 or e-mailing nyitgrad@nyit.edu.

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Financial Aid
NYIT offers many forms of financial aid to qualified and deserving students. Funds for financial aid programs are drawn from institutional funds as well as state and federal funds through scholarships, grants-in-aid, loans, and employment. Awards are designed to recognize scholastic achievement, financial need, character and promise of an applicant, competence in a particular field, or distinctive contributions to the college or the community. The variety of financial aid programs available allows many students to greatly reduce education costs while attending NYIT. It is the responsibility of students and their families to request, complete and submit all forms with necessary documentation for all financial aid programs, including scholarships, in a timely manner. These awards are not granted retroactively. Any student who requires assistance in understanding programs, completing applications, or needs general information regarding financing of his or her higher education is encouraged to contact the Office of Financial Aid.
Application Procedures

Applications for any of the following programs may be secured by writing or calling the NYIT Office of Financial Aid or accessing the forms, links and information on our Financial Aid website at www.nyit.edu. All students, including scholarship recipients are required to file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. The college Title IV code to be used on the FAFSA for NYIT is 002782. The FAFSA form is available at any local high school, online at www.fafsa.ed.gov, or at any NYIT financial aid office. For maximum consideration for all types of aid, students are encouraged to file by March 1 every year. All financial aid programs are subject to change or expansion due to revisions in government or college policies, and are subject to funds availability. Additional criteria and further information maybe obtained through the Office of Financial Aid.

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NYIT Scholarships and Grants
Through the generosity of trustees, alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the college, NYIT provides academic scholarships to undergraduate students on the basis of academic achievements or high scholastic potential. Full time students at NYIT who meet the criteria can choose from over 100 programs of study within the many schools at NYIT (including the combined Bachelor of Science/ Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (B.S./D.O.) program, which provides some assurance of admission into NYIT’s medical school, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine). Service to School Grants-In-Aid are awarded in recognition of demonstrated ability in athletics, as well as academic achievements. Awards vary according to financial need. Grants-In-Aid are awarded or renewed if the student maintains a minimum of 2.0, cumulative GPA and maintains satisfactory academic progress toward a degree and continues to demonstrate financial need. NYIT scholarships and grants are for tuition only, divided equally between fall and spring semesters. They are not applicable to summer session attendance. For all NYIT scholarships and grants a student must be enrolled full time. Students must maintain a specific cumulative grade point average, as indicated, for individual scholarships. Students with scholarships must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year they are enrolled. Students will not be permitted to receive more than one NYIT scholarship. In the event a student is eligible for more than one NYIT scholarship, the one with the highest dollar value will be awarded. Scholarships are awarded for a maximum of eight full-time semesters, unless enrolled in an approved five year program. Students who qualify for special group discounted tuition packages may not qualify for other NYIT scholarships. In addition, students may only qualify for one discounted tuition program at a time. NYIT reserves the right to review its scholarship programs each year and make changes as necessary. NYIT Academic Scholarship Program NYIT has established an academic scholarship program to recognize full-time undergraduate students who have demonstrated their commitment to the college and have achieved academic success after earning 60 credits or more at NYIT which are applicable towards their degree. These awards will be granted on a semester-by-semester basis, according to the recipient’s full-time attendance in the previous term and overall academic performance. Students must have achieved at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) for 60 or more credits earned at NYIT. These scholarships are awarded for a maxium of four semesters. Students cannot receive two NYIT merit-based academic scholarships. In the event that a student qualifies for more than one scholarship, the one with the highest dollar value will be awarded. Presidential Award for Academic Excellence Students who meet all of the above criteria and have a CGPA of 3.5 or higher will receive a $2,000 per semester award based on full-time enrollment. Students who achieve a CGPA 3.0 will receive a $1,500 per semester award based on full-time enrollment. This award will be awarded for a maximum of two years (four semesters).

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The Theodore K. Steele Memorial Scholarship Program This scholarship is granted to academically talented entering freshmen. A calculated average academic index representing a weighted combination of SAT score and high school grade point average is used to determine a student’s eligibility for this scholarship. To be eligible for the Theodore K. Steele Memorial Scholarship, a student must have between a 73.00 to 82.99 calculated average academic index. This scholarship will be renewed each semester, provided that student enrolls full time, maintains high levels of performance and has a CGPA that never falls below 3.1. The student must satisfactorily complete at least 12 credits each semester with no failing or incomplete grades. This scholarship is awarded for a maximum of eight full-time semesters unless enrolled in an approved five year program. Further details may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Transfer Scholarships Limited scholarships are available to graduates of accredited two-year colleges and transfer students from four-year colleges who have a minimum of 24 credits completed who wish to complete their bachelor’s degree at NYIT. Readmitted students to NYIT are not eligible for this scholarship. A student transferring with a CGPA from all previous schools of 2.50 to 2.749 will receive an annual award of $4,000; a CGPA of 2.752.99 will qualify for an annual award of $5,000-5,500; a CGPA of 3.00 to 3.49 will qualify for an annual award of $6,500-7000 and students with a CGPA of 3.5 or better will receive $7,500 -8000 per year for a maximum of three years or six semesters of continuous full-time enrollment. A transfer scholarship will be renewed each semester provided that the student satisfactorily completes at least 12 credits each semester and maintains the appropriate CGPA for each scholarship with no incomplete or failing grades. The following CGPA is required for renewal of the transfer scholarship: Amount of Scholarship $7,500-$8,000 $6,500-$7,000 $4,000-$5,500 Required GPA for Renewal 3.1 2.9 2.7

The dollar value of the scholarships will be reviewed each year and may be changed. Further details may be obtained from Office of Financial Aid or Office of Admissions. B.S./M.S. Scholarships There are several scholarships for students entering the professional phase of the program in occupational therapy in year four. Because these are specialized scholarships, students should contact their advisers to explore appropriate scholarship opportunities. President's Scholarship This scholarship is offered to an entering freshman that has a calculated average academic index of 83.00 to 100.00. The calculated average academic index represents a weighted combination of the student’s SAT score and the high school grade point average. A student meeting these criteria will receive an annual award of between $12,000 and $14,000 for a maximum of four years or eight semesters of continuous full-time enrollment.

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This scholarship will be renewed each semester, provided that the student enrolls full time, maintains high levels of performance and has a CGPA that never falls below 3.3. The student must satisfactorily complete at least 12 credits each semester with no failing or incomplete grades. This scholarship is awarded for a maximum of eight full-time semesters unless enrolled in an approved five year program. Further details may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship In memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and in recognition of the beliefs that he espoused, the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship Program at each of our campuses was established. It serves as a living testimony to Dr. King’s leadership in the historic struggle for rights of minority groups in the United States. The program designed to attract minority students and alumni of outstanding character, achievement and leadership. Qualified scholarship recipients are required to have high levels of academic achievement and low family incomes. For further information, please contact the following offices on the campus that you attend: Old Westbury campus Manhattan campus HEOP Office Student Development 516.686.7574 212.261.1531

Brett Kaufman Memorial Alumni Scholarship In memory of former NYIT Alumni Federation President Brett Kauffman, this scholarship is available to students sponsored by a NYIT graduate. The candidate must demonstrate a commitment to community involvement by submitting an essay titled, "The Importance of Volunteerism," plus recommendation letters from a volunteer organization(s), personal references, and a professional and academic reference where applicable. Finalists will be interviewed by the Alumni Scholarship Committee, which makes a recommendation to NYIT for the award. This scholarship offers $5,500 per year ($2,750 per semester) for undergraduate students and $3,000 per year ($1,500 per semester) for graduate students. It is applied in two equal semesters (fall and spring). Students must be enrolled as full time undergraduates (12 credits) or graduates (nine credits) each semester. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 for undergraduate students and a 3.0 for graduate students is required. Also, financial aid forms (FAFSA, TAP, etc.) must be filed each year they are enrolled. The scholarship covers fall and spring tuition only — intersession and 51

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summer terms are not included. Awards are subject to funds availability. The Brett Kaufman Memorial Alumni Scholarship is renewable through reapplication each academic year, for the duration of the undergraduate and/or graduate program. For more information or to request an application, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations at 516.686.7800. NYIT Scholarship NYIT has made available a limited number of scholarships based on academic merit as determined by the Scholarship Committee. The scholarship amounts range from $7,500 - $8,500 per year for a maximum of four years or eight semesters of continuous full time enrollment. This scholarship will be renewed each semester provided that the student completes at least 12 credits successfully each semester with no incomplete grades and maintains the appropriate CGPA for each scholarship. The following CGPA is required for renewal of the NYIT scholarship: Amount of Scholarship $7,500-$8,500 Required CGPA for Renewal 3.00

NYIT Grant NYIT has made available a limited number of grants based on financial need. A Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form must be completed, processed and received by NYIT for a student to be considered for a grant. Amounts may vary yearly depending on the student’s financial need. For renewal, students must be making satisfactory academic progress toward their degrees, be continuously enrolled full time and be determined to show financial need as evidenced by annual filing of the FAFSA.

State and Federal Grants
Federal Pell Grant: This is a federal grant program for undergraduate matriculated students who are enrolled in at least one credit and meet the financial need guidelines of the program. Students receive the results of their applications directly from the Federal Processing Center, and shortly thereafter the NYIT Office of Financial Aid will receive this information electronically. Awards are based on the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) determined from the application, the cost of education, the number of credits attempted in a given semester, and the federal appropriation for the program. To maintain eligibility for these grants, a student must apply annually and must continue to qualify according to the financial need guidelines, as well as maintain the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards established by NYIT. Federal Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG): This is a limited federal grant that is awarded to eligible students who qualify on the basis of financial need. As there is limited amount of federal funds available for this program, applicants who demonstrated the greatest financial need are the only students considered for SEOG. These funds are awarded by the Office of Financial Aid in amounts ranging from $100 to $4,000 per year. Grants are renewable as long as the student is making satisfactory academic progress toward an undergraduate degree, the recipient continues to demonstrate the required level of financial need and federal funds are available. Academic Competitiveness Grant * 52

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Grants for first and second year undergraduates. In order to be eligible a student must be full time, a U.S. citizen and Pell grant eligible, as determined by the federal government, through filing a FAFSA. The student must have successfully completed a rigorous secondary school program and for first year eligibility, could not be previously enrolled in a program of undergraduate education. The first year award is up to $750. For a second year eligibility, a student must have fulfilled the previously stated requirements and completed a rigorous secondary school program after January 1, 2005 and have at least a 3.0 GPA (as determined by regulation) at the end of the first academic year. The second year award is up to $1,300. SMART (Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent) Grants * Grants for third and fourth year undergraduates. For eligibility, a student must be full time, a U.S. citizen and Pell eligible. For third or fourth year eligibility a student needs to be pursuing a major in the physical, life or computer sciences, mathematics, technology or engineering (as determined by regulation) or in a foreign language that is critical to U.S. national security. The individual must have a 3.0 GPA in coursework required for the designated qualifying major. The third and fourth year award is up to $4000 each year.
*ACG/SMART grants cannot exceed the cost of attendance. These merit awards in combination with a Pell Grant award and all other resources cannot exceed the student’s Cost of Attendance. If, in any fiscal year, the amount authorized and appropriated by the Federal government is less than necessary to provide for full payment to award recipients, then those awards will be ratably reduced. A recipient cannot receive more than one award for each year of eligibility. No award shall be made to any student for an academic year of undergraduate education, if the student received credit before the date of the enactment of the Deficit Reduction Act, of February 8, 2006. These awards are subject to all revisions, suspensions and adjustments of the federal government and the regulations that oversee the program.

New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP): Students who are attending NYIT on a full-time, matriculated basis and who have been legal residents of New York state for at least one year prior to a given academic year may apply for the New York state Tuition Assistance Program. TAP eligibility is based on New York state taxable income. Students must file an annual application for TAP, and are eligible to receive payments for a maximum of eight semesters as long as the taxable income remains in the qualifying range and they meet the minimum academic standards established by NYIT and the state. Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS): This New York state grant program provides aid amounts up to $2,000 per year for eligible part-time students (3-11 credit hours per semester). Students must be enrolled for the entire 15 weeks of the semester for which they are seeking APTS. They must also be matriculated, maintain good academic standing, meet specified income limits, be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, be a resident of New York state, not have used up TAP eligibility for full-time study and have a tuition charge of at least $100 per year. Funding is limited and students are strongly urged to apply and submit all necessary requested documentation early. Applicants must apply to the NYIT Office of Financial Aid each semester. Vietnam Veterans Tuition Award Program: This New York state program provides financial assistance to veterans enrolled in undergraduate programs on either a full- or part-time basis. To be eligible under this program, the veteran must have served in the armed forces of the U.S. in Indochina between Jan. 1, 1963 and May 7, 1975; have been discharged from the service under other than dishonorable conditions; have been a resident of New York state on April 20, 1984, or have been a resident at time of entry into the service and resume residence by Sep. 1, 1987; apply for a TAP award and 53

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a Pell Grant if applying as a full-time student or for the Pell Grant only if applying as a part-time student. Full-time awards are $1,000 per semester or tuition, whichever is less. If the veteran also receives a TAP award, the combination of the two awards cannot exceed tuition. Part-time awards are $500 per semester or tuition, whichever is less. The total of all awards for full-time and/or part-time study received cannot exceed $5,000.

Loans
Federal Perkins Loans: This is a fixed, low-interest rate loan from the federal government and NYIT, taken through NYIT. Eligibility is on the basis of financial need as determined by the FAFSA form. Students who demonstrate financial need after all resources are taken into account may be considered for a Perkins Loan. Legislated loan limits are up to $4,000 for each year of undergraduate study (undergraduate aggregate limit is $20,000) and $6,000 for each year of graduate study (aggregate undergraduate and graduate limit is $40,000). Repayment of loans begins nine months after the recipient leaves school and carries a 5 percent interest rate. On first-time loans disbursed after Oct. 1, 1992, the borrower will make minimum monthly payments of $40. Annual renewal of Perkins Loans is based upon early application, continued demonstration of financial need, availability of federal funds and maintenance of minimum academic standards. Federal Stafford Loans: Students may borrow from their local banks or other lenders under the guarantee of a federally approved guarantee agency. An applicant must be matriculated and in at least half-time attendance. First-year undergraduate students (0-30 completed credits) may borrow up to $3,500, second-year students (31-62 completed credits) may borrow up to $4,500 and students who have completed two years of study (63 or more completed credits) may borrow up to $5,500. The aggregate undergraduate Stafford loan limit is $23,000. Graduate students may borrow up to $8,500 per year. The aggregate combined undergraduate and graduate limit for Stafford loans is $65,500. The total combined (undergraduate and graduate) Stafford loan and additional unsubsidized Stafford loan limit is $138,500. Through the possible combination of a subsidized Stafford loan (interest payments are made by the federal government on the student’s behalf while he/she is in school) and an unsubsidized Stafford Loan (student has option to pay the interest on the loan while in school or let interest accrue) every student meeting all academic requirements should be eligible to participate in the federal Stafford Loan program. All deferred interest payments will be capitalized. For further information, please contact your lender. All students applying for the Stafford Loan must submit a FAFSA form. Under federal regulation, no student can be considered for a Stafford Loan if the Office of Financial Aid does not have the required FAFSA documentation on file before the Stafford Loan application is processed. Regulations also require the Office of Financial Aid to do a complete needs analysis on every student applying for the Stafford Loan. The Office of Financial Aid must review each application and will recommend an amount according to the number of credits attempted, number of credits completed, cost of education, outside resources available to each student, and income and assets of the family. No repayment on the loans will be required while the student maintains at least half-time attendance. Repayment of principal and interest starts six months after the student leaves school or drops below half-time attendance. Students borrowing for the first time after Oct. 1, 1992, will be required to repay the Federal Stafford Loan (subsidized 54

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
and unsubsidized) at a variable interest rate that can change annually. This rate will not exceed 8.25 percent. Effective for Stafford loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2006, the Stafford interest rate will be fixed at 6.8%, students who received loans prior to the above date and who still have balances outstanding on those loans will continue with the interest rate that was in effect at the time of their original loans. Borrowers may be charged an origination/insurance fee. Additional Unsubsidized Stafford Loan: This loan is for undergraduate students who are financially independent of their parents (according to federal definition) and graduate students or for dependent students whose parent has been denied a Parent Loan (PLUS). Effective for loans disbursed on or after July 1, 1994, eligible students may borrow up to $4,000 per year for the first two years of undergraduate study and $5,000 per year after the completion of two years of undergraduate study. Graduate students may borrow up to $12,000 per year. Aggregate Loan Limits: The maximum aggregate outstanding total subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford Loan debt is $23,000 for a dependent undergraduate student. $46,000 for an independent undergraduate student (or a dependent undergraduate student whose parents do not qualify for PLUS loans). No more than $23,000 of this aggregate amount may be in the form of subsidized loans. $138,500 for a graduate or professional student (including loans for undergraduate study). No more than $65,500 of this aggregate amount may be in the form of subsidized loans. Students who receive their first disbursement on or after October 1, 1993, will be required to repay the Additional Unsubsidized Stafford Loan at a variable rate that can change annually. This rate will not exceed 8.25 percent. For loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2006, the interest rate is fixed at 6.8%. An origination/insurance fee may be deducted from the principal. Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS): Parents of dependent undergraduate students who have a favorable credit rating (a credit check will be done) may borrow up to the full cost of their child’s tuition minus any other aid the student receives. Repayment begins 60 days after disbursement. Effective for PLUS loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2006, the PLUS loan rate is 8.5% fixed. Previous PLUS loan borrowing will be governed by rate rules in effect at the time of borrowing. An origination/insurance fee may be deducted from the principal. Dependent undergraduate students whose parents do not have a favorable credit rating (after a credit check has been done) can avail themselves of the additional unsubsidized Stafford loan at the amounts listed above. NYIT and many lenders participate in a process called Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). Under this process, a student’s loan funds are transferred electronically to an interest bearing account at NYIT. NYIT is permitted to retain any interest earned on EFT proceeds. Once a student’s eligibility has been determined, the loan proceeds are credited to the student’s account.

Employment
Federal College Work-Study Program (CWSP): The Office of Financial Aid offers assistance to students who wish to find part-time employment through the federally sponsored College Work-Study Program. To qualify for CWSP, a student must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. The Office of Financial Aid will 55

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
then determine a student’s eligibility based on demonstrated financial need and availability of federal funds. If the student is eligible and would like to participate in the College Work-Study Program, they must accept the offered financial assistance with the Financial Aid office and contact the Office of Student Employment. Renewal is dependent upon continued demonstration of financial need, availability of federal funds, and maintenance of the minimum academic standards established by NYIT. The filing of the FAFSA each year is required.
Other Sources of Aid

Additional sources of assistance may be available through outside organizations or other government agencies. Students should contact them directly. The following is a list of some government agencies offering assistance:
I I I I

New York State Education Department’s Regents Award for Child of a Deceased or Disabled Veteran; Department of Children and Family Services in the student’s county of residence; United States Social Security Administration’s Social Security for Children of Deceased or Disabled Wage Earners; Veterans Administration’s Veteran’s Benefits – Veteran’s Administration or campus VA office.

Requirements for Determination of Independent Student Status for Purposes of Federal Student Financial Aid

For any federal financial aid, an independent student must meet one of the following criteria: A. Age 24, or older, as of Dec. 31 of the award year; B. For students under 24: 1. Orphan or ward of the court; 2. Veteran; 3. Have legal dependents other than a spouse for whom you provide more than 50 percent financial support; 4. Graduate or professional student; 5. Married student; 6. Classified by the Office of Financial Aid as independent because of other unusual circumstances that have been fully documented and are consistent with federal regulations. In most cases, NYIT will require additional certification and documentation to consider students independent for purposes of institutional or federal financial aid. Acceptance of status as an independent student does not guarantee an applicant additional assistance that is sufficient to meet the costs of education.

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Satisfactory Academic Progress

All students are expected to meet the academic standards of the college and to make steady progress toward completion of degree work. To be eligible to renew certain forms of state, federal and institutional aid, students must be making satisfactory academic progress at the end of the prior academic year. Satisfactory program pursuit is defined as receiving a passing or failing grade in a certain percentage of a full-time courseload in each term for which an award is received. The percentage increases from 50 percent of the minimum full-time courseload in each term of study in the first year for which an award is received to 75 percent of the minimum full-time courseload in each term of study in the second year for which an award is received to 100 percent of the minimum full-time courseload in each term thereafter. As an example, in using the table, for a student to be certified (not denied) for TAP for payment number, four in the spring semester of a given academic year, the student must show program pursuit by completing nine or more credits in the preceding fall semester, and must have accrued a total of 21 or more credits with a cumulative average of 1.30 or higher.

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Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards for Financial Aid Eligibility (SAP)

Federal regulations require that NYIT establish policies to monitor the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive federal financial aid. To remain eligible for federal and other types of financial aid, recipients are required to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress toward a degree according to guidelines. The satisfactory progress requirements are measured at the conclusion of the spring semester each academic year. Note: The New York State Tuition Assistance Program has its own academic progress standards. Please see the information regarding TAP and required standards below. Maintaining satisfactory progress means a student must fulfill certain minimum standards regarding academic progress and performance. These minimum standards are demonstrated qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative standard: Represented by grade point average (GPA) A student must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA to remain eligible for aid. Quantitative standard: This standard has two components. There is a Credit completion ratio component and there is completion of degree objective within a maximum time frame component.
Grade Point Average

Qualitative: Undergraduate students are required to have a 2.00 cumulative GPA by the time they complete their second academic year. Students who do not meet the minimum GPA requirement may be eligible for probationary funding the next academic year under certain circumstances. Probationary funding is automatically granted to first-year students whose cumulative GPA is within .30 of this requirement at the conclusion of their first year, provided that the student meets the credit completion requirement and has not exceeded that maximum time frame for degree completion.
Completion of Credits

Quantitative: Students are required to successfully complete at least 67 percent of all coursework attempted, whether they received aid for that enrollment period or not. Successful completion of a course is defined as achieving a passing grade and earning credit. Audited courses are excluded from all SAP measurements. Repeated courses are included in the total credits completed. However, students should be aware that repeat credits also count towards the maximum number of credits allowed to complete the degree. If a student receives a failing or incomplete grade, audits, or withdraws from a class, these credits will count as attempted credits but cannot be counted towards the completion of credits requirements. Only courses for which the student receives an “A” through “D” or “P” grade can satisfy the successfully completed credit requirement. Example: Two students, Joe and Mary, are enrolled in the 128-credit hour, Bachelor of Fine Arts in Communication Arts program. The maximum time frame for completion of this program is 192 credit hours. Because NYIT has set a maximum time frame of 192 credit hours, a student must successfully complete 67percent of all coursework attempted to be making satisfactory academic progress (128 / 192 = 67percent). 58

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Both Joe and Mary attempt 30 credit hours in the first year, 67 percent x 30 credit hours attempted = 21 credit hours Joe completed 30 credit hours and Mary completed 22 credit hours. Because both students successfully completed at least 21 credit hours in their first year, they are both making satisfactory academic progress when entering their second year. Both students attempt 30 hours again in their second year of study. However, Joe completed 27 credit hours and Mary completed 18 credit hours. 67 percent of 60 credit hours attempted – 41 credit hours. Therefore, Joe is making satisfactory academic progress because he has completed 57 credit hours, but Mary is not because she has only completed 40 credit hours.
Completion of Degree Objective

Students must complete their degree requirements within 150 percent of the normal time required for the program of study. The time frame allowed can vary based upon the student’s degree objective. Program requirements are defined in the NYIT catalog. These maximums include all accepted transfer credits and all credits completed at NYIT. The satisfactory progress requirements are reviewed at the conclusion of the spring semester each academic year. Example: Joe enrolled in the 128-credit hour, Bachelor of Fine Arts in communication arts program. Under school policy, the maximum time frame for completion is 128 credits x 150 percent or 192 credit hours. If Joe has not completed his degree by the time he has attempted 192 credits, he does not meet this SAP requirement.
Second Bachelor’s Degree

Students pursuing a second bachelor’s degree will be subject to the same review schedule and standards as other undergraduate students.
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress (UAP) and the Appeal Process

If a student does not meet the SAP (satisfactory academic progress) minimum standards for his/her degree program, the student will be ineligible for financial aid for the following year and future years until the student achieves the minimum standard. Students will be notified by mail if they have made unsatisfactory academic progress (UAP). The student may appeal the unsatisfactory progress status by submitting a written appeal to the appropriate UAP adviser within four weeks of the date of notice. The appeal for requesting a reversal of the UAP status should be accompanied by any supporting documentation of the student’s special circumstances. A recommendation will be made to the Office of Financial Aid by the UAP adviser within two weeks. Students will be notified by mail of the final decision.

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Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)

NYIT is responsible for implementing standards for satisfactory academic progress to maintain eligibility for New York State’s Tuition Assistance program. Described in the chart below, the standards that apply to Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) and other NYS Awards require recipients of such awards to maintain a steady rate of progress toward a degree and to earn a prescribed academic average. These standards affect all students who received TAP and other NYS Awards. Additional information regarding satisfactory academic progress may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid.

TAP Tables

Two-Year Associate and Certificate

Before being certified for this payment A student must have acrued at least this many credits With at least this grade point average

First

Second

Third

Fourth

Fifth

Sixth

0

3

9

18

30

45

0.0

.5

.75

1.3

2.0

2.0

Four- and Five-Year Baccalaureate
Before being certified for this payment A student must have acrued at least this many credits With at least this grade point average First Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Seventh Eighth Ninth Tenth

0

3

9

21

33

45

60

75

90

105

.0

1.1

1.2

1.3

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Tuition and Fees
Tuition and fees are payable as specified below. Checks and money orders should be drawn to the order of NYIT for the exact amount of the tuition and fee payment. The privileges of the college are not available to the student until registration has been completed and tuition and fees paid. The college offers eligible students a multi-payment plan for tuition and fees. Details on payment plans may be obtained at any Bursar Office. The tuition and fees information below applies primarily to full-time undergraduate students. Tuition and fees for weekend and evening students, and graduate students and students in special programs can be found in the brochures describing those programs. Application Fee (Nonrefundable)........................................................................................$50* Payable upon application for admission as a matriculant by all undergraduates. Tuition Deposit (Nonrefundable)........................................................................................$400 Entering students accepted under the college’s regular program of admission are required to make this payment within three weeks after receipt of their notice of acceptance. The payment is applied toward the first semester’s tuition fee. Tuition Full-time undergraduates (12 to 17 credits)** Fall term, 2007 ...................................................................................................$10,454 Spring term, 2008 .............................................................................................$10,454 Total.......................................................................................................................$20,908
#Combined

Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program Fall term, 2007 ...................................................................................................$10,454 Spring term, 2008 .............................................................................................$10,454 Total.......................................................................................................................$20,908

#Undergraduate phase only.

Part-time undergraduates (less than 12 credits) Per credit....................................................................................................................$705

*Application fee for graduate students is $50. **Except for seniors requiring less than 12 credits to graduate, full-time students wishing to enroll for fewer than 12 or more than 18 credits per semester must receive special permission. Students enrolled in less than 12 credits pay on a per-credit basis; students enrolled for more credits than covered by the applicable full-time tuition pay for additional credit at the per-credit fee applicable to their major.

Graduate students Per credit....................................................................................................................$739 Auditing a course and Independent study (undergraduate) Per credit....................................................................................................................$705

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Online campus (college fee not applicable) Per credit (undergraduate)....................................................................................$705 Per credit (graduate)...............................................................................................$739 Doctorate in Physical Therapy, per credit ........................................................$739 Mandatory College Fee, per semester, undergraduate (Affords students a variety of medical and educational services, such as: academic placement, registration, internet, student activities, recreation/athletics, medical facilities and accident insurance, parking at Old Westbury and Central Islip campuses, I.D. cards, career development, commencement exercises and diploma.) Part-Time.................................................................................................................................$250 Full-Time .................................................................................................................................$295 Health professions, architecture and engineering and technology Full-Time (per semester)........................................................................................$550 Part-Time (up to 11 credits per semester) .......................................................$285 *Mandatory health insurance premium for all residence hall students (per semester).....................................................................................................$370 *Mandatory health insurance premium for all international students ................$400 Mandatory accident insurance for full-time students (fall/spring)..................$13.00 Mandatory accident insurance for part-time students (fall/spring).........................$5 Mandatory accident insurance for full-time students (summer) ..............................$5 Mandatory accident insurance for part-time students (summer).............................$1 Special Fees (Nonrefundable) Late payment fee For tuition payment due on: Aug. 1 made after Aug. 1 .....................................................................................$220 Jan. 1 made after Jan. 1........................................................................................$220 Culinary equipment fee (one time only) .........................................................................$735 Culinary uniform fee (2nd year students only)..............................................................$110 Culinary comprehensive fee (per semester)...................................................................$700 Culinary graduation coats ....................................................................................................$65 ACF&I certified cook...............................................................................................................$85 Late registration fee (all programs) .................................................................................$250 Rematriculation fee................................................................................................................$50 Graduate matriculation fee..................................................................................................$75 Challenge examination fee, per credit............................................................................$175 Comprehensive examination fee (CLEP, DANTES), per course.....................................$45 Transcript of record (certified check, bank check, money order only).......................$10 Student evaluation (Occupational Education only).......................................................$45 Prior learning evaluation fee (per credit) .......................................................................$175 Service charge for unpaid check or credit card return..................................................$80 Credit transfer fee for approved courses taken at other colleges while matriculated at NYIT, per credit ..............................................................$75 Replacement identification card fee..................................................................................$10

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Old Westbury Residential Fees (per semester) Single ...................................................................................................................................$3,658 Double ..................................................................................................................................$3,057 Deposit (non-refundable)...................................................................................................$275 Damage deposit (refundable if damages not assessed).............................................$110 Lost key/ID.................................................................................................................................$25 Manhattan Residential Fees (per semester) Riverside: Standard Single...............................................................................................................$6,300 Large Single......................................................................................................................$6,877 Small Double....................................................................................................................$4,500 Standard Double .............................................................................................................$4,815 Large Double ....................................................................................................................$6,430 Clark: Standard Double...............................................................................................................$6,420 Large Double .....................................................................................................................$6,773 Deluxe Double ...................................................................................................................$7,815 Single ...................................................................................................................................$7,815 Summer Monthly rates: Riverside: Single..................................................................................................................................$1,717 Standard Double .............................................................................................................$1,284 Large Double ....................................................................................................................$1,498 Membership Fee...........................................................................................................................$75 Housing Deposit ........................................................................................................................$275 Damage Deposit ........................................................................................................................$250 Early Termination of Lease ....................................................................................................$300

Meal Plan (per semester) Old Westbury......................................................................................................................$1,950 Central Islip.........................................................................................................................$1,950 Housing fee for occupancy during vacations and holiday periods and summer (Per person/per day intersession) .......................................................................................$45 (Per person/per day summer)...............................................................................................$45 (Per person/per week) ..........................................................................................................$210 Schedule of Payments For full-time students, (including international students) the following schedule of payments is in effect: (The amounts presented include tuition and college fee.) For students who register after the due date listed below, payment in full is expected at the point of registration.

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Fall 2007 All students Aug. 1: 100 percent tuition and fees ..................................................................$10,749 Health Professions, Architecture, Engineering and Computing Sciences Aug. 1: 100 percent tuition and fees...................................................................$11,004 Combined Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program Aug. 1: 100 percent tuition and fees...................................................................$11,004 Spring 2008 All students Jan. 2: 100 percent tuition and fees ..................................................................$10,749 Health Professions, Architecture, Engineering and Computing Sciences Jan. 2: 100 percent tuition and fees...................................................................$11,004 Undergraduate Enrollment in Combined Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program Jan. 2: 100 percent tuition and fees...................................................................$11,004
All undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in evening sessions pay all tuition and fees at registration. Undergraduate senior citizens, aged 65 or older, are eligible for reduced tuition of $473 per credit, plus fees. The reduced tuition for the graduate senior citizen is $496 per credit. NYIT reserves the right to withhold student records, including grade reports and transcripts, until all financial obligations (to include fees, fines and other security deposits) to the college have been satisfied. Notwithstanding anything in this catalog, NYIT expressly reserves the right, whenever it deems it advisable, (1) to change or modify its schedule of tuition and fees and (2) to withdraw, cancel, reschedule, or modify any course, program of study, or degree, or any requirement in connection with any of the foregoing.

Cooperative Work-Study Programs

The college’s flexibility in arranging schedules for a student’s individual needs allows for participation in cooperative work-study programs. Special arrangements are made in this area when appropriate. While on campus, in full attendance, the usual full-time fees apply. In periods spent off campus for approved internships, students receive appropriate credits as planned in advance and pay tuition fees on a per credit basis.
Completion of Payments

Students must conform to the payment policies of the controller’s office and are not entitled to attend classes or laboratories until all fees have been paid or properly deferred by the Office of Financial Aid or Bursar. Registrations are considered valid when all fees have been paid and no outstanding indebtedness to the college exists. Students experiencing temporary financial difficulty or with demonstrated need are invited to seek counsel from the Office of Financial Aid.
Student Expenses

Student expenses at NYIT vary with the student’s academic program, schedule of classes, and whether the student commutes or lives in student housing. Fixed costs are tuition and fees. They are the same for both full-time residential and commuting students. Variable costs include such items as transportation, meals on campus, books and per64

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
sonal expenses. The cost of meals on campus will vary. An average figure for meals is about $400 per semester. This figure does not apply to residential students whose midday meal is covered by their meal plans. Books and personal expenses will depend on the student’s major and individual taste in things like clothes and entertainment. An average figure for this category is $900 per semester. Transportation costs will vary with the distance from the college and the method of transportation and whether the student joins a car pool. The per-semester average cost of travel for commuting students is $650. This category of expense would not apply to residential students. Students with unusual expenses or special budget problems should consult the Office of Financial Aid at the campus to which they apply.
Refunds/Reduction of Indebtedness

Tuition is computed on the assumption that a student will remain throughout the academic year. Since a place in class has been reserved, tuition will only be refunded in accordance with the withdrawal policy. Refunds or reductions in indebtedness are made solely at the option of the college for withdrawals necessitated by conditions beyond the student’s control, such as serious illness or other emergency acceptable to the Committee on Refunds. Refunds or reductions in indebtedness are processed after all required approvals are documented on the withdrawal form. Students withdrawing from the college or course(s) are requested to complete a withdrawal/clearance form which is available at the registrar’s office or the Office of Student Services. The withdrawal/clearance form must include written approval of the school dean, dean of students, registrar, bursar and financial aid. Full-time students are generally required to maintain a minimum registration of 12 credits per semester. A refund or reduction of indebtedness, if approved, will be based on the date of withdrawal determined and recorded on the withdrawal form. Requests for a refund or reduction of indebtedness received more than 12 months from the first scheduled day of the semester or term in question will be denied. Approved refunds are issued in the name of the student and mailed to the student’s permanent address. All refunds are mailed to students. A student who registers for a class and who does not attend any class is subject to the above refund policy. No transcripts, grade reports, or diplomas will be released to any student who owes tuition or fees or fines to the college at the time of the request. Upon payment of the outstanding indebtedness to NYIT, transcripts or grade reports may be released. In the event of a reduction of indebtedness, the schedule, excluding non-refundable tuition deposit and room deposit, is as follows: Drop/Add Period: The drop/ add period for Fall and Spring is the first two weeks of the semester. Students may drop and add courses without financial penalty during this period as long as the drop does not result in a full withdrawal from courses for the term. Students who drop to zero credits are considered to have fully withdrawn from NYIT and are subject to tuition charges in accordance with the NYIT refund policy. Please

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refer to the withdrawal period to determine your tuition and fee liability. Traditional Semester*: 1. Dropping at any time from the date of the students registration through the last day of the second week of the semester—100 percent refund on the tuition and the college fee. 2. Dropping at any time after the start of the third week of the semester—no refund. Cycle*: 1. Dropping at any time from the date of the students registration to the day before the first scheduled day of the cycle—100 percent refund of the tuition and the college fee. 2. Dropping at any time during the first week of the cycle—75 percent refund of tuition only. 3. Dropping at any time during the second week of the cycle—50 percent refund of tuition only. 4. Dropping at any time after the start of the third week of the cycle—no refund.
*Refunds apply to tuition. Please refer to dorm contracts for housing and meal-plan refund policies.

All fees are nonrefundable. If you have any questions regarding the above information, contact the Bursar's Office at 516.686.7511. Summer Courses: 1. Dropping at any time from the date of the students registration to the day before the first scheduled day of the course—100 percent refund of the tuition and the college fee. 2. Dropping at any time during the first and second week of course—50 percent refund of tuition only. 3. Dropping at any time after the start of the third week of the course- no refund. Withdrawal Period: In the case of complete withdrawal from the college, students that were awarded federal Title IV financial aid will be subject to proration on the awards in accordance with applicable federal regulations. The application of federal refund provisions may result in an outstanding balance owed to the college and/or the U.S. Department of Education. Details of the adjustment to federal IV financial aid awards will be provided to the student following the withdrawal process. Non-attendance of classes, informing the instructor of withdrawal, or stopping payment on a check does not constitute an official withdrawal and does not relieve the student of his or her financial obligation. Refunds apply to tuition. Please refer to dorm contracts for housing and meal-plan refund policies. In the event of a full withdrawal, the tuition liability is calculated excluding non-refundable tuition deposit and room deposit, as follows: 66

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Traditional Semester: 1. Withdrawal at any time from the date of the students registration to the day before the first scheduled day of the semester—100 percent refund on the tuition and the college fee. 2. Withdrawal at any time during the first week of the semester—75 percent refund of tuition only. 3. Withdrawal at any time during the second week of the semester—50 percent refund of tuition only. 4. Withdrawal at any time during the third week of the semester—25 percent refund of tuition only. 5. Withdrawal at any time after the start of the fourth week of the semester—no refund. Cycle: 1. Withdrawal at any time from the date of the students registration to the day before the first scheduled day of the cycle—100 percent refund of the tuition and the college fee. 2. Withdrawal at any time during the first week of the cycle—75 percent refund of tuition only. 3. Withdrawal at any time during the second week of the cycle—50 percent refund of tuition only. 4. Withdrawal at any time after the start of the third week of the cycle—no refund. Summer Course: 1. Withdrawal at any time from the date of the students registration to the day before the first scheduled day of the course-100 percent refund of the tuition and the college fee. 2. Withdrawal at any time during the first and second week of course-50 percent refund of tuition only. 3. Withdrawal at any time after the start of the third week of the course- no refund.
Collection Agency Fees

If your account is not paid when due, it may be forwarded to an outside collection agency or attorney. At that time, the student will be responsible for paying NYIT all of the costs associated with the collection of your delinquent account, which includes the payment to NYIT of the principal sums due plus additional costs. Additional costs may include, but are not limited to, collection agency fees constituting 33 percent of the principal balance due if NYIT engages a collection agency to secure payment. If NYIT engages legal counsel to secure payment, additional costs may include legal fees constituting 50 percent of the principal balance due, plus all other costs associated with collection of the deliquent amounts. All collection matters shall be governed by New York law. The courts of New York shall have exlusive jurisdiction in these matters.

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Enrollment of Students
Students who wish to enroll in the college for the purpose of earning a degree, diploma, or certificate must file a written application for matriculated status. Such application is not binding to a specific school or course of study. The college reserves the right to refuse matriculation for specific NYIT schools or majors. Transfer students desiring matriculation will be evaluated on the basis of prior course work. NYIT reserves the right to review a degree candidate’s status at any time on the basis of performance and progress. Non-matriculated students may be admitted to individual courses if they meet the prerequisites for these courses. Students who initially enroll as non-matriculants may file for change of status with the Admissions Office, and are encouraged to apply for admission to the college. Students who do not have a Regents high school diploma or GED must first complete 24 credits as a non-matriculated student, and if they are New York State residents, file for a high school equivalency diploma with the State of New York. Unless they receive an exemption, new students must take NYIT’s placement tests in English and math for them to be placed in the appropriate required courses. An exemption for the English placement test is given to a transfer student if he or she receives a minimum grade of C- in a college composition course. An exemption for the math placement test is also given to a transfer student who has a minimum grade of C- in a college math course such as College Algebra or Finite Math and to students entering the associate degree program in culinary art. If you wish to place out of a more advanced level of mathematics, you will have to take an advanced math placement test at NYIT.

Registration Procedures
NYIT makes every effort to provide registration information prior to the beginning of each registration period, but each student is responsible for completing registration procedures for him/her self. Students must register on the dates indicated in the college calendar. Registration procedures are the same for degree candidates and non-matriculated students. The schedule of tuition and fees appears in this catalog. Early registration within the period designated assures the most flexible choice of program and eliminates early cancellation of under-enrolled course sections. A course may be cancelled by NYIT for any reason, including insufficient enrollment. Official registration in a course section is required in order to earn a grade for a class. Registration must be completed by the end of the change of program period (see Academic Calendar). Therefore, students who have not officially registered for a course section will not receive a grade retroactively. Students are not officially registered until all tuition and fees are satisfied. Attendance is not permitted in any class without official registration for that class. Below each course title in this catalog three numbers are given. The first is the number of hours of classroom work, the second is the number of laboratory and studio hours, and the third is the number of semester hours of credit earned.

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Program Advisors

Each student is assigned an adviser for assistance in structuring a program. NYIT posts a list of program advisers at registration time. The student’s adviser is available for help and guidance, and the adviser’s approval is required for each registration. However, the student must assume final responsibility for conforming to all college regulations and completing curriculum requirements.
Central Advising Center

Students receive primary advising from assigned faculty within their academic departments. The Central Advising Center supplements and supports NYIT’s departmental academic advising initiatives. With the assistance of information technology and videoconferencing, based on sound advising and teaching skills, the center provides timely and accurate information about NYIT academic requirements, policies, procedures, and resources. The center also provides undergraduate students assistance with the interschool transfer process.
NYIT Mission of Advising

NYIT recognizes that developmental advising is a critical component of the educational experience of all its students. Developmental advising encourages students to develop decision-making skills, to think critically about goals and objectives, and to assume responsibility for their actions and plans. NYIT offers a range of academic advising resources that include faculty advising, the central advising center, advising website, on-line degree maps, and the college catalog to assist students in making meaningful educational plans that are compatible with their career goals.
Goals of Advising

As an institution, our goals of academic advising include helping students:
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facilitate successful transition into NYIT; develop suitable educational plans; clarify their life and career goals; select appropriate courses; complete degree requirements in a timely manner; interpret policies and procedures.

Central Advising Center Locations Manhattan 16 W. 61st Street Room 702 212.261.1744 Old Westbury Wisser Library Room 109 516.686.3961

Please note: For major specific advising, please contact your academic department or faculty adviser.

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Change of Program

Students are permitted to add and drop courses as well as sections, during the change of program period, after consulting with an advisor. No change of program may be made after the second week of each semester. (See Academic Calendar for dates.) A change in courses (not sections) may affect the tuition charged and financial aid eligibility.
Withdrawal from a Course

The decision to withdraw from a course is a serious matter and should be made only after consulting with the course instructor and faculty advisor. Be aware that withdrawing from a course may affect eligibility for financial aid. To withdraw from a course the student and the class instructor must complete a withdrawal form and the instructor must submit it to the registrar’s office within 48 hours. A W grade cannot be assigned without submission of the withdrawal form to the registrar. Students cannot withdraw from classes during the final exam period. The type of withdrawal grade assigned will be determined by the date of withdrawal and is outlined in the table below. The W grade will be assigned to students who officially withdraw from a class according to the schedule below. The WF grade may be assigned if the student is failing the course or stopped attending class without officially withdrawing. The withdrawal (W) grade is not included in the computation of the grade point average, but it may affect eligibility for financial aid. The withdrawal failing (WF) is a failing grade and is included in the computation of the grade point average, and may affect eligibility for financial aid. Term Fall and Spring semesters Cycle A, B, C, D Summer I, II and III Intersession Date of withdrawal Withdrawal grade

Third through eighth week of the semester W After the eighth week of the semester Third through eighth class session After the eighth class session See academic calendar Before second class session After second class session W W or WF W or WF W W or WF

The Nursing department has additional rules governing course withdrawals. See nursing information in catalog.
Change of Curriculum or Campus

Changes of curriculum or campus are made only upon the recommendation of the dean and with approval of the registrar. No change of curriculum is effective without an evaluation of the student’s credentials and approval by the new department. No change is complete until recorded in the registrar.

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Change of Matriculation Status

Students who are not matriculated in a degree, diploma or certificate program are limited in the total number of credit-bearing courses they may take. Graduate students may not take more than nine credits, and undergraduates may not take more than 24 credits without matriculating.
Courses at Another College

A degree candidate currently enrolled at NYIT may take courses at another accredited institution for credit. Since not all courses will be accepted for credit toward a degree, students must complete the Permission to Take Courses at Another College form, which is available at the registrar, and abide by NYIT’s residency requirements (see section regarding transfer credits). A course may be taken at another college only when it is unavailable at NYIT during the specific semester. Upon completing the course, students have the responsibility for furnishing the registrar with official transcripts so that credit may be entered in their records. An official transcript must be received at NYIT no later than one month after the course is completed. A grade of C- or better is required for credit. Students on probation may not take courses at another college. Teacher Education candidates who are given permission to take an education course at another college, may be required to submit additional documentation demonstrating achievement of specific knowledge or skills related to the course not taken at NYIT. This documentation may include such things as keystone assignments, lesson plans, field experience logs, essays, or student work samples.
Withdrawal from the College

Students who wish to withdraw from the college may initiate an official withdrawal by contacting the registrar’s office and obtaining a Withdrawal from the College form. Depending on the circumstances, the student’s withdrawal date will be recorded as the date the student began the withdrawal process or the date the student notified the college of his/her intent to withdraw. Tuition and financial aid refunds, if any, will be based on the withdrawal date. For an explanation of what happens to financial aid upon withdrawal from the college, visit the registrar area of the NYIT Web site at: www.nyit.edu. If a student withdraws with a balance due on his/her account, no transcript, information or employment references will be furnished until the account is cleared.
Auditing Courses

NYIT allows, but does not actively encourage, the auditing of courses. A student may register to audit a course after obtaining written permission from the appropriate dean. A previously audited course may be taken for credit at a later date, but may not be challenged. A student who registers for a course on an audit basis cannot elect to change over to a credit basis after the session has started. Similarly, a credit course cannot be changed over to an audit course. All usual tuition and fees must be paid for audited courses.

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Military Leave

NYIT recognizes that students who are also in the Armed Forces Reserve/Guard are subject to call-up for active duty. It is NYIT policy to make every effort to support and assist our students who are with the military. Students who have been called for active duty must present a copy of their duty assignment orders to the registrar, and may select one or more of the following options: Withdrawal from all courses: Students may withdraw from all of their courses and receive a full tuition refund regardless of the number of weeks that have expired in the term. They will receive a W for all their courses regardless of their current class averages. To do this, the student must file a Withdrawal From The College Form with the registrar. Upon return from active duty, the student shall be readmitted without paying the readmimssion fee. Withdrawal from individual courses: Students may withdraw from one or more of their courses and receive a W for a grade regardless of the number of weeks that have expired in the term or of their current class averages. They may be entitled to a tuition refund depending upon the number of credits they have withdrawn compared to the number of credits they have not withdrawn. To do this, the student must file a Withdrawal From A Course form with their instructor, who will submit this form to the registrar. The student remains responsible for both the grades and the tuition for the courses not withdrawn from. Transfer to online courses: Students may transfer one or more of their lecture courses from on-campus sections to online sections if appropriate instructors and course materials are available. There will not be an additional fee charged. Incomplete grades: Students may request an incomplete grade from their instructors in one or more courses. Instructors are not required to grant the grade of incomplete, but are encouraged to give due consideration to the student in such circumstances. If the incomplete grade has been assigned, the student will be required to complete the course requirements within two complete semesters following deactivation from duty (an additional semester extension with approval by the dean and the VPAA or designee may also be given). Students who elect to withdraw from one or more courses should first consult with a campus financial aid adviser. Additionally, students can view the Reserve/Guard Financial aid resource page on the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Web site at http://www.nasfaa.org/linklists/reservistguidance.asp. 72

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Academic Standards
A student receives one of the following grades for each course taken during the semester: Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D W I F PR P WF AU IF
Credit

Quality Points per Credit Excellent 4 3.7 3.3 3 2.7 2.3 2 1.7 1.3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Good

Satisfactory

Marginal, but passing Withdrawn, without penalty Incomplete Failure Progress, re-enroll Passing grade Withdrawn failing Audit Failure from an incomplete

Fall and spring semesters are 15 weeks long. The number of semester hours of credit earned for a course corresponds to the number of academic hours of instruction in a standard week. Two, or in some cases, three academic hours of laboratory or studio work in a standard week during a semester constitute one credit for most programs. Summer session classes are scheduled for an equivalent number of academic hours. Semester hours of credit are granted for the grades A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or P. The temporary grade of incomplete (I) shall change to a failing (IF) grade if the student does not complete all work by the end of the allotted time (see schedule below). Such an IF grade may not be challenged, and the course must be repeated by the student to receive credit. The following policies shall guide the awarding and calculation of the I grade and the change of the I grade to an IF grade:
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The student must request additional time to complete a single project, report or final examination; The grade of incomplete is to be assigned only to students who are otherwise passing the course at the end of the semester; The instructor has the right to refuse the request and may assign a final grade based solely on the work already completed; The grade of incomplete will change to the failing grade if the outstanding course work is not completed in accordance with the schedule in effect at the time it was assigned, regardless of the average the student otherwise maintained in the class (see academic calendar for dates); 73

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A single, short extension of the time period shall be granted only in exceptional circumstances by the vice president for academic affairs; The grade of incomplete will not be assigned to students with excessive absences, especially when those absences include the final sessions of the course, unless extenuating circumstances have been established; The incomplete grade is recorded by the registrar as "attempted credits," until the course is complete; The incomplete grade that changes to a failing grade will carry zero quality points; Students can advance if an incomplete grade is assigned to a prerequisite course for the term immediately following the assignment of an I grade but cannot advance after an I grade changes to an IF; When the grade of incomplete is changed to an IF, the I grade shall remain on the record and the transcript so that it will read IF, thereby distinguishing it from the F and the WF grades; I grades may have an effect on the student's financial aid and/or student visa status. Students are encouraged to meet with the financial aid and/or international student adviser when requesting the I option.

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The grade of PR is used only for developmental courses and intensive English as second language courses for students who have made some progress, but who do not demonstrate satisfactory skills to pass those courses. Students are required to re-enroll in those courses in order to complete them.
Classification of Students by Credits

Freshman ......................................Less than 31 credits earned Sophomore ...................................31-62 credits earned Junior .............................................63-96 credits earned Senior.............................................More than 96 credits earned Fifth year architecture..............More than 133 credits earned Except for graduating seniors, students taking less than 12 credits during a semester will not be certified as full-time students. All students in good standing may take a maximum of 18 credits per semester, without special permission, with the exception of a student on the Dean’s List who may take a maximum of 21 credits per semester. Students may exceed these credit maxima with permission of the deans.
*Note: for some courses in the health professions programs, credit value differs from contact hours. See program descriptions.

Quality Points

Quality points are awarded in accordance with the grade schedule at the top of the previous page. For example, students who earn an A in a three-credit course accumulate four quality points per credit for a total of 12 quality points; a grade of B+ in a threecredit course would accumulate 3.3 quality points per credit for a total of 9.9 quality points; a grade of A in a two-credit course would accumulate four quality points per credit for a total of eight quality points. No quality points are awarded for an F. Similarly, no quality points are assigned for grades of W, WF, P, PR, AU, IF or I. 74

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Academic Standing

At the conclusion of the fall and spring semesters, two averages are computed for each student to indicate the general level of academic standing. The first is called the grade point average (GPA), which indicates the scholarship level for the semester. The second is called the cumulative grade point average (CGPA), which indicates the scholarship level for all work taken at the college. The GPA is computed by adding all* the quality points earned for the semester and then dividing by the number of credits for those courses where the grades of A, A-, B+, B, BC+, C, C-, D+, D, WF, IF or F were received. The CGPA, computed in a similar manner, represents all* the quality points earned during all the semesters the student has attended NYIT, divided by the number of credits for those courses where the grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-C+, C, C-, D, D+, WF, IF or F were received. Students who have earned a C-, D+, D, W, F, WF, IF or PR in a course may retake the course for credit (one or more times) to earn a higher grade. Only the higher grade will be used in computing the GPA and CGPA. The other grade(s) will remain on the student’s record as a matter of information.
*Note: Students who have changed majors, please note — only quality points from the first degree program that are applicable to the present degree program are included. Students receiving financial aid should consult a financial aid counselor prior to changing majors to identify any impact this change may have on their financial aid.

Dean’s and Presidential List

A student who earns a place on the Dean’s Honor List is a full-time matriculated student who has attained a minimum grade point average of 3.50 or higher in any semester in which he or she completed 12 or more credits without any incompletes ("I"), or a part-time matriculated student who has attained a minimum grade point average of 3.60 or higher in any semester in which he or she completed six or more credits without any incompletes ("I"). Students who meet the same standards and earn a 3.70 or above are placed on the Presidential Honor List. Notification of these awards is sent to students, and the appropriate honor is recorded on their transcripts.
Attendance

A student is expected to attend each class session on a regular and punctual basis to obtain the educational benefits that each meeting affords. Students shall be informed by their instructors whether latenesses or absences will be allowed during the semester. Instructors shall inform students of the consequences following excessive absences and/or latenesses. In the event of a student’s absence from a test, the instructor will generally determine whether the student will be allowed to make up the work. The privilege of taking a make-up examination is generally not extended beyond one semester from the original date of examination. Make-up examinations are under the jurisdiction of the appropriate academic dean.
Scholastic Discipline

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proper conduct and achievement of passing grades. Any one of the following is regarded as sufficient cause for dismissal: irregular attendance, neglect of work, conduct deemed by the college not consistent with general good order, or failure to comply with the college’s rules and regulations. The college reserves the right to terminate a student’s enrollment at any time. Every student has the right to petition the NYIT Admissions and Academic Standards Committee for redress of actions affecting academic standing.
Academic Integrity

Plagiarism is the appropriation of all or part of someone else’s works (such as and not limited to writing, coding, programs, images, etc.) and offering it as one’s own. Cheating is using false pretenses, tricks, devices, artifices or deception to obtain credit on an examination or in a college course. If a faculty member determines that a student has committed academic dishonesty by plagiarism, cheating or in any other manner, the faculty member may 1) fail the student for that paper, assignment, project and or/exam, and/or 2) fail the student for the course and/or 3) file a formal charge of misconduct pursuant to the Student Code of Conduct Academic Probation and Suspension. Each student enrolled in a course at NYIT agrees that, by taking such course, he or she consents to the submission of all required papers for textual similarity review to any commercial service engaged by NYIT to detect plagiarism. Each student also agrees that all papers submitted to any such service may be included as source document in the service’s database, solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such papers.
Probation/Dismissal Policy

A student must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 to graduate. A minimum cumulative GPA of 1.70 as a freshman, 1.90 as a sophomore, 2.00 as a junior or senior must be achieved to maintain satisfactory academic status at the college. Probation I: The first time a student’s cumulative GPA falls below the minimum required, the student shall be placed on Probation I for his/her next regular semester. The student will receive a letter from the Office of the Registrar outlining available academic support services and requiring the student to meet with an academic advisor. Probation II: When a student is on Probation I and his/her cumulative GPA falls below the minimum required for two sequential (not necessarily contiguous) regular semesters, the student shall be placed on Probation II for his/her next regular semester. The student will receive a letter from the Office of the Registrar outlining available academic support services and requiring the student to meet with an academic advisor. A student on Probation II status cannot register for more than 12 credits until he/she is removed from probation. Dismissal: When a student’s cumulative GPA falls below the minimum required for three sequential (not necessarily contiguous) regular semesters, the student will be dismissed from the college. Dismissal is defined as ineligible to pursue credit-bearing courses at NYIT for a period of two academic years or until a minimum GPA of 2.0 is earned for the most recent 24 credits taken at another accredited United States institution of higher education. 76 The decision of dismissal shall be automatically appealed to the Committee on

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Academic Probation and Dismissal. The Committee on Academic Probation and Dismissal may uphold the dismissal decision or may recommend reversal of the dismissal decision and may impose additional conditions for continuing registration. Students are limited to one appeal per semester and the committee’s decision is binding and final.
Academic Support Services

Mid-Semester Evaluation. A Mid-Semester Evaluation form is distributed to faculty and staff each semester. Upon completion of this evaluation by faculty, students receive a summary letter indicating academic progress and information on campus resources to address any academic or personal concerns (counseling, tutoring, advising, etc.). Early Warning System. After each semester, students who are placed on probation I , propation 2, or suspension are notified of their academic standing by mail and/or by phone. Each student is encouraged to utilize campus resources (tutoring, advising, counseling) to improve their academic standing. Individual and Group Tutorial Assistance/Study Groups. Learning centers on each campus provide free individual and group tutorial assistance to all NYIT students. First semester students are introduced to these services through the College Success Seminar and are informed of new workshops through the course and from their peer mentors. The campus learning center also provides the forum for study groups in collaboration with instructors for select courses. Academic Advisor. Each new student is assigned a faculty advisor upon admission to NYIT. This strategy emphasizes the importance of a quality relationship between student and faculty. Faculty advisers are available to give special attention to the progress of their advisees from the beginning to the completion of a student’s association with NYIT.
Student Grade Appeal

A student may file a formal challenge to a grade. In order to timely commence such a challenge, a student must notify the instructor in writing, no later than the second week of the succeeding semester, excluding summer session, that she/he wishes to challenge the grade. For further information regarding the NYIT Grade Appeal Procedures, see the Office of the Registrar.
Ownership of Student Work

All work presented or submitted in fulfillment of or in conjunction with a student’s course work shall be the property of NYIT, which may waive this right at its discretion. Students may request reproductions of their work for their portfolios.
Student Educational Records—Annual Notice

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. This law includes the following provisions: 1. The student has the right to inspect his own educational records within 45 days after NYIT receives a request. Requests should be submitted to the registrar, who will arrange a reasonable time and place for the inspection.

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2. The student may request correction of inaccurate or misleading information. To do so, the student should submit the request in writing to the registrar specifying why the information should be corrected. 3. The student may consent to the disclosure of educational records to someone else by submitting a signed and notarized statement identifying the records to be disclosed and the party to whom they should be disclosed. If records are photocopied, a reasonable charge must be paid in advance. 4. NYIT has the right to disclose information in educational records to faculty, staff, and government and accrediting agencies that need the information in their work, to appropriate parties in a health or safety emergency, when authorized by the student, and in response to legal process. 5. The results of a disciplinary proceeding may be disclosed to the person who filed the complaint. 6. If a student believes that NYIT has failed to comply with FERPA, the student may file a complaint with the Family Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington DC 20202-4605.
Student Educational Records—Directory Information

1. NYIT designates the following categories of student information as public or “directory” information pursuant to existing laws, and may disclose or release the information without written consent. 2. Students must inform the college if they do not want this information disclosed by filing a written request at the Registrar’s office. 3. Information: Name; major field of study; address, telephone number; electronic mail address; dates of attendance; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; height/weight (for athletic team members); date/place of birth; degrees and awards received and dates awarded; most recent previous institution attended. NYIT also complies with the federal Solomon Amendment, which requires colleges and universities to provide the following information from student records if requested by military recruiters: Name, local address; telephone listing; age or date of birth; present level of education; such as freshman or sophomore; date of graduation; major field of study
Personal Information Protection Policy

(Applies to students attending NYIT in British Columbia) At New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), we are committed to providing our students with exceptional service. As providing this service involves the collection, use and disclosure of some personal information about our students, protecting their personal information is one of our highest priorities. While we have always respected our students’ privacy and safeguarded their personal information, we have strengthened our commitment to protecting personal information as a result of British Columbia’s Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA). PIPA, which came into effect on January 1, 2004, sets out the ground rules for how B.C. businesses and not-for-profit organizations may collect, use and disclose personal information. 78

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We will inform our students of why and how we collect, use and disclose their personal information, obtain their consent where required, and only handle their personal information in a manner that a reasonable person would consider appropriate in the circumstances. This Personal Information Protection Policy, in compliance with PIPA, outlines the principles and practices we will follow in protecting students’ personal information. Our privacy commitment includes ensuring the accuracy, confidentiality, and security of our students’ personal information and allowing our students’ to request access to, and correction of, their personal information. The complete policy can be found on the NYIT Web site at www.nyit.edu.
Religious Observances and Academic Requirements

No later than 15 days after the beginning of the semester, students must notify instructors in writing of classes they will not attend due to religious obligations and practices. No student who is otherwise qualified to participate in all educational activities required by an academic program will be expelled, refused admission or otherwise penalized because of religious obligations and practices. The college will make available, at no extra fee, equivalent opportunities to make up examinations, study or work requirements that may have been missed because of an absence for religious observances.
Prerequisite and Co-requisite Courses

Many courses require prerequisite and/or co-requisite courses. A prerequisite course must be passed prior to taking the desired course, and a co-requisite course must be taken at the same time (or in some cases taken before). The chairperson or dean of the program that offers the course is able to waive these course requirements. Prerequisite and co-requisite requirements are listed in the course descriptions of this catalog. It is the student’s responsibility to meet all necessary course prerequisites and co-requisites. If a student enrolls in a course but has not fulfilled the prerequisites or co-requisites for this course, the department chair has the authority to administratively withdraw the student from course. The student will also be referred to the dean of students office, if he/she fails to comply and adhere to the administrative action taken by the academic department in regard to the course.
Requirements for Graduation

All students who wish to be considered candidates for graduation must file an application for graduation with the registrar at the beginning of their last semester. Applications can be completed online at www.nyit.edu. Students are required to complete all program requirements to be eligible for graduation. Prior to the expected graduation date, each student must meet the following academic standards: 1. The satisfactory completion of a designated program of study for the degree. Students are responsible for ensuring that all degree requirements listed in the catalog in effect on the date of their matriculation are fulfilled. Errors on degree maps or senior advisement forms do not constitute a basis for waiving degree requirements. 2. A minimum cumulative quality point average of 2.00. (some programs require a higher CGPA). 79

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3. All undergraduate students must complete the final 30 credits towards their degree in residence. A minimum of 15 credits in the major must be taken at NYIT. At least nine credits of the final 30 must be advanced level courses (300 or higher) at NYIT in the major field of study. Depending on the major field of study, other additional requirements may be required for graduation. Some major fields of study have additional requirements and students are responsible to ensure that they have met all academic standards for graduation. 4. Completed graduation applications must be filed with the registrar according to the dates listed in the academic calendar.
Degrees with Distinction

A graduating student who has attained a cumulative GPA of at least 3.70 receives the baccalaureate degree summa cum laude; at least 3.50, magna cum laude; and at least 3.20, cum laude. These distinctions are noted on students’ diplomas as well as on their transcripts. Students must complete 55 percent of all coursework at NYIT. If 55 percent of the work was not taken at NYIT, grades for only those courses accepted as transfer credit from previous colleges will be computed into the cumulative grade point average. Students must first receive at least a 3.20 at NYIT before transfer credits are included in the cumulative average. Fifty-five percent of all college course grades must be in the form of letter grades from either NYIT or a former college. Students who do not have at least 55 percent of their credits in courses for which letter grades have been given are not considered for honors.
Requirements for a Second Bachelor’s Degree

Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may earn a second bachelor’s degree by satisfying the following requirements; 1. Upon application to the Office of Admissions, the student should be directed to seek formal advisement from the department. With this advisement on record, the student may proceed and be reviewed for acceptance into the program. 2. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 must be earned in the courses taken at NYIT for the second degree. 3. The work toward the second degree must be completed in a major or program distinctly different from the major or program in the first degree. 4. A student must complete all core requirements of an NYIT bachelor’s degree. The work in the major area of concentration must be completed in accordance with the requirements listed in the applicable catalog. 5. A minimum of 36 credits over and above any used to satisfy the requirements of the first bachelor’s degree must be completed at NYIT. A minimum of 18 of these 36 credits must be in the new major field of concentration. Students must be aware that to complete a new major/concentration, it may require significantly more than 36 credits. Students may not re-take courses previously completed toward the first degree. Students should have an approved degree map on file showing an academic plan at the start of their studies.
Notice of NYIT Policies and Procedures

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Policies and procedures in this catalog are binding on every student. NYIT reserves the right to change its policies and procedures, class schedules and academic requirements, at any time.

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NYIT Core Curriculum
The college’s core curriculum, which is an integral part of every undergraduate major, is designed to provide all students with skills and knowledge related to job success, including communication skills and technological literacy. The core is also concerned with students as responsible citizens and to that end provides the broad perspective of history, science and philosophy, and the insights into human behavior that derive from the study of behavioral science and literature. One special feature of all core courses is writing to learn. Since writing about a subject is one of the best ways of learning the subject, each core course asks students to write often, both formally and informally. Such work helps students gain confidence and fluency in all forms of written expression. Core courses incorporate use of the computer as a tool for writers and displaying information; these skills enhance assurance and job success. Core courses contain elements of quantitative reasoning to help students use numbers and quantitative display techniques to understand and communicate core subjects more effectively. Required of all freshmen in their first term, the College Success Seminar provides first semester students with a co-curricular support group, introduces the academic, personal and interpersonal skills that lead to success, and creates a sense of campus involvement. Library instruction and awareness of career services begin in this course. The College Success Seminar is also available to all NYIT students as a two-credit elective. Core courses are listed below, and all students should adhere to them as closely as possible. Some majors, especially those that require professional accreditation, contain specific required courses from the core sequence. Exceptions to the core sequence should not be sought by students or sanctioned by advisers. Subject Areas Credits College Success Seminar* ................................................................2 English composition...........................................................................6 Group A English** ...............................................................................3 Group B English** ...............................................................................3 Speech ...................................................................................................3 Philosophy ............................................................................................3 History or political science..............................................................3 Behavioral sciences............................................................................3 Economics.............................................................................................3 Physical science ..................................................................................3 Life science...........................................................................................3 Mathematics........................................................................................3 Liberal arts ...........................................................................................3 (one course selected from social science, fine arts, communication arts, or other liberal arts subject area) TOTAL....................................................................................41
No single course can be used to satisfy more than one requirement. * All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar. **See page 142 or listing of Group A and Group B courses.

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Retention Rates

NYIT is committed to providing access to education to qualified students. Students whose academic skills are underdeveloped can get help through study skills centers and other supportive services. Academic standards are demanding, however, and not all students who enter are able to graduate. Those who do graduate possess recognized, marketable skills and are routinely placed in jobs in their fields upon graduation or move on to graduate study. The undergraduate student body at NYIT consists of three primary groups: full-time students who either began as freshmen or transferred to NYIT, part-time students (both transfer and first-time) and re-enrolled students who left the college for a semester or more and returned. In the following table, only the full-time undergraduate students, who entered NYIT for the first time in the fall of 1995, are represented. Publication of this table is required of all colleges in New York state, and in all cases includes only full-time students. Cohort Report Full-Time Undergraduate Student Graduation Rates
ENTERING STATUS FULL-TIME FIRST-TIME FRESHMEN subtotals FULL-TIME TRANSFER STUDENTS subtotals REPORT TOTALS Central Islip Manhattan O.Westbury CAMPUS Central Islip Manhattan O.Westbury ENTERING STUDENTS 9/1/00FALL 2000 8/31/01 139 191 358 688 68 149 217 434 1122 0 0 0 0 1 4 1 6 6 9/1/018/31/02 5 0 4 9 16 24 40 80 89 9/1/028/31/03 2 2 3 7 14 29 57 100 107 9/1/038/31/04 23 16 74 113 6 18 34 58 171 9/1/048/31/05 18 29 65 112 4 9 8 21 133 9/1/058/31/06 3 14 14 31 1 4 5 10 41 6-YEAR TOTAL 51 61 160 272 42 88 145 275 547 GRADUATION Still Retention % ATTENDING 37% 32% 45% 40% 62% 59% 67% 63% 49% 3 5 12 17 0 2 2 4 24 % 30% 23% 44% 35% 87% 79% 79% 80% 50%

It is important to note that each year NYIT awards approximately 1,600 undergraduate degrees. The recipients of undergraduate degrees include full-time and part-time students representing multiple cohorts.

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Student Affairs
Complementing the academic mission of the college, the Office of Student Affairs directs co-curricular programs to promote community, personal development, creativity and responsibility in a student-centered learning environment. The Office of Student Affairs coordinates and supervises programs, services and facilities on all campuses with the assistance of professional staff trained in all facets of student life, including career services, counseling, residential life, athletics, international student services, and cultural activities.
First -Year Programs

NYIT's first-year programs are designed to improve the retention of new NYIT students. Recognizing that the first six weeks of college life are crucial to strengthening a student’s ability to succeed at NYIT. The first-year program consists of strategies that focus on enhancing students academic skills, while addressing their need for early social and intellectual bonding with faculty, staff and peers. College Success Seminar (NYIT 101 – 2 credits). The cornerstone to the FYE program is a two-credit, 15-week course designed to provide students with the tools necessary for collegiate success. This course provides support to new students as they develop confidence in their academic and social endeavors.
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All first semester full-time students and transfer students with less than 12 credit hours are required to take the College Success Seminar during their first academic term at NYIT. Withdrawals from the College Success Seminar are not permitted without the approval of the associate dean of student life. Students who do not successfully complete the College Success Seminar in their first semester are required to re-register for the course until a passing grade is achieved. Students may also take the College Success Seminar as a two-credit elective. Students on academic probation may be required to take the College Success Seminar to improve their grade point average if they have not successfully completed NYIT 101.

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The Jump Start Advantage Program. Geared to those eager to get a head start on their quest for an undergraduate degree, new students take the two-credit College Success Seminar along with a required three-credit course during a five-week summer term. Student Orientation Program. NYIT’s orientation program is conducted at the start of both the fall and spring semesters to help connect new students to the college environment and assists them in making associations necessary to remain connected to NYIT. They learn to identify campus resources, key faculty, staff and administration and gain introduction to campus organizations.

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Peer Mentoring Program. A peer mentor is assigned to each first semester student and transfer student who is enrolled in the College Success Seminar. This program focuses on generating a higher level of social contact for new students entering NYIT. Upper level students, chosen as mentors, initiate weekly interaction with new students by phone and short group meetings throughout the first semester. They also share information about campus social life, and periodically arrange activities to promote social and intellectual development. Through their own experiences as college students, the mentors are able to assist students as they face the transitions to college life. Career Advisement and Evaluation. Students in the College Success Seminar meet with a career adviser from the Career Network Center (CNC) for early career exploration, which can include self-assessment tools, exploring potential career choices and activities that engage students in crystallizing their career aspirations. Beyond the College Success Seminar, outreach efforts keep students connected to career advisement and evaluation tasks. Workshops targeting activities relevant to students’ career opportunities and related to their fields of study are offered, and workshops focusing on particular activities and skills needed in a future job search are offered. Focus Groups. New student group meetings give first-year students a forum where they can voice their opinions and their needs; thus making them a part of the college growth process. The First-Year Experience provides a smooth transition into life at NYIT and introduces all students to the skills necessary for success as well as a support system to help them pursue their individual success.
Counseling and Wellness Center

Free confidential counseling services are provided by trained professional staff members to help students actively manage their environment. Counseling services are learning-based, short-term, and include personal and group activities that focus on helping students develop self-confidence, self-reliance, self-identity, manage emotions, and solve problems in their academic, vocational, personal, and social lives. This office provides a holistic approach to wellness education, promoting individual and community wellness through programs and outreach activities. Special programs, workshops, and group sessions are offered for students experiencing difficulties with academic skills, test anxiety, interpersonal skill building, personal growth, substance abuse, relationships, wellness, human sexuality, and other personal concerns. The Counseling and Wellness Center provides referral services to hospitals, clinics and private practitioners when more specialized assistance is needed.

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Office of Career Services

Academic programs at NYIT prepare students for entry into the job market, graduate, or professional schools. The professionals of the Office of Career Services complement curriculum choices by providing personal career guidance, aptitude and interest tests, and training through a series of annual fall and spring semester workshops. These workshops address self-assessment, career choices, employment opportunities, résumé and portfolio preparation, interview skills, and successful job search techniques. Career resource libraries and computer programs are available for student use and provide practical direction and assistance in maintaining contact with organizations seeking trained personnel. Internet access provides the opportunity for online job searches and career preparation. Business, government and industry representatives actively participate in recruitment activities, including sponsorship of corporate exhibits at annual career fairs, conducted during the fall and spring semesters. Internship and externship programs are available in certain curricula. Career advisement and referral services are provided to the students who choose to integrate academic training with professional work experience in their fields of study.
Identification Cards

All students are required to have an NYIT identification card. Cards may be obtained as follows: Old Westbury, Simonson House Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Saturday – Sunday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Manhattan Campus, Information Hall, Room 200 Monday-Friday 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. During registration periods. Additional access may be obtained by calling 212.261.1536.

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Central Islip, Safety Office, Building 66, Room 116 Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. Closed daily from noon – 1 p.m. and 3:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Students must bring proof of registration. The first ID card is free; there is a fee for replacement cards: $10 for commuting students, and $25 for residential students.
Student Employment

Part-time employment directories emphasizing career-related experiences on and off campuses are maintained in the Office of Student Employment. Students who possess appropriate skills and satisfactory academic standing, or who have met financial qualifications, are eligible to apply for on-campus aide or College Work Study positions. The Office of Student Employment is coordinated through the Office of the Dean of Students on each campus to provide a variety of part-time on campus and approved off-campus employment programs for students throughout their years at the college. In a part-time job on campus or off, students enhance their academic experiences by applying learned skills and theories in a practical setting while earning income to assist with college expenses. Employment opportunities are available in many departments on campus whether a program is college-funded or through the Federal College WorkStudy Program. The Office of Student Employment is a clearinghouse for all on-campus employment opportunities for students seeking jobs. Staff members will assist students with their employment searches, and match skills with position descriptions of available jobs. Position listings are available in each office, as well as on the NYIT Web site. To be eligible for employment, a student must be matriculated in good academic standing. For a number of jobs on campus, students must have demonstrated financial need by having filed a Free Application for federal Student Aid form (FAFSA) with the Office of Financial Aid. Students who wish to work on campus must file an employment application and verify status for employment. Although international students are not eligible for federal aid, they can apply for college-funded campus student employment through the Office of Student Employment.
International Students

Professional staff advisers and support services are based at each campus to meet the special needs of international students. Individual and group services are available to assist students with immigration rules, housing, employment, health, personal concerns and academics. Campus activities and special programs, including English conversation groups, companion programs, cultural festivals, social activities and trips are planned each semester in cooperation with international student associations. Special-interest international student organizations provide social and cultural activities on each campus. Active organizations include Caribbean, Chinese, Indian, Pakistani, and Korean clubs.

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Health and Wellness Services

NYIT provides year-round medical services on the Old Westbury and Central Islip campuses through the Academic Health Care Centers of its medical school, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. Centers are open to all students, faculty and staff. Medical services include physical examinations, low-cost inoculations against illnesses as specified by New York State law, laboratory testing and other specialized services. New York State laws require all students enrolled for at least six (6) credits or equivalent per semester to provide written proof of immunization against Measles, Mumps and Rubella and a Meningococcal Meningitis Vaccination Response. Students must submit a completed copy of NYIT’s “Student Immunization Form” to the Office of Wellness Services. Students will not be permitted to register for courses or attend classes without written proof of immunization compliance. In addition, the college offers a 12-month Basic Sickness Plan and Supplemental Accident and Sickness Plan. All students living in college-sponsored residential facilities and all international students holding an F-1 Visa are required to carry this insurance policy. The cost of the policy is automatically charged to the student’s Bursar account each semester. Coverage is voluntary for full-time and part-time domestic commuter students. Cost information and enrollment forms are available through the school’s insurance plan administrator.
Residential Programs

NYIT maintains full-service residential facilities and support services at the Central Islip, NYIT at SUNY Old Westbury Campus and Manhattan Campus for full-time undergraduate and graduate students. The Offices of Residential Programs offers theme-based and traditional residence halls managed by full-time trained professional staff. The residential “themes” at Central Islip include the Culinary Arts Program and Vocational Independence Program. The NYIT at SUNY Old Westbury and Manhattan campus residential programs; include themes addressing the academic and interpersonal needs of architecture and design students, first-year experience, leadership development and graduate/international education. The primary goal of residence hall living is to promote the student’s intellectual, social, cultural, and interpersonal growth and maturity.
Food Services

Full-service cafeterias, vending operations and snack bars in multiple locations are available during each day of classes and throughout the calendar year. NYIT Food Serv ices offers snacks and meals to students on a cash or meal-plan basis.
Transportation

Regulary scheduled bus service is offered between our Old Westbury campus and the residence halls at the academic village in Old Westbury. Public bus services also are available within walking distance to students on all campuses.

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Parking Stickers

Parking stickers are mandatory at the Old Westbury campus and Central Islip site. Old Westbury students must apply at the Buildings and Grounds Office, Simonson House. Students at Central Islip must apply at the Safety Office. Stickers are free of charge.
Parking

Parking fields at Old Westbury and Central Islip service students, faculty, staff and visitors. All drivers are expected to observe NYIT campus rules and traffic regulations. Parking areas are used at the owner’s and operator’s own risk. Traffic and parking violations require payment of fines unless appeals to designated college authorities are successful. All students must register their vehicles with NYIT Security/Safety Office. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action. Reduced rate parking is available for Manhattan campus students at Central Parking System, 345 W. 58th St., entrance on 60th Street between Broadway and 9th Avenue, and at Prior Parking, 40 W. 61st St., between Broadway and 9th Avenue.
Campus Security

The Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990 requires colleges and universities to publish statistics concerning incidents of criminal behavior that reportedly occurred on campus. This includes information on the number of burglaries, motor vehicle thefts, robberies, aggravated assaults, rapes and murders, and the number of arrests for violations of liquor, weapons-possession, and drug-abuse laws. NYIT presents this required data for its Central Islip, Manhattan and Old Westbury campuses. As these statistics show, NYIT provides safe and secure environments to members of the college community at each of its three campus locations. For more information visit our Web site at www.nyit.edu; go to “About NYIT” and then “general information.” 2004 Old Central Westbury Manhattan Islip
Aggravated Assault Burglary Motor Vehicle Theft Murder Manslaughter Arson Forcible Sex Offenses Non-Forcible Sex Offenses Robbery ARRESTS: Liquor Law Violations Drug Violations Weapons Violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2005 Old Central Westbury Manhattan Islip
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

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Veterans’ Affairs

The NYIT Enrollment Services Center provides assistance and referral services to meet individual academic and personal needs of part- and full-time veterans and dependents who qualify for Veterans’ Administration education payments, work-study jobs, tutorial assistance, or special vocational rehabilitation programs resulting from a serviceconnected disability. The New York State Vietnam Veterans Tuition Award Program provides educational financial assistance to qualified veterans and students serving in armed forces reserve units or the National Guard who are enrolled, full- or part-time, in undergraduate degree programs.
Accommodation Policy for Students with Disabilities

It is the policy of NYIT to provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities, including learning disabilities, physical impairments and other disabling conditions. Possible accommodations include, but are not limited to, test schedule modifications, class relocation and possible assistance in acquisition of necessary equipment. Admission requirements for disabled students are the same as for all other students. The college does accept ACT and SAT scores given under special conditions (i.e., extended time or oral). Reasonable accommodations will be made upon proof both of disability and need for the accommodation. It must be understood that accommodations for disabilities are meant to facilitate educational opportunities. Admission to the college and accommodations do not guarantee success. Therefore, in addition to accommodations, the college encourages use of auxiliary services available to all students to maximize opportunities for success. Students whose disabilities require accommodation must complete a Request for Accommodation form, and an intake interview with a campus services coordinator prior to the academic term. A student can request accommodation at any point during the academic term. However, accommodations cannot be applied to past failures, only to future academic endeavors. Appropriate modifications of accommodations will be worked out on a case-by-case basis and will not necessarily incorporate all requested changes. Students for whom auxiliary services have been approved, such as readers, interpreters, or note takers, etc., should arrange these services with the campus services coordinator. In addition to discussing appropriate educational modifications, the coordinator will serve as a liaison with other college faculty and administration on behalf of students with disabilities, including the Office of Human Resources for those students who are also employees and in need of accommodation in the workplace. Students with disabilities are encouraged to take advantage of the following related services available to all students at the college: I Use of the campus learning centers and listing of free tutorial services; I Individual, confidential counseling and advisement about their concerns; I Academic monitoring, career advisement, general study skills, time management and goal setting assistance; I Referral to qualified resources for diagnostic evaluation of learning disabilities at the student's expense.

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NYIT does not offer students with disabilities the following: I Diagnostic evaluation for disabilities; I Special classes; I A reduced standard for academic performance; I Exemption to graduation requirements; I Credit for effort in place of demonstrated competence in the content. Disabilities and Temporary Disabilities Students wishing to discuss the availability of services for the disabled or temporarily disabled, or who wish to identify barrier problems should contact the campus services coordinator or the disabilities compliance coordinator. For further information regarding disability-related programs or services contact: ADA/Disabilities Compliance Coordinator Theobald Hall, Room 401 Northern Boulevard Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000 516.686.7976 Campus Services Coordinators Old Westbury campus Theobald Hall, Room 401 516.686.7976 Manhattan campus Information Hall, Room 231 212.261.1770

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Student Activities
NYIT campuses provide a student developmental environment that promotes leadership and responsibility through involvement in cultural, educational and social events outside the classroom. Most activities are initiated through student-run, extracurricular and academic organizations, including publications, radio stations, and groups with social, service, religious, and special-interest affiliations. The Offices of Student Activities on all campuses coordinates extracurricular activities and provides liaison with student government organizations. Professional staff members advise student organizations, schedule campus facilities for student programs, assist in forming new clubs, and coordinate the orientation program for new students. Academic Clubs. NYIT academic schools actively advise and support student-run organizations, most of which maintain national affiliation with professional societies. Involvement and membership include participation in special projects, benefits of affiliation with professional societies, and assisting the school and its students in furthering educational programs. Academic school clubs, include American Institute of Architecture Students, American Society of Interior Design, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Behavioral Sciences Club, Biomedical Engineering Society, Criminal Justice Club, Financial Management Association, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, National Society of Black Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Society of Hosteurs. Honor Societies. International and national honor societies, recognizing distinction in scholarship and achievement, offer membership to academically gifted students. General honor societies recognize overall academic achievement. NYIT has chapters in two nationally recognized general honor societies: 1) Golden Key International Honour Society that accepts full-time, fully matriculated students who have successfully completed at least 50 semester hours, with at least 25 of those semester hours at NYIT, and have demonstrated scholastic excellence by maintaining a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, and 2) Phi Eta Sigma National Freshman Honor Society that accepts full-time matriculated students who have earned a 3.5 grade point average during their first year of registration in the college and who have not completed more than 20 semester hours or 30 quarter hours at another college or university after high school graduation and before matriculation at NYIT. Discipline specific honor societies recognize high academic achievement among students majoring in particular subjects. NYIT has active chapters in a number of discipline specific national honor societies: Tau Sigma Delta (Architecture), Delta Mu Delta (Business), Tau Alpha Pi (engineering technology), Psi Chi (psychology), Alpha Epsilon Rho (communication arts and broadcasting), Chi Alpha Chi (culinary arts), and Phi Eta Epsilon (occupational therapy). Membership is open to upper-class and graduate students and each is administered through their respective academic schools. Nu Ypsilon Tau is a local, general academic honor society for students who have a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 for at least 62 credits earned and for transfer students who have completed a minimum of 45 of the 62 credits at NYIT and have obtained a cumulative grade point average of 3.40. Each year’s edition of ”Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges” includes a full range of NYIT seniors. Recommendation of candidates is made by faculty and student affairs personnel on the basis of scholarship, participation in extracurricular activities and service to the college. 91

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Student Government. The Student Government Association is the self-governing, policy-making and executive structure for students on each campus. Each student government provides activities and programs geared specifically to the needs and interests of students on the different campuses. All undergraduate day students are automatically members of one of these three organizations. Each student government recognizes and funds academic and special-interest clubs, and works with the college to provide activities that enhance the quality of education and student life. The deans of students have administrative authority over all NYIT student governments. Student Organizations Following is a description of some currently active student organizations. NYIT will support the organization and activities of new student groups only if they have been officially recognized. Special-Interest Groups. Each campus and its student government offer participation and membership in special-interest clubs, such as International Student Association, Law Club, Women’s Association, African Peoples Organization, Jewish Student Union, Hispanic Student Council, Role-Players/Gamers Association, and Theatre Club. Cultural Activities. The College-Wide Cultural Committee — comprised of administrators, faculty, student leaders and community leaders — plans annual programs of chamber music, symphony, band and jazz concerts, modern dance, and poetry readings, and sponsors presentations on a regular basis during which faculty members discuss contemporary topics. Social Organizations. Fraternities and sororities play an active role in the student activities program at NYIT. Membership emphasis is placed on leadership, friendship, creativity and responsibility through social and service projects. Religious Organizations. Jewish Student Union, Christian Fellowship, Muslim and Newman Clubs are active in planning religious, cultural, educational, social and nonsectarian activities events for students, faculty and staff. Student Media. The Campus Slate at Old Westbury, and The Chronicle in Manhattan are student-funded and student-run newspapers. Campus Radio Stations. NYIT maintains a student-operated radio station, WNYT at the Old Westbury campus. Transmissions originate via commercial cable and may be heard directly in student lounges, meeting rooms and cafeterias. Student staff members manage the station and assume roles of disc-jockeys, announcers, newscasters, newswriters, programmers and business agents.
Women’s Association

Everyone is invited to participate in the activities of this group that supports programs related to the experiences of women. Activities include discussion groups, luncheons, and speakers on topics such as careers, affirmative action, and women’s physiology. The annual celebration of Women’s History Month includes special programs and educational lectures on current topics.

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Athletics and Recreation

NYIT’s Long Island campuses offer a competitive intercollegiate athletic program organized for men and women. Men’s varsity teams compete in baseball, basketball, lacrosse, soccer, indoor and outdoor track and field, and cross country. Women’s varsity teams include intercollegiate cross country, soccer, softball, indoor and outdoor track and volleyball. Varsity teams compete with colleges throughout New York and in neighboring eastern states under the auspices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference (ECAC), and the East Coast Conference (ECC). Baseball is an NCAA Division I sport and all other varsity teams compete in Division II. Intramural and recreation programs are offered at all campuses for men and women. Organized activities promote the concept of total development through competition providing students opportunities to improve emotional and physiological qualities, and to develop skills in leadership, discipline, loyalty and a sense of fair play. Intramural and recreational activities vary on each campus and include aerobics, basketball, flag football, soccer, softball, table tennis, volleyball, tennis and weightlifting. There is a full fitness center and weight room on the Old Westbury campus.
NYIT Policies Affecting Students

Students who accept enrollment at NYIT are responsible for knowledge of, and compliance with, all policies and rules affecting students, including but not limited to those in the student handbooks, traffic and parking regulations, and residence life as a condition upon which the student’s status at the college is contingent. Specific policies affecting students include: Student Code of Conduct Policy on Alcohol and Drugs Sexual Harassment Use of Campus Facilities Immunizations Residential Life Traffic Rules and Regulations Academic Integrity Policy Copies of any or all policies and rules affecting students are available on all campuses through the Offices of Student Affairs, Student Activities, Counseling and Residential Life, as well as on the Web site: www.nyit.edu.
Alumni Placement

NYIT actively follows with great interest the careers of its graduates. Questionnaires are mailed to alumni from time to time, and the results are compared to the U.S. Department of Labor statistics and quarterly reports of the Placement Council. A high percentage of NYIT graduates have been determined to be gainfully employed in their chosen fields of academic study. Graduate and professional school advisement and referrals, in conjunction with academic schools, are provided through the Office of Career Services. NYIT alumni attend postgraduate schools throughout the United States and successfully complete degree programs in every field of study. 93

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Honors and Awards
NYIT recognizes outstanding scholarship, service and leadership. Through the interest of various individuals and organizations, the following are conferred for distinctive student achievement: Dorothy Schure Memorial Award In memory of Dorothy Schure, a founder and member of the Board of Trustees of NYIT, annual cash awards are granted to students whose extracurricular activities reflect concern, support and dedication to the college community at large. Leonard J. Knuth Trustees’ Award To the full–time student graduating with the highest scholastic average in the class with 55 percent or more credits taken at NYIT. Evan Rubin Memorial Award Conferred at school recognition ceremonies each year to the student who is viewed as having manifested the greatest concern for other individuals within the NYIT community. Honor’s Program Certificate Awarded to students in the honor’s program who have met or exceeded all requirements of the program. Honor’s Program Award for Excellence Presented to the student(s) in the honor’s program who have earned the highest cumulative GPA. Special Program Award—HEOP Awarded to Higher Education Opportunity Program participants who have demonstrated exceptional educational achievements. recognition of demonstrated scholarly achievement and potential outstanding contribution to the behavioral science of criminal justice. Excelsior Award in Nursing Conferred by the nursing faculty upon the graduating student with the highest overall GPA. Madeline M. Leininger Award in Nursing Conferred by the faculty of the nursing department upon the graduating student who best exemplifies the application of transcultural nursing principles to the challenge of nursing practice in a global society. Life Sciences Award For outstanding scholarship in the field of life sciences. Life Sciences Faculty Award For outstanding service to the discipline of life sciences. Florence Nightingale Award in Nursing Conferred by the faculty of the nursing department upon the graduating student who best embodies the spirit of nursing. Nursing Chairs Award Conferred by the chairperson of the Department of Nursing upon the graduating student who has demonstrated significant perseverance in the pursuit of success in nursing. Nursing Leadership Award Conferred by the nursing department faculty upon the graduating student who has demonstrated outstanding service to students and faculty of the program in nursing and to the NYIT community. Physician Assistant Studies Academic Performance Award For outstanding academic performance in the didactic phase of the program. Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Performance Award For outstanding academic performance in the clinical year. Physician Assistant Studies Leadership Award For leadership, dedication and service to the PA program, college and community. Psychology Award Conferred by behavioral sciences faculty on a graduate from each campus in recognition of demonstrated scholarly achievement and potential outstanding contribution to the behavioral science of psychology. David G. Salten Award Awarded by the Alumni Federation for excellence in the natural sciences. Sociology Award Conferred by the behavioral sciences faculty on a graduating student in recognition of demonstrated scholarly achievement and potential outstanding contribution to the behavioral science of sociology.

Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences B.S./D.O. Award For outstanding scholarship in the BS/DO program. B.S./D.O. Service Award For outstanding service to the student body and improvement of college life at NYIT. B.S./D.O. Pre–Clinical Education Award For the most outstanding BS/DO student in his/her first year of medical school. Biomedical Society Award Presented by the officers of the Biomedical Society for outstanding service in the life sciences. Community Mental Health Award To a graduating student in recognition of demonstrated scholarly achievement and potential outstanding contribution to the behavioral science of community mental health. Criminal Justice Award Conferred by the behavioral sciences faculty on a graduate from each campus in

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achieved a high scholastic record in architectural technology. Certificate in Teacher Education, Life Sciences Conferred by the life sciences faculty for excellence in teacher education. Michael Brian Unger Award Presented in memory of a youthful victim of cancer to a graduating student whose scholarly achievement in the life sciences denotes an outstanding graduate with a promising future. Michael Wubnig Memorial Scholarship Award To the outstanding graduating senior in behavioral sciences who enrolls in the graduate M.P.S. program. Certificate for Achievement in Architecture Gold and silver certificates awarded by the architecture faculty to graduates who have achieved a high scholastic record in the bachelor of architecture program. Salvatore Coco Memorial Design Fellowship Award To a third-year architecture design student for outstanding achievement in design. Salvatore Coco Memorial Design Fellowship Citation To an outstanding architecture student enrolled in the evening program. Dean’s Award for Design Excellence Awarded by the dean of the School of Architecture and Design to a graduating senior who has achieved excellence in the architecture program. John Emmi Memorial Award Presented to the interior design graduate in Old Westbury with a high academic standing who has excelled in interior design. Named in memory of a former student. The Raymond F. Fellman Design Fundamentals Fellowship Award To design fundamentals students showing the greatest promise in the field of architecture. Leonard Horowitz Award To the interior design graduate in Old Westbury who has excelled in the discipline of interior design. Named in memory of a former student. Interior Design Award Conferred by the architecture and design faculty for excellence in interior design. Interior Design Faculty Award Conferred by the architecture and design faculty for outstanding achievement in interior design. Gary Hess Memorial Scholarship Established in memory of the many contributions of the late Professor Gary Hess. Funds from this traveling scholarship will be awarded to deserving students who have demonstrated superior academic achievement in the NYIT School of Architecture and Design. Robert Jensen Memorial Award Presented by the faculty to a graduating student in architecture for exceptional abilities in one or more of the following fields of study: architectural history, architectural theory and criticism, historic preservation and craft–based architectural design. Melvin Lerner Memorial Award Presented to the interior design graduate in Old Westbury for excellence in leadership, service to the college and promise of professional merit through performance and personality.

Architecture and Design Alpha Rho Chi Medal National Professional Fraternity of Architecture Award presented to a senior for leadership, willing service to the college, and promise of professional merit through attitude and personality. American Institute of Architects Henry Adams Medal and Certificate A medal of achievement and a certificate of achievement to outstanding architecture students. Architectural Chairs’ Award Awarded by the School of Architecture and Design chairpersons at each campus to the graduate who has achieved distinction in architectural design. Maria A. Bentel Memorial Thesis Travel Grant Awarded by a review committee composed of the dean, thesis coordinator, and a senior faculty and one other full time faculty to a female fourth year student in the bachelor of architecture program for travel related to a proposed thesis project. Selection will be based on the review of a written proposal, the student’s academic record and a portfolio. Named in memory of the first female tenured architecture faculty at NYIT. Michael T. Berthold Energy Conservation Award Awarded to a graduating senior in the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Technology or Bachelor of Architecture program who has demonstrated ecologically sensitive and environmentally sound designing architecture or community planning. Certificate for Architectural Design Gold and silver certificates awarded by the architecture faculty design committee to the most deserving graduating five–year students in architecture. Based on the five–year exhaustive review of very high excellence. Certificate for Achievement in Architectural Technology Gold and silver certificates; awarded by the architecture faculty to graduates who have

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The Long Island Chapter of the American Institute of Architects Award To an architecture student for the winning solution in the spring architectural competition. This tuition award is established with an annual fund sponsored jointly by the Long Island Chapter of the AIA and NYIT. The Long Island Chapter of the American Institute of Architects Annual Sophomore Award A renewable scholarship awarded to a sophomore attending Old Westbury for academic achievement and dedication to architecture as a career. The Thomas Mojo Design Fellowship To first–year architectural design students showing the greatest promise in the field of architecture. The New York Council of the Society of American Registered Architects Award To the senior student in the bachelor of architecture program who has given worthy service to the school and to other students in friendship, assistance and constructive attitude. The New York Society of Architects Matthew W. Del Gaudio Award Presented for excellence in total design to a graduating student in each of the architectural schools in the state. Outstanding Service to the Department Award Conferred by the interior design faculty for outstanding service to the department. Arthur J. Pettorino Memorial Award Presented to a graduating student in the architectural technology program, selected by the faculty, in recognition of outstanding achievement in the study of architectural technology. Gina Pisano Ricci Award To the female graduate, architecture program, who has shown outstanding ability and leadership, willingness to serve and promise of professional achievement. Special Faculty Award for Service and Involvement Conferred by the faculty to a graduating student in the architecture program, at each campus, who has generously served the student body and thereby improved the quality of life within the School of Architecture and Design. The Spector Competition for Architectural Design To the winners of an annual student competition for resolution of a particularly difficult architectural problem. A class project for third- and fourth–year architectural design majors, the resulting plans, models and renderings are judged by leading architects from the community and the NYIT architecture faculty. Sponsored by Michael Harris Spector of the Spector Group. John Tam Memorial Award To the interior design graduate in Old Westbury who has excelled in the program. Named in memory of a former student.

Arts and Sciences
Arts

Certificate for Art Faculty Award Conferred by the fine arts faculty to the graduating senior who has shown distinction and promise in the field of fine arts. Computer Graphics Faculty Award Conferred by the fine arts faculty for excellence in computer graphics. Graphic Design Faculty Award Conferred by the faculty for outstanding achievement in graphic design. Animation Faculty Award Conferred by the fine arts faculty for outstanding achievement in an animation project. Web Design Faculty Award Conferred by the fine arts faculty for outstanding achievement in a Web design project. Fine Art Department Chairperson Award Conferred by the fine arts department to the student with the highest academic record in the major. Outstanding Service to the College Award Conferred by the fine arts faculty for outstanding service. Certificate in Teacher Education, Fine Arts Conferred by the fine arts faculty for excellence in teacher education. Faculty Award for Best Web Design Project Awarded to a student who has completed the best web design project as judged by a committee of fine arts faculty. The Marvin Horowitz Sculpture Award Awarded to the student who excels in the discipline of digital sculpture. The Valdis Kupris Painting Award Awarded to the student who excels in the discipline of digital painting. The Cornelius Scholl Photography Award Awarded to the student who excels in the discipline of digital photography. Interdisciplinary Studies Award To graduating seniors in recognition of outstanding scholarship and overall achievement. Dr. Chung S. Lee Memorial Scholarship This scholarship is intended for majors in political science, and has been established in memory of Professor Chung S. Lee.

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Professor Carl A. Atkins Award To a graduating senior from the Manhattan campus for proficiency in English. Named in honor of a former faculty member. Ann McLaughlin Award Recognizes outstanding scholarship in English by a graduating senior. Named in honor of a former staff member of the English department. Social Sciences Award To a graduating senior who has demonstrated excellence in a degree program of social sciences. Society for Technical Communication (New York Chapter) Scholarship Awards Cash awards, based on an annual competition, to undergraduate students showing excellence and achievement in technical writing. Technical Writing Award Conferred by the technical writing faculty for excellence in the subject. Humanities Award Conferred to recognize excellence in writing and scholarship by a graduating senior majoring in English or political science.
Sciences

William M. Altman Award To the communication arts graduate in Old Westbury with high academic standing and all–around excellence. Named in memory of a former faculty member. J. Jack Brown Memorial Award Awarded to a graduating student in communication arts, Old Westbury, who has chosen film as a specialization and has excelled in this field. Named in memory of the father of a communication arts staff member. Neal Martin Cohen Memorial Award To the communication arts graduate in Old Westbury who has done outstanding work in the field of broadcasting. Named in memory of a former faculty member. Communication Arts Award Conferred on graduating students at the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses for high academic average in communication arts. Regina Greene Service Award Awarded to a graduating student in communication arts who has shown unusual dedication and service to the program. Named in honor of a dedicated former staff member who served the communication arts department for more than a quarter century. Charles J. Kambourian Advertising Achievement Award Conferred on a graduating student whose work shows great promise in the field. Named in honor of the first chairperson of the advertising program. The John R. Mazey Memorial Award Conferred on a graduating senior in communication arts from the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses for an outstanding, professional advertising project. Media Production Award Conferred by the School of Arts, Sciences and Communication on a graduating student for an outstanding, professional media production. Philip Miele Memorial Award To a graduating student for excellence in public relations and/or advertising. Named in memory of a former chairman and faculty member. Lee Morrison Memorial Award To graduating students in communication arts, Old Westbury and Manhattan, for overall excellence in the field of radio. Named in memory of a former faculty member. New York Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Science Award Awarded to graduating communication arts students at the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses who excel and show promise in the area of television.

Annual Physics Prize For outstanding scholarship, character and dedication to the field of physics. Eugene Odin Memorial Award Presented to the graduate who has achieved the greatest efficiency and progress in mathematics. Named in memory of a former faculty member. Harvey Pollack Scholarship Award To deserving NYIT students whose studies are in the field of physics. Named in memory of a former member of faculty and staff.
Communication

Advertising Copy Award To the advertising degree graduating student at the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses who has demonstrated the most outstanding skills in advertising writing. Advertising Design Award To the advertising degree graduating senior at the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses who has excelled in advertising design. Advertising Leadership Award To the advertising degree graduating senior at the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses who has demonstrated outstanding leadership in management of professional and academic advertising projects. Advertising Presentation Award To the advertising degree graduating student at the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses who has demonstrated the most outstanding presentation skills.

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Frank Spreeman Memorial Award Awarded to the communication arts graduate, at the Old Westbury campus with high academic standing, who has done outstanding work in the field of public relations. Named in memory of a beloved family member of the communication arts department. Edith Wigutow Memorial Award Presented to a graduating student in communication arts at the Manhattan campus for scholarship and all–around excellence. Award for Excellence in a Professional Field Project – UFT/ TC Conferred upon a deserving student for excellence in preparation of a professional thesis/project related to instructional technology and childhood or adolescence education. Award for Excellence in Professional Training Presented to a deserving graduate for outstanding performance in the field of training and learning technology. Dean’s Award for Academic Excellence in Educational Leadership and Technology Bestowed on a graduate of the educational leadership and technology program who has demonstrated superior academic achievement by earning a 4.0 GPA, a superior rating on the course portfolio, and a strong faculty recommendation. Faculty Award for Educational Leadership Given to a graduate of the Educational Leadership and Technology program in recognition of superior leadership during the internship and within the cohort. The recipient illustrates the spirit of "team leader," has earned a GPA of 3.75 or higher, and has received superior recommendations from cooperating administrators during internship. Technology Leader Award Given to a graduate of the educational leadership and technology program in recognition of superior expertise in the use and integration of technology in educational administration, teaching and learning. The recipient has demonstrated this expertise through exemplary work in the application of technology in course work and practice and has taken a leadership role in the use of technology within the cohort or internship setting. Dean’s Award for Academic Excellence in School Counseling Presented to a graduate of the school counseling program who has demonstrated excellent academic achievement earned a superior rating on the course portfolio, and received a strong faculty recommendation. Dean’s Award for Academic Excellence in Mental Health Counseling Presented to a graduate of the mental health couseling program who has demonstrated excellence academic achievement, earned a superior rating on the course portfolio, and received a strong faculty recommendation. John J. Theobald Graduate Achievement Award for Counseling Leadership Presented to a graduate of the School counseling or mental health counseling program in recognition of outstanding leadership within the cohort and in the field. The recipient illustrates the spirit of leader-advocate, demonstrated excellence in academic work, and has received superior recommendations from cooperating professionals during internship.

Education Career and Technical Education Awards Awarded to the graduate and certified teacher of career and technical education subject who has achieved a high quality grade point average in: business and marketing education, health occupations, trade subjects or technical subjects. Award for Excellence in Technology Teacher Education Presented to the outstanding graduate and certified teacher who has achieved a high quality grade point average. Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Childhood Education Awarded to the graduate who has demonstrated significant growth in professional responsibility and competence, and has manifested effective sensitivity in teaching. Award for Excellence in Adolescence Education Awarded to the graduate who has demonstrated great growth in professional responsibility and competence, and manifested effective sensitivity in teaching. John J. Theobald Achievement Award in Graduate Childhood Education Conferred upon a deserving student in the Master of Science in Childhood Education program, based on scholarship and outstanding contribution to the college and /or community. Dean’s Award for Excellence in Instructional Technology – Off-Campus Students Conferred upon off-campus students in instructional technology, who have shown superior accomplishment in teaching, scholarship and the integration of technology in instruction. John J. Theobald Graduate Achievement Award in Instructional Technology Conferred upon a deserving student in the Master of Science in instructional technology program, based on scholarship and outstanding contribution to the college and/or community.

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Culinary/Hospitality Management

Chefs’ Award Conferred by chefs in the discipline to a graduating student for excellence in production throughout the degree program. Dean’s Award Conferred on a graduating student who has demonstrated academic and career excellence through major improvements as a student and as member of the industry and/or who has publications related to hotel, enology, institutional or restaurant administration that have brought credit to the student, the school and the college. Department of Culinary Arts Award Presented by chefs to a graduating student who demonstrates excellence in performance and high academic achievement. Director’s Award Conferred by the director and chefs to the graduate who best exemplifies management skills in the discipline. Hotel Faculty Award Conferred by the faculty of the hospitality management department on the student who has demonstrated continued service, concern and support of the school, the college and the industry. Society of Hosteurs Club Award Presented to a graduating senior who has made a significant contribution to the club. Student Colleague Award Conferred by students on a colleague who best exemplifies team–work and consistency in the program. Whitsons Scholarship A cash award given to culinarian contest winner. Engineering Sciences and Computing

Dean’s Award Presented by the dean of the School of Engineering and Computing Sciences to the graduating student at each of the campus who has achieved high academic average in the bachelor of science program in computer science. Electrical Engineering Award Awarded to the graduating student at each campus for creativity, ability and service in this discipline. Electrical Engineering Faculty Award Awarded by the Old Westbury faculty to the graduate who has attained superior scholastic achievement and participation in the discipline. Environmental Technology Faculty Award Awarded to the graduating student in the undergraduate environmental technology discipline who combines outstanding scholarship with personal and professional achievement. Andrew Farber Memorial Award To the full–time electrical engineering undergraduate who has achieved excellence in the field throughout the four–year program. The Gottlieb Koenig Achievement Award Presented to graduating senior with a high academic average in mechanical engineering and a record of service to the college and/or the outside community. N.A. Karr Award Presented to graduating students in computer science at each of the campuses who have high scholastic averages and records of service to the campus community. Louis Liss Memorial Award To the upper–class student of electrical engineering who has shown creative ability and ingenuity in the field. Metropolitan Club, Association of Old Crows Scholarship To an upper–class student in electrical engineering to encourage the pursuit of a career in the electronic defense profession. Henry and Alice Schiff Award To the student with a high academic average in the Bachelor of Science program in industrial engineering. School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Telecommunications Award To the graduate who demonstrates academic excellence in the program. Samuel Shapiro Scholarship Award To the graduate of the School of Engineering and Computing Sciences deemed most worthy in his or her pursuit of graduate studies.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Outstanding Student Award To a graduating student who has made a great contribution toward the operations of the student branch of the AIAA. American Society of Mechanical Engineers Award In recognition of outstanding academic achievement in the mechanical engineering major throughout a four–year program. Bachelor of Technology Faculty Award To the graduate at each campus who has attained superior scholastic achievement and participation in the program. Computer Science Faculty Award To the graduating senior at each campus for creativity, ability and service in the discipline of computer science.

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Management Nat Deerson Scholarship Award Conferred on an Old Westbury graduating student for academic excellence in one of the management degree programs, who has a sincere desire to pursue a career in law. Delta Mu Delta National Honor Society Award Conferred by Alpha Xi, the NYIT chapter of the national business honor society, in recognition of outstanding scholarship in business. Finance, Accounting and Management Association Award To the student who has excelled in extracurricular activities related to the business program. New York CPA Society Award To the student graduating with a high academic average in accounting who shows promise in the public accounting profession. School of Management Award Conferred on graduating students who have achieved the highest averages in the majors offered by the discipline: accounting, business administration, management, marketing, MIS and finance. Benjamin and Ethel Silverstein Award Conferred on a graduating student in recognition of outstanding achievement in finance. Wall Street Journal Achievement Award To a graduating student who has achieved excellence in business studies. NYIT Alumni Award To graduating students from each campus who have contributed outstanding service to the college. Estelle Ormont Award Presented for outstanding extracurricular activity and/or special effort related to the student’s field of interest. Residential Life Service Award To the graduating student who has provided outstanding leadership, sincere dedication, and meritorious service in the area of residential life. Israel Louis Schure Award Conferred for outstanding performance in extracurricular leadership. Jules H. Singer Memorial Award To a student who has made outstanding contributions to the intellectual and cultural climate of the college. Student Services Award To a graduating student at each campus for outstanding service to the college.

New York College of Osteopathic Medicine Senior Student Awards for Service and Academic Achievement AMWA's Janet M. Glasgow Memorial Award for the female receiving top honors in her class. Mark A. Andrews, Ph.D., Award for excellence in physiology. Biophysical Society Student Research Achievement Award. Board of Governor's Award for excellence in osteopathic manipulation. The Council of Deans' Achievement Award for overall academic excellence. Council of Student Council President's Student D.O. of the Year Award. Dean's Award for service to NYCOM. Roy DeBeer, D.O., Award for excellence in gastroenterology. Philip F. Fleisher, D.O., Memorial Award for excellence in cardiology. Steven Galler, D.O., Alan Scheinbach, D.O. and Steven Grainer, D.O., Award for excellence in internal medicine.

Student Services Athletic Achievement Award For demonstrated outstanding team spirit, sportsmanship, and playing ability. Richard Gabay Memorial Award Presented by the Old Westbury Student Government Association for demonstrated outstanding leadership in extracurricular activities. P.W. Gentile Award for Sportsmanship For demonstrated outstanding athletic ability and sportsmanship. Frank R. Jaklitsch Memorial Award Presented by the Office of Student Services, Central Islip, for demonstrated outstanding leadership in extracurricular activities. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Award Presented for outstanding contribution to the minority community at NYIT. Named in honor of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in recognition of his charismatic leadership in the cause of civil rights and peace.

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Robert E. Mancini, Ph.D., D.O., Award for excellence in medical pharmacology. Gates Pharmaceutical Award for outstanding achievement in the study of medicine. Mary E. Hitchcock, D.O., Memorial Award for commitment to osteopathic principles. Robert E. Mancini, Ph.D., D.O., Award for excellence in clinical toxicology. Philip Marcus, M.D., Award for excellence in pulmonary medicine. Mark Marmora, D.O., Memorial Award for excellence in teaching OMM sponsored by Schering Pharmceutical. The McNeil Pharmaceutical Award for excellence in family practice. Medical Society of New York State Award for community service. Esther & Max Nagler Fund Award for excellence in pathology. NYCOM Alumni Association Award

NYSOMS Award for interest in organizational affairs. Award for Excellence in Obstetrics/Gynecology Award for Excellence in Pediatrics Samuel Plotnick, D.D.S., MPH Award for community medicine. Excellence in Psychiatry Award Thomas A. Scandalis, D.O., Award for excellence in sports medicine. Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Award Shepard Splain, D.O., Award for excellence in surgery. St. Barnabas Award for excellence in radiology. Student National Medical Association Dedicated Service Award Donna Jones Maritsugu Award to a supportive spouse.

101

BRANDON KUBIK ARCHITECTURE MAJOR

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

School of Architecture and Design
Judith DiMaio, M.Arch., AIA, Dean

Architecture Architectural Technology Interior Design

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
School of Architecture and Design
Degrees Offered

The School of Architecture and Design offers degrees both in Architecture and Interior Design. Four degrees are offered in Architecture: an Associate in Applied Science in Architectural Technology Degree (A.A.S.), a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Technology (B.S.A.T.), a Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.), and a Master of Architecture in Urban and Regional Design. The B.Arch. degree is recognized as a first professional degree and is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (N.A.A.B.). The Masters program offers a “post professional degree”. The school also offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design (B.F.A.) which is a professional degree accredited by The Council for Interior Design Accreditation (C.I.D.A.).
About the School of Architecture and Design

Architecture, since ancient times, has been considered the mother of all the arts. In a manner much the same as in the other visual arts, the act of making architecture requires the use of the eye, the mind and the hand. Above all, the making of architecture demands passion, precision, and intelligence without which no act of creation can occur. Unlike the other arts, architecture has a functional task, the creation of built environments for human activity. In doing this, architecture becomes the inevitable expression of human values. Through the design process and the production of a built environment, architecture not only addresses issues of form and space making, it addresses the interrelated physical, social, political, economic, and cultural values prevailing in a particular place and time. Design is an intellectual exercise and an art form, and serves as the primary focus of the academic program at the NYIT’s School of Architecture and Design. The School maintains that this emphasis on design within the curricula best prepares students for effective participation in the profession and for rendering service to the public. With this being said, the intentions of the program for every student are summarized as follows: 1. To stimulate artistic sensitivity, creative power, and personal self-confidence. 2. To strengthen intellectual ability as it is applied to the making of solutions to architectural problems. 3. To acquire the technical skills needed for the practice of architecture and the related design fields. Architecture today operates in a fast changing and complex milieu. The emergence of computer technology, and the rapid paced change in building construction imposes tremendous pressures on design pedagogy. Architecture must meet the demands made for energy conservation. Vast changes in contemporary society, such as the disintegration of social, geographic, and communication barriers, impose additional challenges. Prescriptive philosophies, once embraced by architecture schools are now questioned for their relevance and effectiveness. In response to this, the School of Architecture and Design holds that each student must develop his or her own approach to design, based upon the sound intellectual and technical foundations offered at NYIT. Diverse course offerings allow students to explore the interrelationships and specializations occurring in the architecture and interior design fields. Students may define their own career paths and goals based on the knowledge acquired in the classroom. After the first foundation year, students may select either majors in architecture or 104 interior design.

School of Architecture and Design
Computer technology is having a profound effect, not only the planning and design of the built environment, but in actual construction practices. Consistent with the changes occurring in the other professions, computers are drastically changing the way that architecture as an art and as a profession is practiced. The curriculum at the School of Architecture and Design, in step with the objectives of NYIT, is committed to keeping up with change and anticipating the future. Computer use is introduced early in the program. As they progress in their studies, students are provided the opportunity to master computer aided design. Several student access computer labs feature up-to-date computer software and are available to all students enrolled in the program. Interior Design as an art and a profession has greatly changed. In the past, it was understood primarily as the act of decorating an existing space. It has evolved into a profession that is far broader and encompassing. Today’s interior designers are trained to enhance the quality of working and living environments. This includes, not only aesthetics but functionality, efficiency, and safety. Many interior designers today are part of larger design teams including architects, engineers, consultants, contractors, and others all working in tandem to create exciting environments. Their work professionally allies and interrelates with architecture and architectural technology. The integration of course work between the interior design program and the architecture program at the School of Architecture and Design facilitates an interchange and comprehension between interior design and architecture students that will serve graduates well when they enter the workplace. All interior design students are required to complete two semesters of design fundamentals ARCH 101 & 102 as well as an architecture history survey course, alongside architecture students, prior to advancing in the Interior Design studio sequence. From that point in the curriculum, course work remains closely related to the program offerings in architecture, with additional course work specific to their field. Courses offered throughout the Interior Design curriculum demonstrate an intention to closely unify the studies of interior design and architecture studnts.
Architecture

Faculty: M. Altwicker, P. Amatuzzo, R. Beattie, F. Bentel, M. Bertomen, F. Campani, A. Dadras, D. Diamond, N. Defelice, J. DiDomenico, J. DiMaio, A. DiSanto, M. Dockery, J. Friedman, P. Griffin, Y. Ilkaneyev, R. Imas, B. Karahan, M. Nolan, E. O’Keefe, W. Palmore, T. Rochon, A. Sayles, J. M. Schwarting, B.B. Taylor, N. Vossoughian, J. Wiesenfeld. Adjunct Faculty: M. Ackerson, J. Alayo, A. Amoia, D. Baskin, J. Bassin, A. Bollinger, S. Buzbee, F. Capone, C. Carbonaro, L. Cespedes, M. Chen, J. Cornell, T. Costello, G. Cumella, J. Cunniffe, D. Cunningham, H. Chin-Hong, T. Collins, Y. Crespo, R. Dadras, E. Davis, J. Davis, P. Dawson, F. de la Cruz, J. Dillon, A. Dong, E. Emerson, P. Dorsey, J. Fink, L. Fischer, J. Gabriel, A. Gale, E. Gamburg, E. Gandhi, S. Garcia, A. Gutman, G. Haley, C. Harp, D. Heinze, H. Hoang, J. Hwang, W. Haskas, J. Hoppa, A. Jackson, E. Kath, J. Ke, M. Kim, Z. Kostura, T. Lazzaro, P. Lew, R. Liu,P. Locascio, R. Liu, C. Mack, F. Meuschke, F. Mruk, D. Neff, J. Palazzolo, J. Pike, A. Pisano, G. Proksch, C. Puchall, R, Requejo, C. Rodriguez, R. Saxton, J. Tax, B. Urick, C. Rivielle, W. Rockwell, B. Roslyn, B. Russell, R. Saxton, L. Schwartz, P. Scott, R. Shatarah, S. Sloan, K. Striga, T. Szalczer, P. Tymus, A. Yalcin, T. Zoli. All students admitted to Architecture first enter the Bachelor of Science in Architecture Technology (B.S.A.T.) program, and undertake a two-year common core curriculum. This curriculum includes design studios and architectural history courses, as well as liberal arts courses such as English composition, math, physics, behavioral science, economics, fine arts, and social science. Direct admission into the first year of this curriculum 105

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
requires a minimum combined SAT score of 1000. Students failing to meet the requirement are permitted to matriculate with an undeclared degree status in the School of Architecture and Design and undertake selected courses that foster the exploration of architecture and provides the student the opportunity to demonstrate academic success in a college setting. Completion of the first semester with a minimum cumulative grade average of 2.5 allows the undeclared major access to the B.S.A.T. program. In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. Master’s degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. After successful completion of the two-year common core curriculum, students may either continue in the four-year B.S.A.T. program, which is accredited by New York State and may lead to New York State licensure, or apply for admission into the five-year B.Arch. program, which provides the successful candidate with a first professional degree accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. The N.A.A.B. certified B.Arch. degree may lead to New York State licensure plus reciprocal licensure in all States except California. Admission to the B.Arch. program requires the submission of a representative portfolio of individual student design work, called the Foundation Portfolio, which is reviewed by a committee of faculty members. Following the acceptance of the Foundation Portfolio by the review committee, the student candidate may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Architecture program. At the time of application, the student must demonstrate a cumulative grade average of 2.75 for all courses undertaken at NYIT or 3.00 for courses undertaken in architecture exclusively. Candidates for admission into the B.Arch. program must submit their Foundation Portfolios for review prior to enrollment in Design V or Arch. 401. Students must be accepted in the B. Arch. Program prior to enrolling Design VI, ARCH 402. With the Bachelor of Architecture degree, the successful student may proceed with the sequence of internship and the professional steps that lead to licensure as well as eligibility for certification from the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB). The Bachelor of Science in Architectural Technology is a non-professional degree offering that permits the successful student to gain a license to practice architecture in the State of New York but does not make the degree holder eligible for NCARB certification. Should the successful Bachelor of Science in Architecture Technology graduate later seek to gain a first professional degree in architecture, he or she could pursue a first professional degree Bachelor of Architecture or a first professional degree Master of Architecture. Those students who choose to undertake the B.S.A.T. program may wish to consider the opportunity to concentrate their studies in construction management. Upper level courses in areas such as contract management, construction supervision, and real estate fundamentals make up the offer of the B.S.A.T. with a concentration in construction management. 106

School of Architecture and Design
Two semesters of Design Fundamentals, the first year design studios, introduce the student to the basic principals of three-dimensional design through a series of composition, planning, and introductory design problems. In the second year, progressively more demanding problems, in addition to significant building design analysis exercises, are undertaken. The student that is accepted into the Bachelor of Architecture program is required to complete Design III through Design VIII, or an additional six semesters of design studios. In the third year students are required to solve architectural problems involving small but increasingly more complex building programs. Urban and community design and building design programs requiring inventive structural systems are emphasized in the fourth year. In the fifth and final year of the five-year program, students undertake a terminal thesis project, individually chosen, which serves to demonstrate a cumulative grasp of all of the factors that influence the design of a complex work of architecture. In the fourth and final year of the Bachelor of Science in Architecture Technology curriculum, the student is required to complete a capstone Project Integration Studio where all aspects of a building design and architectural technology are fully explored and integrated into one comprehensive exercise. Although the design studios form the core of the experience at the School of Architecture and Design, complementary avenues of study and inquiry operate as essential aspects of the program and the training of students. Courses in architectural history introduce the student to the history of the built domain from the earliest times to the present. Methods of historical building design analysis and interpretation are introduced to the student through the study of great architectural monuments, as well as through the study of cities. Architectural history is introduced not only as a chronology of building development, but as a body of knowledge, an anthology, that serves as a tool in the design process. In addition to the survey courses, the School offers history seminars in areas such as architectural theory, the history of building technology, and the history of urban planning. A coordinated sequence of drawing and computer courses provide students with the skill to visualize and document design ideas starting with an introductory course focusing on hand drawing and the use of art media and concluding with a course on advanced digital visualization and rendering. The NYIT School of Architecture and Design program is widely respected by the professional community for its course offerings in areas of building technology. Technical competence is cultivated by exposure to an array of course offerings that cover all aspects of building materials, structural systems, and mechanical and electrical systems. The management of the construction process is covered by comprehensive upper level courses that focus on the procedures of professional practice and construction supervision as well as contemporary use of computers in construction industry. The technology faculty, as active members of the construction community, brings real world experience to the coursework and maintains an up-to-date bridge between the curriculum and changes in professional practice. The Associate in Applied Science degree in Architectural Technology is also offered.
Additional Information

Transfer students must complete at least 30 credits with a 2.75 cumulative grade average in all course work or a 3.0 cumulative average in architecture courses before applying for admission to the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.). A portfolio review by school design faculty is required for all transfer students seeking transfer credit for design course work. 107

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All work completed in fulfillment of course requirements or in conjunction with a student’s coursework shall be the property of the School of Architecture and Design. The School may waive this right at its discretion. Students reserve the right to gain access to materials for the purpose of making copies and reproductions. The School of Architecture exercises a policy of student redistribution in design studio sections that meet at the same scheduled time period in order to promote a diversity in the learning experience. Redistribution is based on the student’s prior experience of design faculty members and their previous academic performance.
Additional Options

1. In conjunction with the School of Engineering, a B.S.A.T. with a concentration in Energy Management is offered. This program trains the student in areas of building technology and construction with a particular emphasis on energy management and the development of energy use policies. The program allows the student to substitute courses in energy management for general elective credits required by the B.S.A.T. program. 2. In conjunction with the School of Management, a B.S.A.T. with a concentration in Business Administration is offered. This program enables students to compliment a growing expertise in construction technology with organization and management skills. The program allows the student to substitute courses in business for general elective credits required by the B.S.A.T. program. 3. In Conjunction with the School of Engineering, a combined B.S.A.T. in Energy Management and Master of Science in Energy Management is offered. This five year program is offered to qualified undergraduate architecture students who undertake 18 credits of graduate level Energy Management courses in a fifth year of study. This program permits attainment of the combined degrees in five years of full time study. Interested students must declare their intention to pursue this option by formal submission to the Deans of both the School of Architecture and Design and the School of Management.
Summer Study Abroad

The School of Architecture and Design enjoys an international reputation for its summer studies abroad programs. These programs are offered under the direction of one or more full time faculty members. The school offers one to three diverse programs a summer depending upon interested students, and faculty availability. Thus far we have offered programs in China, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Greece and Turkey. These programs put students and faculty in contact with foreign students and architects while living in another culture, enabling them to understand first-hand the range, diversity, and power of living architecture as individual buildings or as entire cities and spaces. Summer study abroad course credit can be applied to a student’s specific curriculum and field of study. The summer programs are open to students enrolled in any degree program offered by the School of Architecture and Design.

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School of Architecture and Design

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Architecture
(1)

College Success Seminar

2 credits 5 5 3 3 3 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 5 3 3 5 5 3

English Composition Speech One Group A course One Group B course

6 3 3 3 15 credits

Architecture ARCH 101 Design Fundamentals I ARCH 102 Design Fundamentals II ARCH 140 Visualization I ARCH 160 Introduction to History, Theory and Criticism in Architecture ARCH 161 Survey History of Architecture I ARCH 162 Survey History of Architecture II ARCH 201 Architectural Design I ARCH 202 Architectural Design II ARCH 211 Statics & Strength of Materials ARCH 221 Building Construction I ARCH 222 Building Construction II ARCH 240 Visualization II ARCH 271 Site Planning ARCH 301 Architectural Design III ARCH 302 Architectural Design IV ARCH 311 Structural Steel Design ARCH 312 Reinforced Concrete Design ARCH 321 Building Equipment I ARCH 322 Building Equipment II ARCH 327 CAD Construction Drawings ARCH 340 Visualization III ARCH 361 Arch History & Theory Sem. ARCH 362 City Planning ARCH 401 Architectural Design V ARCH 402 Architectural Design VI ARCH 411 Advanced Structural Concepts I ARCH 481 Professional Practice I ARCH 501 Architectural Design VII ARCH 502 Architectural Design VIII Architecture Electives

Fine Arts ARTH 111 Introduction to the Arts Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus

2 credits 3 credits 4 4 credits

Physics PHYS 136 Physics for the Modern Architect

4

4 credits Science and Math electives PHYS 156 Selected topics in Environmental & Engergy Issues for the Modern Architect or MATH161 Basic Applied Calculus or MATH170 Calculus I or PHIL 250 Logic and the Scientific Method

3 3 4 3

3-4 credits Social Sciences History or Political Science Philosophy Social Science Choice Economics 3 3 3 3 12 credits Electives 8-10 credits Total credits required—169
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

110 credits Behavioral Sciences PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology or SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology PSYC 367 Environmental Psychology or SOCI 355 Urban Society 3 3 3 3 6 credits

109

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Architectural Technology
(1)

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
One Group B course Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus 3 15 credits 3 credits 4 4 credits Physics PHYS 136 Physics for the Modern Architect Science and Math electives PHYS 156 Selected topics in Environmental & Engergy Issues for the Modern Architect or MATH161 Basic Applied Calculus or MATH170 Calculus I or PHIL 250 Logic and the Scientific Method 4

College Success Seminar

2 credits 5 5 3 3 3 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 5 3 3 3

Architecture ARCH 101 Design Fundamentals I ARCH 102 Design Fundamentals II ARCH140 Visualization I ARCH 160 Introduction to History, Theory and Criticism in Architecture ARCH 161 Survey History of Architecture I ARCH 162 Survey History of Architecture II ARCH 201 Architectural Design I ARCH 202 Architectural Design II ARCH 211 Statics & Strength of Materials ARCH 221 Building Construction I ARCH 222 Building Construction II ARCH 240 Visualization II ARCH 271 Site Planning ARCH 311 Structural Steel Design ARCH 312 Reinforced Concrete Design ARCH 321 Building Equipment I ARCH 322 Building Equipment II ARCH 327 CAD Construction Drawings ARCH 340 Visualization III ARCH 411 Advanced Structural Concepts I ARCH 412 Advanced Structural Concepts II ARCH 423 Project Integration Studio ARCH 471 Construction Supervision & Mgmt I ARCH 481 Professional Practice I Architecture Electives

4 credits

3 4 3 3

3 credits Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Social Science Choice 3 3 3 3 12 credits Electives 6-8 credits Total credits required—136
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

84 credits Behavioral Sciences English Composition Speech One Group A course 3 credits 6 3 3

110

School of Architecture and Design

I Curriculum requirements

for the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Technology with a Minor Concentration in Construction Management
(1)

English Composition Speech One Group A course One Group B course

6 3 3 3 15 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits 5 5 3 3 3 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 5 3 3 3 3 3 3

Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus

3 credits 4 4 credits

Architecture ARCH 101 Design Fundamentals I ARCH 102 Design Fundamentals II ARCH 140 Visualization I ARCH 160 Introduction to History, Theory and Criticism in Architecture ARCH 161 Survey History of Architecture I ARCH 162 Survey History of Architecture II ARCH 201 Architectural Design I ARCH 202 Architectural Design II ARCH 211 Statics & Strength of Materials ARCH 221 Building Construction I ARCH 222 Building Construction II ARCH 240 Visualization II ARCH 271 Site Planning ARCH 311 Structural Steel Design ARCH 312 Reinforced Concrete Design ARCH 321 Building Equipment I ARCH 322 Building Equipment II ARCH 327 CAD Construction Drawings ARCH 411 Advanced Structural Concepts I ARCH 412 Advanced Structural Concepts II ARCH 423 Project Integration Studio ARCH 471 Construction Supervision & Mgmt I ARCH 473 Construction Management Contracts ARCH 474 Real Estate Fundamental Development ARCH 475 CAD Management and Administration ARCH 476 Modern Construction Technologies ARCH 481 Professional Practice I

Physics PHYS 136 Physics for the Modern Architect

4

4 credits Science and Math electives PHYS 156 Selected topics in Environmental & Engergy Issues for the Modern Architect or MATH161 Introduction to Calculus or MATH170 Calculus I or PHIL 250 Logic and the Scientific Method

3 3 4 3

3-4 credits Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Social Science Choice 3 3 3 3 12 credits Total credits required-136
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

90 credits Behavioral Sciences 3 credits

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I The following courses may be
ARCH 291 Special Studies in Arch.* ARCH 292 Selected Studies in History & Delineation* ARCH 293 Research in Architecture* ARCH 313 Structural Timber Design ARCH 361 Architecture History Seminar ARCH 375 Landscape Design ARCH 376 Energy Conservation ARCH 377 Building Renovation ARCH 378 Tropical Architecture ARCH 381 Externship in Architecture ARCH 382 Externship in Architecture ARCH 383 Externship in Architecture ARCH 395 Special Topics in the History of Architecture ARCH 483 Building & Zoning Codes ARCH 491 Honor Student Teaching I ARCH 492 Honor Student Teaching II ARCH 493 High School Teaching Aide *ARCH 291, 292, 293, 361: Topics may cover any of the following: Computer Graphics Energy Applications in Architecture Seminar in Theory of Architecture Specifications Design Development Seminar in History of Architecture Community Design Project Sketching Earthquakes-Hazards Environmental Psychology Urban Workshop Design Competitions Lighting Design Furniture Design Landscape and Garden History Frank Lloyd Wright Contemporary Architecture of Asia, Africa and Latin America New York City Topics Theories of Architecture Case Studies in Urbanism

used as architectural electives: 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 2 3 3 3 3

I Curriculum requirements for the
Associate in Applied Science Degree in Architectural Technology
(1)

College Success Seminar

2 credits 5 5 3 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3

Architecture ARCH 101 Design Fundamentals I ARCH 102 Design Fundamentals II ARCH 140 Visualization I ARCH 160 Introduction to History, Theory and Criticism in Architecture ARCH 201 Architectural Design I ARCH 202 Architectural Design II ARCH 211 Statics and Strength of Materials ARCH 221 Building Construction I ARCH 222 Building Construction II ARCH 327 CAD Construction Drawings Architecture electives

41 credits English Composition Speech 6 3 15 credits Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus 3 credits 4 4 credits Physics PHYS 136 Physics for the Modern Architect 4

4 credits Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science 3 3 6 credits General Elective 1-3 credits Total credits required—70
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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ARCH 100 Introduction to Architecture and Design (for non-majors) 2-3-3 An introduction to what Architecture and Design are, and what architects and designers do. Lectures, readings, and projects provide a general study of the theories, practices, and outcomes of the design professions and their influences on the evolution of human environments. This course is open to all students. ARCH 101 Design Fundamentals I 2-5-5 Architectonics. Studies nature of architectural ideas directly through medium of space. Mass- void modeling explores part, transformation, figure-ground, etc. and is basis of planimetric, axonometric, perspective and graphic studies. Co-requisites: ARCH 140– Architecture students / DSGN 131– ID students ARCH 102 Design Fundamentals II 2-5-5 Dynamics. Continues study of architectural ideas directly through space. Volume modeling explores spatial intersections, tartan grid, light, circulation, materials and structure, as aspects of plastic design at human scale. Animation and color also studied. Prerequisite: ARCH 101, Co-requisites: ARCH 240 – Architecture students / DSGN 341 – ID students ARCH 140 Visualization I 1-3-3 The course focuses on three areas simultaneously: technical drawing, graphic and fine arts, and an introduction to computer applications in architecture. It includes descriptive geometry, art composition, mediums and techniques, analysis and theory of fine art and computer software application. The course assists the production of the required Design Studio portfolio. ARCH 160 Introduction to History, Theory and Criticism in Architecture 3-0-3 The course exposes the culture of architecture in order to acquire conceptual and language tools specific to the realm of architecture. It is thematic and topical rather than chronological and discusses theory, methodology, technology, construction, building equipment systems and other fine arts and related fields. ARCH 161 Survey History of Architecture I 3-0-3 A Survey of the historical development of architecture from its earliest forms through the Baroque period. The course focuses on major buildings primarily from the Western tradition. Basic issues of planning, design, program, structure, and materials are examined in relation to one another and to the cultural and climatic context in which the building was erected. Prerequisite: ARCH 160, architecture students / ARTH 111 – ID students ARCH 162 Survey History of Architecture II 3-0-3 Addresses the development of the modern movement in architecture from the built and theoretical work of Boullée and Ledoux in the eighteenth century to buildings by twentieth century masters such as Frank Lloyd Wright, LeCorbusier, Walter Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Alvar Aalto, and Louis Kahn. Changes in the form and the development of modern building types are discussed in relation to the new technological, social, political, and economic circumstances to which they respond. Prerequisite: ARCH 161 ARCH 201 Architectural Design I 2-5-5 Design problems are given which deal with specific issues as they pertain to the generation and making of architectural form/space, i.e. program, site, structure, material, light, geometry; all of which are understood as sources and reference for spacial intervention/solution. Emphasis is on the generation and evaluation of the architectural parti. Prerequisite: ARCH 102. ARCH 202 Architectural Design II 2-5-5 Design problems are structured so as to necessitate the resolution of multiple issues simultaneously and interdependently. Emphasis is on the translation and development of a parti into spaces capable of being inhabited and constructed. Prerequisite: ARCH 201. ARCH 211 Statics and Strength of Materials 3-0-3 Statics and strength of materials; force systems; equations of statics; beam supports and reactions; geometric properties of sections; stress and strain; axial tensile stress and elongation; axial compressive stress and buckling; shear stress and shear diagrams; bending stress and moment diagrams and beam deflections. Prerequisites: PHYS 135 and MATH 161. ARCH 221 Building Construction I 3-0-3 Introduction to materials of architectural construction (lime, gypsum, cement, concrete, wood, brick, metals, stone) with reference to their structural capabilities and aesthetic qualities. Elementary methods of construction, problems of public safety, and requirements of building law. Prerequisite: ARCH 102. ARCH 222 Building Construction II 3-0-3 Fire resistant, non-fire resistant, and slow- burning construction. Framing systems and types of foundations. Analyzing the above structures in terms of safety, strength, weatherability, and long-term economy. Related subjects such as interior and exterior finishes, floor, roof, and panel systems. Prerequisite: ARCH 221. ARCH 240 Visualization II 3-0-3 Continuation of ARCH 140 introducing basic CAD skills and architectural drawing as it pertains to producing drawings of buildings. Auto CAD skills and software, printing and plotting hardware are taught. The application of these combined with other visual presentation techniques are explored in relation to the design process and presentation. The course supports the design studio. Prerequisite Arch 140 – Visualization I ARCH 271 Site Planning 2-3-3 Concepts of site design and engineering, including projects, theory, process, and techniques, from analysis to design

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drawings. The basic principles of surveying are applied to site planning and design. Reference to zoning concepts, constraints of environmental considerations, roadways, parking, cut and fill. Prerequisites: ARCH 201, MATH 161 ARCH 291 Special Studies in Architecture 3-0-3 Study on topics of interest in architectural design and structures. Prerequisite: completion of core program. ARCH 292 Selected Studies in History and Delineation 3-0-3 Study of selected topics in architectural history and delineation. Prerequisite: completion of core program. ARCH 293 Research in Architecture 2-0-2 Study in topics of interest in architectural design and structures, and research as required. Prerequisite: completion of core program. ARCH 294 Studio Workshop 0-1-1 Investigation of selected topics in architectural design ARCH 301 Architectural Design III 2-5-5 Investigation of the public realm in our communities through the design of a public building. The semester-long problem encompasses analysis of precedent and site, and development of a design project from initial parti through large-sale presentation models and drawings. Emphasis is placed on the unique capacity of architecture to convey meaning through purely spatial and plastic means. Prerequisite: ARCH 202. ARCH 302 Architectural Design IV 2-5-5 Investigation of the public realm in our communities through the study of housing. Design problems examine housing prototypes and the mutual impact the design solutions and neighborhood contexts exert on one another. Emphasis on exploring the interface between the large scale of city public spaces and the intimate scale of private individual spaces. Prerequisites: ARCH 301 and ARCH 311 or ARCH 312. ARCH 311 Structural Steel Design 3-0-3 Design of steel and tension, compression and flexure members. Design and detail of welded, bolted, and riveted connections. Prerequisite: ARCH 211. ARCH 312 Reinforced Concrete Design 3-0-3 Design of concrete columns, beams, one-way slabs, isolated footings, and retaining walls. Introduction to prestressed concrete design. Introduction to indeterminate structures. Prerequisite: ARCH 211. ARCH 313 Structural Timber Design 2-0-2 Design of tension, compression and flexure members in timber. Includes sawn and glue-laminated members and plywood. Bolted, nailed and split-ring connections. Surveys standard prefabricated units. Prerequisites: ARCH 311, ARCH 312, and completion of three years. ARCH 321 Building Equipment I 3-0-3 Sources of water and design of water supply systems. Design of sanitary and storm drainage systems, and sewerage disposal. Thermal properties of materials: computation of heating and cooling loads, methods of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. Prerequisite: ARCH 202. ARCH 322 Building Equipment II 3-0-3 Characteristics of electrical distribution systems, computation of electrical loads, theory and design of wiring systems, study of electrical codes, electrical service and controls for elevators and escalators, types of lighting equipment, theory and design of lighting systems. Prerequisite: ARCH 202 or DSGN 202. ARCH 327 Computer Aided Construction Drawings 1-3-3 Modern Methods of construction drawing development, purpose, and organization, through the use of computer-aided design and drawing. Study is directed and guided in the preparation of a complete set of drawings: plans, sections, elevations, details, schedules, and an introduction to specifications through digital media. Prerequisites: ARCH 202, ARCH 211, ARCH 221, ARCH 222 ARCH 340 Visualization III 3-0-3 Continuation of ARCH 240 to develop skills with advanced drawing and multi-media techniques as well as state of the art digital skills. The emphasis is on working with a wide range of techniques available to the architect and on the graphic art of presentation. Prerequisite ARCH 240. ARCH 361 Architectural History and Theory Seminar 3-0-3 A seminar engaging historical, theoretical, and thematically based topics, integrating architecture and texts, across the historical spectrum. Topics will include the major historical period styles, the work of specific architects, or the development of important building typologies. The formal and technological aspects of architecture will be examined in relation to primary and secondary documentary sources as well as in the context of prevailing cultural and political circumstances. Specific topics to be announced each semester. Prerequisite: ARCH 162. Students may substitute graduate course ARCH 725 or ARCH 726 with permission of the chairperson. ARCH 362 City Planning 3-0-3 A comparative analysis of urban design and planning from the classical period to the present. The attitudes and theories that have shaped the city historically are discussed in the context of prevailing social, economic, and political conditions. Important built and unbuilt paradigms are used to examine the theoretical and practical issues of urban and suburban development, new town planning, land-use controls and zoning, transportation planning, and historic preservation. Prerequisite: ARCH 302. Students may substitute graduate course ARCH 721 with permission of the chairperson.

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ARCH 375 Landscape Design 3-0-3 Study of plant materials and landscape forms, their relation to site planning and buildings. Design of exterior areas. Prerequisite: ARCH 202. ARCH 376 Energy Conservation 3-0-3 Study of solar energy, alternate sources of energy, design technology for energy efficient buildings, application, computations, equipment, present development of conservation techniques. Prerequisite: ARCH 321. ARCH 377 Building Renovation 3-0-3 Selected studies in the problems of change of use of existing buildings. Prerequisites: ARCH 202, Arch 327 or similar acceptable experience. ARCH 378 Tropical Architecture 3-0-3 Study of the impact of climate, local materials and methods, and environmental influences on design in tropical areas. Problems of shelter are analyzed in terms of past solutions and new techniques. (Fall semester only.) Prerequisite: ARCH 202. ARCH 381 Externship in Architecture 0-6-3 Students enrolled in this course are given an opportunity to work in the architecture professional environment of an architectural office for credit. To be eligible, students must have a junior or senior status, 3.0 or better GPA, recommendation of the faculty advisor and the permission of the chairperson. This course is repeatable without limit, but no more than six externship credits may be credited toward BSAT or BARCH degrees. Application must be approved during the prior semester. Grades are on pass/fail basis. ARCH 382 Externship in Architecture 0-4-2 Students enrolled in this course are given an opportunity to work in the architecture professional environment of an architectural office for credit. To be eligible, students must have a junior or senior status, 3.0 or better GPA, recommendation of the faculty advisor and the permission of the chairperson. Application must be approved during the prior semester. Grades are on pass/fail basis. This course is repeatable without limit, but no more than six externship credits may be credited toward BSAT or BARCH degrees. Application must be approved during the prior semester. ARCH 383 Externship in Architecture 0-2-1 Students enrolled in this course earn credit while gaining practical experience in a professional architectural office. To be eligible, students must have completed one year of architectural studies with a minimum GPA of 2.75. Recommendation of the Externship faculty advisor and permission of the chairperson. Upon registration, a separate application must be filed with the Externship advisor. Grades are on a Pass/Fail basis. This course is repeatable without limit, but no more than six externship credits may be credited toward BSAT or BARCH degrees. Application must be approved during the prior semester. ARCH 395 Special Topics in the History of Architecture 2-0-2 Special topics in architectural history will be offered as teaching staff becomes available and as student interest indicates. May change from semester to semester, and more than one special topic may be taught per semester. Prerequisites: ARCH 161 and ARCH 162. ARCH 396 Urban Studies 2-0-2 Seminar on urban form, urban renewal projects, rehabilitation studies. Prerequisite: completion of three years. ARCH 401 Architectural Design V 2-5-5 The design of complex mixed-use buildings in an urban context (New York City) is the vehicle for exploring issues of density, sequence and connection. Textural/figural, public/private and cultural/social overlays are introduced. Prerequisites: ARCH 302. ARCH 402 Architectural Design VI 2-5-5 An increasingly complex large-scale design problem in the ambiguous suburban realm (Long Island) tests characteristics of urbanity/suburbanity in both public and private domains. The interaction of architecture and planning are explored through study of infrastructure, program, type and landscape. Prerequisites: ARCH 401 and admission to Bachelor of Architecture Degree program. ARCH 411 Advanced Structural Concepts I 3-0-3 Conceptual studies of the behavior of structures under load and the analysis of forces acting on these structures. Building frames, trusses, long spans, prestressed and precast members. Use of models. Prerequisites: ARCH 311 and ARCH 312. ARCH 412 Advanced Structural Concepts II 2-0-2 Continuing conceptual studies of behavior of structural systems including space frames, arches and domes, suspension structures, membrane structures, and high rise buildings. Introduction to methods of analysis including use of the computer and models. Prerequisite: ARCH 411. ARCH 416 Advanced Structural Concepts in CAD 2-0-2 Advanced studies of behavior of structural systems, utilizing CAD in the investigations. Systems may include space frames, arches and domes, suspension and membrane structures, and high-rise buildings. Methods of analysis utilize digital media. Prerequisite: ARCH 411. ARCH 423 Project Integration Studio 2-5-5 Students working in teams generate and develop the design of a small-scale building. In the process the students incorporate the guidelines as described in the phases of service of the Professional A.I.A. Agreement. The design of a harmonious relationship between the site and building is stressed. Emphasis is placed on creativity in the process of integrating all building systems (spatial, structural, mechanical and electrical) in the design. Prerequisite: ARCH 202 (6176), completion of 3rd year.

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ARCH 471 Construction Supervision and Management I 3-0-3 Concepts and goals of construction supervision and management and their application to contemporary building, including conventional and innovative building methods and structural concepts. Installation problems, requirements, and costs. Construction manager’s legal responsibilities and obligations. The manager’s relation to various building professionals. Quantity surveys, cost control, and scheduling. Prerequisite: completion of three years. ARCH 472 Construction Supervision and Management II 3-0-3 Continuation of Construction Management I. Cost estimating, bidding negotiations, labor and trade union relations, advanced cost and schedule control methods. Prerequisites: completion of three years and ARCH 471. ARCH 473 Construction Management Contracts 3-0-3 The management of a project from conceptualization to completion is studied. The responsibilities of the construction manager in contracts and communication with the owner, consultants and contractors/sub-contractors will be reviewed. Methods of financial management and account, record-keeping, construction safety and risk management/ time management will be discussed. Prerequisite: Completion of 3rd year. ARCH 474 Real Estate Fundamentals and Development 3-0-3 The course will outline the owners expectation of the construction manager in the development process. Project feasibility, zoning issues and project financing will be presented and discussed by means of case studies. Prerequisite: Completion of 3rd year. ARCH 475 Computer Aided Management and Administration 3-0-3 This course teaches concepts and goals of construction management and administration and their application to contemporary buildings using computer-aided methods and contemporary digital media. Topics include installation issues, legal responsibilities, costs and benefits, relation between building trades and professionals, critical path methods, administrative organization and on line project management methods. Prerequisite: Completion of 3rd year. ARCH 476 Modern Construction Technologies 3-0-3 In this course students study the history of modern technological developments in construction methods and techniques. The latest innovations in the means and methods of construction will be explored, including value engineering programs. The course will use a case study and an internship/externship format. Prerequisite: Completion of 3rd year. ARCH 481 Professional Practice I 3-0-3 Introduction to the problems involved in the practice of architecture and building. A study of the personal, ethical, and legal interrelations of the architect, engineer, owner, builder, and artisan. An analysis of the organization and administration of an architectural practice, and the various legal forms under which it can be organized. Study of building laws, codes, and zoning and their application. Supervised externships in offices. Prerequisite: ARCH 222, 271, 311 or 312, 327 ARCH 483 Building and Zoning Codes 3-0-3 An intensive study of background and scope of building and zoning codes and their effect on the design and construction of buildings. Examples are drawn from practice using existing New York City and other local codes. Prerequisite: completion of two years. ARCH 491 Honor Student Teaching I 0-0-3 Selected senior students participate in the teaching of freshmen, primarily in design fundamentals courses. They assist and counsel those requiring special attention. Prerequisite: approval of dean. ARCH 492 Honor Student Teaching II 0-0-3 Continuation of ARCH 491. Prerequisite: approval of dean. ARCH 493 High School Teaching Aides 0-0-3 Advanced students are recommended for service as aides in the teaching of students in architectural courses in high schools. Programs are developed with faculty assistance. Prerequisites: ARCH 202 and approval of dean. ARCH 501 Architectural Design VII 2-5-5 The first half of a two-semester thesis sequence providing the student with an opportunity to carry out an architectural design at a highly realistic and professional level. This semester is devoted to research, programming, and presentation of alternative schematic proposals. The student may choose either a studio or independent study. Emphasis is placed on a thorough definition of the project and its physical, social, and conceptual parameters. Prerequisite: ARCH 402. ARCH 502 Architectural Design VIII 2-5-5 A continuation of ARCH 501. The student develops a final thesis design proposal. After evaluation and approval by the faculty, the student proceeds to final presentation of drawings, models, and films, together with a final written program. The presentation will demonstrate the student’s ability to identify, understand, and ultimately control the many forces which shape contemporary architecture. Prerequisite: ARCH 501. ARTH 111 Introduction to the Arts 2-0-2 The history of art is viewed from the standpoint of painting and sculpting as they relate to architecture during significant periods in the history of art. Emphasis will be placed upon the parallels in the history of art and architecture.

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Interior Design
Faculty: R. Allen, M. Newman, M. Siegel Adjunct Faculty: A. Adefope, S. Dallago-Genden, B. Beldock, V. Berzins, M. Del Pezzo, A. Gale, J. Katimaris, S. Kim, S. Stegmaier, K. Striga, A. Zoli. Interior design has taken on a multi-faceted identity. Interior designers create human environments that enhance the function and quality of public and private spaces as opposed to the decoration of interior rooms. Interior design is the expression of human values and a context for human activity. Interior designers work, based upon aesthetics, improves the quality of life, increases productivity, and protects health and safety. This course of study, leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Interior Design, will prepare you for the rewarding challenges of designing for the 21st Century. The program focuses on the relationship between human performance and environment through an innovative mix of studio design projects, profession-specific coursework, community oriented projects, and externships in the field. Complementing these experiences, the program also incorporates multiple site visits to furniture, fabric/textile, lighting and other material showrooms. This is easily accomplished because New York City and the surrounding metropolitan area are a major center of design, including showrooms of products, thousands of practitioners’ offices, and access to many public spaces. Links for the student are established with professionals through office visits and, wherever possible, with project sites. The Summer Abroad Programs are open to both interior design and architecture students. The experience becomes an opportunity for the design and architecture students to intermingle and confront architecture and design together in the same way that it developed in other cultures through the ages. The curriculum includes course work that covers all aspects of professional interior design. A unique aspect of the program is that during the course of their studies the students of interior design and architecture will join in classes, which emphasize design fundamentals, building technology, and the history of architecture introducing the close working partnership between the two professions. Advanced courses in interior design cover such topics as materials, perspective, color, computer-aided drawing (CAD), building codes, history of interior design, furniture design, lighting, business procedures and special projects. There is a strong correlation between the different levels of courses. The curriculum is sequential, with the knowledge that the skills and design sensibilities gained at each level directly affect succeeding levels, as they advance through the program. A very special aspect to the program is that faculty members are either practicing professionals in the fields of interior design, architecture and other related professions. This cross-disciplinary approach mirrors real world interaction and relationships. As the professions of interior design and architecture cross-reference each other more and more, this becomes a critical and important distinction for both programs. Students’ cultural diversity and broad life experiences are integral to the program, and to ensure opportunity for students with diverse backgrounds, freshmen are not required to submit portfolios as part of their admission process. However, all students are required to submit a portfolio for review, and have a 2.75 cumulative index or a 3.00 average in interior design courses after completion of DSGN 202 Interior Design II.

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Since acceptance of portfolios is required prior to admittance to DSGN 301 Interior Design Problems 1, students must submit portfolios for review while enrolled in DSGN 202 Interior Design II. Portfolio reviews are required for transfer students who are applying for interior design, architecture or fine arts credits. As a student, they will work closely with a faculty advisor who serves as an academic and professional mentor throughout the years at NYIT. During the junior or senior year, they will be required to complete a 256-hour externship in a professional design studio. In the final year of study the student will develop a capstone thesis, which serves to showcase their skills and accrued knowledge in the design program. They develop and research a program, select the site, and conceptualize and design the interior environment. The research, drawings and images that result are then presented to a professional jury of practitioners and professors. NYIT’s four-year Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Interior Design is based at the Old Westbury campus and puts the student on a career path to professionalism. Upon graduation and two years of interior design work experience, one is eligible to sit for the National Council of Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) exam. Passage of this exam, in conjunction with one additional year of work experience will allow one to apply to NY State for certification. Other states have similar certification and licensing requirements. The NYIT Interior Design Program at Old Westbury has been accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) since March 1984. The most recent CIDA visit resulted in a six-year professional level accreditation from 2007-2013.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design College Success Seminar (1) 2 credits 2 4 4 2 3 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 4 4 2 3 Interior Design DSGN 131 Technical Drawing DSGN 201 Interior Design I DSGN202 Interior Design II DSGN 211 Structures DSGN 221 Working Drawings DSGN222 Materials I DSGN223 Materials II (Specs & Systems) DSGN 301 Interior Design Problems I DSGN302 Interior Design Problems II DSGN 331 Perspective Drawing & Rendering I DSGN332 Color in Space DSGN 341 Interior Design CAD I DSGN342 Interior Design CAD II DSGN360 Philosophy of Design DSGN362 History of Interiors I DSGN363 History of Interiors II DSGN 370 Lighting Strategies for Interiors DSGN 381 Business Procedures in Interior Design DSGN 401 Interior Design Problems III DSGN402 Senior Project in Interior Design DSGN 421 Furniture Design I DSGN 481 Building Codes & Regulations

Behavioral Sciences English Composition Speech One Group A course One Group B course

3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits

Fine Arts ARTW 101 Drawing I ARTH 111 Introduction to the Arts

3 2 5 credits

Liberal Arts Life Science Mathematics Physical Science Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 3 3 9 credits

General Electives

6-8 credits Total credits required—131

63 credits Architecture ARCH 101 Design Fundamentals I ARCH 102 Design Fundamental II ARCH 161 Survey History of Architecture I ARCH 322 Building Equipment II 5 5 3 3

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

16 credits

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DSGN 131 Technical Drawing 1-3-2 Practice in the fundamentals of creative graphic representation. Use and maintenance of drafting materials and instruments. Execution of projects. Perspectives, isometrics. DSGN 201 Interior Design I 2-5-4 Recognition of simple design problems and their analysis. Human needs and behavioral patterns as a basis for planning interior environments. Interactions of spaces. Experiments in organization and furnishing of residential interiors. Prerequisite: DSGN 131 and ARCH 102 or permission of the chairperson. DSGN 202 Interior Design II 2-5-4 Interior design problems of moderate scope. Design analysis and criticism of projects in residential, commercial, and institutional interiors. Prerequisites: DSGN 201. DSGN 211 Structures 1-3-2 Study of basic construction components, materials, and systems, and their applications for the interior designer. Prerequisite: DSGN 131 and ARCH 102 or permission of the chairperson. DSGN 221 Working Drawings 1-3-3 A continuation of DSGN 131 emphasizing drafting technique and detailing as it applies to the Interior Designer. Working drawings are produced with quality, precision and accuracy stressed. The essential elements necessary to communicate the manufacture or building of a project are learned. Prerequisite: ARCH 102 and DSGN 211. DSGN 222 Materials I 2-0-2 Introduction to various materials; their properties and aesthetic qualities; methods of working with them and their use in the interior design field. DSGN 223 Materials II, Specifications and Systems 1-3-2 The characteristics and function of materials for interiors and furniture other than those covered in DSGN 222. Students will become familiar with the proper specification of these materials based on function, maintenance, comfort, and safety; including fire rating and barrier free requirements and aesthetics. Along with acquainting the student with these materials, emphasis will be placed on the development of material boards, presentation formats, specification writing, finish schedules and specification of modular office systems. Prerequisites: DSGN 222. DSGN 294 Studio Workshop 0-1-1 Investigation of selected topics in Interior Design. DSGN 301 Interior Design Problems I 2-5-4 Design of larger scale interiors in commercial, public, and institutional buildings. Analytical exploration of space, modulation, and perception. Analysis of functions. Coordination of design elements such as color, furnishings, and textures. Prerequisite: DSGN 202, approved portfolio, a 2.75 cumulative index or a 3.00 average in Interior Design. DSGN 302 Interior Design Problems II 2-6-4 Continuation of DSGN 301 with emphasis on research, programming, and analysis of task. Task performance as a basis for the design of residential and nonresidential interiors. Aesthetic qualities. Prerequisites: DSGN 301, DSGN 332. DSGN 323 Model Making 1-3-2 A specialized course of study in materials, techniques, and skills necessary to design and construct scale models used in the interior design profession. Models of furniture as well as interior spaces and geometric forms will be constructed. The student will be taught the use of simple hand tools and the realization of a tool’s potential. Prerequisite: DSGN 131 or permission of the chairperson. DSGN 324 Textile Design 1-3-2 Study of textiles. Adaptation of textile design to varied purposes. Design as related to function, texture, and color. Use of diversified processes for production. Style and analysis. DSGN 325 Furniture Detailing 1-3-2 Structural detailing, working drawings, and specifications for custom-made and mass-produced furniture. Prerequisite: DSGN 421. DSGN 331 Perspective Drawing and Rendering I 1-3-2 Development of professional skills in one and two point perspective drawing and methods of rapid rendering for interiors. Use of various media such as watercolor, ink and tempera. Prerequisite: DSGN 131. DSGN 332 Color in Space 1-3-2 Experiments in the use of color in spatial and environmental design; its effect on scale, balance, form, size, movement, etc. Color and the senses. Color organization and theories. Color and lighting. Prerequisite: DSGN 201 or ARCH 201 and DSGN 331 or ARCH 231. DSGN 333 Graphics Workshop 1-2-2 Processes, methods, and skills utilized for graphic expression in the Interior Design field. DSGN 334 Rendering II 1-3-2 Application of perspective construction and rendering techniques. Exercises in rendering and presentation of architectonics: interior space and buildings. Use of different media. Prerequisite: DSGN 331. DSGN 335 Marker Techniques 1-3-2 An introduction to the professional use of markers in color for working drawings and final presentation in interior designs. Prerequisite: DSGN 131 and DSGN 331.

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DSGN 341 Interior Design CAD I 1-3-3 In a studio/laboratory setting, students learn to use computers for the creation, manipulation and understanding of three dimensional space. They will learn the necessary skills to create their own design through their interaction with the software and the instructor’s guidance. Prerequisite: DSGN 131. DSGN 342 Interior Design CAD II 2-2-3 A continuation of DSGN 341 Interior Design CAD I with emphasis on three dimensional work and project rendering. Prerequisite: DSGN 341 or ARCH 341. DSGN 360 Philosophy of Design 2-0-2 In this course the students will be introduced to the nature of human sensory perceptions and their relationships with spatial design concepts in the 20th century interior design and architecture. Prerequisite: ARCH 101. DSGN 362 History of Interiors I 3-0-3 Analysis of the principles which have guided interior and furniture design through the ages—with sketching exercises. The Classical period to 1815. Prerequisite: DSGN 201. DSGN 363 History of Interiors II 3-0-3 A continuation of History of Interiors I, from 1815 to approximately 1925. Prerequisite: DSGN 362. DSGN 370 Lighting Strategies for Interiors 2-1-3 The objectives of this course are to give students a working knowledge of the field of lighting and illumination. It will examine lighting as an influential role in the design landscape today. The Lecture component will consist of exploration of vocabulary, calculations, an graphic representations of lighting. In the Demonstration and Studio Components, students will gain further knowledge through observation of lighting system and collaborative research projects. Issues of materials science, health concerns and sustainability relative to lighting strategies will be covered. Prerequisite: DSGN 201 or ARCH 201. DSGN 372 Lighting Design 1-3-2 Design of lighting fixtures based on contemporary lighting theories and using modern material and techniques. Fullscale models. Prerequisite: DSGN 370. DSGN 373 Design for Interior Environment 1-5-3 Design projects and research related to current problems of the interior environment: space planning, community planning, and low-cost housing interiors. Exploration of new materials and systems. Prerequisite: DSGN 301. DSGN 381 Business Procedures in Interior Design 2-0-2 Financial, legal, and other commercial aspects of interior design. Prerequisite: DSGN 301. DSGN 401 Interior Design Problems III 2-5-4 Advanced, more complex problems in interior design. Coordination of design aspects and elements to achieve an integrated, balanced interior. Emphasis is placed upon presentation. A necessary requirement for credit in this course is a specified number of hours in externship to a professional interior design studio. The selection of the cooperating firm is the responsibility of the student and must be approved by the instructor. This same externship may also satisfy this requirement in DSGN 402. Prerequisite: DSGN 302, DSGN 332 and DSGN 371. DSGN 402 Senior Project in Interior Design 2-5-4 Final design project in interior design or furniture design, including a written thesis selected by the student with the advice of the faculty. The student will prove the ability to utilize and organize all the aspects of design in the solution of a problem, and to express them in a complete presentation. A necessary requirement for credit in this course is a specified number of hours in externship to a professional interior design studio. The selection of the cooperating firm must be approved by the instructor. The student may use experience acquired in DSGN 401, if the total hours of involvement were sufficient. Prerequisite: DSGN 401. DSGN 421 Furniture Design I 1-3-2 Furniture as an element of interior space. A study of the function of form and its effect on furnishings. Investigating and utilizing modern materials. Techniques of furniture production. Prerequisite: DSGN 301. DSGN 422 Furniture Design II 1-3-2 Continuation of DSGN 421. Problems will provide opportunity for the execution of designs in model forms, some of which will be executed in full scale. Prerequisite: DSGN 421. DSGN 481 Building Codes and Regulations 3-0-3 Using the health, safety and welfare of building occupants as an underlying rationale, this course studies the impact of building codes and regulations as they specifically relate to building interiors. The identification, comprehension and application of codes, in tandem with the different phases of design, construction and occupancy, are stressed. Specific topics include occupancy, fire prevention, egress, environmental standards, ADA and Universal Design. Prerequisite: DSGN 202. DSGN 492 Open Elective—Interior Design 1-2-2 An elective course intended for specialized material, such as model building, and certain subjects which utilize the unique expertise of particular instructors from the profession at large. The content and prerequisites will be announced upon scheduling. DSGN 493 Open Elective—Interior Design 3-0-3 Similar to ID 8492 in all respects except credit yield since more after-class hours will be required of the student.

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OLGA POGREBINSKAYA ADVERTISING MAJOR

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

College of Arts and Sciences Roger Yu, Ph.D, Dean

Advertising Communication Arts English and Speech
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Foreign Languages

English Language Programs

English Language Institute Fine Arts
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Computer Graphics

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Graphic Design

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Visual Arts Education

Interdisciplinary Studies Mathematics Physics Social Sciences

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Advertising
Manhattan Coordinator: D. Winokur The rapid growth of integrated communications has created an unprecedented demand for more and more professional practitioners, pursuing fast-track careers in advertising, public relations, direct marketing, and sales promotion. This quick expansion within the contemporary media environment is being met at NYIT by the Communications Arts Department, and its unique Bachelor of Science Degree Program in Advertising. Students studying and working with us gain real world knowledge and skills through a rich variety of hands-on/minds-on experiences in our career oriented, liberal arts based curriculum–and our award winning, student managed advertising and public relations agency, serving a prestigious client list of local, regional, and national organizations. Our program, historically one of the first such academic majors established and developed in the Northeast, emphasizes professional specialization areas encompassing account management, advertising research, media planning, creative and art direction, copywriting and workplace literacy skills in applicable multimedia technologies, and professionally-oriented computer programs. This practical training is enhanced by a balance of studies in the humanities and the sciences, incorporating the college's liberal arts core curriculum with a complementary concentration of Business and Marketing courses. While students anchor their work with us, progressing through the requirements of the Advertising degree, each individual is encouraged to explore appropriate elective offerings in other related programs, including Communication Arts, Fine Arts, Behavioral Sciences, and Interdisciplinary Studies. In addition, Advertising majors who qualify are advised to take advantage of the numerous opportunities within our internship program, structured for upper level students to earn academic credit while working off-campus, on-site in professional settings; as well as to participate in local, regional, and national competitions sponsored by non-profit organizations such as the Advertising Club of New York, the Long Island Advertising Club, Advertising Women of New York, the American Advertising Federation, and other corporations and businesses. Before graduation, each student, working with an Advertising program mentor, develops a professional portfolio, which then becomes an integral component of each individual's personal employment and/or graduate school search. The B.S. in Advertising degree program is offered at the college’s Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses; a specialization in advertising is available in the B.F.A. program on the Old Westbury Campus. Students earning baccalaureate degrees in the Humanities and Interdisciplinary Studies at NYIT can include a concentration in Advertising as a part of their degree programs. Transfer students considering the Advertising major at NYIT should immediately inquire about the acceptance of transfer credits into our program.

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Advertising 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 3

Science Life Sciences Physical Sciences

3 3 6 credits

Communication Arts ADVG 101 Introduction to Advertising ADVG 150 Plan and Create Ad Campaign ADVG 160 Media Planning and Buying ADVG 201 Advertising Design Concepts ADVG 210 Computer Application in Advertising ADVG 220 Media Production ADVG 240 Advertising Copywriting ADVG 301 Agency Workshop I ADVG 330 Advertising and Public Policy (Capstone) ADVG 450 Advertising Portfolio Workshop (Capstone)

Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy

3 3 3 9 credits

Advertising/Communication Arts Electives (consult with advisor) 9 credits Free Electives (with faculty approval) 12-14 credits Total credits required—125
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

32 credits Upper Electives (Strongly Recommended) ADVG 320 Business to Business Advertising ADVG 401 Agency Workshop II PREL 101 Public Relations I

3 4 3

10 credits Behavioral Sciences Business MGMT101 MRKT 101 MRKT305 MRKT 401 Introduction to Business Introduction to Marketing Direct Response Marketing Marketing Research 6 credits 3 3 3 3 12 credits English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course English Elective 6 6 3 3 3 21 credits Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 125 Finite Mathematics 3 credits 3 3 credits

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ADVG 101 Introduction to Advertising 3-0-3 This course provides a survey of modern advertising covering the major media: print, radio and television. Media are compared for their utility, impact and effectiveness as vehicles for advertising. Principles of good advertising copy and production are emphasized as are advertising ethics. Required of advertising majors. ADVG 150 Planning and Creating the Advertising Campaign 3-0-3 This course moves onto the study of planning, organizing and executing an advertising campaign, including such elements as research, market analysis, target market, consumer and trade strategy, budget, media strategy, promotion and evaluation. The creation of print and broadcast advertising is included, as is the role of the client in campaign planning. Required of advertising majors. ADVG 160 Media Planning and Buying 3-0-3 This combination case study-project course translates target marketing into media plans for specific advertising projects. It deals with the nature of the respective media (television, radio, newspapers, magazines), trade practices in each area and case studies in successful use of each medium. Media strategies are treated at a complex level, integrating prior coursework and current information on media services. Required of advertising majors. Prerequisites: ADVG 101, MRKT 101. ADVG 201 Advertising Design Concepts 3-0-3 In this course, lectures and discussions cover the applications of professional design concepts, from original creative ideas to completed advertising material. Discussions cover a wide variety of artistic and practical uses of typography, photography, film, video, other visuals, layout, and storyboarding, in preparing print and electronic commercial messages for the page and screen. Assignments are oriented toward helping students to develop critical thinking and media skills, as they develop personal portfolios, as well as assimilating acquired concepts into other courses and the advanced agency media and experiences within the Advertising degree program–based on computer soft-ware. Required for all Advertising majors ADVG 210 Computer Applications in Advertising 1-3-3 This course provides an introduction to computer-based technologies utilized by the advertising field. Students are initiated into electronic publishing and computer applications in typesetting, layout, graphics, printing, photography, and multimedia material. It includes a survey of the impact of digital systems on newspapers, book publishing, radio and audio recording, film, television and video, direct marketing, data base services, and research techniques. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory formats provide a thorough overview for understanding the sophisticated uses of software packages, to enhance productivity in subsequent coursework. Required for all Advertising majors. Prerequisite: ADVG 201. ADVG 220 Media Production Workshop 1-3-4 Advertising majors are introduced to fundamental techniques of media production including: still visuals, moving visuals and sound. This is a workshop experience in which students gain basic audio-visual skills. Required of advertising majors. ADVG 230 Broadcast Advertising 3-0-3 In this course, advertising for radio and television is studied in detail. Topics include: audience measurement, rate cards, sales servicing and merchandising, preparation and evaluation of commercials. Prerequisite: ADVG 101. ADVG 240 Advertising Copywriting 3-0-3 This course teaches practical application of the principles and techniques of copywriting to the preparation of advertising campaigns. It emphasizes the development of professional skills in writing effective copy for advertising in the print, radio and film/television media. Each student is expected to develop through all stages of preparation of the following: ad copy and layout for print, script for radio commercials with all necessary cues for sound effects and music, script and storyboard for a commercial to be produced on film or videotape. Required of advertising majors. ADVG 301 Agency Workshop I 0-6-4 In the professional environment of an advertising agency format, students work on selected advertising projects under a specialist’s supervision. Organizational planning, target audience analysis, trafficking, as well as campaign management skills, are stressed while the creative execution of varying levels of projects, e.g., direct response ads, business-to-business ads, takes place. This course is open to juniors and seniors only. ADVG 310 Intermediate Advertising Design Concepts 1-3-3 This course provides workshop and laboratory simulations of professional techniques and processes for generating advertising material including brochures, logos, packages, and digital videos. Discussions incorporate the situational dynamics of the working environment. Assignments are oriented toward helping students to develop critical thinking, creative skills, and personal portfolios, as well as assimilating acquired concepts into other courses and the advanced agency experiences within the Advertising degree program. Completed through computer-based media and software. Prerequisites: ADVG 201, ADVG 210. ADVG 320 Business-to-Business Advertising 3-0-3 This course concentrates on that essential segment of advertising directed toward trade and industry. It analyzes and reviews the frequently specialized and often highly technical creative approaches required to reach these markets as well as the highly selective media in which the advertising must run to be most productive. Also included are reviews and

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appraisals of the "non-media" advertising utilized within these marketing areas. Prerequisites: ADVG 101, MRKT 101, ADVG 220. ADVG 330 Advertising and Public Policy 3-0-3 In this course, the ethical and legal implications of current professional standards in are examined critically. Issues selected for analysis include truth in advertising advertising, gender and ethnic stereotyping and advertising for the children’s market. Practices are viewed from the vantage point, not only of present federal regulations, but also from an enlightened public policy for the future. Junior level required of advertising majors; open to non-majors by instructor’s permission only. ADVG 340 Television Commercial Writing Workshop 3-0-3 This course is designed to help develop students’ knowledge of techniques and structure used in planning TV commercials, including new technologies. The basic disciplines necessary for the creation of a professionally acceptable TV commercial will be reviewed and redefined. The written commercial will be evaluated in its totality (concept, philosophy, words, visual credibility, music, sound effects and potential for satisfying a specific objective). This course is an elective for junior and senior advertising majors; non-majors need instructor’s permission. ADVG 351 Independent Study in Advertising 0-0-1 Upper division advertising majors with superior performance records have the opportunity to pursue special topics of professional interest in an independent study format. An approved preliminary independent study proposal including the grading criteria must be on file prior to registration in this course. Registrants are expected to devote forty-five hours of academic work for each academic credit awarded. (See Independent Study Guidelines.) This course is an elective for junior and senior advertising majors. ADVG 352 Independent Study in Advertising* 0-0-2 ADVG 353 Independent Study in Advertising* 0-0-3 ADVG 354 Independent Study in Advertising* 0-0-4 ADVG 361 Independent Advertising Project 0-0-1 This course is limited to junior and senior-level advertising majors with superior performance records in the major have the opportunity to pursue a creative advertising project in an independent study format. An approved project proposal, including grading criteria, must be on file prior to registration in this course. Registrants are expected to devote forty-five hours of academic work for each academic credit awarded. (See Independent Study Guidelines.) ADVG 362 Independent Advertising Project** 0-0-2 ADVG 363 Independent Advertising Project** 0-0-3 ADVG 364 Independent Advertising Project** 0-0-4 ADVG 384 Externship in Advertising 0-0-4 Selected junior and senior-level advertising majors who have demonstrated superior performance in coursework have the opportunity to participate in the advertising field at a sponsoring agency site. Externs carry out assigned tasks under professional supervision in the field; a log of activities and evaluation report is required. (Consult the Externship Guidelines for details on application, standards, hours and deadlines.) Placement is based on availability of sponsoring agency, cooperation and qualification of candidates, the department site, the number of externship credits applicable to the degree. Open to qualified upper division advertising majors; non-majors require departmental approval. The grade of P (Pass) is awarded for successful completion of externships. ADVG 401 Agency Workshop II 0-6-4 This is a continuation of the first level of Agency Workshop in which students pursue more complex and diversified projects. The course poses projects utilizing basic media strategy, e.g., television, radio, newspaper, magazines, outdoor and transit advertising and supplementary media. Visualization continues as an important focus, as do print production techniques, television and radio commercial production and dealer programs. Cost effectiveness factors are a theme throughout. Upper division advertising elective; strongly suggested for advertising majors. Non-advertising majors need instructor’s permission. Prerequisite: ADVG 301. ADVG 410 Advanced Advertising Design Concepts 1-3-3 This course provides seminar and laboratory replications of professional guidelines and procedures for directing creative personnel and for coordinating the development of advertising material. Discussions explore the independent relationships among advertising principals and their clients, and emphasize organizational and industry precepts. Assignments are oriented toward having students develop critical thinking, managerial skills. Prerequisites: ADVG 310.

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ADVG 450 Advertising Portfolio Workshop 1-3-3 This course provides a culminating educational experience for advertising Majors, in which individuals develop professional materials illustrating the broad range of expertise acquired throughout the degree program. A survey of employment opportunities in the field is undertaken; and regular trade journal reading reports are required. Techniques of professional preparation of resumes, arrangement of writing and print samples, and display of campaign project involvement, presentation of research and media strategy skills will be emphasized. Each student develops a professional videotape of "self-presentation." Required for advertising majors. This course is open to senior level students only. COMM 240 Writing for the Mass Media 3-0-3 This is a practical introductory course that exposes students to the basics of effective writing and the variety of writing challenges posed by the mass media. Simple forms of writing for various media are explored as are elements of good writing such as internal conflict, word economy, objectivity, subjectivity, and the use of nonverbal messages. Prerequisites: WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. COMM 301 Communication Law 3-0-3 This survey of the statutes and regulations governing press, broadcasting, film, and the Internet includes the analysis of defamation, contempt, privacy, freedom of speech, censorship, and political expression. Open to juniors and seniors only COMM 350 Seminar in Mass Communication Problems 3-0-3 This seminar deals with different current problems and selected topics affecting mass media or a specific medium. Students may re-enroll if the topic varies. Open to juniors and seniors only. PREL 101 Public Relations and Publicity I 3-0-3 This introductory course confronts the ethics of public relations and techniques of identifying public relations problems by using public relations techniques, and then measuring results. Case histories are analyzed. PREL 201 Public Relations and Publicity II 3-0-3 This is a workshop course in which students select actual organizations as "clients," and develop practical public relations programs. The class operates as a consulting public relations agency, which assists each member with program development. Prerequisite: PREL 101. *Same as ADVG 351. **Same as ADVG 361.

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Communication Arts
Faculty: M. Banks, G. Brinkmann-Zhang, V. Ditingo, J. Fauvell, D. Fizzinoglia, M. Gamble, J. Hanc, P. Hopper, P. Lipsky, I. Matic, A. O’Brien, A. Piazza, J. Saslow, R. Sherwin, D. Winokur. Professional Staff: L.I. News Tonight-K. Eckhardt, C. Pack, G. Licker. Engineering- H. Savran, J. Vincennes. Adjunct Faculty: : D. Bird, D. Cavanaugh, L. Colantuono, K. Eckhardt, T. Fleming, E. Lansdale, S.M. Lin, J. Locicero, A. Mandel, J. McCune, B. Monteiro, J. Morosoff, C. Pack, P. Perez, B. Pierce, T. Pison, J. Price, H. Savran, B. Walsh. The distance between Madison Avenue and Hollywood, between the newsroom and the editing suite is closer than ever. The communications industry of the twenty-first century demands professionals who can span that distance—professionals with multiple skills, who can utilize multiple platforms—digital, visual, written—to produce and disseminate their messages. This kind of versatility is characteristic of NYIT Communication Arts graduates: news people who can write, edit and deliver a news story on-air; new media specialists who design, digitize, animate and publish web pages; and filmmakers who write, direct and edit for television, cinema and the web. Communication Arts students may focus on traditional aspects of the field—radio and audio recording, filmmaking, television, advertising/public relations, print and electronic journalism, corporate and international communication. Our newly equipped laboratories also permit study and experimentation in the latest aspects of digital graphics, animation, web design and broadcast graphics, which may be integrated into interactive multiple media productions for the web. All NYIT Communication Arts students follow a similar educational model: a solid conceptual grounding, hands-on instruction in the practical aspects of the discipline, and digital literacy on the latest equipment. Through this combination of learning and doing, of time-honored principles and timely applications, our students learn how to function successfully in the new, integrated world of communications.
Degree Programs

NYIT's Communication Arts department offers four degree-program paths: The Associate in Applied Science Degree with a major in Communication Arts: a twoyear, 66-credit program with basic coursework in all media, a humanities core and some specialization. (See curriculum requirements on the following pages.) The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Degree with a major in Communication Arts: a fouryear program with specializations possible in: advertising, audio recording and radio, digital film, media studies, print and electronic journalism, public relations, corporate and documentary video, television production, web design and computer graphics. The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) with a major in advertising. (See curriculum requirements on the following pages.) The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Communication Arts: a graduate degree with a number of media specializations described in the NYIT graduate catalog. In special cases of advanced standing, individualized degree programs are customized to meet the special needs and interest of registrants.

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The Communication Arts Department also provides selected areas of concentration for students pursuing a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies or Humanities. Further, the department offers a rich selection of elective coursework for other majors at NYIT, especially those in Technical Writing and Computer Graphics.
Communication Arts Combined BFA-MA Program

The Communication Arts combined BFA/MA program allows students to achieve a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Communication Arts and a Master of Arts in Communication Arts in five (5) years. The five year program creates a fast track to our Master’s degree by allowing the best Communication Arts students to complete a total of 109 undergraduate credits, and then move into the 36-credit Master of Arts Program. This combined degree is intended for students who wish to be recognized as graduates of a highly selective program. It also offers students an opportunity to enter the job force earlier than they might otherwise be able to. Admissions: Entering Freshmen who wish to apply for admission to the combined BFA/MA program must have a minimum combined SAT score of 1100 and/or a 90 (3.5) average in high school. Students in the regular undergraduate degree program who demonstrate academic success as evidenced by their academic performance (3.0 GPA or better) may request consideration for transfer into the five-year program at the beginning of their second academic year, or completion of 30 credits. Communication Arts majors from other institutions may transfer into this program provided that they have a 3.0 GPA and transfer in no more than 30 credits. Two letters of recommendation and an essay are also required of all applicants to the five-year program. The applicants will also be interviewed by members of the Graduate Committee of the Communication Arts department in order to ascertain their ability and their understanding of the challenges of the program they are about to undertake. Students who apply for admission but are not accepted into the combined BFA/MA program will automatically be considered for admission into the 4 year BFA program in Communication Arts. Annual Reevaluation: All students in this combined program will be reviewed at the end of each of the first three academic years in order to monitor their performance achievement. Students whose grade point averages fall below 3.0 will be notified that their standing in the program is in jeopardy. Their standing will be reevaluated at the end of the following semester. Progression to the MA: Students will progress to the graduate phase of the combined degree program after completing all 109 undergraduate credits with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0.
Specialized Professional Opportunities

Long Island News Tonight: The department maintains a professional news bureau in Old Westbury which produces a nightly news program for cable distribution. Students selected for interest in newswriting, reporting and production register for specific courses to participate in the production of this nightly news program under professional supervision. Registrants must be available at least one full day a week for this activity which runs through the calendar year. 130

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Externship Program: To further enhance student professionalism cultivated in coursework, the School administers an internship program. Qualified advanced students are placed in professional situations. Working for a semester or more within a company, students acquire a sense of the real world for which they are preparing, and receive academic credit for their efforts. On many occasions, externships lead to full-time employment. NYIT externs are actively sought in all areas of communication: broadcast networks and independent television and radio stations; cable and public broadcast stations; advertising and public relations agencies; international corporate and educational institutions; newspapers, magazines and production companies. To qualify, students must have junior-senior status, a GPA of 3.0 or better, and be recommended by academic advisers. Students can register for two, three, four, or five externship credits. Credit varies depending on activities of the extern and the amount of time in the placement. Registration in the same externship may be possible if responsibilities of the role are more complex or diversified. Students should plan about 150 hours as the minimum commitment for a three-credit externship. The department sets the credit allocation and there is a 12 credit limit to the number of externship credits allowed. Advertising and Public Relations Agency: The department provides a professional full-service agency environment in conjunction with advertising and public relations curriculum offerings. In Manhattan, the Agency Workshop and on the Old Westbury campus, the Carleton Group serve this function for those majoring in advertising and public relations in the B.S. programs. NuVision, a student public relations experience on the Old Westbury campus serves that specialization in the B.F.A. program.
Facilities

The department of Communication Arts maintains studios and laboratories for all production classes in television, digital filmmaking, radio and sound, multi-media productions, advertising/public relations, web design and computer graphics. Television: Both the Manhattan and the Old Westbury campuses have television studios with high quality cameras. Both campuses have video editing suites with state-of-the-art avid and final cut pro nonlinear editing stations. In Old Westbury, a TV newsroom is equipped with AP wire service and and web based research service. Both campuses have broadcast quality, and HDV digital cameras. Filmmaking: In Old Westbury at the de Seversky Center’s academic wing and at 16 W. 61 of the Manhattan campus, digital filmmaking laboratories include digital cameras, non-linear editing stations and screening facilities. Radio: On the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses, radio laboratories are equipped with digital stereo consoles, digital recording equipment and computer-based audio editing programs. The sound processing laboratories have voice recording, sound transfer and digital mixing facilities. Motion Graphics: State-of-the art, multi-platform computer labs are avail-able on both campuses to support all communication arts specializations including the new media. Radio Station: The radio station operated by students is WNYT in Old Westbury. 131

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Quality of Academic Experience

Communication arts majors are encouraged to participate in academic, social, and service activities. Voluntary service to each campus newspaper, radio station, yearbook, the production house, media festivals, special events and the like is part of the communication arts major’s way to gain experience with media as well as to contribute to campus life. While it is the responsibility of each student to review options and make wise choices regarding degree programs, concerned faculty and staff are available for academic advisement. Not all course offerings are available at each campus every semester; planned courses may be cancelled for lack of sufficient registration. Students are urged to discuss special needs with advisers early in degree programs.
Rights to Media Productions Developed in NYIT Coursework

Essentially this policy covers films, video and audio productions, and other nonprint media. All films and videotapes produced in the Department of Communication Arts in fulfillment of class assignments, or as advanced individual study projects, whether made on school premises or elsewhere, with or without departmental equipment, with or without extra funds, are subject to the following ownership policy: 1. All such films and tapes are co-owned by the student and the school. In each case the students who originate the film/tape should decide which student or students co-own the film/tape with the school. 2. Either the student or the school may arrange distribution. Students who do not wish to have their films/tapes distributed may veto distribution. 3. The school will decide whether or not to put its name on a given film/tape. 4. Distribution deals, whether arranged by the school or by the student, must be approved and signed by the dean. 5. All income, after print costs and other up-front obligations are paid, will go directly from the distributor to the student and the school on a 50/50 basis. Outside funding is not considered to be an up-front obligation. 6. The school’s income will be used for scholarships, for funding future student films/tapes and for fees and expenses in connection with placing student films/tapes in festivals. If a film/tape wins a prize, that prize goes to the student minus the cost of placing the film/tape in competition. 7. Films/tapes may be distributed only after a faculty adviser is certain that all necessary clearances have been obtained by the student. 8. The student and NYIT each have a right to prints (copies) at cost as such prints (copies) are needed for NYIT or student use. Such prints (copies) may not be rented or sold.

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I Curriculum requirements for

CA Electives Non-major Electives

23 credits 12 credits

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Communication Arts, Combined Baccalaureate/ Masters of Arts in Communication Arts program

Total Undergraduate credits required—109 credits B. Graduate MA Courses A student’s graduate work would begin in the 8th semester at NYIT. At the graduate level, students will take 4 core courses (12 credits) spread out over the three semesters of graduate work. Students will also select 24 credits of graduate level courses from those listed in our Graduate Catalog. Students should continue to consult with faculty advisors to select electives that will form one of four graduate tracks. Graduate Core 12 credits COMM610 Vocabulary of the Media Critic 3 COMM630 Media & Culture 3 COMM620 Media Research or COMM625Art in the Era of Mass Comm 3 DGIM 601 Multimedia Production Tools or DGIM 700 Advertising Design 3 Graduate Electives 24 credits

Undergraduate and Graduate Requirements A. Undergraduate BFA Courses College Success Seminar(1) 2 credits

Communication Arts ADVG 101 Introduction to Advertising or PREL 101 Public Relations and Publicity COMM 101 Communication: Principles & Process COMM 210 Broadcasting History and Crit. or FILM 210 History of Motion Pictures COMM 240 Writing for the Mass Media or TEVE 340 Scriptwriting I COMM 301 Communications Law COMM 401 Mass Communication in Society DGIM 101 Intro. to Digital Imaging FILM 101 Fundamentals of Filmmaking (FILM I) JOUR 101 Introduction to Journalism TEVE 101 Fundamentals of TV Production (TV I)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Total Graduate credits required—36 credits Total credits for BFA/MA—148 credits
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83) . Communication Arts students should consult advisers for appropriate open elective courses such as: marketing, business, political science, computer graphics, technical writing, behavioral science, speech, English, and computer courses. Special permission may be given to qualified students to select advanced open electives in lieu of CA electives; check prerequisite requirements.

30 credits Behavioral Sciences English Composition One Group A Course One Group B Course Speech 6 credits

6 3 3 3 15 credits

Liberal Arts Mathematics Sciences Life Science Physical Science

3 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits

Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy

3 3 3 9 credits

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I Core Curriculum for Bachelor of
College Success Seminar
(1)

Fine Arts in Communication Arts 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Communication Arts ADVG 101 Introduction to Advertising COMM101 Communication: Principles and Process COMM210 Broadcasting History and Crit. COMM240 Writing for the Mass Media COMM301 Communications Law COMM401 Mass Communication in Society DGIM 101 Intro. to Digital Imaging FILM 101 Fundamentals of Film Production (FILM I) FILM 210 History of Motion Pictures JOUR 101 Introduction to Journalism PREL 101 Public Relations and Publicity I RADI 101 Fundamentals of Radio Prod. TEVE 101 Fundamentals of TV Production (TV I)

Communication Arts students should consult advisers for appropriate open elective courses such as: marketing, business, political science, computer graphics, technical writing, behavioral science, speech, English, and computer courses. Special permission may be given to qualified students to select advanced open electives in lieu of CA electives; check prerequisite requirements.

I Curriculum requirements for the
Associate in Applied Science Degree in Communication Arts
(1)

College Success Seminar

2 credits

39 credits Behavioral Sciences English Composition One Group A Course One Group B Course Speech 6 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits Liberal Arts Mathematics Sciences Life Science Physical Science 3 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy 3 3 3 9 credits CA Electives Non-major Electives 26 credits 19-21 credits Total credits required—128
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

Communication Arts ADVG 101 Introduction to Advertising COMM101 Communication: Principles and Process COMM210 Broadcasting History and Crit. DGIM 101 Intro. to Digital Imaging FILM 101 Fundamentals of Film Production (FILM I) FILM 210 History of Motion Pictures JOUR 101 Introduction to Journalism RADI 101 Fundamentals of Radio Prod. TEVE 101 Fundamentals of TV Production (TV I)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

27 credits English Composition One Group A Course One Group B Course Speech 6 3 3 3 15 credits Behavioral Sciences Liberal Arts Mathematics Sciences Life Science Physical Science 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits Social Sciences History or Political Science Open Electives 3 credits 4-6 Total credits required—66
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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ADVG 101 Introduction to Advertising 3-0-3 This course provides a survey of modern advertising covering the major media: print, radio and television. Media are compared for their utility, impact and effectiveness as vehicles for advertising. Principles of good advertising copy and production are emphasized as are advertising ethics. Required of advertising majors. ADVG 150 Planning and Creating the Advertising Campaign 3-0-3 This course moves onto the study of planning, organizing and executing an advertising campaign, including such elements as research, market analysis, target market, consumer and trade strategy, budget, media strategy, promotion and evaluation. The creation of print and broadcast advertising is included, as is the role of the client in campaign planning. Required of advertising majors. Prerequisite: ADVG 101. ADVG 230 Broadcast Advertising 3-0-3 In this course, advertising for radio and television is studied in detail. Topics include: audience measurement, rate cards, sales servicing and merchandising, preparation and evaluation of commercials. Prerequisite: ADVG 101. ADVG 240 Advertising Copywriting 3-0-3 This course teaches practical application of the principles and techniques of copywriting to the preparation of advertising campaigns. It emphasizes the development of professional skills in writing effective copy for advertising in the print, radio and film/television media. Each student is expected to develop through all stages of preparation all of the following: ad copy and layout for print, script for radio commercials with all necessary cues for sound effects and music, script and storyboard for a commercial to be produced on film or videotape. Required of advertising majors. Prerequisite: ADVG 150. AUDI 201 Theory and Practice of Audio Recording 2-1-3 Students are introduced to the theory and practice of multichannel recording. The rationale behind equipment selection will be explored as it applies to the recording and editing of a variety of live materials. Students will carry out recording and editing assignments applicable to all areas in which multichannel recording is used. Prerequisite: RADI 101. AUDI 250 Advanced Audio Engineering 3-0-3 Emphasis is placed on assuming total responsibility for the various phases of recording live music. Students are involved in the set-up, overdubs, and mixes, and will be held responsible for demonstrating the mastery of all the techniques involved in such recording. Prerequisites: AUDI 201, AUDI 301. AUDI 301 Advanced Theory and Practice of Audio Recording 2-1-3 This second-level course in audio recording gives the students an opportunity to carry out professional recording assignments that further expand the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in the pre-requisite course. Prerequisite: AUDI 201. COMM 101 Communication: Principles and Process 3-0-3

This survey course introduces the nature, principles, elements, and mechanism of the communication process. How, why, in what forms, and through what stages communication occurs is explored along with the nature of human perception and the role of verbal and nonverbal language in conveying meaning. Emphasis is placed on providing a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of communication as they apply to the design and delivery of the message via such media as print, radio, television, film, and the Internet. Required for all communication arts freshmen.
COMM 210 Broadcast History and Criticism 2-1-3 This survey of radio and television development in the United States includes consideration of the roles played by the broadcast media as cultural, social, and economic forces. Special emphasis is placed on major trends in both entertainment and factual programming. The course includes class lectures plus independent viewing assignments. COMM 240 Writing for the Mass Media 3-0-3 This is a practical introductory course that exposes students to the basics of effective writing and the variety of writing challenges posed by the mass media. Simple forms of writing for various media are explored as are elements of good writing such as internal conflict, word economy, objectivity, subjectivity, and the use of nonverbal messages. Prerequisites: WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. COMM 301 Communication Law 3-0-3 This survey of the statutes and regulations governing the press, broadcasting, film, and the Internet includes the analysis of defamation, contempt, privacy, freedom of speech, censorship, and political expression. Open to juniors and seniors only. COMM 310 Current Broadcast Operations 3-0-3 Students in this course study the modern radio or television broadcast station. The functions, requirements, and problems of each department are dealt with in detail. Station-network relationships, unions, the independent station, and the educational station are also considered. Open to juniors and seniors only.

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COMM 340 Modern Audiovisual Techniques 1-3-3 This course covers the operation and handling of modern A/V systems and their utilization in a variety of training and educational settings. Open to juniors and seniors only. COMM 350 Seminar in Mass Communication Problems 3-0-3 This seminar deals with different current problems and selected topics affecting mass media or a specific medium. Students may re-enroll if the topic varies. Open to juniors and seniors only. COMM 355 Special Studies in Communication Arts 3-0-3 Individual creative and/or research projects in one or more medium are offered for intensive study in areas of specific student interest. Registration by permission of instructor in whose area the study is performed. COMM 360 Special Projects, in Communication Arts 3-0-3 Essentially the same as COMM 355, particularly applicable to interschool projects. Registration by permission of instructor in whose area the study is performed. COMM 362 Externship in Communication Arts 0-2-2 Students enrolled in this course are given an opportunity to work in professional environments in the area of communications and advertising for credit. To be eligible, student must have junior or senior status, a 3.0 or better GPA, the recommendation of his/her faculty adviser and the chair’s permission. Applications must be approved during the prior semester. Grades are on pass/fail basis. The number of hours for a particular externship assignment is determined by each externship coordinator, based on the sponsoring agency requirements and learning value. May be repeated up to 12 credits. COMM 363 Externship in Communication Arts 0-3-3 Students enrolled in this course are given an opportunity to work in professional environments in the area of communications and advertising for credit. To be eligible, student must have junior or senior status, a 3.0 or better GPA, the recommendation of his/her faculty adviser and the chair’s permission. Applications must be approved during the prior semester. Grades are on pass/fail basis. The number of hours for a particular externship assignment is determined by each externship coordinator, based on the sponsoring agency requirements and learning value. May be repeated up to 12 credits. COMM 364 Externship in TV Newsroom Operation or Externship in Communication Arts 0-4-4 The Externship in TV Newsroom Operation is a two-level course in Broadcast News Operations. First level students will be provided instruction in preparing, gathering, writing, producing and broadcasting TV news. Assignments are carried out in the NYIT newsroom, which is capable of broadcasting TV news to the Long Island market. Emphasis is on "on-thescene" reporting, utilizing portable equipment (ENG). Qualified second-level students assume responsibilities with newsroom personnel such as correspondent/reporter, camera person, sound operator, news writer and video tape editor. When the nightly show is videotaped, students act as crew members. Grades are on a pass/fail basis. May be repeated up to 12 credits. Prerequisites: TEVE 101; instructors permission and approval of news director. Students enrolled in the Externship in Communication Arts are given an opportunity to work in professional environments in the area of communications and advertising for credit. To be eligible, student must have junior or senior status, a 3.0 or better GPA, the recommendation of his/her faculty adviser and the chair’s permission. Applications must be approved during the prior semester. Grades are on pass/fail basis. The number of hours for a particular externship assignment is determined by each externship coordinator, based on the sponsoring agency requirements and learning value. May be repeated up to 12 credits. COMM 365 Externship in Communication Arts 0-5-5 Students enrolled in this course are given an opportunity to work in professional environments in the area of communications and advertising for credit. To be eligible, student must have junior or senior status, a 3.0 or better GPA, the recommendation of his/her faculty adviser and the chair’s permission. Applications must be approved during the prior semester. Grades are on pass/fail basis. The number of hours for a particular externship assignment is determined by each externship coordinator, based on the sponsoring agency requirements and learning value. May be repeated up to 12 credits. COMM 370 Media Workshop I 2-6-4 Advanced students are assigned to projects on an individual basis. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. COMM 372 Externship in Communication Arts 0-2-2 COMM 375 Media Workshop II 2-6-4 A continuation of the media workshop begun in COMM 360. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. COMM 380 Externship in Communication Arts 0-4-4 Students enrolled in this course are given an opportunity to work in professional environments in the area of communications and advertising for credit. To be eligible, student must have junior or senior status, a 3.0 or better GPA, the recommendation of his/her faculty adviser and the chair’s permission. Applications must be approved during the prior semester. Grades are on pass/fail basis. The number of hours for a particular externship assignment is determined by each externship coordinator, based on the sponsoring agency requirements and learning value. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

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COMM 401 Mass Communication in Society 3-0-3 This capstone course is an intensive, multi-faceted exploration of the mass media as systems of communication as well as social and psychological influences on society. Media ethics and responsibilities are explored along with a study of research methodologies in the communications field. Readings and discussions. Open to seniors only. DGIM 101 Introduction to Digital Imaging 3-0-3 This course focuses on the uses of the computer as a media development system. Students create imagery using drawing and painting software, and explore the computer’s potential in new forms of media content. Focus is on the development of the Internet as a resource for communication. Each student creates a personal web page. FILM 101 Fundamentals of FILM Production 2-3-3 This course provides an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of digital filmmaking. Elementary aesthetic principles of film language are introduced along with the roles of director, cinematographer, and other creative personnel. Specially designed shooting exercises in the classroom teach the basic techniques of digital film production. Student director/cameraperson teams are assigned to produce and edit short silent digital films. Shooting and editing sessions are scheduled in addition to class time. All necessary equipment is provided. FILM 201 FILM Production Workshop 2-3-3 This course explores all the essentials of sync-sound digital filmmaking. Its emphasis is on tools and technology and their relationship to the aesthetic and functional concerns of the filmmaker. Basic practical skills are taught in cinematography, lighting and sound. Student teams of director and cameraperson write, cast and shoot a short digital film. Preproduction and production for these projects are scheduled in addition to classes. Prerequisite: FILM 101 and TEVE 340 or instructor’s permission. FILM 210 History of Motion Pictures 2-1-3 This survey course explores the development of the film as an art form and a technique. Fifteen hours of selected representative films are screened during the laboratory portion of the course. Post-screening analysis, research, and a term paper are required. FILM 215 The Documentary in Film and Television 1-3-3 This course provides a brief historical introduction to the documentary film and its role as an educational, ideological, and sociological force. Post-screening analysis, research, and a term paper are required. FILM 301 Advanced Film Production Workshop 2-3-3 This course uses the skills and knowledge provided in FILM 201 to progress to the in-depth study of advanced production techniques through rough cut stage. Students are required to complete projects. Prerequisites: FILM 201 or instructor’s permission. This course is open to juniors and seniors only. FILM 310 Film Industry in the United States 3-0-3 This course provides an analysis of the organizational structure, finances, and management of the film industry in the United States. The mechanism of film funding, specifics of distribution and exhibition of films produced by the major studios and by independent producers are explored as are sponsored film and other non-theatrical markets. The legal aspects of film production, distribution and exhibition are also covered. FILM 350 Documentary Film and Television Workshop 1-4-3 This advanced filmmaking course emphasizes the production of documentary and informational films for use in television and other purposes. Each student, working individually or in an assigned group, is assigned to produce any one of the varieties of such film material. Prerequisites: FILM 201 and instructor’s permission. JOUR 101 Introduction to Journalism 3-0-3 This course provides a survey of evolution of the American press and its influence in our democratic society. Freedom of the press and social responsibilities are emphasized along with the professional goals, qualities, and ethics of a journalist. Technical developments and organizational structure in print and broadcast journalism are explored. Various types and styles of journalism and profiles of the prominent journalists are covered through a survey of literature Vocational opportunities in journalism are also discussed. JOUR 315 Investigative Reporting 3-0-3 This course is a practical application of journalism theory and practice to developing in-depth news material in such fields as government, politics, crime, and other areas of public concern. Significant case histories in the field of investigative reporting will be examined. Prerequisite: JOUR 401 JOUR 340 Advanced Techniques in News Reporting and Editing 3-0-3 This course covers the reporting and editing of news, with particular emphasis on the functions of rewrite, copy-editing, and make-up. The roles of the copy-editor and managing editor along with the use of electronic media in the gathering of news are explored. Prerequisite: JOUR 350.

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JOUR 350 Introduction to News Reporting for All Media 3-0-3 This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of news reporting through the study of sources and the preparation of news, feature, and editorial materials. The emphasis is on print, although the techniques of electronic journalism are included. Prerequisites: JOUR 101, WRIT 101, WRIT 151. JOUR 401 Broadcast News Writing and Editing 3-0-3 This class teaches the fundamentals of writing, editing, and organizing news broadcasts, with special emphasis on the electronic media. Prerequisites: JOUR 101, WRIT 101, and WRIT 151. PREL 101 Public Relations and Publicity I 3-0-3 This introductory course confronts the ethics of public relations and techniques of identifying public relations problems by using public relations techniques, and then measuring results. Case histories are analyzed. PREL 201 Public Relations and Publicity II 3-0-3 This is a workshop course in which students select actual organizations as “clients,” and develop practical public relations programs. The class operates as a consulting public relations agency, which assists each member with program development. Prerequisite: PREL 101. RADI 101 Fundamentals of Radio Production 1-3-3 This course provides students with orientation in the basic techniques of radio production. Major attention is paid to the development of competence in basic studio equipment and terminology. Essentials of studio production in basic program forms are covered. An additional hour for preparation of production material is required. RADI 102 Radio Production Workshop 2-3-3 This class moves on to the study of the radio program: its planning, writing, and production. Major emphasis is placed on current radio program forms. Prerequisite: RADI 101. TEVE 101 Fundamentals of Television Production 1-3-3 This course provides students the basic techniques of television production. Major attention is paid to developing competencies in studio equipment and terminology. Essentials of studio production in basic program forms are covered. TEVE 201 Television Production Workshop 1-4-3 This course centers on the television program: its planning, writing, and production. Major emphasis is placed on current non-dramatic programming forms, which are produced live to tape Prerequisite: TEVE 101. TEVE 250 Video Editing 1-3-3 This course explores the process of video editing. Videotape formats, the recording process and elements of postproduction management as they apply to the video-editing environment are studied. Students are familiarized with the operation of equipment in the edit suite. Prerequisite: TEVE 201. TEVE 301 Television Project Development 3-0-3 Students develop a script for the purpose of its production in the following semester, devising the floor plan, light plot, storyboard, graphics, music, and all other preproduction elements. Prerequisite: TEVE 201 and instructor’s permission. TEVE 310 TV Studio Crew Working 1-8-4 This course consists of intermediate-level practical work in television production as a member of a studio crew. Lectures and laboratory workshops are held in conjunction with TEVE 401. Each student shares responsibilities with other members of the TV studio crew involved in producing a TV show originated and directed by students enrolled in TEVE 401. Responsibilities include: creative use of camera, sound, lighting, and duties of the technical director, assistant director, floor manager, recording operator, tele-cine operator, graphic generator operator, grips and floor assistants. At least two of the areas listed above must be covered by each student for completion of the course. Prerequisite: TEVE 201. This course is open to juniors and seniors only. Instructor’s permission required for other students. TEVE 315 Set Design for FILM and Television 3-0-3 This course explores the practical basic skills of set design techniques and technologies (limited to interiors only). Students study styles of set design produced by a variety of artists for actual films and television shows. Students complete a project based on a given script that includes sketches, perspective drawings, elevations, and floor plan (model is optional). Prerequisite: This course is open to juniors and seniors only. Other students require permission of the chair. TEVE 320 Directing Professional Talent 1-3-3 This course provides a practical workshop in the fundamentals of the director’s craft. Techniques of script analysis, casting and rehearsals are studied through exercises and discussions. Emphasis is placed on the working relationship between the director and actor. Additional hours TBA. Prerequisite: TEVE 201. TEVE 326 Broadcast Announcing 2-2-3 This class provides practice in announcing, interviewing, and leading discussions. Students will have the opportunity to host panel shows and variety programs while learning specific methods for improving voice, posture, dress, and TV personality. Prerequisites: RADI 101, TEVE 101.

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TEVE 330 Electronic Field Production 1-3-3 The workshop-project approach in this course provides students with experience and skill in location video techniques. A production team project is generally required in drama, music or documentary video production. Producing, directing, lighting, and editing are covered. Prerequisite: TEVE 201. TEVE 340 Scriptwriting I 3-0-3 This course covers the basic principles of dramaturgy and its application to the writing of screenplays for film and television. Students learn the technicalities of script formats for film and television and the various stages of preparation through which scripts normally pass such as: concept, treatment, draft, rewrites, synopsis. Students are guided as they develop of short screenplay through all necessary stages into a complete story script ready for pre-production and production in future semesters. Required for students specializing in film and television. Prerequisites: WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. TEVE 345 Writing for Television and FILM/Scriptwriting II 3-0-3 This course builds on the principles learned in TEVE 340 as students study scriptwriting techniques for television and motion pictures. Analysis of script formats, techniques, and styles of the filmmaker today are coupled with practice assignments in writing synopses and scripts. Prerequisite: TEVE 340 TEVE 401 Advanced Television Workshop 2-6-4 This is a course in writing, producing, and directing, a digital production with emphasis on working on a set, utilizing both single and multi-camera techniqes. Students assume the responsibilities of the producer and director as they work with professional actors. Members of the class are responsible for, the creative use of lighting, scenery, and makeup. Prerequisite: TEVE 301 and instructor’s permission. Corequisite: TEVE 402.

TEVE 402 Set Building, Dressing, and Lighting 0-5-3 This practical course is required for all students registered in TEVE 401, Advanced Television Workshop. By building, dressing, and lighting the sets for student productions in the television studio, students develop the basic skills of professionals such as the stagehand, prop man, lighting director, set decorator. Corequisite: TEVE 401. TEVE 410 Advanced Television Workshop II 2-6-4 This advanced workshop offers students the opportunity to continue their development as writers, producers and directors through participation in all aspects of the creation of dramatic television. Shows produced in this class are shot in the studio "film style." Productions are designed around the matte effect, whereby a set is created by using a miniature, computerized images, or previously recorded video to replace a chrom-key blue background. Post-production elements are emphasized, and students are encouraged to utilize non-linear editing computer graphics and video effects, adding music and sound effects as well as titles and credits. Prerequisite: TEVE 301. TEVE 420 Educational and Instructional Television Workshop 2-6-4 This course explores the role of educational, instructional, and community television in contemporary society. Students receive laboratory experience in the planning, writing, and production of instructional and educational material in the context of current practices. Prerequisite: TEVE 301 and instructor’s permission.

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English and Speech
Faculty: C. Bernard, E. Brown, A. DiMatteo, E. Donaldson, J. Duffy, H. Fils-Aime, M. Gamble, J. Griffiths, E. Guiliano, D. Hogsette, L. Jirousek, K. LaGrandeur, C. Moylan, M. Prézeau, D. Quigley, M. Schiavi, G. Stephens, J. Thoms, K. Williams. Adjunct Faculty: S. Aiello, J. Bamford, N. Bandele, C. Barnett, A. Boodaghian, J.C. Clark, L. Comac, G. Feinzig, D. Fiumano, D. Fleischhacker, J. Frymer, S. Getzen, N. Gold, D. Horwitz, S. Jarvis, L. Karkala, D. Kohn, A. Kraar, M. Kremers, A. Levine, A. Menzie, J. Misak, B. Nelson, M. Nolan, C. Patterson, L. Piscitello, E. Rind, S. Rubinstein,C. Seaman, R. Seret, M. Shavell, S. Sparacio, M. Stacey, J. Stahl, C. Sylvia, D. Velasquez, W. Weydig.
Bachelor of Arts in English

The Bachelor of Arts in English degree offered at NYIT prepares graduates to be creative thinkers and articulate workers in the changing world of the 21st century. Students take core and advanced classes in literature and culture, drama, and/or professional writing. This rigorous and structured curriculum also offers students the opportunity to pursue their own professional interests and to personally shape their education through work in a second field and through the opportunity to take a large number of elective courses. The curriculum reflects attention to multiculturalism and takes advantage of NYIT’s strengths in using computers to teach professional writing, multimedia, and theater, as well as literature. NYIT’s distinctive English program incorporates technology of all kinds into the education process. While students meet routinely in conventional classes, they also use computers and emerging technologies throughout their study. Many of their courses meet in "computer classrooms," and in distance learning labs supported by NYIT’s fiber optic network. Employment opportunities for English majors have traditionally been excellent. The skills and flexibility the study of English provides is an asset in our changing economy and world. The world economy will demand an ever-greater number of candidates with strong writing, editing, and speaking skills, as well as computer literacy, software skills, and Internet training. The NYIT English program helps students develop not only intellectual skills and cultural literacy, but also applied critical thinking, graphic communication, and computer application competencies. NYIT English majors develop a competitive edge. Bachelor of Arts students register for 39-41 credits of core curriculum courses, 30 credits of English courses beyond the freshman/sophomore level, and 50-51 elective credits. In the English area, students take five required core courses in English plus 15 credits (5 courses) in one of three areas: literature and culture, drama, and professional writing. The B.A. in English is offered at all three NYIT campuses and courses taken at any NYIT campus apply toward the degree.

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I Curriculum requirements for
Bachelor of Arts in English
(1)

College Success Seminar Behavioral Sciences Economics

2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 3 3

English SPCH 105 Basic Speech Communications WRIT 101/111 College Composition I WRIT151/161 College Composition II

Drama LITR 315 LITR 320 LITR 410 THEA 110 THEA 210 THEA 260 THEA 265 THEA 270 THEA 275

Modern Drama Shakespeare Literature Seminar (drama topics) Intro to Theater Arts Principles of Acting Advanced Acting Wkshp in Theatrical Performance Wkshp in Theatrical Performance Wkshp in Theatrical Performance

3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 4

1 of 4 Group A (see p. 175) Literary Genre Surveys:3 LITR 210 The Art of Poetry LITR 220 The Art of Drama LITR 230 The Art of Fiction LITR 240 The Art of Prose Group B (recommended course-see p. 175) WRIT 330 Writing for Commun Arts 3

Note: In fulfilling the drama subspecialty, students may choose a maximum of 6 acting/performance credits; additional credits may be taken as part of the students’ pool of elective credits. Also, students who choose this area should select LITR 220 (The Art of Drama) as their Group A course.

15 credits History or Political Science Liberal Arts Life Science Mathematics Philosophy Physical Science 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits Core credits required—39-41 English Courses
(2)

Professional Writing SPCH 205 Professional Speaking WRIT 210 Workshop in Publication WRIT 220 Workshop in Publication WRIT 230 Workshop in Publication WRIT 335 Writing for Publication WRIT 351 Advanced Technical Writing WRIT 355 Advanced Writing and Editing WRIT 360 Seminar Professional Writing WRIT 363 Writing for the Web WRIT 366 Survey of Technical & Professional Document Production WRIT 415 Internship in Technical & Professional Writing

3 2 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

15 credits English credits required—30 (Plus 15 credits of General Core English) Electives

Required Core LITR 420 Literature Survey LITR 430 Major Author LITR 440 Multicultural Literature LITR 450 Special Topics in Literature LITR 460 Capstone Seminar

3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

Students select 50-51 credits of electives in consultation with faculty advisers. Electives may be selected from within any discipline and may include courses in education, communication arts and/or English.

Elective credits required—49-51 Total credits required—120
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p.83). (2) Note: no single course can satisfy two (2) or more requirements

Subspecialty Courses
Students select 15 credits from one of three subspecialties: literature and culture, drama,or professional writing.

Literature LITR 310 LITR 315 LITR 320 LITR 330 LITR 331 LITR 340 LITR 341 LITR 342 LITR 360 LITR 410

and Culture Modern Poetry Modern Drama Shakespeare Surv World Literature Art of the Novel African American Literature 20th Century American Literature 19th Century American Lit. Irish Literature Literature Seminar

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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Bachelor of Science

The English Department collaborates with the School of Education to offer rigorous content study in English for students preparing to be teachers of English in grades 7 to 12. In addition to a general English core, students may select a subspecialty in literature and culture, drama, or professional writing. The requirements for NYS certification are very specific and will affect students’ selection of courses for the core curriculum and as electives. Students pursuing a degree in Childhood Education in English and Adolescence Education in English should meet with an advisor in the English Department as well as their advisor in Teacher Education to plan their class schedules in order to meet degree requirements in the core curriculum, English, and teacher education.
Core Requirements—All Majors*

A student's performance on the English Placement Test determines the sequence of English courses. All students must take WRIT 101 or WRIT 111 and WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. A separate sequence of English courses is designed for ESL students who, on the basis of the English Placement Test, require specialized instruction in written English. Students in the English as a Second Language (ESL) sequence take WRIT 111 and WRIT 161, which are equivalent to WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. Some students may require additional practice in basic writing and may be asked to take WRIT 100 or WRIT 110 or the intensive English sequence. Upon completion of the required sequence of composition courses, students choose one course from each of the following groups:

GROUP A— Literature Options LITR 210 LITR 220 LITR 230 LITR 240 The Art of Poetry The Art of Drama The Art of Fiction The Art of Prose or any English literature course.

GROUP B— Career Writing Options WRIT 310 WRIT 316 WRIT 320 WRIT 325 WRIT 330 Business Writing Writing for the Technical Professions Report Writing Writing for Arts and Architecture Writing for Communication Arts or any advanced writing course.

The speech program emphasizes the importance of effective oral communication in formal and informal situations. Students learn the fundamentals of speech composition and delivery through informative and persuasive speaking and through discussion. All students take SPCH 105 and earn a total of 15 credits in English and speech. Practicums in theater arts and principles of acting are also offered. *See page 81 for complete core requirements.

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I Curriculum requirements for

Technical Writing Certificate Program

Students seeking to earn a Certificate in Technical Writing are required to complete 18 credits of course work in the technical writing/professional communications area and pass a final proficiency examination. (Students with a 3.0 or better cumulative quality point average will be exempt from the exam.) Foundation Class WRIT 316 Writing for the Technical Professions 3 Intermediate Level ARTV 110 Introduction to Visual Literacy WRIT 366 Survey of Technical & Professional Document Production Advanced Level WRIT 351 Advanced Technical Writing WRIT 363 Writing for the Web 3 3 3 3

Plus one of the following advanced courses DGIM 101 Introduction to Digital Imaging LITR 240 The Art of Prose: Scientific and Technical Literature SPCH 205 Professional Speaking and Advanced Oral Communication WRIT 220 Workshop in Publication WRIT 355 Advanced Writing and Editing Techniques WRIT 360 Seminar in Professional Writing WRIT 415 Internship in Technical & Professional Writing
NOTE

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

1) A student may earn up to 3 credits by challenging for life experience. 2) Those entering the program without sufficient technical background must take 6 additional credits in a technical area. Members of the faculty will determine what constitutes an appropriate background.

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HUMA 210 Humanities I 3-0-3 An interdisciplinary introduction to the humanistic values of contemporary Western civilization designed to broaden the student’s human awareness. The approach is chronological, from Biblical times to the mid-eighteenth century. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. Elective credits only. Does not satisfy Group A. HUMA 220 Studies in Humanities 3-0-3 An interdisciplinary exploration of selected topics in the arts and humanities, designed to broaden the student’s cultural awareness. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. Elective credits only. Does not satisfy Group A. LITR 210 The Art of Poetry 3-0-3 An intermediate-level course in which the student learns the technique of reading, interpreting, and evaluating poetry of increasing difficulty and brilliance. This course may be chosen to fulfill the Group A requirement. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 220 The Art of Drama 3-0-3 An intermediate-level course in which the student explores dramatic literature in an effort to discover its ritual origins, historical role, and current significance. This course may be chosen to fulfill the Group A requirement. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 230 The Art of Fiction 3-0-3 An intermediate-level course in which selected works of fiction are examined in an effort to understand the approaches, strategies, and techniques of artists in this compelling medium. This course may be chosen to fulfill the Group A requirement. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 240 The Art of Prose: Scientific and Technical Literature 3-0-3 An intermediate-level course in which the art of prose writing is explored in depth. This course focuses on stylistics and rhetoric and covers the development of scientific and technical literature. This course may be chosen to fulfill the Group A requirement. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 310 Modern Poetry 3-0-3 This course is more a study in depth than an introduction to representative British and American poets of the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which modern poetry derives from traditional patterns yet manages to create new forms and messages for our time. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 315 Modern Drama 3-0-3 An in-depth study of representative British, American, Continental and other dramatists of the twentieth century, with an emphasis on both the modern and contemporary periods. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 320 Shakespeare 3-0-3 An advanced course in which selected texts and critiques from Shakespearean literature are examined intensively. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 330 Survey of World Literature 3-0-3 Study of outstanding writers from all over the world except England and America, from ancient times to the twentieth century. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 331 The Art of the Novel 3-0-3 An advanced study of selected masterpieces in the novel form. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 340 African American Literature 3-0-3 Reading and discussion of representative works of African American writers. Historical and social backgrounds are explored to interpret African American literature within the American literary tradition. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 341 Twentieth-Century American Literature 3-0-3 An advanced study of major American literature of this century. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 342 Nineteenth-Century American Literature 3-0-3 Concentrated readings in major American writers through the nineteenth century. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 350 Children’s Literature 3-0-3 In this advanced course, students will study selected children’s literature from the nineteenth century to the present. A variety of genres, including fairytales, fantasy, fables and adventure stories are examined, each in the light of literary and psychological themes. Writing is an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161; counts as Group A requirement for Education majors only. LITR 360 Irish Literature 3-0-3 This course examines representative works of Irish writers since 1700, with special attention paid to social, historical, political and religious contexts and their effect on Irish literature. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 410 Literature Seminar 3-0-3 An advanced course which explores in depth each semester one major literary figure, one historical period, one move-

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ment, one literary type, one work, or the writing of literature in the areas of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, or drama. The subject will vary from offering to offering. A student may repeat the seminar but not any one given course content. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 420 Literature Survey 3-0-3 In this advanced course, students will survey British or American literature of a specific period. The period covered will vary from semester to semester. Students may repeat the course to cover additional time periods. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 430 Major Author 3-0-3 In this advanced course, students will study a single major author. The course will provide intensive study of selected texts, an examination of the milieu in which the author wrote, and will include study of other texts that were influential upon or influenced by the major author. The author studies will vary from semester to semester; the choices will include those authors who are generally considered part of the canon as well as third world and minority authors. Students may repeat the course to study a different major author. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 440 Multicultural Literature 3-0-3 In this advanced course, the focus will be on the literature of another culture, subculture, or combination of cultures. The approach and subject matter will vary from offering to offering. A student may repeat the course to take advantage of the different offerings. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 450 Special Topics in Literature 3-0-3 In this advanced course, students will examine literature from a particular perspective. The course will focus on a specific theme, genre or approach, may focus on literature in relation to another discipline, or may look at literature in any other way that does not fall within the Survey, Major Author, or Multicultural categories. The content of the course will vary from semester to semester. Many of the offerings will focus on non-Western literature. Students may repeat the course to take advantage of the varying offerings. Satisfies Group A. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. LITR 460 Capstone Seminar 3-0-3 This senior seminar provides special studies in the students' area of specialization: Literature and Culture, Professional Writing, or Theater. Individual, supervised research is a major component of the course. Prerequisite: Senior standing. WRIT 100 Basic Writing and Reading 4-0-4* A course designed for students whose English placement test reveals the need for improved basic writing and reading skills. Students will read various kinds of writing and create a portfolio of their own writing. The course will improve the use of standard grammar and mechanics and develop comprehension strategies, vocabulary and study skills. Coursework includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: English placement test. WRIT 101 College Composition I 3-0-3 Instruction in and application of the principles and skills involved in effective expository writing, with most readings from nonfiction prose. Required of all freshmen. Coursework includes the creating of a portfolio and a computer lab component. Prerequisite: Writ 100 or English Placement Exam. WRIT 110 Basic Writing and Reading for International Students 5-0-5* A course for international students whose English placement test reveals need for improved basic writing and reading skills. Students will read various kinds of writing and create a portfolio of their own writing. The course will improve use of standard grammar and mechanics and develop comprehension strategies, vocabulary and study skills. Coursework includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: English placement test. WRIT 111 College Composition I for International Students 3-0-3 A writing course for students of English as a second language. Instruction in and application of the principles and skills involved in effective expository writing, with attention placed on vocabulary, idiom, sentence structure, and general fluency. In lieu of College Composition I for ESL students. Coursework includes the creating of a portfolio and a computer lab component. Prerequisites: WRIT 110 or English placement test. WRIT 151 College Composition II 3-0-3 Further development of the expository writing and reading skills taught in English. An introduction to literature and development of library skills leading to a documented research paper. Prerequisite: WRIT 101. WRIT 161 College Composition II for International Students 3-0-3 Continuation and expansion of Writ 111. An introduction to literature and development of library skills leading to a documented research paper. Prerequisite: WRIT 111. WRIT 210 Workshop in Publication 2-0-2 Students enrolled in this course are given the opportunity to work in a supervised, professional manner on campus. Grades are on a pass/fail basis. May be repeated up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: WRIT 101 or WRIT 111 and approval of instructor. WRIT 220 Workshop in Publication 3-0-3 A continuation of WRIT 210. Prerequisite: WRIT 101 or WRIT 111 and approval of instructor. WRIT 230 Workshop in Publication 4-0-4 A continuation of WRIT 220. Prerequisite: WRIT 101 or WRIT 111 and approval of instructor.

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WRIT 310 Business Writing 3-0-3 An intermediate-level writing course for students in business. Instruction and practice in all phases of business communications, such as reports, memoranda, correspondence, and oral presentations, as well as in-depth study of research methods. Required of all business and management majors. Coursework includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or 161. WRIT 316 Writing for the Technical Professions 3-0-3 An intermediate-level writing course for students of the physical and life sciences and technology. Emphasis on style in technical writing, modes of technical discourse (definition, description, analysis, interpretation), and strategies for effective business communication, including resume writing, technical reports and oral presentations. Methods and procedures of research are explored in depth. Recommended for all science and technology majors. Course work includes a computer lab component, oral presentation of final reports using presentation software, and exploration of appropriate technology for technical communication. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or WRIT 161. WRIT 320 Report Writing 3-0-3 An intermediate-level writing course for students of the behavioral and social sciences. Methods and procedures of research; emphasis on reports and advanced research papers and strategies for effective business communication including resume writing and oral presentations. Recommended for all majors in the behavioral sciences, political science, and economics. Coursework includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or 161. WRIT 325 Writing for Arts and Architecture 3-0-3 An intermediate-level writing course for students of the arts and architecture. Methods and procedures of writing critical and technical papers, proposals, and articles, and strategies for effective business communication including resume writing and oral presentations. Recommended for all art and architecture majors. Coursework includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or 161. WRIT 330 Writing for Communication Arts 3-0-3 An intermediate-level writing course for students in the communication field with emphasis on developing writing fluency. Focus on expository, persuasive writing; in-depth study of research methods; and strategies for effective business communication, including resume writing and oral presentations. Coursework includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or 161. WRIT 335 Writing for Publication 3-0-3 An advanced writing course, with special emphasis on published work. Students interested in writing and those seriously committed to their own writing improvement and to the writing of prose articles, fiction or poetry are especially encouraged to take this course. Prerequisite: WRIT 151 or 161. WRIT 351 Advanced Technical Writing 3-0-3 Advanced training and practice in the techniques and forms of technical writing. Focused around planning and producing electronic and print-based manuals. Topics will include: information gathering; usability testing; group collaboration, project management, using text and graphics, relevant technologies, and writing techniques. Course work includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: Any Group B course. WRIT 355 Advanced Writing and Editing Techniques 3-0-3 An advanced workshop in business and technical writing techniques including technical aspects of editing and interpersonal skills employed by successful editors. Participants practice revising writing for specific audiences; strengthen their techniques in revising for style, clarity, and conciseness; increase their command of grammar and mechanics; practice production editing and using style manuals; utilize word processors and computerized text editors; and develop important interpersonal editing skills through the use of role playing and peer evaluation. Participants also continue to be exposed to a variety of common forms of career-oriented business and technical writing. Prerequisite: Any Group B course. WRIT 360 Seminar in Professional Writing 3-0-3 An advanced seminar in a specialized topic, utilizing the expertise of an instructor from the profession at large or from the regular NYIT faculty. The topic will vary from offering to offering. Prerequisites: Any Group B course. WRIT 363 Writing for the Web 3-0-3 This is a computer-intensive course. Focus is on learning and practicing advanced aspects of creating multimedia, hypertext, and online help documents. Topics: linear and nonlinear planning structures ("information architecture"), writing stylistics, the rhetoric and use of graphics, linking, reading and editing online, project management. Oral presentations of final project with computer-based presentation programs. Prerequisite: Any Group B course. WRIT 366 Survey of Technical & Professional Document Production 3-0-3 A survey of principles, techniques and procedures of electronic and print-based document production. Topics: the relationship between written and visual material, traditional copy preparation and design, desktop publishing, traditional printing techniques for books, brochures, pamphlets, and newsletters. Students will produce their own brochures, pamphlets, and newsletters. Course work includes a computer lab component. Prerequisite: Any Group B course. WRIT 415 Internship in Technical & Professional Writing 3-0-3 An advanced elective course which permits the student to gain supervised on-the-job experience as a technical communicator in a professional environment. Prerequisite: WRIT 351, WRIT 355, and/or permission of advisor.

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Theater
THEA 110 Introduction to Theater Arts 3-0-3 The arts of the theater: drama, music, dance, and play production, with study of plays representing major theatrical trends. THEA 210 Principles of Acting 3-0-3 An introductory course in acting intended to give the student a basic technique. Prerequisite: SPCH 105. THEA 260 Advanced Acting 3-0-3 Students refine and develop acting techniques through advanced exercises, in-class performance, formal instruction and professional and peer evaluation. Prerequisite: THEA 210. THEA 265 Workshop in Theatrical Performance 2-0-2 Students enrolled in this course are given the opportunity to work in a supervised, professional manner on some aspect of play production—from acting to set design. Grades are on a pass/fail basis. May be repeated up to 12 credits. THEA 270 Workshop in Theatrical Performance 3-0-3 A continuation of THEA 265. THEA 275 Work in Theatrical Performance 4-0-4 A continuation of THEA 270. SPCH 215 Speeches for all Occasions 1-0-1 Study and practice of basic types of speaking situations. Prerequisites: SPCH 105. SPCH 250 Parliamentary Procedure 1-0-1 Parliamentary procedure from the point of view of the chairperson, combining study of the fundamental principles of procedure and actual practice in the conduct of meetings. Prerequisite: SPCH 105.

Foreign Languages
ARAB 101 Elementary Arabic I 3-0-3 The Arabic course is a semester-long course of Arabic as a living language. It introduces students to the four language skills, namely listening, speaking, reading & writing. Instruction includes initiating and responding to a simple conversation, reading simple short passages, and writing simple compositions. The course touches on aspects of the culture and exposes students to authentic materials such as audio, video, and text. Previous knowledge of Arabic is not required. CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I 3-0-3 Elementary Chinese I is the beginning course in Chinese language. The emphasis of this class will be on developing conversational skills in Chinese. The course teaches Modern Standard Chinese, the official language of the People’s Republic of China and Taiwan. The dialect taught in this course is Mandarin. The course also provides opportunities for students to develop basic reading skills needed to function in contemporary China. Background information on China’s history, culture and society will be introduced as an element of the course. No prerequisite required. SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I 3-0-3 Drill in pronunciation, essentials of grammar and basic vocabulary. Reading of basic text. SPAN 151 Elementary Spanish II 3-0-3 Continued drill in pronunciation, essentials of grammar and basic vocabulary. Reading of progressively more difficult textual material. Prerequisite: SPAN 101.
* Equivalent credits. Not applicable to the baccalaureate degree, but valid for maintaining full-time student status. The credit for WRIT 100 or WRIT 110 may be used as elective credits for some majors but not others. Check the specific major in this catalog to determine if these credits are not eligible for elective credits.

Speech
SPCH 105 Basic Speech Communication 3-0-3 Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication. Each student will speak several times to an audience. SPCH 205 Professional Speaking and Advanced Oral Communication 3-0-3 Study through practice of professional public speaking and advanced professional communication techniques. Topics covered include: audience analysis, techniques of persuasion, interview techniques, listening skills, presentation styles and techniques, effective audio and visual aids, and special problems of communicating technical information. Students deliver presentations in both live audience and media environments. Prerequisites: SPCH 105. SPCH 210 Oral Communication 2-0-2 Intensification of speech disciplines introduced in SPCH 105. Individual recordings of oral readings and extemporaneous speeches are made to effect improvement in oral communication. Prerequisite: SPCH 105.

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English Language Program
The English Language Program offers students with English as a second language special preparation in the acquisition of college-level reading and writing skills. The Program, coordinated by specially-assigned faculty on the Manhattan, Old Westbury, and Central Islip campuses, is dedicated to developing critical fluency in English language and American culture while at the same time respecting the cultural diversity of students. The Program assists students in arranging for tutorial and other support services should the need arise for extra help.

English Language Institute
Coordinator: Linda Comac Assistant Coordinator: Tracy McGoldrick Adjunct Faculty: J. Frymer, M. Stacey, T. Stacey. The English Language Institute offers a highly competitive program in English as a Second Language, especially designed to prepare students for both academic and professional careers. The ELI offers beginners', high-beginners', intermediate, and advanced non-credit courses in reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Placement in one of these levels is determined by an English proficiency exam. All classes are limited to 15 students so that every student receives individual attention. All the classes run for fifteen weeks in the fall and spring and 8 weeks in the summer. The English Language Institute is also a cultural center where international students are introduced to American culture and life. The ELI offers cultural and social activities that become part of our students’ educational experiences. Furthermore, ELI is a service center for those residents of our communities for whom English is a second language. ELI offers part-time courses for those students who need to improve their language skills but do not need to be full-time students. This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students.
ESLI 068 Basic English 20 hrs/wk This course is an intensive program in reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking for beginners. ESLI 077 Intensive Reading and Writing (Low-Intermediate) 10 hrs/wk This course offers students instruction to improve their reading and writing skills. ESLI 078 Intensive Conversation/Listening Comprehension (Low-Intermediate) 10 hrs/wk Students have the opportunity to improve their speaking and listening skills through informal conversation, group work, and individual presentations. This course uses audio and video materials in addition to lectures. ESLI 086 Intermediate Reading 6 hrs/wk The course is designed to expand students’ reading skills, vocabulary, and command of idioms. Students read and discuss short stories, essays, and news articles.

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ESLI 087 Intermediate Writing 6 hrs/wk The emphasis of this course is on the conventions of the written language. Students practice writing in a variety of styles. ESLI 088 Intermediate Course in Speaking and Listening Comprehension 6 hrs/wk This course is designed to develop oral fluency, pronunciation, and accent reduction. The use of audio-video materials helps the students develop their listening comprehension skills. ESLI 096 Characteristics of American Culture 6 hrs/week This course is designed for speakers of English as a second Language who wish to improve their conversation as well as their writing and reading skills. The course examines the beliefs, behaviors and experiences that may be unique to the United States. Students will read and discuss various documents (e.g., the Bill of Rights) as well as current essays. In addition, noteworthy TV programs, films, and speeches will be presented in class. ESLI 097 Advanced Reading and Writing Course 6 hrs/wk This course is designed mainly for students who need to prepare themselves for academic writing. Students read and discuss essays and learn the conventions of essay writing through examples and practice. ESLI 098 Advanced Course in Speaking and Listening Comprehension 6 hrs/wk This course emphasizes stress and intonation, and the appropriate use of idioms. Students learn to speak with ease in social, professional, and academic settings. Besides participating in class discussion, students are expected to make formal presentations. The use of audio-visual materials helps the students develop their listening comprehension skills. ESLI 100 The Sounds of American English: A Course in Accent Reduction 3 hrs/wk This course is designed for speakers of English as a second language who are somewhat fluent in English but need to improve their pronunciation skills. Students will have the opportunity to practice the sounds of American English extensively with the guidance of a professional instructor. ESLI 594 American Academic Writing 4 hrs/wk An advanced course that focuses on the writing conventions expected of students in American colleges and universities. Students will become acquainted with the concepts of thesis and topic sentences, paragraph structure, and developing an essay. Students will learn research techniques and practice writing a research paper. Throughout the semester, sentence structure and grammer rules will be stressed. ESLI 595 Technical English 4 hrs/wk An advanced course that stresses the techniques and forms of scientific and technical writing for ESL students. It is primarily for graduate students who are studying computer science, engineering, environmental technology, and related fields. Students practice writing resumes, reports, manuals, memos, and analysis essays. In addition, students will learn research techniques and write a research paper. ESLI 596 Business English 4 hrs/wk An advanced course that emphasizes the development of vocabulary and idioms used in the business world. Students also learn research techniques and write a research paper, resume, cover letter, memos, and a proposal. Role-playing of job situations increases fluency and confidence. This course is primarily for students in the M.B.A. program and similar graduate majors but any qualified student may register for it. ESLI 597 American Culture in Film 4 hrs/wk This course introduces ESL students to the various aspects of American culture as depicted in films. The course emphasizes the development of listening comprehension, speaking, and writing skills. Students watch, discuss, and write about films. In addition, they will learn research techniques and write a research paper. This course is recommended for graduate students in communication arts, but any qualified student may register for it.

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Fine Arts
Faculty: D. Durning, W. Ganis, J. Grundy, T. Nauheim, Y. Oda, L. Pocock, R. Smith, R. Vavetsi, P. Voci. Adjunct Faculty: M. Cerreta, J. Cino, J. Dewoody, T. DiSpigna, E. Donsky, M. Greene, W. Leighton, V. Manzi-Schacht, A. Masino, S. McCarthy, L. Poliakov, A. Prohaska, T. Radell, Y. Sun, Deborah Tint, M. Vahey, R. Valeo, G. Viskupic, D. Voci, P. Wongpakdee, S. Woodburn, R. Zagury, F. Zbarsky. The fine arts program of the College of Arts and Sciences is offered in three areas: computer graphics, graphic design and teacher education. All lead to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. A distinguished faculty of practicing artists and designers expose the student to a variety of artistic approaches, from traditional through modernist and contemporary styles. Admission is competitive. Fine arts applicants are required to submit a portfolio of previous artwork; samples are evaluated for artistic skills, potential, and overall presentation. All curriculums are designed to increase student awareness of the entire field of visual arts. Prior to specialized study, each area requires the same first-year foundation curriculum which establishes principles of artistic concepts through emphasis on composition, design, color and drawing. A series of exhibitions throughout the academic year reflects the scope of instruction within this area of study. The Fine Arts Department's computer graphics coursework uses state-of-the-art hardware systems, as well as a wide variety of 2-D and 3-D application software. The computer graphics laboratories in Old Westbury and Manhattan are considered among the most advanced facilities in the metropolitan area. The range of experience for the student of fine arts includes drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, computer graphics, and photography with emphasis upon both technique and artistic problems. The primary goal is to sharpen values and develop individual artistic personality. The fine arts curriculum has as its ultimate objective the improvement of the very quality of the perceptions of life, and therefore forms the philosophical foundation of the professionally oriented programs in this area.
Computer Graphics

Computer Graphics is an artist's medium which has emerged as a powerful imaging tool. Today, computer graphics is a much sought-after field of study due to its expansive use in a variety of visualization applications throughout the world. Without the foundations in the principles of design, studio practice and a portfolio of critiqued work, the application rarely produces professional results. Our goal is to help students understand the relationship of design and technology. This allows the student to develop the ability to create and compose content that communicates ideas in an effective manner for both general and specific markets. Successful presentations will educate, inform, motivate, entertain, persuade, challenge and inspire audiences while transcending the medium of delivery.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Computer Graphics
(1)

Behavioral Sciences English SPCH 105 Speech WRIT 101 English Composition I WRIT 151 English Composition II WRIT English Group A LITR English Group B

3 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

College Success Seminar Freshman ARTD 101 ARTD 102 ARTD 151 ARTD 152 ARTW 101 ARTW 151 Computer ARTC 201 ARTC 251 ARTC 301 ARTC 351 ARTC 401 ARTC 402 ARTC 451 ARTC 452 ARTC 404

2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 63 credits

Foundation Two-Dimensional Design I Three-Dimensional Design I Two-Dimensional Design II Three-Dimensional Design II Drawing I Drawing II Graphics Sequence * Computer Graphics I Computer Graphics II Computer Graphics III Computer Graphics IV Sr. Project Computer Graphics I Sr. Thesis Computer Graphics I Sr. Project Computer Graphics II Sr. Thesis Computer Graphics II Special Project A

Liberal Arts Mathematics Science Life Science PHYS 115 Humanity & Physical Univ.

3 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits

Social Sciences ECON 101 Economics History or Political Science PHIL 110 Philosophy

3 3 3 9 credits

Studio Options (choose 5) ARTJ 403 Special Project B ARTP 201 Painting I ARTR 201 Printing I ARTS 201 Sculpture I ARTW 201 Drawing III ARTW 251 Drawing IV ARTY 201 Photography I

Departmental elective Free electives

3 credits 9 credits

Total credits required— 126-128
*All computer graphics courses require department permission prior to registration. (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

Art History ARTH 101 Art History I ARTH 151 Art History II ARTH 201 Art History III ARTH 301 Aesthetics I

3 3 3 3 12 credits

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Graphic Design

Graphic Design as an industry has become a significant growth area worldwide. With the rapid changes taking hold in the way business and advertising is being conducted today, it surely is no wonder that experts have targeted graphic design as the profession to manage and deliver the volume of information which is exponentially produced and consumed. The new graphic designers must be able to design and direct a multitude of media without being lost in the avalanche. The graphic design sequence of courses prepares our students to accept the challenge by integrating and interpreting the language and syntax of visualization within emerging technology. This knowledge and skill has become the current entry level requirement of the industry. NYIT students will be well prepared at their first employment interview with portfolio in hand, on CD-ROM and on a Web page.

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design
(1)

Behavioral Sciences English SPCH 105 Speech WRIT 101 English Composition I WRIT 151 English Composition II WRIT English Group A LITR English Group B

3 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

College Success Seminar Freshman ARTD 101 ARTD 102 ARTD 151 ARTD 152 ARTW 101 ARTW 151

2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 66 credits

Foundation Two-Dimensional Design I Three-Dimensional Design I Two-Dimensional Design II Three-Dimensional Design II Drawing I Drawing II

Liberal Arts Mathematics Science Life Science Option PHYS 115 Humanity & Physical Univ.

3 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits

Design Graphics Sequence ARTC 201 Computer Graphics I * ARTC 251 Computer Graphics II * ARTC 301 Computer Graphics III * ARTG 201 Graphic Design I ARTG 251 Graphic Design II ARTG 301 Graphic Design III ARTG 302 Typography ARTG 303 Illustration ARTG 351 Package Design ARTG 352 Editorial Design ARTG 401 Advertising Design Problems ARTG 402 Book Design ARTG 451 Portfolio Studio Options (choose 3) ARTP 201 Painting I ARTR 201 Printing I ARTS 201 Sculpture I ARTW 201 Drawing III ARTW 251 Drawing IV ARTY 201 Photography I

Social Sciences ECON 101 Economics History or Political Science PHIL 110 Philosophy

3 3 3 9 credits

Departmental elective Free electives

3 credits 9 credits

Total credits required—128
*All computer graphics courses require department permission prior to registration. (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

Art History ARTH 101 Art History I ARTH 151 Art History II ARTH 201 Art History III

3 3 3 9 credits

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Visual Arts Education

The Fine Arts Department collaborates with the School of Education to offer rigorous content study in art for students preparing to be teachers of Visual Arts in grades P to 12. The Visual Arts education program is an important component of the B.F.A. program and the Department is committed to continually developing the program with the School of Education. The sequence of required courses in the Visual Arts has been structured to provide a solid base in drawing and design, art history, and the studio arts, including computer graphics. Options provide flexibility and enable teacher candidates to explore areas of interest and talent. The Visual Arts concentration develops knowledge and technical skills needed to teach all aspects of the P-12 Visual Arts curriculum. The requirements for NYS certification are very specific and will affect students’ selection of core curriculum and elective courses. Students in the Visual Arts Education program should meet with an advisor in the Fine Arts Department as well as their advisor in Teacher Education to plan their class schedules in order to meet degree requirements in the core curriculum, Fine Arts, and teacher education. For additional information, please see the School of Education section, beginning on page 173.

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ARTC 201 Computer Graphics I 1-3-3 Introductory course in digital image-making which surveys the currently used application packages in the computer graphics field. Hands-on experience with emphasis on developing and understanding of the workings of a digital design system. Prerequisite: Department permission. ARTC 251 Computer Graphics II 1-3-3 In-depth use of commercial computer graphic design packages. Lecture topics include: preparation, input, manipulation, display and output of digital images. Prerequisite: ARTC 201. ARTC 301 Computer Graphics III 1-3-3 Advanced work in two-dimensional computer graphic design with emphasis on the process for creating digital compositions. Prerequisite: ARTC 251. ARTC 351 Computer Graphics IV 1-3-3 Introduction to multimedia creation utilizing a computer graphic system and commercial software. Final project includes production and presentation of a complete digital portfolio of student work. Prerequisite: ARTC 301. ARTC 401 Senior Project in Computer Graphics I 2-6-4 A final project for the senior student in computer graphics involving a team approach to formulating and executing a professional 3-D production. Prerequisites: ARTC 351 and department permission. ARTC 402 Senior Thesis in Computer Graphics I 3-0-3 A writing course in which the senior student presents a thesis in computer graphics on either its technical or conceptual aspects. This thesis may be related to a concurrent senior project. Faculty will approve and direct the proposal. Prerequisite: Senior student. ARTC 404 Special Project A 2-6-4 Advanced work in 3-D computer graphics with an emphasis on the development of a singular directed project. The student will be responsible for concept development, storyboard creation, technical and aesthetic problem solving, and final product presentation. Prerequisite: Department permission. ARTC 451 Senior Project in Computer Graphics II 2-6-4 A continuation of Senior Project I in which the project or series of projects in Computer Graphics are finalized. Presentation of final work for critique is required. Prerequisite: ARTC 401. ARTC 452 Senior Thesis in Computer Graphics II 3-0-3 A continuation of Senior Thesis I in which a new thesis may be introduced. The previous thesis may also be extended if the scope of the proposal warrants. Prerequisite: ARTC 402. ARTD 101 2-D Design I 1-3-3 An introduction to the principles of two-dimensional design and color theory. Visual concepts are presented and reinforced through a series of classroom assignments. ARTD 102 3-D Design I 1-3-3 An introduction to the principles of three-dimensional design. Methods and materials are explored through a progressive series of studio assignments. ARTD 151 2-D Design II 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTD 101. Prerequisite: ARTD 101. ARTD 152 3-D Design II 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTD 102. Prerequisite: ARTD 102. ARTG 201 Graphic Design I 1-3-3 An introduction to various aspects of graphic design from concept to finished art for visual communications. Learning skills include: symbol design, die cutting, embossing, magic marker indication, and various use of art tools and materials. Basic lecture in computer technology, production, pre-press and printing methods. ARTG 251 Graphic Design II 1-3-3 Designing the corporate identity and its application to business graphics. Long term design applications for business stationary, signage, and trademarks. For advertising on client's products and services to convey a public image. From concept to finish art. Prerequisite: ARTG 201. ARTG 301 Graphic Design III 1-3-3 Advanced graphic design projects with a greater emphasis on concepts (integrating art and copy). Assignments based on the unique use of typography and other visual elements of design. Project solution are guided towards finished art and professional presentation methods, to achieve competitive portfolio samples. Prerequisite: ARTG 251. ARTG 302 Typography 1-3-3 A course in type awareness. To explore the history of typography, origins of the alphabet, type families, and designing with type. Learning skills will cover type preferences, type moods, traditional and computer copyediting methods. ARTG 303 Illustration 1-3-3 Techniques pertinent to editorial design. Advanced illustration techniques using pencil, gouache, tempera, watercolor, and magic marker.

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ARTG 351 Package Design 1-3-3 A study in two and three-dimensional package design, creating innovative and functional packaging to promote the manufactured product. Learning skills will include designs for labels, various shaped containers, and point of purchase in store counter-top display. Prerequisite: ARTG 301. ARTG 352 Editorial Design 1-3-3 The design of single and double page layouts for magazines and newspapers using typography, illustrations, photography and other design elements to enhance the layout. Prerequisite: ARTG 351. ARTG 401 Advertising Design Problems 1-3-3 Advanced graphic design problems will explore planning and design of a corporate advertising campaign. The student will learn how to design ads, brochures, packaging, TV storyboards, car cards, direct mail and billboard advertising. Prerequisite: ARTG 401. ARTG 402 Book Design 1-3-3 Planning and producing illustrated manuals and trade and textbooks for publication. In addition to designing contents, construction techniques may include the accordion fold, spiral binding, a stapled pamphlet, and a hand-sewn, bound hardcovered book. Prerequisite: ARTG 251. ARTG 451 Portfolio 1-3-3 This course will help the student enhance and assemble a variety of work samples acquired throughout the degree program. A resumé will also be prepared. Additional objectives will include learning advertising agency procedures, preparing for the interview, working with placement agencies, and where to look for employment in the graphic design field. Prerequisite: ARTG 401. ARTH 101 Art History I 3-0-3 A survey of history and principles of the fine and utilitarian arts from the Paleolithic era through the Renaissance. ARTH 111 Introduction to the Arts 2-0-2 The history of art is viewed from the standpoint of painting and sculpture as they relate to architecture during significant periods in the history of art. Emphasis will be placed upon the parallels in the history of art and architecture. ARTH 151 Art History II 3-0-3 A continuation of Art History I from the Baroque Era to the eve of World War I. ARTH 201 Art History III 3-0-3 A continuation of Art History II from 1914 to approximately 1980. (Art beyond this point is reviewed in ARTH 301 Aesthetics). ARTH 301 Aesthetics I 3-0-3 A survey of the visual arts of the present days. Comparative analysis of the visual arts and the various performing and literary arts. The study of the more notable historical contemplation on the nature of art and beauty. ARTH 351 Aesthetics II 3-0-3 A continuation of ARTH 301. Prerequisite: ARTH 301. ARTJ 301 Open Elective in Fine Arts 1-3-3 A course intended to utilize the unique experience or talents of particular instructors, either currently teaching in the school or from the profession at large. The content and prerequisites will be announced upon each scheduling. ARTJ 302 Open Elective in Fine Arts 2-4-4 A course intended to utilize the unique experience or talents of particular instructors, either currently teaching in the school or from the profession at large. The content and prerequisites will be announced upon each scheduling. ARTJ 401 Special Project D 1-1-1 Designed for the advanced student to carry out investigations of certain aesthetic concepts and experiments using diverse materials which cannot be accomplished under other more specialized course numbers. Project abstract must be filed and approved prior to registration. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. ARTJ 402 Special Project C 1-2-2 Designed for the advanced student to carry out investigations of certain aesthetic concepts and experiments using diverse materials which cannot be accomplished under other more specialized course numbers. Project abstract must be filed and approved prior to registration. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. ARTJ 403 Special Project B 1-3-3 Designed for the advanced student to carry out investigations of certain aesthetic concepts and experiments using diverse materials which cannot be accomplished under other more specialized course numbers. Project abstract must be filed and approved prior to registration. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. ARTP 201 Painting I 1-3-3 Elements of composition as well as basic painting techniques are introduced through studio assignments. ARTP 251 Painting II 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTP 201. Prerequisite: ARTP 201.

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ARTP 301 Painting III 1-3-3 Advanced projects in painting are offered to allow the student a greater interaction with the medium. Prerequisite: ARTP 251. ARTP 351 Painting IV 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTP 301. Prerequisite: ARTP 301. ARTR 201 Printing I 1-3-3 Studio survey of the process used in designing and producing prints. Zinc plate etching is the primary medium. ARTR 251 Printing II 1-3-3 Technical theory and studio work in the screenprint process. Basic stencil and photographic methods are explored. Prerequisite: ARTR 201. ARTR 301 Printing III 1-3-3 Advanced work in printmaking allowing the student a greater range of experimentation with the medium. Prerequisite: ARTR 251. ARTR 351 Printing IV 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTR 301. Prerequisite: ARTR 301. ARTS 201 Sculpture I 1-3-3 An introduction to sculpture utilizing a variety of natural and synthetic materials. Methods include: casting, carving and construction. ARTS 251 Sculpture II 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTS 201. Prerequisite: ARTS 201. ARTS 301 Sculpture III 1-3-3 Advanced studio work in a variety of different materials and methods. Prerequisite: ARTS 251. ARTS 351 Sculpture IV 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTS 301. Prerequisite: ARTS 301. ARTS 401 Sculpture Workshop 1-3-3 A sculpture course offered primarily to non-matriculated students. A variety of materials and methods are explored. Stone carving, casting, welding, and model making projects are assigned and evaluated. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. ARTV 110 Introduction to Visual Literacy 1-3-3 The investigation, interpretation and practice of communicating information and emotions is explored via visual imagery. Using the language of 2D and 3D composition, students are introduced to design fundamentals that emphasize the relationships between line, mass and form in organizing the elements that create statements within the frame. Exercises will be assigned utilizing a wide variety of media. Topics include: the meaning of images in a cultural context; misrepresentation and subliminal messaging in visualization; application of color theory; uses of photography and typography; internet site and page design. ARTW 101 Drawing I 1-3-3 An introduction to perspective and figure drawing in which a variety of techniques are used. ARTW 151 Drawing II 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTW 101. Prerequisite: ARTW 101. ARTW 201 Drawing III 1-3-3 Intermediate drawing. Emphasis on form, structure, and individual expression. Projects are geared toward the preparation of independent work. Prerequisite: ARTW 151. ARTW 251 Drawing IV 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTW 201. Prerequisite: ARTW 201. ARTW 301 Drawing V 1-3-3 Advanced concepts in drawing. Prerequisite: ARTW 251. ARTW 351 Drawing VI 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTW 301. Prerequisite: ARTW 301. ARTY 201 Photography I 1-3-3 An introduction to the fundamentals of photography. Emphasis on procedures and aesthetic approaches to the medium. ARTY 251 Photography II 1-3-3 A continuation of ARTY 201. Prerequisite: ARTY 201. ARTY 301 Photography III 1-3-3 Advanced black and white photography projects using a large format camera. Prerequisite: ARTY 251. ARTY 351 Photography IV 1-3-3 Intro to color photography with any format camera. Prerequisite: ARTY 301.

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College of Arts and Sciences
Interdisciplinary Studies Degree
Faculty: N. Bloom, E. Donaldson. Adjunct Faculty: M. Kremers. The degree program in Interdisciplinary Studies educates students for a wide variety of careers and graduate study. The program stresses knowledge and understanding by promoting the virtues of a broad-based general education. A broadly focused degree that develops competencies in several disciplines may be the best preparation for the modern workplace. Enrollment in Interdisciplinary Studies offers students the opportunity to organize a degree program to suit their individual career and academic goals. A program of academic advisement matches a student with a faculty adviser and together they design a degree map. The course of study is built around a required liberal arts core curriculum (39-41 credits), which introduces students to the various areas of study at the college. In addition to the core courses, each student selects three subject areas of concentration, taking at least 12 credits in each area. An additional 18 elective credits may be taken in one of these areas of concentration, and an additional 6 elective credits in each of the other two areas. The 37-39 elective credits are chosen to complete and complement the student’s individual degree plan. The Foundations of Interdisciplinary Research (IDSP 310) introduces the students to the historical contexts of Interdisciplinary Studies and the development of academic disciplines. The Capstone Seminar (IDSP 410) rounds out the college experience by involving students in research activities related to their concentrations. Areas of concentration may be selected from the following sixteen categories: Architecture, Behavioral Sciences, Business, Communication Arts, Computer Science, English, Fine Arts, Hospitality Management, Humanities, Labor Relations, Life Sciences, Mathematics/Physics, Social Sciences, Technical Writing, Technology, and Telecommunications Management. Note that the humanities concentration may include courses in such areas as literature, philosophy, art history, architectural history, or film history. The wealth of elective credits available in Interdisciplinary Studies affords excellent opportunities for students with prior learning experience. Through transfer credits taken at other institutions or through life experience, students may have their learning experiences converted to NYIT credits. The program in Interdisciplinary Studies offers three degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Professional Studies. Although all students complete the same core courses, individual degree plans differ significantly. Students who complete at least 75% (90 credits or more) of liberal arts courses will be granted the Bachelor of Arts degree. Those who complete at least 50% (60-89 credits) of liberal arts courses will be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree. The Bachelor of Professional Studies degree is granted to those students with fewer than 60 credits of liberal arts courses.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor’s degree in Interdisciplinary Studies Liberal Arts Core: College Success Seminar Behavioral Sciences English Composition Speech One Group A course One Group B course
(1)

Interdisiplinary Studies IDSP 310 Foundations of IS Research IDSP 410 Capstone Seminar Interdisciplinary Studies Concentrations

3 3

2 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits

At least 36 credits in three permitted areas of concentration, with a minimum of 12 credits in each area. Up to 18 additional elective credits in any one of the three areas (a possible total of 30 credits) will count toward the IS degree; up to 6 additional elective credits in each of the other two areas (a possible total of 18 credits each) are also allowed.

Concentrations include:
Architecture, Behavioral Science, Business, Communication Arts, Computer Science, English, Fine Arts, Hospitality Management, Humanities, Labor Relations, Life Sciences, Math/Physics, Social Sciences, Technical Writing, Technology, Telecommunications Management.

Liberal Arts Mathematics Sciences Life Science Physical Science

3 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits

Concentration credits—36 Electives 37-39 credits Total credits required—120
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with fewer than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy

3 3 3 9 credits

IDSP 310 Foundations of Interdisciplinary Research 3-0-3 A junior level course that introduces students to the historical contexts of interdisciplinary studies and the development of academic disciplines. Students learn key concepts and methods of disciplinary and interdisciplinary research and are trained in critical thinking in information and technological literacy. IDSP 320 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Research 3-0-3 Specialized studies in interdisciplinary topics. The course may focus on an interdisciplinary field of study or may examine a specific issue or theme from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. May be repeated if topic changes. IDSP 401 Senior Project 1-0-1 This course provides students an opportunity to pursue a creative interdisciplinary project. Individual, supervised research or creative activity is a major component of the course. A final report is required. IDSP 402 Senior Project 2-0-2 This course provides students an opportunity to pursue a creative interdisciplinary project. Individual, supervised research or creative activity is a major component of the course. A final report is required.

IDSP 403 Senior Project 3-0-3 This course provides students an opportunity to pursue a creative interdisciplinary project. Individual, supervised research or creative activity is a major component of the course. A final report is required. IDSP 404 Senior Project 4-0-4 This course provides students an opportunity to pursue a creative interdisciplinary project. Individual, supervised research or creative activity is a major component of the course. A final report is required. IDSP 410 Capstone Seminar 3-0-3 This seminar involves reading, writing and research activities requiring demonstration of mastery in analytic and communication skills in addressing a problem related to students’ individualized programs of study. Prerequisite: IDSP 310. IDSP 450 Internship/Service Learning in Interdisciplinary Studies 0-3-3 An advanced elective course which permits the student to gain supervised professional experience. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor.

158

College of Arts and Sciences
Mathematics
Faculty: J. Chini, S. Goodman-Petrushka, F. Gordon, G. Guram, B. Kestenband, M. Kohn, L. Luo, T. Loughlin, Y. Roitberg, R. Roy, D. Segal, A. Silverstein. Adjunct Faculty: P. Bigliani, R. Bigliani, D. Capozzi, R. D’Ambrosio, R. Dumas, D. Ehrhardt, D. Esposito, B. Greene, E. Inkelis, G. Lancer, M. Lomangino, P. Papazogolou, R. Schecter, F. Schieferstein, W. Smith, G. Weickel. Coursework in mathematics is a key area of study at the college. Required and elective mathematics courses are prominent in every NYIT curriculum. Although a liberal arts major in mathematics is not offered, students may elect to pursue a mathematics program option to prepare for teacher certification in secondary school mathematics education. For science and technology majors, mathematics essentially represents a “second language” without which comprehension of the laws of science would be impossible. The curriculum provides a meaningful sequence of courses to help technically oriented students grasp the quantitative elements of physics, life sciences, and electrical, computer, mechanical, architectural, and aerospace technology. Courses give students of nontechnical subjects an understanding of the basic tools of algebra, trigonometry, and elements of calculus for application in their professional fields. Use of technology is stressed throughout the curriculum. Most mathematics courses require the use of a pocket computer. In addition to the prescribed mathematics courses, advanced electives provide further study and enrichment. Most students taking college mathematics for the first time, whether currently enrolled, entering freshmen, or transferring from another institution, are required to take a mathematics examination prior to registration. Registration in the appropriate level mathematics class will be determined by the results of the examination and consultation with the mathematics faculty. Students whose mathematics diagnostic test results indicate they need a developmental mathematics course will be enrolled in either MATH 096 or MATH 101 in order to receive intensive assistance in developing the basic skills required to study mathematics.
Mathematics Education

The Mathematics Department collaborates with the School of Education to offer rigorous mathematics content study for students preparing to be teachers of Mathematics in grades 7 to 12. Mathematics is one of the areas identified by the NYS Department of Education as having a shortage of teachers, making job prospects in this field very promising. The sequence of required mathematics courses provides a solid core of knowledge from several modern branches of this science and equips teacher candidates with the technical skills need to teach all mathematics subjects in secondary school. The requirements for NYS certification are very specific and will affect students’ selection of core curriculum and elective courses. Students pursuing a degree in Adolescence Education in Mathematics should meet with an advisor in the Mathematics Department as well as their advisor in Teacher Education to plan their class schedules in order to meet degree requirements in the core curriculum, mathematics, and teacher education. For additional information, please see the School of Education section, beginning on page 173. 159

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

MATH 096 Developmental Mathematics I 5-0-4* This course is for students who have not acquired the techniques of algebra. It can also serve as a refresher course and must be followed by MATH 100, as a prerequisite for MATH 120, 125, 140, or TMAT 135. MATH 100 Developmental Mathematics II 5-0-4† A continuation of the sequence of topics in algebra begun in MATH 096. This course may not be challenged and may not be substituted for required mathematics credit. This course, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for MATH 120, 125, 140 or TMAT 135. Prerequisite: MATH 096 or equivalent determined by placement test. MATH 101 Developmental Mathematics I/II 5-0-4† Designed for the accelerated student who has had some skills in algebra and is more motivated to finish at a faster pace. Topics covered include basic operations of signed integers and fractions, factoring, basic operations of algebraic fractions, exponents and radicals, functions and graphs, and equations. This course or its equivalent is a prerequisite for MATH 120, 125, 140, or TMAT 135. Prerequisite: diagnostic test or permission of the instructor. MATH 110 Introductory Seminar 2-0-2 Introduction to special topics of current interest in mathematics. MATH 115 Introductory Concepts of Mathematics 3-0-3 A course on selected topics in mathematics for students of the humanities, especially in communication arts. Topics include: graphs, matrices, elements of linear programming, finite probabilities, introduction to statistics. Applications to real-life situations are emphasized. The place of these topics in the history of mathematics is outlined.

MATH 120 Fundamentals of Mathematics 5-0-4 A review of algebra, including exponents, factoring, fractions, linear equations, ratios, proportions. Content includes word problems, coordinate systems, graphs of functions, straight line, slope, systems of linear equations and their applications, complex numbers, quadratic equations. Introduction to trigonometry. Prerequisite: Placement Exam, MATH 100 or 101 or equivalent. MATH 125 Finite Mathematics 3-0-3 Review of elementary algebra and selected topics in statistics and probability. Sets, real numbers, graphing, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, relations and functions, solving systems of linear equations, descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, introduction to probability. Prerequisite: Placement Exam, MATH 100 or 101, or equivalent. MATH 141 Precalculus 4-0-4** A study of relations and functions; inequalities; complex numbers; quadratic equations; linear systems of equations; higher degree equations; trigonometric functions; identities; functions of composite angles; graphs of the trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; and binomial theorem. Note: A graphing calculator is used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Placement exam, MATH 100 or 101, or equivalent.

*Equivalent credits. Not applicable to the baccalaureate degree, but valid for maintaining full-time student status. **Equivalent to TMAT 135 and TMAT 155. † The credit for MATH 100 or MATH 101 may be used as elective credits for some majors but not others. Check the specific major in this catalog to determine if these credits are not eligible for elective credits.

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MATH 145 Introduction to Probability 3-0-3 Functions, curve equation relationship, set theory, random events, probability functions, mathematical expectation, conditional probability, special distributions (e.g., binomial, normal, and notion of a statistic). Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent. MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus 3-0-3 Applications of calculus to business and social science. Intuitive use of limits and continuity. Derivatives, extrema, concavity, and applications such as marginal analysis, business models, optimization of tax revenue, and minimization of storage cost. The exponential and logarithmic functions. Antiderivatives and the definite integral. Areas and consumer’s surplus. Some concepts of probability extended to discrete and continuous sample spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 125, 140 or TMAT 135. MATH 161 Basic Applied Calculus 3-0-3 An introduction to calculus and its applications. Topics include functions, limits, the derivative, tangent line, the chain rule, maxima and minima, curve sketching, applications, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration by simple substitution, finding areas. Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent. MATH 170 Calculus I 4-0-4 Study of lines and circles. Functions, limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, introduction to derivatives of trigonometric functions. Application of derivatives to physics problems, related rates, maximum-minimum word problems and curve sketching. Introduction to indefinite integrals. The conic sections. Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent. MATH 180 Calculus II 4-0-4 Riemann sums, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of the calculus. Area, volumes of solids of revolution, arc length, work. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Inverse trigonometric functions. Formal integration techniques. L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals. Polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 170. MATH 210 Plane Geometry 3-0-3 This course is directed toward understanding the main concepts of plane geometry, as applicable to high school teaching. Topics include polygons, tessellations, symmetry, polyhedra, metric and non-metric geometry, topological properties of plane figures. Prerequisite: MATH 141. MATH 215 Introduction to Sets and Logic 3-0-3 An introduction to set theory and the foundations of mathematics. Topics in set theory include: deMorgan’s Laws, infinite sets, cardinals and ordinals, combinatorics. Topics in logic include: paradoxes, mathematical induction, propositional logic, rules of inference, predicate logic. Prerequisite: MATH 180 or permission of department. MATH 220 Probability Theory 3-0-3 An introduction to probability theory and its applications with emphasis on stochastic processes such as random walk phenomena and waiting time distributions. Computer graphics simulations will be used. Students use mathematical modeling/multiple representations to provide a means of presenting, interpreting communication, and connecting mathematical information and relationships. Topics include sets; events; sample spaces; mathematical models of random phenomena; basic probability laws; conditional probability; independent events; Bernoulli trials; binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, normal and exponential distributions; random walk and Markov chains. MATH 225 Biostatistics 3-0-3 An introduction to statistical techniques for the analysis of biomedical data, including data organization, inferential statistics, regression and correlation, analysis of variance, discriminant analysis and factor analysis. Computer statistical package will be taught and applied. Prerequisite: MATH 180. MATH 230 Applied Mathematics for Information Sciences 3-0-3 Sequences and series, Taylor series; functions of several variables, partial derivatives, implicit partial differentiation, higher-order partial derivatives, the chain rule; maxima and minima for functions of two variables, La Grange multipliers with applications; topics in linear algebra and matrix theory, row-reduced echelon matrices; approximation techniques; Fourier series, including the method of least squares. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or equivalent. MATH 235 Applied Statistics 3-0-3 An introduction to modern inferential statistics with appropriate applications to telecommunications and related fields. Major topics covered are descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling and the Central Limit Theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. The primary focus in this course will be on application of these statistical ideas and methods. Students will be required to conduct individual statistical projects involving the collection, organization and analysis of data. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or equivalent. MATH 260 Calculus III 4-0-4 Sequences and series, Taylor series. Vector analysis and analytic geometry in three dimensions. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, total differential, the chain rule, directional derivatives and gradients. Multiple integrals and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 180. MATH 310 Linear Algebra 3-0-3 Matrices and systems of linear equations, vector spaces, change of base matrices, linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, canonical forms. Prerequisite: MATH 180.

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MATH 320 Differential Equations 3-0-3 Solving first order ordinary differential equations: exact, separable, and linear. Application to rates and mechanics. Theory of higher order linear differential equations. Method of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters. Application to vibrating mass and electric circuits. Power series solutions: ordinary and singular points, the method of Frobenius. Partial differential equations: the method of separation of variables. Prerequisite: MATH 260. MATH 350 Advanced Calculus 3-0-3 Topics include: Vector functions of several variables, the Jacobian matrix, the generalized chain rule, inverse function theorem, curvilinear coordinates, the Laplacian in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, Lagrange multipliers, line integrals, vector differential and integral calculus including Green’s, Stokes’s and Gauss’s theorem. The change of variable in multiple integrals, Leibnitz’s rule, sequences and uniform convergence of series. Prerequisite: MATH 260. MATH 360 Functions of a Complex Variable 3-0-3 The general theory of functions of a complex variable, analytic functions, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, the Cauchy integral theorem and formula, Taylor series, Laurent series, singularities and residues, conformal mappings with applications to problems in applied science. Prerequisite: MATH 260. MATH 450 Partial Differential Equations 3-0-3 Generalities on linear partial differential equations and their applications to physics. Solution of initial boundary value problems for the heat equation in one dimension, eigenfunction expansions. Definition and use of Fourier series and Fourier transform. Inhomogeneous problems. The wave equation in one dimension. Problems in two dimensions: vibrating rectangular membranes, Dirichlet and Neumann problems. Prerequisite: MATH 320. MATH 455 Numerical Analysis 3-0-3 The following topics are covered: solution of algebraic and transcendental equations by Newton-Raphson, Muller, and other iterative methods including discussion of convergence considerations, finite and divided differences, numerical integration by Newton-Cotes and Gaussian methods, solution of ordinary differential equations by predictor-corrector and Runge-Kutta methods, Gaussian elimination and band matrices. Additional topics are selected from: Operator methods, interpolation, numerical differentiation, Romberg extrapolation, stability, boundary value problems, polynomial and spline approximation. Prerequisite: MATH 320. MATH 460 Advanced Seminar 3-0-3 Advanced topics of current interest in mathematics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. TMAT 135 Technical Mathematics I 5-0-4 The first course in the sequence of mathematics courses for students in the Bachelor of Technology program. Review of algebra: exponents, factoring, fractions. Linear equations, ratio, proportions. Word problem application. Coordinate systems and graphs of functions: straight line, slope. Systems of linear equations and their applications. Complex numbers. Quadratic equations. Introduction to trigonometry. Applications to problems in engineering technology are emphasized throughout. Prerequisite: Placement exam, MATH 100 or MATH 101, or equivalent. TMAT 155 Technical Mathematics II 5-0-4 Part of the integrated course sequence in mathematics for students in the Bachelor of Technology program. Topics include trigonometric functions, identities and equations, the sine and cosine laws; graphs of the trigonometric functions; functions of a composite angle; DeMoivre’s theorem; logarithms; binomial theorem; and Cramer’s rule. Applications drawn from technology. Prerequisite: TMAT 135 or equivalent. TMAT 235 Technical Mathematics III 5-0-4 The derivative and the tangent line, maxima- minima problems, differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions, curve sketching, velocity and acceleration, the indefinite integral, areas under curves, definite integrals, applications to electrical circuits. Prerequisite: TMAT 155 or equivalent. TMAT 255 Engineering Mathematics 3-0-3 The last course in the sequence of mathematics courses for students in the Bachelor of Technology program. Topics include elements of calculus of two variables, introduction to first and second order differential equations, series, and transform methods. Prerequisite: TMAT 235 or equivalent. TMAT 265 Technical Mathematics IV 3-0-3 Topics in linear algebra and matrix theory, including systems of equations, vector spaces. Linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Row-reduced echelon matrices. Approximation techniques, including Fourier series. Prerequisite: TMAT 235.

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Physics
Faculty: M. Chang, B. Fryshman, S. Lin, L. Silverstein, G. Sunshine. Adjunct Faculty: S. Catto, W. Eng, Y. Li, Z. Li, P. Serafino. The objective of the core curriculum in physics and mathematics is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental laws and basic principles which govern the physical world. Classes are conducted in both lecture and laboratory sessions for appropriate correlation of theory and experiment.

Science Education

The Physics Department collaborates with the School of Education to offer rigorous science content study for students preparing to be teachers of Physics in grades 7 to 12. Physics is one of the areas identified by the NYS Department of Education as having a shortage of teachers, making job prospects in this field very promising. The sequence of required science courses provides students with fundamental principles of physics, mathematics and chemistry at the beginning of the program, then exposes them to the enriching experience of advanced concepts intensively presented in small classes. The program includes science electives to further enrich the teacher candidates’ background. The requirements for NYS certification are very specific and will affect students’ selection of core curriculum and elective courses. Students pursuing a degree in Adolescence Education in Physics should meet with an advisor in the Physics Department as well as their advisor in Teacher Education to plan their class schedules in order to meet degree requirements in the core curriculum, science, and teacher education. For additional information, please see the School of Education section, beginning on page 173.

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PHYS 110 Introductory Seminar 2-0-2 Introduction to special topics of current interest in physics and astronomy. PHYS 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe 3-0-3 A survey course utilizing inquiry based strategies in the physical sciences for non-science students. This course examines a broad range of topics including: Newtonian mechanics, electricity, magnetism, sound, optics, heat, energy and power, earth science including weather and climate, modern physics and the solar system. The interactions between physical science and technology and their impact upon society and the quality of life will be considered. PHYS 116 Humanity and the Physical Universe Laboratory 0-2-1 This is an elective laboratory course that is designed for students to get hands-on discovery experience through collaborative laboratory experiments and exercises. Utilizing inquiry strategies allows the student to experience experimental design and data examination through graphical and analytical means. The laboratory will include the use of various measuring instruments. Students will be required to submit written laboratory reports with detailed analysis of experimental data from the various explorations they performed. This laboratory course is open to all non-science majors. Corequisite: PHYS 115. PHYS 120 Journey Through The Universe 3-0-3 Introductory and descriptive course in astronomy. Topics include: study of the Universe; planetary motion; the solar system; stars and galaxies; quasars, pulsars, and black holes; possibility of extra-terrestrial life. PHYS 130 Introductory Physics 3-2-3 This course covers the basic principles of mechanics and heat. Prerequisite: TMAT 135. (Required of Bachelor of Technology students.) PHYS 136 Physics for the Modern Architect 4-0-4 The course will cover basic physical principles relating to current architectural practice. A broad spectrum of topics will be covered, primarily in classical physics to include: Units, Vectors, Motion, Statics, Work, Energy, Heat, Electricity, Sound and Light. The emphasis will be conceptual and required mathematical skills will be college algebra and trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 141. PHYS 140 Physics for Life Sciences I 4-0-3 A basic course designed to meet the needs of biology and medical technology majors. Topics covered include vectors, laws of motion, work, energy, momentum, heat and wave motion. Illustrations from the field of life sciences will be stressed. Corequisites: MATH 161, PHYS 141. PHYS 141 Physics I Laboratory 0-2-1 Laboratory course illustrating principles taught in the introductory physics for life sciences course, PHYS 155. Corequisite: PHYS 140. PHYS 150 Introductory Physics II 3-2-3 For Bachelor of Technology majors. A continuation of PHYS 130, Introductory Physics. Topics covered include electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics. Prerequisites: TMAT 135 and PHYS 130. PHYS 156 Selected Topics in Environmental and Energy Issues for the Modern Architect 3-0-3 This course uses physical perspectives to descriptively examine issues relating to interactions between the built environment and the natural world as they are likely to be encountered by practicing architects in the 21st century; especially as they relate to building design, construction and utilization. Major topic areas addressed will include such environmental and energy issues as: greenhouse effect, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, air, water and land pollution, traditional and alternative energy resources and their efficient utilization. Additionally, issues associated with ambient electromagnetic energy exposure, light pollution, thermal pollution and other contemporary concerns will be discussed. A descriptive approach will be emphasized and required mathematical skills will be minimal. Invited speakers and/or field trips to local sites will be incorporated where possible to supplement and enrich classroom discussions. Prerequisite: PHYS 136. PHYS 160 Physics for Life Sciences II 4-0-3 A continuation of PHYS 140. Topics are selected from the fields of thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Applications for the field of life sciences will be emphasized. Prerequisites: PHYS 140, 141; Corequisite: PHYS 161. PHYS 161 Physics II Laboratory 0-2-1 Laboratory course in physics supplementing the physics for life sciences course, PHYS 160. Corequisite: PHYS 160. PHYS 165 Physics for Telecommunications 4-0-4 A basic course in the physics of communication systems. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, frequency band width relationships. This course will include an introduction to signal propagation in different media as well as amplification and signal correction as applied to electrical and optical systems. Prerequisite: MATH 125 or equivalent; Corequisite: MATH 151. PHYS 170 General Physics I 4-2-4 A basic course covering vectors, Newton’s laws of motion, particle kinematics and dynamics, work, energy, momentum, and rotational motion. Corequisite: MATH 170.

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PHYS 175 General Physics for Pre-Med I 5-2-5 A basic course in physics for the student in the Combined Baccalaureate/Osteopathic Physician Program. Covers vectors, forces and torques, dynamics, energy momentum, fluids, gasses, liquids, solids, heat and thermodynamics. Corequisite: MATH 170. PHYS 180 General Physics II 4-2-4 A continuation of PHYS 170. Topics include fluids, wave motion, electric fields and electric potential, dc circuits, magnetic fields, capacitance and inductance, ac circuits, and electromagnetic waves. Prerequisite: PHYS 170; Corequisite: MATH 180. PHYS 185 General Physics for Pre-Med II 5-2-5 A continuation of PHYS 175. Includes waves, sound, light, optics, electricity, current, magnetism, instrumentation, atoms and nuclei. Prerequisite: PHYS 175; Corequisite: MATH 180. PHYS 220 General Physics III 4-2-4 The final basic course covering the laws of thermodynamics, reflection and refraction of light, interference and diffraction, radiation, atomic physics, waves and corpuscles, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 180. PHYS 225 Introduction to Modern Physics This course is designed to familiarize students with the following topics: thermodynamics, optics, relativity, atomic and nuclear physics, fundamental quantum theory of photons, and semiconductors. Prerequisite: PHYS 180. PHYS 230 Hydrology and Water Resources 4-0-4 This course covers fundamental elements of hydrology for ground waters, flowing waters and impounded waters, including occurrence of groundwater, precipitation, snow surveys, factors affecting runoff, floods and flood-routing. Water quality is examined as are effects of pollution, sampling and testing, dispersion of waste waters, deoxygenation of polluted waters, reaeration of flowing waters and water resource management. The survey includes various assessments of water policy in the United States. Prerequisite: PHYS 460; Corequisite: CHEM 105. PHYS 240 Introduction to Energy, Environmental Issues and Policy 3-0-3 This course is designed to analyze basic economic and political factors which are involved in production and use of energy-related resources and consequent impact on the environment, with particular attention to the environmental crisis. Problems and prospects facing non-conventional or alternative energy systems are studied, including solar, wind, geothermal and bio-mass conversion, use of agricultural and urban waste, use of conservation as an alternative source of energy and incentives for reducing Prerequisites: ECON 101, PHYS 460. consumption.

PHYS 250 Introduction to Pollution Sources and Diffusion 3-0-3 This course examines factors affecting existence of natural resources and the consequences of exploitation. Among topics treated are identification of sources, effects and fates of pollutants in the atmosphere and in the food chain; the creation of acid rain and snow and their effect on forests and marine life; the green house effect and nuclear winter. Mathematical modeling and treatment of diffusion processes will be considered. Prerequisites: PHYS 460, TMAT 235, CHEM 105. PHYS 260 Energy and Environment Instrumentation 2-3-3 This course covers electrical test and measurement techniques using basic modern laboratory instruments, including digital and analog devices such as function generators, oscilloscopes, multi-meters and sensors. The two-hour lecture emphasizes principle components and operation of those devices. Prerequisite: PHYS 220. PHYS 310 Optics 3-0-3 An intermediate course in geometrical and physical optics covering wave motion, interference, diffraction, polarization, spectrometry, and laser optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 220, MATH 260. PHYS 320 Thermodynamics 3-0-3 The relations between heat and work, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, entropy, applications to various systems, the kinetic theory of gases, and an introduction to classical statistical mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 220, MATH 260. PHYS 330 Advanced Laboratory I 1-3-2 A senior course covering the art of physical measurement, the techniques of experimental research, and the treatment of data. The student performs advanced experiments requiring much independent work in the fields of mechanics, electron physics, magnetism, optics, and atomic, quantum, and nuclear physics. The lectures include such topics as laboratory safety, theory of errors, vacuum technology, electronics, the operation of standard laboratory equipment, and machine shop operations. Prerequisites: PHYS 220, MATH 260. PHYS 340 Analytical Mechanics I 3-0-3 An intermediate course covering particle kinematics and dynamics, one-dimensional oscillatory motion, mechanics of a system of particles, the central force problem, essentials of celestial mechanics, and motion in a noninertial frame of reference. Prerequisite: PHYS 220; Corequisite: MATH 320.

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PHYS 350 Analytical Mechanics II 3-0-3 A continuation of PHYS 340. Subjects include kinematics and dynamics of a rigid body in two and three dimensions, generalized coordinates, calculus of variations, Lagrange’s formalism, Hamilton’s equations, and vibration theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 340. PHYS 360 Advanced Laboratory II 1-3-2 A continuation of PHYS 330. Selected students will begin to work with faculty members on advanced projects. Prerequisite: PHYS 330. PHYS 370 Electricity and Magnetism I 3-0-3 The first course in a two-term sequence in the theory of electromagnetism. Topics include vector calculus, electrostatics, dielectrics, static magnetic fields, magnetic materials, electromagnetic induction. The course culminates with an introduction to Maxwell’s equations. Prerequisites: PHYS 220, MATH 320. PHYS 380 Electricity and Magnetism II 3-0-3 A continuation of PHYS 370. Topics include plane electromagnetic waves in infinite media, reflection and refraction of plane waves, radiation of electromagnetic waves, and relativistic aspects of electrodynamics. Prerequisite: PHYS 370. PHYS 410 Modern Physics I 3-0-3 A senior course designed to familiarize the student with modern concepts in physics. Includes: special relativity, wave-particle duality, limits of classical physics and the origin of quantum theory, atomic spectra and structure, Schroedinger’s wave equation with applications to simple systems. Prerequisites: PHYS 370, MATH 320. PHYS 420 Modern Physics II 3-0-3 A continuation of PHYS 410 covering X-rays; statistical mechanics with application to molecular physics; molecular binding and spectra; and nuclear physics including nuclear structure, stability transformations, and reactions. Prerequisite: PHYS 410. PHYS 430 Advanced Laboratory III 1-5-2 This course covers the design and performance of research experiments in physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 360. PHYS 440 Solid State Physics 3-0-3 An introduction to the theory of solids with applications to solid state devices and the techniques of physical measurement. Topics include crystal structure, the band theory, the free-electron and Fermi-Dirac theories, and the physical properties of semiconductors and metals. Prerequisite: PHYS 410. PHYS 450 Mathematical Physics 3-0-3 A course designed to provide the student with the mathematics required for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate study in the physical sciences. Topics covered are vector analysis, introduction to vector space and matrix algebra, infinite series, the partial differential equations of physics, an introduction to the special functions of Bessel, Legendre, Hermite, and Laguerre, and Fourier series. Physical applications are stressed. Prerequisites: PHYS 220, MATH 320. PHYS 460 Advanced Seminar 3-0-3 Advanced topics of current interest in physics.

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Social Sciences
Faculty: N. Bloom, K. Cheek, E. Katz, E. Kelly, L. Navia, S. Pinkerton, L. Schuster. Adjunct Faculty: A. Abraham, D. Albrecht, J.P. Barnabas, J. Buchwalter, A. Candal, A. DeLaurentiis, T. Farkas, J. Grasso, M. Gregorek, J. Misiano, M. Navia, M. Izady, J. O'Connell, S. Puccio, M. Roussis, J. White. Social sciences at NYIT include history, philosophy and political science. These disciplines impart appreciation for intellectual, historical and political accomplishments of humankind and aid students in assuming civic and social responsibility. Students who major in political science are prepared for public service and policy formation, graduate programs in political science, law, international service and political careers.

Social Science Education

The Social Sciences Department collaborates with the School of Education to offer rigorous content study in Social Studies for students preparing to be teachers of Social Studies in grades 7 to 12. The sequence of required courses in the Social Sciences provides students with the solid knowledge base in US and world history, government and politics, economics, philosophy and sociology they need to teach all aspects of Social Studies in secondary school. The requirements for NYS certification are very specific and will affect students’ selection of core curriculum and elective courses. Students pursuing a degree in Adolescence Education in Social Studies meet with an advisor in the Social Science Department as well as their advisor in Teacher Education to plan their class schedules in order to meet degree requirements in the core curriculum, the Social Sciences, and teacher education. For additional information, please see the School of Education section, beginning on page 173.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Political Science
(1)

College Success Seminar Political Science

2 credits

English Composition SPCH 105 Basic Speech Communication One Group A course One Group B course

6 3 3 3

15 credits Liberal Arts 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits Mathematics MATH 115 Introductory Concepts of Mathematics 3 or MATH141 PreCalculus 4 3-4 credits Science Life Science Physical Science 3 3 6 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Social Sciences Philosophy HIST 110 American History I HIST 150 American History II HIST 210 Contemporary World History Electives 3 3 3 3 6 18 credits Electives and/or Interdisciplinary Concentration 28-30 credits

Required Courses: PSCI 110 American Gov. and Politics PSCI 210 Comparative Government PSCI 230 International Relations PSCI 305 Politics and Society PSCI 325 Public Administration

Choose, as advised, at least 15 credits from the following non-core Political Science Courses: Non-core Political Science Courses: PSCI 220 History of Political Thought PSCI 240 Basic Legal Concepts and Administration of Justice PSCI 310 Politics of Change PSCI 315 American Society and Judicial Behavior PSCI 320 Foreign Policy of the U.S. PSCI 350 Government and Metropolitan Problems PSCI 355 Government and Business PSCI 360 International Law and Organization PSCI 365 Public Policy Analysis PSCI 390 Seminar in Political Science PSCI 410 Selected Topics in American Government and Politics PSCI 420 Selected Topics in Comparative Government PSCI 430 Selected Topics in International Relations and Foreign Policy PSCI 440 Selected Topics in Public Administration and Policy PSCI 450 Selected Topics in Political Theory and Methodology PSCI 470 Political Science Internship PSCI 480 Public Administration Internship

Total credits required—120-121
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

(at least) 15 credits Behavioral ANTH 101 PSYC 101 SOCI 101 Sciences Anthropology Intro. to Psychology Introduction to Sociology 3 3 3 9 credits Economics ECON 105 Principles of Economics I ECON 110 Principles of Economics II 3 3 6 credits

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History
HIST 110 American History I 3-0-3 This is a survey course of American history from the colonial period, the Revolution to the establishment of the Republic, the first half of the nineteenth century, up through the period of the Civil War, ending in 1865. The impact of geography on the growth of the Republic is considered. The political, economic, and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues. HIST 150 American History II 3-0-3 This is a survey course of American history from the end of the Civil War to the present: the period of the Reconstruction, the industrialization of the United States, the emergence of the country as a Great Power, U.S. role in the twentieth century are considered. The political, economic, and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues. HIST 170 History of the State of New York 1-0-1 This one credit course is a survey of the political, economic and social history of the state of New York beginning with its colonial history. Special attention will be paid to the legacy of the American Indians, such as the Iroquois confederacy, the early Dutch settlers of the colonial period, the industrial growth of the state, the emergence of New York as the financial center of the world, and New York state's role in national politics. HIST 210 The Contemporary World 3-0-3 This is a survey course of 20th century global history; it covers the period of imperialism leading to World War I, the emergence of the USSR as a major power, the transformation of Europe as a result of World War II, the period of the Cold War, the role of the USA in the post-cold war world. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of geography, science and technology on political, economic and cultural development of the world.

HIST 230 Survey of Jewish History 3-0-3 A survey of the life of the Jewish people from their beginnings in the Near East to the mid- twentieth century. Attention is focused on major migrations, leading personalities, and historic movements. HIST 220 African American Experience 3-0-3 A survey of the role of African American people in American history from African beginnings to the present time. Topics include: African American response to the major political, social and economic changes in America; the contributions of outstanding African American to American history; the interaction of the African American and majority environments; and the black movements that help shape African American consciousness. HIST 240 History of Technology 3-0-3 The history of Western technology is surveyed with emphasis on technological change since the Industrial Revolution. Attention is given to both the positive and the negative aspects of technological change. The various interrelationships among technological change and other aspects of history are highlighted, as is the phenomenon of the geometrical progression of technological changes. HIST 310 Seminar in History 3-0-3 Selected topics in history.

Philosophy
PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy 3-0-3 An introduction to philosophy by way of selected problems from various areas of philosophy. Topics include: the nature of a priori knowledge and of scientific explanation, the existence of God, whether or not there can be moral knowledge, and the problem of free will. The course objective is to acquaint students with these philosophical issues, and through detailed discussion, to teach them how to analyze ideas critically.

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PHIL 210 Philosophy and History of Religion 3-0-3 This course acquaints the student with major elements associated with the development of religion as examined by psychologists, anthropologists, sociologists, and historians, as well as by selected theologians. Special attention is paid to the philosophical analysis of religious phenomena, clarifying issues, such as the existence of God and gods, the nature of religious experience, the belief in the soul, and other typically religious subjects. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) PHIL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy 3-0-3 An examination of some of the most critical issues of moral and social philosophy. These include subjects such as the linguistic analysis of terms such as “good,” “evil,” “duty,” “right,” and others. The basis of different moral systems will be studied, and selections from ethical and social philosophers will be read. PHIL 230 Technology, Society, and Values 3-0-3 An examination of models and case studies concerned with the impact of machines on man, of technological systems on social structures, and modes of production on value systems. Special attention is paid to the ethical problems connected with newly emerging technologies. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) PHIL 250 Logic and the Scientific Method 3-0-3 An introduction to the valid forms of reasoning and the methods of inquiry practiced by the natural, social, and behavioral sciences. PHIL 260 Philosophy and History of Science 3-0-3 An examination of the principal moments in the development of scientific thought, with special emphasis on the analysis of the principles of scientific methodology. The contributions of individuals like Aristotle, Ptolemy, Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Kant, Darwin, and Einstein will be carefully explored. Notions such as induction, deduction, proof, explanation, and truth will be subjected to extensive criticism. PHIL 310 Seminar in Philosophy 3-0-3 Selected topics in philosophy. PSCI 160 American Intelligence Community and its Relation to Foreign Policy 3-0-3 This course provides an introduction to U.S. Intelligence and the Intelligence Community, surveying the intelligence process from collection to analysis and dissemination. Also covered will be the roles of intelligence in the development and maintenance of US foreign policy, as well as ethical issues in intelligence. Case studies of Intelligence successes and failures will be featured. PSCI 210 Comparative Government 3-0-3 An introduction to comparative political structures and institutions covering the major European governments as well as non-Western political systems. PSCI 220 History of Political Thought 3-0-3 A study of the historical and theoretical underpinnings to current political ideologies, starting with the Greek city state and the political theories of Plato and Aristotle, continuing with the Roman, Medieval and Renaissance contributions to political thought and culminating in the radical political theories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. PSCI 230 International Relations 3-0-3 A systematic analysis of national goals and determinants, the basis of national power, sources of international conflict. The uses of power: balance of power and the balance of terror. Diplomacy, collective security, and international organizations will also be explored. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSCI 240 Basic Legal Concepts and Administration of Justice 3-0-3 This course covers the judicial process and its evolution, the rights of accused persons, and the administration of justice in the light of the elementary foundations and functions of substantive and adjective law. The theoretical aspects of basic concepts will be examined, but the stress will be on the practical aspects. PSCI 305 Politics and Society 3-0-3 The fundamental concepts of the state, government, and their interrelationships. Topics include: the state as an instrument of social control; power, its legitimacy and authority; political doctrines such as democracy, oligarchy, and totalitarianism; the modern state and its political structures, elites, and decision makers; the electoral process and sociopolitical means of attitudinal influence. The impact of class, status, and influence will also be analyzed. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSCI 310 Politics of Change 3-0-3 This course is concerned with the impact of modernization on the political system; the relationship between modernization and decolonization, revolution and nation-building; theories

Political Science
PSCI 110 American Government and Politics 3-0-3 This course is an introduction to the processes of the American form of democratic government; the nature and structure of US government; its chief characteristics and functions. Special attention is paid to the intimate relation and mutual impact of government and the people on each other, expanding the students' awareness of the effects of governmental decisions on the American people.

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of political change; and the consequences of modernization as experienced by several countries from the First, Second, and Third Worlds. PSCI 315 American Society and Judicial Behavior 3-0-3 This course covers changing values and patterns of judicial behavior, federal courts and the power of judicial review, fundamental constitutional principles, nationalization and enforcement of the Bill of Rights, the Supreme Court’s policy-making role and its effect on economic policy, and the controversy over the arbiter role of the court. Included will be an analysis of constitutional development of rights and duties of the people, and the role of the government as an institution. PSCI 320 Foreign Policy of the United States 3-0-3 The historical development of American policy, the mechanics of its formulation, and its current objectives will be studied, discussed, and analyzed. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSCI 325 Public Administration 3-0-3 This is a study of the nature and scope of public administration: principles, societal protection, assistance to various groups, governmental proprietary enterprises, and regulation of business. Bureaucratic organization administration relationships. Policy making and implementation will be closely examined: unit specialization, organization coordination, centralization, planning, efficiencies, and control. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSCI 350 Government and Metropolitan Problems 3-0-3 The first part comprises the political framework: state governmental structure, its functions, services, and financing; local, rural, and urban governments, their structures, services, and functions. The second half focuses on metropolitan problems and their interaction with metropolitan government; housing, schooling, transportation, sanitation, pollution, and taxation. Social parameters stemming from ethnic, religious, class, and employment factors, among others, will be interwoven in the analysis. PSCI 355 Government and Business 3-0-3 A consideration of relationships between business enterprise and the societal and political milieu in which these enterprises operate. New concepts in business ethics and corporate responsibility. Government regulation of business activity. PSCI 360 International Law and Organization 3-0-3 The nature of international law; the organization of the community of nations; the United Nations system; the regional organizations of the bloc type; the substantive rules of international law; procedures for the pacific settlement of international disputes; international and social cooperation; and prospects for a development system of world order through international organization. PSCI 365 Public Policy Analysis 3-0-3 This course will approach public policy decisions to determine goal achievement in terms of need articulation, relative costs and expended resources, planning and programming for future needs, and resource development. PSCI 390 Seminar in Political Science 3-0-3 Research topics in political science. PSCI 410 Selected Topics in American Government and Politics 3-0-3 PSCI 420 Selected Topics in Comparative Government 3-0-3 PSCI 430 Selected Topics in International Relations and Foreign Policy 3-0-3 PSCI 440 Selected Topics in Public Administration and Policy 3-0-3 PSCI 450 Selected Topics in Political Theory and Methodology 3-0-3 PSCI 470 Political Science Internship 3-0-3 This internship is designed to offer the student an opportunity to combine academic preparation with practical political experience under the joint supervision of cooperating personnel and faculty members. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: 15 credits of political science coursework; open to juniors and seniors only. PSCI 480 Public Administration Internship 3-0-3 Participation in an internship program will enable students to integrate academic preparation with administration practice under the joint supervision of cooperating personnel and faculty members. Prerequisite: 15 credits of political science coursework; open to juniors and seniors only.

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MOHAMMAD AMIR BUSINESS MAJOR

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

School of Education
Division of Teacher Education Programs Michael E. Uttendorfer, Ed.D., Dean

Childhood Education Adolescence Education
I

Biology

I

Chemistry

I

English

I

Physics

I

Math I Social Studies

Business and Marketing Education Career and Technical Education
I

Health Occupation Subjects

I

Technical Subjects

I

Trade Subjects

Technology Education Visual Arts Education

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
School of Education
The School of Education (SOE) offers preparatory and advanced professional study through two divisions: the Division of Teacher Education Programs (undergraduate and graduate), and the Division of Advanced Professional Programs (graduate only). Programs (degree and non-degree certificate) are offered for persons preparing for careers in education as P-12 teachers, school building leaders, school counselors, educational technology specialists, mental health counselors, or as professional trainers.
Accreditation

The School of Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation and advanced educator preparation programs. NCATE is recognized by the US Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation to accredit programs for the preparation of teachers and other professional school personnel. In addition, the childhood education program received national recognition from the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) and the Technology Education program received recognition from the International Technology Education Association Council on Technology Teacher Education. (ITEA/CTTE)
Mission of the School of Education

The mission of the School of Education is to provide effective professional preparation and development programs that are career oriented, integrate technology, support diversity, and connect with the real world through learner active instructional strategies. In addition to professional education, our purposes include the generation of field relevant research that expands the knowledge base and the provision of services to the community to inform practice.
Distinctive Characteristics of the School

Three characteristics make NYIT’s School of Education unique among New York State’s 112 teacher education institutions: technology, diversity, and field relations. Technology is not just part of our name, it is substantively woven through our beliefs and actions. We see technology as the medium of communication and the foremost tool for teaching and learning: It entices, encourages, enables and empowers learners (Silverman, 1990). Technology skills needed by professionals in the field are infused in every program design, from childhood education to adolescence education, visual arts education, and business and marketing education. Our commitment to diversity is tangible in all we do. Our programs seek to benefit all learners and are offered in several delivery modes at multiple sites. This variety offers modality options and expands access by reducing geographic and time barriers. By tapping the vast array of content material, formats, and instructional strategies candidates learn to create and customize instructional experiences to meet the specific needs (age, exceptionality, cultural, language, reading level, learning style, modality etc.) of students and clients. From the earliest years, NYIT has been committed to preparing students for successful careers and with that focus in mind has brought together a faculty with strong field 174

School of Education
relations. The faculty of the School of Education are both highly credentialed scholars and successful practitioners in their fields. Faculty in teacher education have P-12 teacher/administrator experience as well as doctoral degrees in the areas they teach. This combination assures that theory and practice are inextricably linked and that the programs of study provide sufficient opportunities for candidates to develop critically needed professional knowledge, dispositions, and skills before graduation. Faculty include teacher educators, counselors, classroom teachers, principals, superintendents, instructional systems designers, psychologists, trainers and developers of training and instructional materials.
Campus Locations

Programs of study are offered at both NYIT’s New York campuses: Old Westbury and Manhattan. Not all courses in each program are offered every semester at each campus. The table below shows where particular programs are primarily located. Note: several courses are offered simultaneously on all three campuses by teleconference in our distance learning facilities. Program Childhood Education (Grades 1-6) Adolescence Education 7-12 (Biology, Chemistry, English, Physics, Social Studies) Business and Marketing Education Career and Technical Education (Health Occupation Subjects, Technical Subjects, Trade Subjects) Technology Education (Grades 1-12) Visual Arts Education (Grades 1-12) Old Westbury P Manhattan

P P

C C

P P P

C C C

P = Entire program offered here; C = Courses in the program offered here.

Facilities

The School of Education degree and certificate programs are supported by the college’s campus libraries, the Academic Computing Laboratories (ACL), wireless Internet access, the Educational Media Center (EMC), software libraries, computer multimedia and television facilities. In addition, the Curriculum Materials Center (CMC) housed in the lower level of the Wisser Library on the Old Westbury campus provides print and non-print resources for teacher candidates, including text books, videotapes, P-12 educational software, and education reference materials.

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Computer Requirements

All students in the School of Education are provided Internet accounts for their educational and personal communication needs. Coursework and assignments require the use of computers outside the classroom. Students use their own computers, those in one of the NYIT labs, or others to which they have access. Assignments may involve word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, multimedia, Internet-based resources, or specialized software applications. Please obtain a technology brochure from your department, or check the School's web site for additional specifications.
Class Schedules

Education classes are normally scheduled Monday through Friday starting at 10a.m. These classes usually meet twice a week for 1 hour and 20 minutes or once a week for 2 hours and 40 minutes for 15 weeks. Contact time is adjusted if the number of weeks is changed. Some courses are offered in the evening to accommodate field experience in schools. Classes are occasionally offered on Saturdays. The Saturday classes usually meet either in the morning from 8 AM to 12:30 PM or in the afternoon from 1:00 PM to 5:30 PM. All teacher education courses require field experience in P-12 classrooms in addition to regular college class attendance. These field experiences are part of state teacher certification requirements, occur during regular school hours, and contribute significantly to candidates’ preparation for teaching independently.
Academic Advisement

Each academic program has a prescribed course of study and a developmentally sequenced progression of content and skills. Each student has an assigned faculty advisor. Students are required to meet with their advisors prior to registration for course selection guidance. Substitutions for courses or changes in course sequence require prior approval. For an appointment, call 516.686.7777. Students preparing to be teachers must seek advisement from their assigned teacher education advisor as well as from their concentration advisor to select courses that meet state certification requirements and NYIT’s core curriculum and discipline area requirements. Failure to do so may result in the need to complete additional courses in order to qualify for certification. Please note that state certification requirements will affect your choice of electives.

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Division of Teacher Education Programs
Faculty: D. Arneson, D. Burton, H. Hsu, D. Palak, J. Penrose, R. Slotnick, S.K. Wang. Adjunct Faculty: M. Costello, M. Gallo, Z. Gega, D. Gordon, J. Kappenberg, B. Love, B. Pollock
Programs of Study

The Division of Teacher Education programs offers a wide variety of teacher preparation programs in conjunction with concentrations in the College of Arts and Sciences; the School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences; the School of Management, and the School of Engineering and Computing Sciences. These programs lead to initial certification as a classroom teacher in New York State. In addition, students in any major at NYIT who are interested in learning about contemporary education may register for EDUC 201 Educational Foundations as an elective course without prerequisites. The table below lists the teacher preparation programs, the certification for which graduates will be eligible, approved concentrations for each program, and the degree earned at program completion. I Childhood Education
Certification: Childhood Education 1-6 Concentration in: Behavioral Science (Psychology) Biology Chemistry English Degree: B.S. in Childhood Education Mathematics Physics Political Science (Social Studies)

I Adolescence Education
Certification: Adolescence Biology 7-12; Adolescence Chemistry 7-12; Adolescence English 7-12; Adolescence Mathematics 7-12; Adolescence Physics 7-12; or Adolescence Social Studies 7-12 Concentration in: Life Science: Biology Mathematics Life Science: Chemistry Physics English Political Science/Social Science Option Degrees: B.S. in Adolescence Education: Biology; B.S. in Adolescence Education: Chemistry; B.S. in Adolescence Education: English; B.S. in Adolescence Education: Mathematics; B.S. in Adolescence Education: Physics; B.S. in Adolescence Education: Social Studies

I Business and Marketing Education
Certification: Business and Marketing (All grades) Concentration in: Business Administration Degree: B.S. in Business and Marketing

I Technology Education
Certification: Technology Education (All grades) Concentration in: Interdisciplinary Technical Fields Degree: B.S. in Technology Education

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
I Career and Technical Education
Certification: Teacher of Technical Subjects; Teacher of Health Occupations Subjects; Teacher of Trade Subjects Concentration in: Technical/Occupational Fields Degree: B.S. in Health Occupations Subjects; B.S. in Technical Subjects; Certificate, B.S. in Trade Subjects

I Visual Arts Education
Certification: Visual Arts (All grades) Concentration in: Fine Arts Degree: B.F.A. in Visual Arts Education Academic Standards

Teacher education candidates are expected to satisfactorily complete all components of their degree program including but not limited to core curriculum requirements, their subject area concentration, the teacher education course components, field experiences, student teaching, professional examinations, and professional portfolio (if required for their programs). Candidates must maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 or higher. If their GPA falls below 2.50, they will be placed on probation and allowed one semester to bring their grade point average up to the standard. Failure to meet the GPA requirement after a semester of probation may result in additional remedial actions and/or dismissal from the program. Candidates are expected to exhibit professional conduct, academic integrity, and excellent moral and ethical behavior throughout their programs. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action, remedial actions and/or dismissal from the program. The development of professional knowledge, dispositions and skills occurs throughout the program of study and candidates’ progress is assessed at multiple points in their programs, including but not limited to entry, at the end of each semester, prior to admission to the Professional Semester (student teaching), exiting student teaching, and prior to graduation. Teacher education candidates are expected to make satisfactory progress through each of these gateways or they may be subject to remedial actions.
Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Courses

New York State teacher certification regulations currently permit individuals who have a bachelor’s degree and specific required education courses and experiences to apply for certification through transcript evaluation. Individuals who are pursuing this route to certification may be permitted to take the required courses as post-baccalaureate study. Interested persons should call 516.686.7777 for an appointment with a teacher education advisor. Note: The NYS Department of Education has announced that transcript evaluation will be terminated in the future. For up-to-date information regarding the state’s timeline for this change, visit their website at www.nysed.gov.
Teacher Preparation Programs

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NYIT’s teacher education programs are structured to assure that each candidate has a strong foundation in the liberal arts and sciences (39-41 credits in NYIT’s core curriculum), a strong major in the area(s) he or she will teach (30 or more credits), college-level course work in the areas of NYSED’s Student Learning Standards (at least 9 credits in each area), a grounding in professional studies, preparation to use

School of Education
technology for teaching and learning, and a skill-building sequence of pedagogical courses (45 credits in education). This content is paired with progressive stages of field experience leading to student teaching and independent practice. In addition, candidates develop as reflective practitioners—professionals who can critically examine and refine practice, always creating new ways to help students reach their personal best. Career preparation is broader than job preparation and encompasses growth beyond course content. Teacher candidates study and experience social, emotional, psychological and psychomotor development and acquire a broad range of skills, attitudes and knowledge. In addition, they develop sophisticated skills in information processing and instructional technology that will enable them to continue to learn and successfully confront the challenges and changes in their professional future.
Admission to the Teacher Education Programs

Admission to Teacher Education has two distinct levels: Level 1: Admission to a teacher education program of study; Level 2: Admission to teacher education candidacy (Gateway 1) Level 1: Admission to a teacher education program of study. Prospective teacher education candidates may apply directly to the desired education program as an entering freshman or apply to the education program after completing one or more semesters in an area of concentration. Direct application. To make a direct application, follow the general application procedures outlined in the beginning of this catalog and checkmark the box on the admissions application identifying the specific teacher education program requested. Upon admission to NYIT, contact an advisor in your area of concentration and your education advisor for assistance coordinating your program of study to avoid conflicts in scheduling and to assure proper sequencing of the core curriculum, concentration courses, and teacher education components of their degree. From another program. Prospective teachers are encouraged to apply to their teacher education program before the end of freshman year, or as soon as possible thereafter. The timing of the change may affect the number of credits and courses required to graduate and meet certification standards. To apply to a teacher education program after one or more semesters requires completion of a Change of Major form and approval from the dean of the school you are leaving as well as the dean of the School of Education. Applicants who have completed one or more semesters of college must have earned a minimum of 2.50 cumulative GPA , a minimum of 2.75 GPA in their subject concentration, and be in good academic standing (no incompletes). Admitted students will continue to be advised by their advisor in their area of concentration as well as a teacher education advisor to avoid conflicts in scheduling and to assure proper sequencing of core curriculum, concentration courses, and teacher education components of their degree. Once admitted to a teacher education program, prospective teachers prepare by building a foundation in the arts and sciences through NYIT’s core curriculum and by 179

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developing content knowledge through courses in their area of concentration. Language skills are strengthened in WRIT 101 and WRIT 151 and candidates are introduced to contemporary issues in education, human development, learning theory and behavior, and instructional technology in EDUC 201, EDUC 203 and EDUC 212. Courses in the core curriculum and concentrations have been identified that meet NYIT degree requirements and the state’s requirements for general education study in English, mathematics, science, social studies, a language other than English, and artistic expression. Level 2: Admission to Teacher Education Candidacy The second level of admission – Gateway 1—generally occurs in the candidate’s third semester but no later than the fifth semester of study. This level marks the beginning of focused attention on teacher preparation as a teacher candidate. To apply for a Gateway 1 review and teacher education candidacy, students must: 1. Complete the application for Teacher Education Candidacy –Gateway 1 form. 2. Have completed at least 36 credits toward a bachelor’s degree with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.50 and a minimum of 2.75 GPA in their area of concentration. 3. Demonstrate competent English language skills by successful completion of WRIT 101, WRIT 151, and acceptable performance on the teacher education writing skills assessment and verbal skills assessment. 4. Successfully complete EDUC 201 and EDUC 203 5. Provide two completed recommendation forms, one from a personal reference and one from a faculty member, attesting to positive personal attributes and dispositions. An approved Teacher Education Candidacy form will be issued by the coordinators of Teacher Education and sent to the registrar when all above requirements are met. This permits candidates to take more advanced courses in teacher education leading up to student teaching including: EDUC 211 (EDUC 262 or EDUC 345, if appropriate), EDUC 306 and an appropriate methods course(s). In these courses candidates learn principles of curriculum design, a wide range of teaching strategies, and best practices for supporting the learning of all children. Concurrently, they are gaining expertise in their area(s) of concentration and related liberal arts. Candidates are also engaged in field experiences in schools linking their classroom learning with observation and participation in P-12 settings. (See section on Field Experiences below.) The chart below shows a timeline for courses prior to application for Student Teaching. Recommended Semester Courses EDUC 201 Educational Foundations 2 EDUC 203 Introduction to Educational Technology 2-3 EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth 3-4 EDUC 211, EDUC 262 4-5 or EDUC 345 Curriculum and Instruction * EDUC 306 Servicing Special Needs 3-5 EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum 4-8 *After EDUC 211 (or EDUC 262 or EDUC 345, if appropriate) and prior to student teaching, teacher education candidates other than those in childhood education take one of the following courses, depending on their teacher certification focus: 5-7 EDUC 260—Occupational Education

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EDUC 320—Art; EDUC 325—English; EDUC 330—Science EDUC 335—Social Studies; EDUC 340 - Business EDUC 350—Mathematics; EDUC 346 - Technology Education *After EDUC 211 and prior to student teaching, childhood education candidates take the following courses: EDUC 318 Teaching Reading EDUC 319 Reading and Language Arts for At-Risk Learners EDUC 370 Strategies Utilizing Instructional Technology in Science EDUC 371 Strategies Utilizing Instructional Technology in Mathematics EDUC 372 Strategies Utilizing Instructional Technology in Social Studies EDUC 374 Curriculum Articulation Through Multimedia
Field Experience Requirements

5-7 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-7

NYIT’s teacher education programs provide extensive opportunities for observation, participatory field experiences, and student teaching in a variety of communities and school districts, including those designated by the state as "high-needs" schools. Field experiences prior to student teaching give candidates the opportunity to observe and work with a range of student populations and developmental levels, including students who are English language learners, and students with a range of abilities and disabilities. Student teaching assignments are made to provide multiple grade level placements in accord with state requirements for certification. All field experiences are arranged by the Director of Field Experience. Details regarding the requirements for each field experience are provided by the faculty members who teach the related courses. Documentation of the field experience is required and students must achieve a satisfactory grade on field experiences prior to being approved for Student Teaching The table below shows the total number of field experience hours required. Certification Type Required Field Experience Hours Childhood Education 1-6 220 hours Adolescence Education 7-12 (Biology, Chemistry, English, Physics, Social Studies) 140 hours Business and Marketing Education (All Grades) 140 hours Career and Technical Education 160 hours Technology Education 160 hours Visual Arts Education (All Grades) 140 hours Approval for Student Teaching – Gateway 2 Teacher education candidates apply for Gateway 2 approval for Student Teaching October 1st for Spring semester or by March 1st for Fall semester. To be approved for Student Teaching and pass the Gateway 2 review, candidates must: 1. Have completed at least 90 credits toward the bachelor’s degree and earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 and a minimum of 3.00 GPA in their area of concentration and education courses. 2. Successfully completed the required pre-student teaching courses listed previously. 3. Submit the following completed application components by the due date: a. application for Student Teaching b. approval form signed by dean or designee of concentration area

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c. student teaching profile form d. medical clearance e. fingerprint clearance 4. Have completed and documented the required clock hours of field experience in sites approved by the Director of Field Experience. Documentation must show time, nature of the experience and activities completed consistent with course assignments. For additional information about applying for Student Teaching, please call 516.686.7777. 5. Provide a copy of their passing score report for the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations’ (NYSTCE) Liberal Arts and Science Test (LAST). The Student Teaching Semester For all programs except Career and Technical Education, Student Teaching is a nine-credit experience consisting of: EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching 3 Credits EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 6 Credits For the A.A.S. and B.S. in Career and Technical Education, Student Teaching is a six-credit experience: EDUC263/463 Seminar in Student Teaching 3 Credits EDUC292/492 Supervised Student Teaching 3 Credits Candidates who are admitted to Student Teaching are assigned placements in elementary or secondary school settings appropriate for their programs and as required by state certification regulations. Student teaching is a full-time experience and candidates are required to be at their assigned schools for the full school day, five days per week. Placements are based on the semester schedule of the cooperating school and begin on the first day of that school’s semester through the final day of classes in NYIT’s semester. The seminar and other workshops and classes on campus follow the regular college calendar. The demands of Student Teaching and the related seminars are substantial. Permission from the program coordinator is needed to take additional courses during this semester. During student teaching, the candidate works under the guidance of a master cooperating teacher and an NYIT college field supervisor to plan instructional activities, teach and evaluate student learning. Candidates participate in school related activities including parent-teacher conferences, school board meetings, faculty meetings, etc. Each candidate maintains a student teaching journal and a daily log that form a record of the student teaching experience. Journals and logs are submitted to the program coordinator during the last week of classes in the college calendar after being reviewed by the college field supervisor. Candidates planning to register for student teaching must be approved for the experience in advance.

WHEN CAN YOU START?
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Education Careers in New York State

The School of Education offers degree programs that prepare individuals for initial teacher certification in biology, business and marketing, career and technical education, chemistry, childhood, English, mathematics, physics, social studies, technology education, and visual arts education. At the graduate level, the school offers an initial certification program in childhood education as well as programs leading to certification as an educational technology specialist, school counselor, or school building and technology leadership. Candidates who satisfactorily complete all program components, including field experience, student teaching, or internships, are eligible for NYIT endorsement for certification. [Note: state certification tests are also required.] Information about state certification requirements is available on the New York State Department of Education web site at www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/.
New York State Certification Examinations (NYSTCE)

New York State requires candidates for teaching certification to demonstrate their general knowledge, knowledge of the content they will teach, and teaching skills. These are assessed using the New York State Certification Examinations. The exams include a Liberal Arts and Science Test (LAST), a Content Specialty Test (CST), and an Assessment of Teaching Skills-Written (ATS-W). The examinations are scheduled throughout the year. Advance registration is required. Information regarding the exams is available on the test website at http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/certificate/certexaminfo.htm or by calling 516.686.7777. The table below shows data reported by New York State Education Department (NYSED) on the proportion of NYIT teacher candidates who passed the teacher certification examinations from 2005 to 2006. NYIT Candidates’ NYSTCE Pass Rates 2005 to 2006
Test

Assessment of Teaching Skills Written (ATS-W) Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (LAST)r

Number Tested 20

Number Passed 20

Pass Rate 100%

21 13

21 13

100% 100%

Academic Content Areas, including Biology, Multi-subject, Social Studies

Education Job Opportunities in New York State

According to the New York State Education Department, there are significant shortages of qualified teachers and other educational professionals throughout the state. The supply and demand for teachers varies by certificate title (teaching area) and geographic location. New York City currently has a shortage of classroom teachers in Mathematics, Science, Special Education, and Languages according to a report of the NYSED (www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/respublic/teachersupplydemanddata.htm). This report also indicated that school district and Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) data from a 2001 NYSED survey revealed schools were having difficulty 183

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recruiting certified teachers in languages other than English, technology education, sciences, career and technical education, mathematics, bilingual/TESOL, and school media subjects, with the most hard to hire areas being the sciences and mathematics. Urban and rural areas reported more difficulty than suburban districts. The following tables provide information on median teacher salaries for the three geographic areas served by NYIT: Long Island Region (Nassau and Suffolk counties), New York City Region (New York, Bronx, Kings, Queens and Richmond counties), and the Mid-Hudson Region (Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan and Ulster counties). Data presented are from the annual Report the Governor and Legislature on the Educational Status of the State’s Schools: Statewide Profile of the Educational System, July 2005. Range of Median Teacher Salaries by County and Region Region County

Range of Median Salaries for Districts In County $67,740 – $72,218 $54,476 – $63,261 $54,476 – $48,947 $54,476 – $52,422 $54,476 – $52,181 $54,476 – $56,996 $59,830 – $60,729 $59,830 – $53,958 $59,830 – $55,941 $59,830 – $71,000 $59,830 – $67,190 $59,830 – $52,774 $59,830 – $58,126 $59,830 – $74,038

Long Island Region Nassau Suffolk New York City Region Bronx Kings New York Queens Richmond (S.I.) Mid-Hudson Region Dutchess Orange Putnam Rockland Sullivan Ulster Westchester

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Childhood Education
The program in Childhood Education prepares individuals for successful careers teaching children in grades 1 to 6. It leads to a B.S. in Childhood Education and qualifies graduates for initial NYS certification in Childhood Education. The Childhood program has been accorded national recognition by the Association of Childhood Education International. In addition to core curriculum courses and professional study related to childhood education, program candidates take a concentration of at least 30 creditsin one of these content areas: Behavioral Science (Psychology) Biology Chemistry English Mathematics Physics Political Science (Social Studies)

In the program, emphasis is placed on developing knowledge and understanding of the learning process and the use of instructional techniques and approaches that maximize children’s learning. The program embodies a constructivist philosophy, develops candidates as reflective practitioners who can critically evaluate learning activities and create experiences that enable all children to reach their personal best. The program’s emphasis on multicultural understanding and respect for all persons undergirds its approach to diversity and the development of meaningful learning experiences for all students. The program includes study of curriculum scope and sequence, a broad range of best practice teaching/learning strategies, and the integrated use of instructional technology. Course work is enhanced and linked to classroom practice through extensive prestudent teaching field experiences that progress from observation to participation to full class teaching. The program was designed to prepare educators who are able to integrate technology in teaching and learning, adopt instructional approaches that are socially and culturally connected to learners, and model strong moral values and ethics in their professional practice and interactions. The curriculum model below shows the program components. Degree maps for each concentration outline the specific courses in the discipline and number of credits required for graduation. See an advisor for the degree map for your area of concentration.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
College Success Seminar
(1)

Bachelor of Science in Childhood Education 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

English WRIT 101 College Comp I WRIT 151 College Comp II SPCH 105 Basic Speech LITR 350 Children’s Literature One Group B English

Teacher Education Core EDUC 201 Educ. Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students PSYC 220 Child Psychology

3 3 3 3 3 3

18 credits Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 318 Teaching Reading EDUC 319 Reading and Language Arts for At-Risk Learners EDUC 370 Strategies using Instructional Technology in Science EDUC 371 Strategies using Instructional Technology in Mathematics EDUC 372 Strategies using Instructional Technology in Social Studies EDUC 374 Curriculum Articulation through Multimedia 3 3 3 3 3 3

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 110 American History I HIST 150 American History II HIST 170 History of NY State HIST 210 The Contemporary World PSCI 110 Amer Govt Politics

3 3 3 1 3 3 16 credits

18 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits Note: 220 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching. Required Non-credit Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Personal Health Workshop Fire Safety Total credits required—127-139
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (p. 83)

Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Introductory to Psychology Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics

3 3

Physical Science PHYS 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe 3 Life Science BIOL 102 Basic Concepts in Life Sciences 3

Mathematics 6-12 credits Courses/credits dependent on concentration Language SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II 3 3 6 credits Artistic Expression One fine art course with approval 3 credits

Arts and Science Concentration (30 credits minimum) Courses and credits are dependent on the subject concentration. Concentrations are available in biology, chemistry, English, physics, political science, psychology.

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Adolescence Education

The programs in Adolescence Education prepare individuals to teach specific subjects in grades 7 to 12. They lead to a B.S. in Adolescence Education with a specialization in one of the following subject areas: Biology, Chemistry, English, Mathematics, Physics, or Social Studies. Graduates of the programs are eligible for initial NYS certification to teach their content subject in grades 7-12. The programs of study were designed to give aspiring teachers a broad background in the liberal arts and sciences through NYIT’s core curriculum and maximum knowledge and technical skills in the subject matter they will teach through rigorous 30-36-credit area concentrations. In addition, the program provides a strong professional education component including preparation to infuse cutting-edge technology in a wide variety of instructional strategies to help meet the learning needs of all students. The courses in the content area concentration provide breath and depth in the subject matter and the background to excel in teaching and graduate study. Education course work is enhanced and linked to classroom practice through extensive pre-student teaching field experiences that progress from observation to participation to full class teaching. The programs culminate in full-time student teaching with the support of master teachers and a college field supervisor. For the specific courses in each of the subject areas, see the detailed curriculum for each major on the pages that follow.

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 316
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Adolescence Education: Biology 7-12 2 cr 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Writing for Tech. Professions

Biology Concentration BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 330 Microbiology BIOL 107 Environmental Science OR BIOL 230 Ecology BIOL 340 Biochemistry BIOL 410 Genetics OR BIOL 430 Cell Physiology CHEM110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II

4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 39 credits

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 210 Contemporary World Social Science Option

3 3 3 9 credits

Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics Physical Sciences PHYS141/140 Physics for Life Science I PHYS161/160 Physics for Life Science II

3 3 4 4 8 credits

Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 330 Methods and Materials of Teaching Science

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

21 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching. Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teaching Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety Total Credits 127-129

Life Science BIOL 110 General Biology I Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus MATH 161 Basic Applied Calculus

4 4 3 7 credits

Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II

3 3 6 credits

Artistic Expression One Fine Arts course w/approval

3 credits

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 316
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Adolescence Education: Chemistry 7-12 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

Artistic Expression One Fine Arts course w/approval Chemistry BIOL 107 BIOL 150 BIOL 310 BIOL 340 CHEM 110 CHEM150 CHEM 210 CHEM250 CHEM 310 CHEM 410 Concentration Environmental Science General Biology II Human Physiology Biochemistry General Chemistry I General Chemistry II Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry II Quantitative Analysis Physical Chemistry I

3 credits 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 39 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Writing for Tech. Professions

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 210 Contemporary World

3 3 6 credits

Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics Physical Sciences PHYS 175 Physics Pre-Med I PHYS 185 Physics Pre-Med II

3 credits 3 3 credits 3 5 5 10 credits

Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 330 Methods and Materials of Teaching Science

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

21 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits 4 4 4 4 12 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching. Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teaching Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety Total Credits 131-133

Life Science BIOL 110 General Biology I Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II

Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II

3 3 6 credits

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 316
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Adolescence Education: Physics 7-12 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

Artistic Expression One Fine Arts course w/approval Physics Concentration PHYS 180 General Physics II PHYS 220 General Physics III PHYS 330 Advanced Laboratory I PHYS 340 Analytical Mechanics PHYS 360 Advanced Laboratory II PHYS 370 Electricity and Magnetism I PHYS 410 Modern Physics I PHYS 450 Mathematical Physics

3 credits 4 4 2 3 2 3 3 3 24 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Writing for Tech. Professions

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 210 Contemporary World

3 3 6 credits

Science Elective (select one) BIOL 107 Environmental Science BIOL 230 Ecology PHYS 310 Optics

3 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Physical Science PHYS 170 General Physics I Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II MATH 260 Calculus III MATH 310 Linear Algebra MATH 320 Differential Equations

4 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 22 credits

Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 330 Methods and Materials of Teaching Science

21 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching.

Life Sciences CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM 150 General Chemistry II

4 4 8 credits Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teaching Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety Total Credits 127-129

Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II

3 3

6 credits

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 316
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Adolescence Education: Mathematics 7-12 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

Mathematics Core MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II MATH 220 Probability Theory MATH 235 Applied Statistics MATH 260 Calculus III MATH 310 Linear Algebra MATH 320 Differential Equations

4 4 3 3 4 3 3 24 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Writing for Tech. Professions

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy History or Political Science Option

3 3 6 credits

Mathematics Electives (select three) MATH 110 Introductory Seminar MATH 210 Plane Geometry MATH 215 Intro. to Sets and Logic MATH 350 Advanced Calculus MATH 360 Functions: Complex Variations MATH 450 Partial Differential Equations MATH 455 Numerical Analysis MATH 460 Advanced Seminar

2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics Physical Science PHYS 170 General Physics I and PHYS 180 General Physics II or PHYS 175 Physics for Pre-Med I and PHYS 185 Physics for Pre-Med II

8-9 credits 4 3 3 4 4 5 5 8-10 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 350 Methods and Materials of Teaching Math 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

21 credits 3 6 9 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching.

Life Sciences BIOL 102 Basic Concepts—life Sciences CHEM 105 Applied Chemistry

3 3 6 credits

Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II

3 3 6 credits

Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teaching Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety Total Credits 121-127

Electives Artistic Expression One Fine Arts course w/approval

3-6 credits 3 credits

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 350
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Adolescence Education: English 7-12 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Writing for Comm. Arts

Literature LITR 310 LITR 315 LITR 320 LITR 330 LITR 331 LITR 332 LITR 340 LITR 341 LITR 342 LITR 410

and Culture Option Modern Poetry Modern Drama Shakespeare Survey of World Literature Art of the Novel Survey of Jewish Literature African American Literature 20th Century American Literature 19th Century American Literature Literature Seminar

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

15 credits Drama Option LITR 315 Modern Drama LITR 320 Shakespeare LITR 410 Literature Seminar (drama) THEA 110 Intro. to Theater Arts THEA 210 Principles of Acting THEA 260 Advanced Acting THEA 265 Wkshp in Theatrical Performance THEA 270 Wkshp in Theatrical Performance THEA 275 Wkshp in Theatrical Performance 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 4

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 210 Contemporary World

3 3 6 credits

Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics

3 3

15 credits Professional Writing Option SPCH 205 Professional Speaking WRIT 210 Wkshp in Publication WRIT 220 Wkshp in Publication WRIT 230 Wkshp in Publication WRIT 351 Advanced Technical Writing WRIT 355 Advanced Writing and Editing WRIT 363 Writing for the Web WRIT 366 Survey of Technical and Professional Document Production WRIT 415 Internship in Technical and Professional Writing 3 2 3 4 3 3 3 3 3

Physical Science PHYS 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe 3 Life Sciences BIOL 102 Basic Concepts—Life Sciences Mathematics MATH 115 Intro. Concept in Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus 3 3 4

7 credits Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II Artistic Expression One Fine Arts course w/approval Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 325 Methods and Materials of Teaching English 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

15 credits Concentration: English Core LITR 420 Literature Survey LITR 430 Major Author LITR 440 Multicultural Literature LITR 450 Special Topics in Literature LITR 460 Capstone Seminar 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits English Electives Professional Semester EDUC 489 Sem. in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 12 cr 3 6 9 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching. Total Credits 121-123

21 credits Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teaching Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Adolescence Education: Social Studies 7-12 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

Artistic Expression One Fine Arts course w/approval Social Studies Concentration PSCI 110 American Gov’t. and Politics PSCI 210 Comparative Gov’t. PSCI 230 International Relations PSCI 305 Politics and Society PSCI 325 Public Administration HIST 110 American History I HIST 150 American History II PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy PHIL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy PHIL 250 Logic and Scientific Method Political Science Elective History Elective

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 36 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature One Group B

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 210 Contemporary World

3 3 6 credits

Mathematics TMAT 135 Technical Math I` TMAT 155 Technical Math II

4 4 8 credits

Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics ECON 105 Principles of Economics I ECON 110 Principles of Economics II

3 3 3 9 credits

Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 335 Methods and Materials of Teaching Social Studies

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

21 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching. Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Personal Health Workshop Fire Safety Total Credits 128-130

Behavioral Science ANTH 101 Anthropology or SOCI 101 Intro. to Sociology PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology PSYC 240 Educational Psychology

3 3 3 3 9 credits

Natural Sciences BIOL 102 Basic Concepts—life Sciences 3 PHYS 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe 3 6 credits Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II 3 3 6 credits

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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Business and Marketing Education

The program in Business and Marketing Education prepares candidates for careers as teachers of business related subjects (accounting, marketing, business math, etc.). It provides the foundation of knowledge and skills required by NYS Student Learning Standards in Career Development and Occupational Studies (CDOS). It leads to a B.S. in Business and Marketing and NYS certification as a Business and Marketing teacher for all grades. The program was designed to give aspiring teachers a broad background in the liberal arts and sciences through NYIT’s core curriculum and a substantial knowledge base in the business content they will teach through a rigorous 36-credit area concentration taken in the School of Management. Course work addresses the subject matter identified by NYS as critical to students’ preparation for careers in business: business communications, accounting, marketing, information technology, qualitative and quantitative analysis, economics, banking, law, and finance. In addition, the program provides a strong professional education component including preparation to infuse cutting-edge technology in a wide variety of instructional strategies to help meet the learning needs of all students. The teacher education course work is enhanced and linked to classroom practice through extensive pre-student teaching field experiences that progress from observation to participation to full class teaching. The program culminates in full-time student teaching with the support of master teachers and a college field supervisor.

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 310
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Business and Marketing 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Business Writing

Concentration: Business and Marketing MGMT101 Intro. to Business MRKT 101 Intro. to Marketing ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting LLAW 101 Business Law I LLAW 150 Business Law II FINC 201 Corporation Finance MIST 101 Intro. to Computer Applications MIST 205 Software and Hardware Survey MGMT205 Organizational Behavior QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory Business Elective

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 210 Contemporary World PSCI 110 American Gov’t. and Politics

36 credits 3 3 3 9 credits Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 340 Methods and Materials of Teaching Business 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Mathematics MATH 125 Finite Mathematics MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus

3 3 6 credits

Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology SOCI 101 Intro. to Sociology

21 credits 3 3 6 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits 3 3 3 9 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching. Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Personal Health Workshop Fire Safety Total Credits 3 3 6 credits 129-131

Economics ECON 105 Principles of Economics I ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking

Physical Science PHYS 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe 3 Life Sciences BIOL 101 Humanity and the Biological Universe 3 Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

Artistic Expression One Fine Arts course w/approval Psychology PSYC 223 Adolescent Psychology

3 3

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Career and Technical Education

The programs in Career and Technical Education prepare individuals with work experience in a technical or occupational field to teach in the area of their expertise in grades 7 to 12. Career and Technical Education (also referred to as occupational education) is one of areas identified by NYS Department of Education as having a shortage of teachers; thus job prospects for qualified graduates are very promising. The programs complement the knowledge and skills acquired through practical on-thejob experience, and take maximum advantage of the candidate’s qualifications and abilities. Up to 36 credits may be granted toward a bachelor’s degree for qualified work experience. Criteria for credit include validation of the work experience and competency in the field. Note: The bachelors degree qualifies candidates for initial certification or professional certification, depending on prior certification and teaching experience. There are three areas of specialization offered in the Bachelor of Science in Career and Technical Education: Health Occupation Subjects 7-12, Technical Subjects 7-12, and Trade Subjects 7-12. Candidates become certified in a single subject, based on their professional area. The list below shows the areas of teacher certification in Career and Technical Education and their certifications code. Three major areas of specialization are offered: Health Occupations Subjects: Dental Assisting (8200) Dental Laboratory Assisting (8201) Health Assisting (8220) Home Health Assisting (8230) Medical Assisting (8240) Medical Laboratory Assisting (8250) Medical Therapy Assisting (8260) Nurse’s Assisting (8290) Ophthalmic Dispensing (8426) Physical Therapy Assisting (8285) Practical Nursing (8300) Radiation Therapy Assisting (8280) Technical Subjects Aerospace Technology (8134) Architectural Technology (8135) Biological Technology (8144) Chemical Technology (8136) Civil Technology (8137) Computer Technology (8138) Electrical/Electronic Technology (8139) Electro/Mechanical Technology (8140) Fashion Design Technology (8141) Industrial Design Technology (8142) Manufacturing Technology (8143) Marine Technology (8761) Mechanical Technology (8145) Systems Technology (8146) Transit Technology (8154) 196

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Technical Subjects Automotive Service (8162) Diesel Mechanic (8163) Heavy Equipment Repair and Operation (8164) Vehicle Body Repair and Painting (8103) Vehicle Mechanical Repair (8102) Drafting (8392) Electrical/Electronic Equipment Occupations Repair and Installation (8109) Electro-mechanical Equipment Occupations Repair and Installation (8110) Elevator Mechanic (8161) Commercial Art (8111) Professional Photography (8112) Printing/Lithography (8113) Carpentry (8114), Masonry (8115) Plumbing (8116) Electrical (8117) Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration (8118) Residential/Commercial Building Maintenance and Remodeling (8119) Machine Tool Operation/Machine Shop (8120) Sheet Metal (8121) Welding (8122) Machine/Specialty Area (8123) Motorcycle, Marine and Outdoor Power Equipment Occupations (8124) Jewelry Making (8166) Cosmetology (8129) Airframe Maintenance and Repair (8125) Power Plant Maintenance and Repair (8126) Avionics Servicing and Repair (8127) Ground Support Equipment Maintenance and Repair (8128) Optical Mechanics (8427) Public and Private Security (8130) Visual Merchandising (8429) Dance - Classical Ballet (8155) Dance - Modern (8157) Dance Music (8158) Drama (8159) Stage Design (8165) Food Preparation Baker(8420) Food Preparation Catering (8421) Food Preparation Cook/Chef (8422) Food Preparation Meat Cutter (8423) Food Preparation Store Services (8425)
Note: New York State teacher certification regulations provides options for qualifying for initial certification in one of these areas prior to completing the bachelor's degree. Individuals who are interested in applying for initial certification through individual transcript review while enrolled in the bachelor's degree program should contact their advisor. If candidates hold the initial certification, the bachelor's degree qualifies them professional certification, providing they have met the state's testing and teaching experience criteria.

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I Curriculum requirements

for Bachelor of Science in Career and Technical Education: Health Occupations Subjects, Technical Subjects or Trade Subjects
(1)

College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 310

2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Business Writing or WRIT 316 Writing for Tech. Professions

Professional Education EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 260 Methods and Materials Teaching Occupational Ed. EDUC 262 Curriculum Development for Occupational Education EDUC 265 Occupational Analysis

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

24 credits Professional Semester EDUC 263 Occupational Professional Development Seminar or EDUC 463 Professional Development Seminar and EDUC 294 Supervised Student Teaching in Occupational Ed. or EDUC 494 Supervised Student Teaching in Occ. Ed.

3 3 3 3

Mathematics MATH 115 Intro Concept of Math TMAT 135 Technical Math I

3 4 7 credits

Physical Sciences PHYS 115 Humanity and Physical Universe Life Science BIOL 101 Humanity and Biological Universe Social Science HIST 210 Contemp. World Hist. or PSCI 110 Amer. Gov’t. and Politics PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy

3 3 3 3 3 Career and Technical Electives

6 credits 6 Health, Technical or Trade Concentration 36 cr Courses or experience; max. 20 cr granted for 5 yrs. eligible work experience; Max 16 cr granted for 4 yrs. teaching in field Required Non-credit Workshops Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teaching Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety Note: a minimum of 160 hours of field experience is required prior to student teaching Total Credits 126-128

6 credits Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Language SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I SPAN 151 Elementary Spanish II 3 3 3 3 6 credits General Electives Liberal Arts Electives 3 credits 6 credits

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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Technology Education

Technology is an applied discipline that focuses on extending human capabilities and problem solving in the real world. Technology education teaches children in grades 1 to 12 how the principles of science and mathematics, the art of design, and human and/or computer skill and technique combine and work in manufacturing, communications, construction, power, energy, and environmental control. The School of Education Technology Education program leads to the Bachelor of Science in Technology Education and certification as a technology teacher for all grades. Technology Education is one of areas identified by NYS Department of Education as having a shortage of teachers. As schools implement curriculum geared to Student Learning Standards in Math, Science and Technology, this shortage may become more acute. The Technology Education program gives aspiring teachers a broad background in the liberal arts and sciences through NYIT’s core curriculum and a significant knowledge and skills base in the subject matter they will teach through a rigorous 43-48-credit area concentration. The content courses address all of the topics recommended by NYSED: design, communication and information technology, construction technology, electricity/electronics, energy, engineering, manufacturing, transportation, materials, systems, and technology as a human endeavor. The Technology Education has been accorded national recognition by the International Technology Education Association of the Council on Technology Teacher Education (ITEA/CTTE). In addition the program provides a strong professional education including preparation to infuse cutting-edge technology in a wide variety of instructional strategies to help meet the learning needs of all students. Education course work is enhanced and linked to classroom practice through extensive pre-student teaching field experiences that progress from observation to participation to full class teaching. The programs culminate in full-time student teaching with the support of master teachers and a college field supervisor. The curriculum requirements below outline the general program of study for technology education.

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 316
(1)

for the Bachelor of Science in Technology Education 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Writing for Tech. Prof.

Social Sciences PHIL 230 Technology, Society and Values HIST 210 Contemporary World PSCI 110 American Government and Politics

3 3 3

Required Technical Courses DSGN 211 Structures DSGN 222 Materials I CTEC 205 Computer Programming ARCH 140 Visualization I ETEC 110 Electrical Tech I ETEC 120 Electrical Tech II ETEC 131 Electronic Tech I ENVT 301 Air and Noise Pollution MENG105 Engineering Graphics MTEC 210 Intro. to CAD MTEC 220 Automation and Computer Aided Manufacturing RADI 101 Fund. Radio Production or TEVE 101 Fund. TV Production

2 2 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 36 credits

9 credits Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology or SOC 101 Intro to Sociology 3

Technology Electives

3-5 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 credits Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics Physical Science PHYS 130 Introductory Physics Life Sciences BIOL 107 Environmental Science CHEM 105 Applied Chemistry 3 3 3 3 6 credits Mathematics TMAT 135 Tech. Math I TMAT 155 Tech. Math II 4 4 8 credits Language SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II 3 3 6 credits Artistic Expression ARTC 201 Computer Graphics or One Fine Arts course w/approval 3 3 3 credits Liberal Arts Elective 3 credits

Teacher Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 345 Curriculum for Technology Education EDUC 346 Methods of Teaching Technology Education EDUC 365 Strategies Using Instructional Technology in Technology Education

24 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits Note: 160 clock hours of approved field experience are required prior to Professional Semester Required Non-credit Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse and Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teahing Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety Total Credits 135-138

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83)

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Visual Arts Education

The program in Visual Arts Education is offered in conjunction with the School of Arts, Sciences, and Communication and leads to NYS certification as a Teacher of Visual Arts (all grades) and to a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts. The Visual Arts Education program gives aspiring art teachers a broad background in the liberal arts and sciences through NYIT’s core curriculum and a solid knowledge and skills base in art with a strong emphasis on design, drawing, art history, computer graphics and studio art. In addition the program provides a strong professional education including preparation to infuse cutting-edge technology in a wide variety of instructional strategies to help meet the learning needs of all students. Education course work is enhanced and linked to classroom practice through extensive pre-student teaching field experiences that progress from observation to participation to full class teaching. The programs culminate in full-time student teaching with the support of master teachers and a college field supervisor.

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 350 WRIT 325
(1)

for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts Education 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3

College Comp I College Comp II Basic Speech Children’s Literature Writing for Arts and Architecture

15 credits Social Sciences PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy HIST 210 Contemporary World 3 3 6 credits Mathematics MATH 115 Intro. Concepts of Mathematics MATH Math Option 3 3

Concentration: Visual Arts ARTH 101 Art History I ARTH 151 Art History II ARTH 201 Art History III ARTW101 Drawing I ARTW151 Drawing II ARTD 101 2-D Design I ARTD 151 2-D Design II ARTD 102 3-D Design I ARTD 152 3-D Design II ARTP 201 Painting I ARTS 201 Sculpture I ARTY 201 Photography I ARTC 201 Computer Graphics I ARTC 251 Computer Graphics II

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 42 credits

Fine Arts Electives ARTW201 Drawing III ARTP 251 Painting II ARTS 251 Sculpture II ARTR 201 Printing I

6 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

6 credits Behavioral Science PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics 3 3

Physical Science PHYS 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe 3 Life Science BIOL 101 Humanity and the Biological Universe 3 Language Study SPAN 101 Elem. Spanish I SPAN 151 Elem. Spanish II 3 3 6 credits Liberal Arts Option 3 credits Required Workshops 0 cr Reporting and Prevention of Child Abuse/Abduction Safety and Violence Education (SAVE) Teaching Personal Health Teaching Fire Safety

Professional Education Core EDUC 201 Educational Foundations EDUC 203 Intro. to Ed. Technology EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum EDUC 320 Methods and Materials of Teaching Art

21 credits Professional Semester EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 3 6 9 credits Note: 140 hours of field experience are required prior to student teaching. Total Credits 126-128

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar. (see p. 83)

WHEN CAN YOU START?

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Course Descriptions
EDUC 108 College Reading Strategies 2-1-3 A performance-based course providing intensive, direct instruction leading to rapid improvement in the reading and study strategies needed for college and career success. EDUC 201 Educational Foundations 3-0-3 This course is a study of major educational factors that impact on the schools. The topics emphasized are social issues, school governance and finance, cultural diversity, learning and learning styles, inclusion, curriculum and instruction, legal issues, global education, and technology integration in the classroom. Historical and philosophical approaches are emphasized and sociological principles are applied to the solution of these problems. In this required course for teacher certification the profession of teaching is studied and experienced through required field observations, a visit to a school board meeting and by modeling a constructivist, learner-active approach to instruction. Required for teacher certification students. EDUC 203 Introduction to Educational Technology 3-0-3 This keystone course will provide students with a technology toolbox for lifelong learning and teaching. The student learns theoretical and application related uses of databases, spreadsheets, telecommunications, word processing, presentation and modeling tools which are integrated and enhanced in all courses in the program. Students develop skills in using technology and in teaching K-12 students to use technology to acquire information, communicate successfully in person, on paper and online, and to enhance learning. Field observation is required. Required for teacher certification students. EDUC 211 Curriculum and Instruction 3-0-3 Learning and curriculum design theories and principles are studied in this course. The topics emphasized are curriculum planning, methodology, evaluation, instructional strategies,

learning styles, technology integration, multicultural diversity, rubrics and assessment. Students design a unit plan applying learning principles and a systematic, constructivist, learner-active approach to instruction. Through required fieldwork, pre-service teachers participate in the implementation of the curriculum in the classroom Prerequisite: Approval for Teacher Certification candidacy, Department Chairperson’s approval. EDUC 212 Teaching, Learning and Growth 3-0-3 Students will study the processes of physical, cognitive and psychosocial growth and development in early and middle childhood and adolescence, and how to provide learning experiences (and conduct assignments) reflecting the understanding of those processes. Developmental issues specifically pertaining to home, school and community will be examined. Students will explore pedagogical concepts, knowledge and skills that will allow them to become good and effective teachers and foster effective relationships with their pupils that increase motivation, readiness to learn, and ability to interact and collaborate with others. Students will learn how to enhance student achievement, create a positive classroom climate, effectively communicate with their pupils, manage the classroom and improve pupil cooperation. Field observation is required. Required for teacher certification students. EDUC 214 Middle Childhood Characteristics and Development 3-0-3 This course prepares professionals to understand the developmental characteristics and educational needs of the early adolescent. The course topics will include the physiological, sociological, emotional, intellectual, and moral characteristics of the developmental period of early adolescence within social and cultural context. Study will include changes in family settings and relationships, social contexts, threats to health and safety, and risk behaviors in contemporary society that effect health development of young adolescents. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Required for Middle Childhood Teacher Certification.

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EDUC 215 Middle Childhood Models and Curriculum Studies 3-0-3 This course will encompass study of various curricular structures including interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, as well as traditional approaches. Technology rich instructional strategies that are based on appropriate teaching and learning approaches will be emphasized along with the study of school structures such as team teaching and cooperative learning. Integration of content areas of the curriculum and the process of curriculum development, adaptation, and assessment will be given. Early field experience is required. Required for Middle Childhood Teacher Certification. Prerequisite: Approval of Teacher Certification candidacy, ACD. EDUC 260 Methods and Materials of Teaching Occupational Subjects 3-0-3 This course on siders teaching techniques and materials as applied to selected occupational subject areas in order to develop appreciation for a variety of teaching/learning methodologies. Early Field Experience is required. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education. EDUC 262 Curriculum Development for Teachers of Occupational Subjects 3-0-3 Acquisition of curriculum-development skills and techniques. Student effort will focus on in-depth development of units, modules, and other resource materials for teachers’ use in the occupational subject classes. Early Field Experience is required. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education. EDUC 263/463 Occupational Professional Development Seminar 3-0-3 A seminar designed to facilitate development of selected occupational education professional competencies to be determined by assessment of individual needs during candidate’s college-supervised field experience. Learning activities will, when appropriate, provide field support by faculty for the demonstration of competencies under development. Prerequisite: Admission to field placement semester. EDUC 265 Occupational Analysis 3-0-3 Consideration of techniques for analysis of an occupational area to identify skills and related technical information to be taught. Independent study and application of techniques in the development of individual student projects. Attention will be given to problems of shop organization and management, as appropriate. Early Field Experience is required. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education. EDUC 268 Technology for Special and Mainstreamed Students 3-0-3 A performance based instructional experience which examines the use of technology for teaching mainstreamed students having a wide range of special learning needs. Application of the technologies in the support and evaluation of methods and curricula for different learners is covered. EDUC 291/491 Education Seminar 2-0-1 The student will undertake directed study in one or more areas of the educational process/ profession. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education. EDUC 292/492 Education Seminar 2-0-2 The student will undertake directed study in one or more areas of the educational process/ profession. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education. EDUC 293/493 Education Seminar 3-0-3 The student will undertake directed study in one or more areas of the educational process. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education. EDUC 294/494 Supervised Student Teaching—Occupational Education 0-0-3 Teaching in a school under the direction and close supervision of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. Appropriate experience in the various roles of a teacher for a minimum period to be determined by the coordinator of the School of Education and the college supervisor responsible for assessing student achievement of required competencies. Enrollment limited to individuals who are employed full time and who seek certification to teach an occupational subject. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education. Corequisite: EDUC 263/463. EDUC 296/496, 297/497, 298/498 Education Workshop * The student will undertake a specific educational task or tasks other than student teaching. Illustrative tasks include serving as a teacher aide, tutoring, designing curriculum components, or directing a training program for volunteers. Requirements include task design and implementation as well as development of evaluative criteria and implementation of the evaluation process. Prerequisite: Approval of the School of Education. *Credits to be arranged. EDUC 306 Serving Special Needs Students 3-0-3 Prospective teachers focus on the growing diversity of student populations in contemporary elementary and secondary schools. Consideration is given to servicing special needs of students from minority families; students with handicapping conditions and the use of assistive technology; and those who are identified as gifted and talented. Home and community factors are studied in order to foster the health, learning, appropriate behavior and independence of all students in a supportive, respectful and least restrictive environment. Particular emphasis is placed on developing open-mindedness, eliminating prejudicial bias as well as addressing targeted students’ strengths and needs. Principles of nonsexist and collaborative education will also be explored. Field observation is required. Prerequisite: Approval of School of Education.

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EDUC 313 Occupationally Related Mathematics 3-0-3 This course is designed to provide occupational education students with practical applications of basic mathematical knowledge and skills as related to their specific occupational field. Successful performance will broaden and strengthen each student's understanding of mathematical processes and procedures beyond mathematics study at the senior high school level. The intent of this course is to provide each occupational education student with the mathematical and personal finance background essential for success in teaching the skills needed to become a working citizen. This course will provide instruction in the use of mathematical procedures in problem solving, decision-making, and day-to-day operations within a cross-section of the various occupational areas. A State syllabus will describe the educational results expected, and provide examples of how the several areas of mathematics are applied in a variety of employment tasks. EDUC 314 Occupationally Related Mathematics II 3-0-3 Continuation of practical applications of mathematical principles and processes related to the student's occupational field. Advanced algebra, geometry, personal finance problem solving and decision making are key elements of this course. Hands-on laboratory activities will be utilized so that concept application and understanding can be assessed. Prerequisites: EDUC 313 or equivalent. EDUC 315 Occupationally Related Science I 3-0-3 Practical applications of scientific principles and processes related to the student's occupational teaching field. This course will focus on the health science and safety and the physical applications modules of the state syllabus. Hands-on laboratory activities will be utilized to enhance scientific concepts presented. Teachers of Occupationally Related Science must prepare students to solve problems and make decisions. EDUC 316 Occupationally Related Science II 3-0-3 This course will focus on chemical and material science applications and on the life science modules of the state syllabus. Hands-on problem solving and laboratory activities will be utilized to enhance scientific concepts presented. Teachers will utilize models from the State Education Department syllabus for Middle and Junior High School Science and from Secondary School Science, Technology and Society syllabus. Prerequisites: EDUC 315 or equivalent. EDUC 317 Literacy Across the Curriculum This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of various approaches, methods, and procedures for use in content area classrooms to encourage and improve students’ literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening, and representing). It will further provide proactive experience using various literacy engagements, study/learning strategies, and textbooks and supplemental reading and will describe modification, and methods of differentiation of literacy instruction to teach students from diverse populations including ESL/ELL students. “New literacies” will be emphasized across the curriculum. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: EDUC 201, EDUC 203, EDUC 212. EDUC 318 Teaching Reading 3-0-3 This course is designed to provide the pre-service teacher with the theories and principles of children’s language and literacy development from emergent status to that of accomplished reader and writer. The course will focus on effective strategies in teaching reading, listening, speaking, and writing for all children, including those with special learning needs by developing skill in designing and offering differentiated instruction, understanding learning processes that stimulate and sustain student achievement to each student’s highest level of learning, and integrating technology to support literacy acquisition activities. This course satisfies three hours of teaching reading for teachers in childhood education. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: EDUC 201, EDUC 203, EDUC 211, EDUC 212, PSYCH 220. EDUC 319 Reading and Language Arts for At-Risk Learners 3-0-3 This course develops an understanding of concepts and application of methods and materials necessary for utilizing effective instructional strategies in teaching language arts. Curriculum analysis, instructional planning and skills in selecting multiple research-validated instructional strategies for teaching students within the full range of abilities and developing skill in designing and offering differentiated instruction to enhance the learning of all students is stressed. Special emphasis is placed on understanding formal and informal methods of assessing the learning process as it applies to classroom management, raising student achievement to encourage each student’s highest level of learning in the classroom, developing skills in identifying learners’ strengths, cooperative learning techniques and developing skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course satisfies three hours of teaching reading; language acquisition and literacy development for childhood education. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: EDUC 201, EDUC 203, EDUC 211, EDUC 212, EDUC 318, PSYC 220. EDUC 320 Methods and Materials of Teaching Art 3-0-3 Emphasis is placed on up-to-date analysis and synthesis of the standards-based content in elementary and secondary art. This course is designed to prepare the student with multiple research-validated instructional strategies, including the use of computer technology to effectively differentiate instruction and stimulate and sustain student interest, student collaboration, and student achievement to each student’s highest level of learning. Students use art materials and resources, respond to and analyze works of art and understand the cultural dimensions and contribution of teaching the arts. Attention will be placed on literacy development and content terminology as it applies to art. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: Approval for Teacher Certification candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval.

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EDUC 321 Multimedia Evaluation and Classroom Applications 3-0-3 This course would examine the use of multimedia technologies in the classroom setting. Students will develop strategies for identifying and selecting appropriate media for instructional goals. Students will evaluate and experience current available multimedia program packages, that is, laser disc and CD-ROM technologies. This activity will culminate in the design and development of interactive lessons incorporating appropriate multimedia components. Prerequisite: EDUC 203. EDUC 322 Multimedia Design, Development and Curriculum Integration 3-0-3 This course would explore the factors involved in designing and creating effective instructional multimedia materials. The students will develop skills and work with multimedia resources that are interactive, graphics based, relevant to curriculum topics in the subject content field at the appropriate grade level and include usage of telecomputing learning resources. The role of the community, development of children and adolescents, and consideration of the changing school population with attention to learning disabilities will also be learning dimensions of the course. Prerequisites: EDUC 203, EDUC 211 or equivalent, and EDUC 321. EDUC 325 Methods and Materials of Teaching English 3-0-3 This course prepares students to become teachers of English at the secondary level. Teaching techniques, curriculum development and instructional planning are studied, appraised and applied for the purpose of developing a variety of appropriate, updated knowledge and teaching methodologies to enhance the learning of all students. Special emphasis is given to understanding the learning processes in classroom organization and management and focuses on applying this understanding to stimulate and sustain student achievement to each student’s highest level of learning. Students will develop skills in collaborating with others to address special needs and students with disabilities in the classroom. Attention will be placed on language acquisition, literacy development, and content terminology as it applies to English. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: Approval for Teacher Certification candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 330 Methods and Materials of Teaching Science 3-0-3 Multiple strategies for presenting science on the secondary level are discussed, analyzed, and practiced. This includes application activities that highlight scientific principles and practices as well as responding to a variety of learning styles. In addition, assessment strategies are developed that coincide with the science classroom experience. The infusion of technology into the science curriculum is a critical component. Students gain insights into the use of instructional technology and its effectiveness as a learning tool. Attention will be placed on Literacy development and content terminology as it applies to science. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: Approval for Teacher Certification candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 335 Methods and Materials of Teaching Social Studies 3-0-3 Emphasis will be placed on up-to-date analysis and synthesis of the standards-based content areas in history, geography, economics, civics, citizenship, and government, and is designed to prepare the student with multiple research-validated instructional strategies, including the use of computer technology, to effectively stimulate and sustain student interest, student collaboration, and student achievement to each student's highest level of learning. The course provides the understanding that the process of social studies synthesizes academic areas in the social sciences and that its teaching necessitates creativity and a sensitivity to culture and heritage. Attention will be placed on literacy development and content terminology as it applies to social studies. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: Approval for Teacher Certification Candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 340 Methods and Materials of Teaching Business 3-0-3 Emphasis is placed on up-to-date analysis and synthesis of the standards-based content in business. Students demonstrate an understanding of business, marketing, and multinational economic concepts; perform business related mathematical computations; and analyze and interpret businessrelated numerical information. They will demonstrate an understanding of the inter-relatedness of business, social and economic systems. The course is designed to prepare the student with multiple research-validated instructional strategies, including the use of computer technology, activities to stimulate and sustain student interest, techniques to develop student collaboration and foster achievement to each student’s highest level of learning. Attention will be placed on literacy development and content terminology as it applies to business. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisites: Approval for Teacher Certification Candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 345 Curriculum and Instruction for Technology Education 3-0-3 This course covers the principles of learning as applied to the technology teaching/learning process. Emphasis is placed on the development of curriculum materials and on the development of learning activities for teaching technological concepts, including the NYS standards and student outcomes. Emphasis is given to curriculum planning, methodology, and student learning styles and evaluation procedures. Field experiences are part of course requirements. Prerequisite: Approval for Teacher Certification Candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 346 Methods and Materials of Teaching Technology Education 3-0-3 This course is part of the teacher preparation program in technology education for teachers of technology in the elementary and secondary schools. It integrates methods and materials to be used in teaching NYS curricula in the areas of manufacturing, communications, construction, power, technical drawing, computer, electronics, and graphics. Infusion of standards into the curriculum and instructional approaches

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will be examined. Attention will be placed on literacy development and content terminology as it applies to technology education. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Prerequisite: Approval for Teacher Certification Candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 350 Methods and Materials of Teaching Mathematics 3-0-3 The course includes the study and utilization of a variety of strategies for differentiated instruction and their application in the teaching of elementary and secondary mathematics. Problem-solving strategies include hands on applications, visualization, and heuristics. The role of computer applications and use of mathematical terminology in the teaching of standards –based mathematics is included. Attention will be placed on literacy development and content terminology as it applies to mathematics. Field observation and experience is required. Prerequisites: Approval for Teacher Certification Candidacy; Departmental Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 364 Operating Vocational Student Organizations 3-0-3 The purpose of this course is to develop procedures for establishing student organizations; planning and conducting student leadership activities; and the relationship of student leadership activities to the classroom instructional program. This course is for advisers of specific organizations such as VICA (Vocational Industrial Clubs of America), FBLA (Future Business Leaders of America), DECA (Distributive Education Clubs of America), and HOSA (Health Occupation Students of America). EDUC 365 Strategies Utilizing Instructional Technology in Teaching Technology Education 3-0-3 This course encompasses the study of traditional curricula as well as interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches. Technology-based instruction is applied, with specific focus on the New York State Standards as they are to be integrated into the technology curriculum. Field observation and experience is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 201, 203, 345, 346, EDUC 350. EDUC 366 Organization of Cooperative Education Programs 3-0-3 The first of two three-credit courses required to qualify for New York State certification as coordinator of work-based learning programs for career awareness, and/or for career development. Course focus is on planning, developing and organizing work-based learning experiences and programs. Students develop the expertise necessary to organize workbased learning programs that include survey planning, establishment of guidelines, data collection, student recruitment and enrollment, securing training and shadowing stations, legal consideration, credit allocation, budget preparation, essential records and reports and related general instruction. Prerequisite: Teacher certification in business, technology education, career and technical subjects. EDUC 367 Operation of Cooperative Education Programs 3-0-3 Development of the competency necessary to operate a cooperative work-study program to include identification of training stations, student placement, training of on-the-job instructors, coordination and supervision of on-the- job instruction, evaluation of students, educational and career guidance, and safety needs of vocational students. Prerequisite: EDUC 366. EDUC 369 Diverse Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Studies 3-0-3 This course focuses on the middle school structure, the concept of middle education and the basis for the active learning environment. Topics will include cooperative learning, middle school classroom management and organization, learning centers, instructional tasks, values-clarification activities and instructional coordination with content fields to meet the educational needs of the early adolescent. Field observation and experience are required and integrated into the course. Required for Middle Childhood Teacher Certification. EDUC 370 Strategies Utilizing Instructional Technology in Science 3-0-3 Instructional strategies are developed that illustrate the incorporation of instructional technology into elementary science curricula in alignment with the NYS Standards and assessment. Software that is appropriate to instructional objectives is examined, and methods of incorporating the use of software into the science classroom are developed. Differentiated Instruction, critical thinking skills, and technology applications are integrated into the science curricula. Attention will be placed on literacy development, and content terminology as it applies to science. Field experiences are part of the course requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 201, EDUC 211, EDUC 212, PSYC 220. EDUC 371 Strategies Utilizing Instructional Technology in Mathematics 3-0-3 Instructional Strategies are developed that utilize manipulatives, calculators, computers, and cooperative learning, as they may be applied to teaching the content of standardsbased elementary mathematics. Students focus on differentiated instruction and the selection and utilization of appropriate hardware and software, examination and development of instructional programs, and the analysis and practice of alternate problem-solving methodologies. Attention will be placed on literacy development and content terminology as it applies to mathematics. Field experiences are part of the course requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 201, EDUC 203, EDUC 211, EDUC 212, PSYCH 220.

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EDUC 372 Strategies Utilizing Instructional Technology in Teaching Elementary Social Studies 3-0-3 Multiple research-validated instructional strategies for the elementary classroom that prepare the prospective teacher with skills in developing technology-enhanced materials and strategies for differentiated instruction of students. The course will include the use of technology to acquire information, communicate, and enhance achievement in social studies. The focus of the course includes the pedagogic examination, analysis, and synthesis of NYS Social Studies Standards within a technology-enhanced curriculum in history, geography, economics, citizenship, and government, valuing diversity in culture, heritage, and socioeconomic level in a state, national, and global context. Attention will be placed on literacy development and content terminology as it applies to social studies. Field experiences are part of the course requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 201, EDUC 203, EDUC 211, EDUC 212, PSYC 220. EDUC 373 Practicum in Middle Childhood Education 3-0-3 A guided orientation of the many programs of intermediate level elementary schools and middle schools. Students will study, observe, and participate in a variety of school programs that encompass varied organizational structures. The course will meet regularly on campus, but will require observation and participation in the school setting. Discussions will include reports of field experiences and the relationship of the on-site participation to the assigned readings. This course cannot be waived on the basis of the student teaching experience. Prerequisite: Teacher certification Candidacy. Department Chairperson’s approval. EDUC 374 Curriculum Articulation Through Multi-Media 3-0-3 Instructional strategies for the elementary classroom that involve experiences in music, art, physical movement and various media. Preparation of the prospective teacher for the utilization of media and materials that integrate into the creative arts will be the primary focus. As the development of software continues to emphasize the interconnections between concepts and skills, experience with such materials is essential in sharpening children's views of the world around them. Field experiences are part of the course requirements. Prerequisites: EDUC 201, EDUC 203, EDUC 211, EDUC 212, PSYC 220 and the approval of department. EDUC 375 Current Issues in Occupational/ Vocational Education 3-0-3 An examination of the major current issues, trends, and approaches in teaching occupational education. This course will consider the current and controversial topics that have impacted occupational educators and assist them in assessing their instructional approaches and course goals. Field observation in required and integrated into the course. EDUC 376 Strategies for Teaching Adults in Occupational Subjects 3-0-3 Teaching strategies particularly suitable to occupational settings, that focus on analysis of classroom conditions, teaching/learning styles, alternative methods of assessment, and application of new strategies in information processing. EDUC 489 Seminar in Student Teaching 3-0-3 The culminating experience in our teacher education program focuses on integrating program goals and analyzing one’s own teaching practices throughout the student teaching experience as the candidate makes the transition into the teaching profession. A problem solving approach is employed. The role of technology applications is included. Required course for teacher certification students in conjunction with EDUC 490. Prerequisite: Approval for Teacher Certification candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 490 Supervised Student Teaching 0-0-6 Supervised student teaching is a full-time experience in a local school district under the direct guidance of a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. Students observe classes, assist teachers with instructional tasks, teach independently, and assume other professional responsibilities. Focus is on the application and further development of specific educational competencies. Teaching experience will be gained at both the lower and upper childhood and adolescent levels during the entire semester of the field assignment. Required capstone course for teacher certification students in conjunction with EDUC 489. Prerequisite: Approval for Teacher Certification Candidacy; Department Chairperson’s Approval. EDUC 499 Career Exploration Seminar 3-0-3 An education seminar designed to enable students to achieve the goals set for personal, academic, and career development. Students will receive instruction in problem solving, goal setting, decision making, and value clarification through research, discussion, and group interaction. Learning activities will be developed in a logical, sequential order designed to help students discover, clarify, and evaluate their own interests, values, talents, and skills, to set goals, and then to relate these goals to specific academic and job-career choices. Prerequisite: Approval of Dean.

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Teacher Education (Non-Credit) Workshops
Workshop on Teaching Health, Physical fitness, Dance, and Movement Education This workshop instructs teacher education candidates in the relationship between physical activity and the positive effects on the body. The workshop includes instructional activities that are used in the school setting to instruct education majors about the relationship between health risks and an inactive lifestyle. The topics of the workshop include physical education sports and fitness exercise, some approaches to dance activities and movement experiences, as well as an interdisciplinary approach to teaching sound and musical experiences appropriate to the developmental age level. Workshop on Teaching Prevention of Child Abduction and Identifying and Reporting of Child Abuse This workshop prepares teacher education candidates, and other professionals dealing with children regarding the current contemporary issues of child abduction and identification and reporting of child abuse. The workshop includes the use of video materials, print-text materials, and cooperative learning activities that require the involvement and participation of individuals in a series of activities as prescribed by the state. Students are required to complete this workshop to earn the endorsement of the NYIT School of Education. Workshop on Teaching Personal Health This workshop consists of content instruction on personal health topics and includes such topics as preventing alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse. This non-credit workshop is integrated into the teacher education program and is conducted by our School of Education faculty. Students are required to complete this workshop to earn the endorsement for teaching by the NYIT School of Education.

Workshop on Teaching Safety, Fire Prevention, and Safe Environment Teacher certification candidates are instructed in safety concerns and precautions in the classroom and how to deal with these issues in the home setting as well. Students learn the legal implications of these contemporary safety issues. This non-credit required workshop is offered each semester. It will be conducted by School of Education faculty. Students are required to complete this workshop to earn the endorsement for teaching by the NYIT School of Education. Workshop on Career Awareness and Career Development This workshop prepares teacher education candidates with a range of activities that are needed to stimulate interest and knowledge of career areas, career skills, and the value of analysis and self-evaluation of competencies in skill areas. Approaches to identifying the motivation to develop skills, talents, and commitment to learn and prepare for challenging and satisfying careers is a key element of this workshop activity. This workshop will be integrated into the weekly schedule of topics offered in the student teaching seminar during the professional semester experience. This workshop will be conducted by School of Education faculty and college student-teaching supervisors.

209

TIJANA R. MIHAJLOVICH MASTER OF SCIENCE, COMPUTER SCIENCE

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences Heskia Heskiaoff, Eng.Sc.D., Dean

Computer Science Electrical and Computer Engineering Information Technology Mechanical Engineering Engineering Management Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology Telecommunications Network Management Telecommunications Technology

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
School of Engineering and Computing Sciences

The School of Engineering and Computing Sciences offers baccalaureate degrees in Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Electronics and Information Security, Information Technology, Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Management, Electrical Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, and Telecommunications Management. Associate degrees in Electrical, Mechanical, and Telecommunications Technologies are also offered. The school also offers Master's degrees in Computer Science, Environmental Technology, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Energy Management.
Computer Requirements

Computers are indispensable in virtually all fields of human endeavor today. Few engineers or technologists can get along without them. The ability to use computers with skill and intelligence is essential for graduates of engineering schools. At NYIT, the use of computers has been integrated into almost all courses in the School of Engineering and Computing Sciences. This process continues to include computer applications in all courses so that students will have the pervasive experience that produces understanding of the tool and the possibilities it presents. To achieve program goals, students must have unrestricted access to computers at all times. The only way this is possible is for all students to purchase their own computers. Therefore, all students are required to obtain a computer compatible with specifications available at the school. A brochure containing specifications and possible suppliers may be available in departmental offices of the School. This information is provided purely as a service to students; NYIT does not recommend any suppliers nor does it imply any warranty or benefit in dealing with them.
Computer Science

Faculty: S. Barone, S. Billis, M. Colef, M. Drossman, H. Heskiaoff, A. Jafari, E. Kafrissen, K. Kaplan, F. Li, R. Mihajlovic, Y. Saito, S.L. Wang, J. Wu, Tao Zhang. Adjunct Faculty: H. Chin, S., Homem de Mello, A. Lee, C. Liou, P. Stirpe, H. Taylor. The college offers courses leading to both Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Computer Science. The electronic digital computer has contributed to revolutionary changes in the methodologies of business and governmental data processing, the control of manufacturing operations, and the scope and nature of research in scientific and technological areas. Present trends leave little doubt that increasing computer capabilities will exert a profound influence on the nature of world culture. At NYIT, courses pursued by computer science majors may be classified as (a) courses in the hardware and software aspects of computer science; (b) humanities courses; (c) groups of courses termed options which provide a solid background in the field in which the student will apply a knowledge of computing. Present options include Internet Engineering and Distributed Information Systems with minor concentrations in Management, Fine Arts or Engineering.

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Entering students should be prepared to begin calculus and have a working knowledge of computer programming. Transfer students from recognized community colleges, technical institutes, or undergraduate colleges will receive the maximum allowable transferrable credit toward programs at NYIT. All students have access to sophisticated computer equipment and up-to-date laboratory facilities. By the end of the second term, each computer major must select, in consultation with an adviser, an area of computer application in which to specialize. A minimum of 12 elective credits, approved by the department, must be selected in this area. Courses are designed to produce a versatile individual capable of graduate study or employment in expanding computer-based industries. Those seeking graduate studies in computer science will find new avenues of knowledge and many job opportunities. The Master of Science degree in computer science is designed to serve a wide range of professional interests and includes a broad-based approach to practical, computer-related applications.

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I Curriculum requirements for the

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with options in Internet Engineering and Distributed Information Systems

Mathematics MATH170 Calculus I MATH180 Calculus II MATH310 Linear Algebra

4 4 3 11 credits

ETCS 105 Career Discovery(1) Computer Science

2 credits

Science Requirements PHYS170 General Physics I PHYS180 General Physics II Life Science/Biology Elective or CHEM110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II Physics Elective or BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II Physics Elective

4 4 3 11 credits

Required courses: CSCI 120 Programming I CSCI 130 Computer Organization CSCI 170 Computer Architecture CSCI 180 Programming II CSCI 230 Discrete Structures CSCI 260 Data Structures CSCI 312 Theory of Computation CSCI 318 Programming Language Concepts CSCI 330 Operating Systems CSCI 335 Design and Analysis of Algorithms CSCI 370 Intro. To Computer Networks CSCI 380 Introduction to Software Engineering CSCI 450 Seminar Project CSCI Electives(2)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

4 4 3 11 credits 4 4 3 11 credits

45 credits Internet Engineering Option: ITEC 305 Internet Programming I ITEC 320 Web-based Mult-Med I CSCI 405 Distributed Database Systems or Distributed Information Systems Option: ITEC 290 Appl Database Systems 3 CSCI 401 Database Interfaces and Programming 3 3 CSCI 405 Distributed Database Systems 9 credits or 9 credits of 300 or 400 level courses from CS and/or ITEC with department approval 9 9 credits Engineering Management IENG 245 Statistical Design I IENG 345 Statistical Design II IENG 400 Technology and Global Issues 3 3 3 9 credits Behavioral Sciences 3 credits

Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy English(3) Composition Speech One Group A course(4) WRIT 316 Writing for the Technical Professions Concentration(5)

3 3 3 9 credits

3 3 3 9 credits

6 3 3 3

15 credits Minor 12 credits 3 credits 3 credits 130-132

Liberal Arts General Electives Total credits required

(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) All electives must be approved by the department. (3) Intensive English as a second language is not acceptable as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. (4) Group A courses are LITR 210, 220, 230 and 240. (5) In consultation, with an advisor, the student can select a minor area of concentration. Areas of specialization may include: Computer Engineering, Mathematics, Management, Fine Arts, Computer Graphics, and Telecommunications. Students with a Minor concentration in one of the Engineering disciplines are required to take Mathematics 260, 320.

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ETCS 102 Computers and Society 3-0-3 A course designed to provide an understanding of what the computer can do and how it does it for the nontechnically oriented student. This course covers the basic concepts of computer operation and programming, applications of computers, and the effects of computers on society. This course replaces College Success Seminar for students in the School of Engineering & Computing Sciences. ETCS 105 Career Discovery 2-0-2 The course experience provides the skills and tools necessary for a technical career while enabling students to develop confidence in their academic endeavors. The creative role in the multi-disciplinary design and development process is emphasized in addition to communication skills, ethical, legal, and professional responsibilities. This course may be waived for students with sophomore or higher status. This course replaces College Success Seminar for students in the School of Engineering & Computing Sciences. ETCS 365 Externship for the Technical Professions 1-0-1 This course provides students with an opportunity to work in a professional environment in areas appropriate to their field of study. To be eligible, students must have junior or senior status, a GPA of 3.0 or better, and the permission of his/her chairperson. The grade is on a Pass/Fail basis and is to be determined by the faculty advisor in consultation with the student’s supervisor. A term paper, with presentation, is required. This course will be in addition to the required courses for the degree and may be repeated. CSCI 105 Introduction to Computational Tools 1-2-2 In this course students will learn how to use the computer as a tool to solve problems in engineering, computer science, and related area. Packages such as MathCAD or MATLAB will be used to illustrate the solution to new and familiar problems in physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. CSCI 110 Introduction to Computer Science 3-0-3 This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the basic hardware and software organization of computer systems. Students get hands-on experience with the DOS and Windows operating systems environments. Computer Programming Skills are taught using the Visual Basic programming language. Prerequisite: MATH 141 or TMAT 155 CSCI 120 Programming I 3-0-3 This course provides basic skills in problem solving and programming. Topics covered include simple data types, expressions and statements, program flow control structures, exception handling and functions. Elements of object oriented programming techniques are also introduced. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Algebra. CSCI 130 Computer Organization 3-0-3 The course covers the basics of combinatorial and sequential digital circuits. Representative digital circuits are multiplexers, demuliplexers, decoders, counters, registers, memory and ALUs. The use of programmable logic devices in digital circuitry is also covered. The course culminates with the design of a simple computer to specifications, both hardware description language and a graphical editor to design and implement digital circuits throughout the course. Equivalent to EENG 130. Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent. CSCI 170 Computer Architecture 3-0-3 A detailed discussion of computer hardware organization and design. Topics included are: processor bus organization, the arithmetic unit, micro-instructions, micro-programming, memory subsystem design, memory organization, I/O interface, asynchronous data transfer, interrupt and direct memory access. Prerequisite: CSCI 130 or EENG 130. CSCI 180 Programming II 3-0-3 Object oriented design concepts and techniques are explored. Topics covered include classes, objects, function overloading and inheritance, to name a few. Students are introduced to object oriented design, code reusability and encapsulation. The techniques learned are applied in solving practical problems using a modern software development environment. Prerequisite: CSCI 120. CSCI 220 Computer Laboratory 1-2-1 This course is intended to strengthen the student’s programming skills in a high level language such as JAVA, through numerous programming assignments. Students who do not receive a grade of “B” or better in CSCI 120 may be required to take this course. Corequisite: CSCI 180. CSCI 225 Introduction to Hardware Description Language 3-0-3 An introduction to the programming techniques used to design electronic circuits. The structure of the language, the method of specifying signals, digital logic and components will be developed using object-oriented programming algorithms and constructs. Circuit design software and languages such as ABEL, VERILOG, and VHDL will be reviewed. Equivalent to EENG 225. Prerequisites: CSCI 130/EENG 130, CSCI 180. CSCI 230 Discrete Structures 3-0-3 A review of sets, functions, relations, mathematical induction and algorithmic analysis as applied to Computer Science. Graph theory, including minimal and maximal algorithms and the critical path method, is studied as well as automata theory and formal languages. Prerequisite: MATH 170 or MATH 161, CSCI 180.

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CSCI 260 Data Structures 3-0-3 The classic data structures, such as stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, etc. are studied. Sorting and searching are stressed. Computational analysis is also studied. Prerequisites: CSCI 180, MATH 170 or MATH 161. CSCI 280 COBOL 3-0-3 For computer majors. A detailed study of the COBOL languages with application to business problems: identification, environment, data and procedure divisions, syntax structure. File organization is discussed in connection with the data processing system. Prerequisite: CSCI 180. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) CSCI 305 Introduction to Automata Theory 3-0-3 Synchronous sequential circuits, interactive networks, transformation of sequential machines. Asynchronous sequential circuits, the structure of sequential machines, state identification, finite state recognizers. Prerequisite: CSCI 130 or equivalent. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) CSCI 310 C and UNIX 3-0-3 A study of the ANSI Standard C programming language and the UNIX programming environment. Topics covered include the syntax of C, basic UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, filters and pipes, shell programming and using UNIX system calls in C. C++, the object-oriented extension of C, will also be introduced. Prerequisite: CSCI 260. CSCI 312 Theory of Computation 3-0-3 The basic concepts of the theory of computation are studied including set theory, finite automata, context free and context sensitive languages, Turing machines, Church’s thesis and uncomputability. The classes of computation complexity and their practical limitations are studied. Prerequisite: CSCI 230 CSCI 318 Programming Language Concepts 3-0-3 Formal definition of programming languages including specification of syntax and semantics. A comparative analysis of various high-level programming languages with emphasis on the appropriateness of languages for certain applications. Prerequisite: CSCI 260 CSCI 320 Computer Graphics I 3-0-3 Introduction to the principles of interactive computer graphics, including input techniques and devices, display devices, display files, interactive graphic techniques, two- and three-dimensional computer graphics, and transformations. Graphic oriented languages are also discussed. Prerequisites: MATH 310, and CSCI 260 or equivalent. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) CSCI 325 Compiler Design 3-0-3 The design and implementation of a compiler is studied, including compiler organization, lexical analysis, searching methods and symbol tables, formal languages and grammar, parser construction, code syntax and code generation. Prerequisites: CSCI 260, CSCI 170. CSCI 330 Operating Systems 3-0-3 The design and implementation of an operating system is studied, including process states and synchronization, memory management strategies, processor scheduling, multiprocessing, parallel processing, hardware organization, disk scheduling and file management. Prerequisites: CSCI 260, CSCI 170. CSCI 335 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3-0-3 The fundamentals of designing computer algorithms are introduced. An overview of advanced data structures such as balanced trees, heaps and hash tables is presented. A discussion of algorithm design techniques will include, but not be limited to, sorting and ordering, divide and conquer, shortest path and dynamic programming. The complexity of each class of algorithms is analyzed and the efficient use of algorithms to various applications is discussed. Prerequisite: CSCI 260 CSCI 340 Numerical Methods 3-0-3 A thorough treatment of problems requiring interpolation, numerical integration, relaxation and iterative processes. Truncation and roundoff errors. Error estimate and curve fitting. Runge-Kutta methods. The solutions will be implemented in a scientific language such as FORTRAN which will be studied in some detail. Prerequisites: CSCI 120, MATH 320. Corequisite: MATH 310. CSCI 355 Artificial Intelligence I 3-0-3 Introduction to artificial intelligence programming languages LISP, PROLOG, and object- oriented programming. Basic problem representation and heuristic searching techniques will be discussed. Concept of knowledge engineering and various application of knowledge representation schemes will be studied. Prerequisite: CSCI 260. CSCI 370 Introduction to Computer Networks 3-0-3 An introduction to the fundamentals and the applications of data communications. Network architectures, topology and the ISO model will be discussed. Novell’s LAN or equipment will be used for practical hands-on experience. Prerequisite: CSCI 330.

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CSCI 375 Systems Design 3-0-3 Structured systems design including flow charts, structure charts, module coupling and cohesion, and composite design. The use of simulation in systems design is discussed and various simulation techniques are covered. Prerequisite: CS 335. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) CSCI 380 Introduction to Software Engineering 3-0-3 Formal approach to techniques of software design, development, testing and management. Design techniques considered include formal models of structured programming, stepwise refinement, segmentation, top-down design, data abstraction, information hiding and object oriented development. A modern programming language will be used. Prerequisites: CSCI 260. CSCI 385 Network and Internet Security 3-0-3 In this course we provide students with a firm understanding of the major aspects of network and Internet security. A hands-on project in a laboratory setting to emphasize some aspect of network or Internet security will be studied. Prerequisites: CSCI 370. CSCI 401 Database Interfaces and Programming 3-0-3 An advanced course in static and dynamic programming, embedded SQL using C. Open Database Connectivity (ODBC), interface to access data from various database management systems with Structured Query Language (SQL). Prerequisite: CSCI 300 (offered regularly, but not every semester). CSCI 405 Distributed Database Systems 3-0-3 Concepts underlying distributed systems: synchronization, communication, fault tolerance. Concepts and architecture of distributed database systems. Distributed concurrency control and recovery. Replicated databases. Distributed Query Processing. Examples of commercial relational distributed DBMS. Prerequisite: CSCI 300. CSCI 410 Artificial Intelligence II 3-0-3 Principal artificial intelligence application areas such as Natural Language Processing (NLP), Computer Vision, speech recognition and understanding, problem solving and planning and machine learning systems will be studied. Current stateof-the-art Expert Systems and Expert System Tools will be introduced. Prerequisite: CSCI 355. CSCI 420 Computer Graphics II 3-0-3 Advanced work in computer graphics, including surface description methods, color perception and images synthesis. Dynamic Vectors, Raster displays. Applications such as CAD/ CAM will be discussed. Prerequisite: CSCI 320. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) CSCI 450 Seminar Project 3-0-3

The student will undertake a project under the guidance of an instructor. Each student will present oral reports before the group in a seminar situation. The project will be concerned with some aspect of computer science and results will be presented in a final written report. Prerequisite: Approval of chairman.
CSCI 460 Special Topics I 3-0-3 Critical study of theory and research related to advanced topics in computer science such as computer graphics, artificial intelligence, performance evaluation, advanced systems programming or topics in computability, automata theory, etc. The specific topics of the seminar will be determined by the interest of both the students and the instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. CSCI 470 Special Topics II 3-0-3 Advanced topics in computer science which are of interest to both students and faculty will be covered. Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.)

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Electrical and Computer Engineering

Faculty: S. Barone, S. Billis, S. Blank, J. Cheung, M. Colef, M. Drossman, R. Dua, A. Jafari, E. Kafrissen, W. Mesa, Y. Saito, S. Wadoo, M. Wernicki, Tao Zhang. Adjunct Faculty: A. Gelman, D. Hoitsma, K. Kazi, M. Khoshsima, W. Vojir Currently, NYIT offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Manhattan and Old Westbury campuses. The primary educational objectives of the Electrical and Computer Engineering program at NYIT are to produce well-rounded graduates who have a broad range of skills, aptitudes, and interests, and are prepared for successful careers in industry, government, or their pursuit of graduate studies. These objectives are consistent with the overall mission of the college: to provide its students with a career-oriented education and access to opportunity, to conduct applications-oriented research, and to render service in the public interest. The objectives of the electrical and computer engineering program are satisfied by the required and elective courses in liberal arts, humanities, science, mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering with an increasing emphasis on design. The sequences established are meant to provide both depth and breadth in the major areas of study while also providing a degree of flexibility, through a choice of elective courses, that allows the students to specialize in areas of particular interest. The college’s liberal arts and humanities core curriculum is designed to provide the student with skills related to career and graduate school success. It is concerned with preparing the student to be a responsible citizen and engineer. To achieve this goal, it offers a broad perspective of advanced courses in social science, philosophy, and literature. Written and oral presentation skills are intended to carry over into their major areas of study. Today’s engineering student must understand both digital and electronic systems. The electrical and computer engineering program addresses this need through its sequence of course requirements. This includes the skills necessary to design and analyze the hardware and software aspects of the computer systems. The use of modern engineering tools and computers are integrated into nearly all engineering courses. This includes lab work where software is used for the analysis and presentation of data. As students progress through the curriculum, increasing emphasis is focused on analog and digital electronics as well as software design. Each student takes two Capstone design classes in both digital and electronic system design. The design projects are intended to utilize the full extent of the technical skills and knowledge the students gain throughout the curriculum as well as an understanding of the relevant economic, societal, and ethical issues appropriate for effective engineering practice. Teamwork, when appropriate, is emphasized and effective presentation of ideas, whether written or oral, is stressed.

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Within this general direction and the mission of the college as well, the faculty have determined Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) that intend to create versatile engineers who will:
I I I I

be successful in their engineering or chosen career path. engage in life-long learning and professional development through graduate studies and active participation in professional organizations. be able to interact effectively with others in a collaborative team-oriented manner in the management and execution of a project function as a responsible member of society with a willingness to act as a mentor to fellow employees and in the community with an understanding of the social, ethical and economic impact of his/her work at the local and global level.

To support these objectives, the curriculum has been developed to provide program outcomes which describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. Upon graduation students are expected to have:
I I I

an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility an ability to communicate effectively the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning a knowledge of contemporary issues an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

I I I I I I I I

The program in Electrical and Computer Engineering is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
ETCS 105 Career Discovery(1) Electrical Engineering EENG 130 Intro. to Computer Hardware EENG 212 Electrical Circuits I and Eng. Tools EENG 270 Introduction to Electronic Circuits EENG 275 Electronics Laboratory I EENG 281 Electrical Circuits II EENG 310 Electronic Circuit Applications EENG 315 Electronics Laboratory II EENG 320 Control Systems EENG 330 Electromagnetic Theory I EENG 341 Signal and Systems EENG 360 Electronics Laboratory III EENG 370 Microprocessors EENG 382 Random Signals and Statistics EENG 401 Communication Theory EENG 403 Electronics Laboratory IV EENG 491 Senior Design Project Design Elective EE/CS Electives

Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering 2 credits 3 4 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 1 2 2 6

Life Sciences CHEM 107 Engineering Chemistry Mathematics MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II MATH 260 Calculus III MATH 310 Linear Algebra MATH 320 Differential Equations

4 credits 4 4 4 3 3 18 credits

Mechanical Engineering MENG 211 Engineering Mechanics I Physics PHYS 170 General Physics I PHYS 180 General Physics II PHYS 225 Intro to Modern Physics

3 credits 4 4 3 11 credits

Social Sciences Economics PHIL 230 Tech, Soc, & Val OR IENG 400 Tech & Global Issues Philosophy

3 3 3 3 9 credits

48 credits Computer CSCI 120 CSCI 170 CSCI 180 CSCI 230 CSCI 260 CSCI 330 Science Programming I Computer Architecture Programming II Discrete Structures Data Structures Operating Systems General Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 credits Behavioral Sciences 3 credits 6 3 3 3 English (3) Composition Speech One Group A course (4) WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions

3 credits

Total credits required—135-137
(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Students should choose one from each of the following 2 groups of courses. Group 1: EENG 410, 415, 420, 430, 450, 465, 470, 488, 492. Group 2: EENG 435, 440, 483, 488. (3) Intensive English as a second language is not acceptable as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. (4) Group A courses are LITR 210, 220, 230 and 240.

15 credits Liberal Arts 3 credits

Visit us at www.nyit.edu

220

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences
EENG 130 Introduction to Computer Hardware 3-0-3 The course covers the basics of combinatorial and sequential digital circuits. Representative digital circuits are multiplexers, demuliplexers, decoders, counters, registers, memory and ALUs. The use of programmable logic devices in digital circuitry is also covered. The course culminates with the design of a simple computer to specifications, both hardware description language and a graphical editor to design and implement digital circuits throughout the course. Equivalent to EENG 130. Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent. EENG 201 Introduction to Electrical Engineering 3-3-4 A lecture and laboratory course in the elements of electrical engineering. Brief review of topics covered in elementary physics such as Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws. Elementary dc and ac circuit analysis and basic electronic devices. Prerequisites: MATH 170, PHYS 170. (Not for electrical engineering majors.) EENG 211 Electrical Circuits I 3-0-3 Properties of linear networks, mesh and nodal analysis, network theorems, solution of first order and second order circuits in the time domain are studied. Prerequisites: MATH 170, PHYS 170. Corequisites: MATH 180, PHYS 180. EENG 212 Electrical Circuits I and Engineering Tools 3-1-4 Properties of linear networks, mesh and nodal analysis, network theorems, solution of first order and second order circuits in the time domain are studied. A software package, such as PSPICE, MATLAB and MATHCAD will be introduced. Prerequisites: MATH 170, PHYS 170. Corequisites: MATH 180, PHYS 180. EENG 221 Computational and Engineering Tools 1-0-1 An introduction to the problem solving process using software packages, such as MATLAB. Corequisite: MATH 170. EENG 225 Introduction to Hardware Description Language 3-0-3 An introduction to the programming techniques used to design electronic circuits. The structure of the language, the method of specifying signals, digital logic and components will be developed using object-oriented programming algorithms and constucts. Circuit design software and languages such as ABEL, VERILOG, and VHDL will be reviewed. Equivalent to CSCI 225. Prerequisites: CSCI 130/EENG 130, CSCI 180. EENG 260 Electrical Engineering II 3-0-3 Direct current and alternating current motors and generators. LaPlace transform and basics of control theory and digital logic. Sampling, quantization and encodings of analog signals. Not for electrical engineering majors. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 201. EENG 270 Introduction to Electronics Circuits 3-0-3 Characterization of semiconductor diodes, Zener diodes, transistors and field effect transistors (FET). Effect of temperature variation. Amplifier bias analysis and large signal analysis. Power amplifiers. Small signal models and small signal amplifier analysis. Prerequisite: EENG 212. EENG 271 Introduction to Engineering Design 3-0-3 This course provides theoretical as well as practical insights into fundamental concepts of design in modern engineering. Emphasis on the creative role of the engineer, model utilization, problem formulation and analysis, optimization techniques and the search for alternative solutions leading to a functional and economical design are studied. Tools for effective engineering communication as well as the ethical, legal and professional responsibilities of the engineer in the design process are presented. Prerequisite: EENG 212. EENG 275 Electronics Laboratory I 0-3-1 Laboratory work to complement lecture courses. Prerequisites: Engl WRIT 101 or WRIT 111, EENG 212. EENG 281 Electrical Circuits II 3-0-3 Topics covered in this course include: phasors, AC steadystate analysis, transfer functions, frequency response, Laplace transform two-port networks. Prerequisites: EENG 211, CSCI 180. Corequisite: MATH 320. EENG 301 Energy Conversion 3-0-3 This course covers methods for converting energy between electrical and other forms. Electromechanical, electrochemical, photoelectric, thermoelectric, and other methods of conversion are studied. The transduction of low energy signals as well as the conversion of large quantities of energy is discussed. The transmission of electrical power is also covered in this course. Prerequisites: EENG 270, PHYS 220. EENG 310 Electronic Circuit Applications 3-0-3 Difference amplifiers, Darlington configuration, low and high frequency analysis, op-amps, gates: TTL, ECL, CMOS, comparators and Schmitt trigger, flip-flops with level and edge triggering, monostable and astable timing circuits. Prerequisites: EENG 270. Corequisites: EENG 281. EENG 315 Electronics Laboratory II 0-3-1 Laboratory work to complement lecture courses. Prerequisite: EENG 270, 275.

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EENG 320 Control Systems 3-0-3 Control systems analysis. Differential equations of motion of mass-spring and RLC systems. Differential equations of motion of servomechanism. Response to step, ramp and sinusoidal forcing command. Servomechanism transfer functions, signal-flow diagrams. State- space description; transition matrix, sensitivity analysis and error analysis. Stability analysis using the Bode diagram and the root locus methods. Prerequisites: EENG 281 or EENG 260. EENG 330 Electromagnetic Theory I 3-0-3 Review of vector calculus, static electric and magnetic fields. Maxwell equations in integral form, Maxwell's equations in differential forms. Dielectrics, conductors, magnetic materials. Energy storage, Poynting's vector, dispersion and group velocity. Prerequisites: MATH 320, PHYS 180. EENG 341 Signals and Systems 3-0-3 Topics covered in this course are: discrete networks, difference equations, discrete continuous convolution, Z transforms and Fourier series and transforms. Prerequisite: EENG 281. EENG 360 Electronics Laboratory III 0-3-1 Laboratory work to complement lecture Prerequisites: EENG 310, 315, WRIT 316. EENG 403 Electronics Laboratory IV 0-3-1 Laboratory work to complement lecture courses. Prerequisite: EENG 360, 370. Corequisite: EENG 401. EENG 410 Control Systems Design 3-0-3 Design of linear feedback systems using the Bode diagram and root locus method. System compensation using cascade and minor-loop feedback techniques. Design of non-linear feedback systems using the describing function, phase-plane method, Liapunov’s method, and Popov’s method. Introduction to optimal control theory using dynamic programming and the maximum principle. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 320. EENG 415 Digital Control Systems 3-0-3 Linear discrete dynamic system analysis using the z-transform. Properties of the z-transform. Discrete equivalents to continuous transfer functions: the digital filter. Analysis of sampling, data extrapolations, and block diagram reduction techniques. Stability analysis of digital control systems using frequency response methods (the w-transform), the root locus method and Ragazzini’s method. Design of digital control system using state-space methods. The development of theoretical topics is coupled with application of the theory to practical control system problems. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 320. Corequisite: EENG 341. EENG 420 Digital Filter Design 3-0-3 This course provides step-by-step procedures for the design and implementation of digital filters. Discrete Fourier transforms and Z-transforms, recursive digital filter design satisfying prescribed specifications, non-recursive digital filters, quantization and practical implementations. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 341. EENG 430 Operational Amplifier Design 3-0-3 The theory and design of a medium scale integrated (MSI) circuits are discussed. Criteria for a single stage BJT and FET amplifier design, multi-stage cascode hybrid design, active current source and active current load design, output stage design, and DC level shift design are covered. Multi-stage operational amplifier design with differential and Darlington stages, frequency response of an operational amplifier, and the negative feedback design are also presented. Prerequisite: EENG 310 EENG 435 Robotics and Flexible Automation 3-0-3 Robot classification, robot subsystems; electrical, computer, mechanical drives and links. Programming methods, work cells, and safety procedures. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 320. Corequisite: EENG 370.

courses.

EENG 370 Microprocessors 3-0-3 Microprocessor architecture, memory, I/O ports, interrupts, DMA and A/D-D/A converters are discussed along with interfacing and programming techniques. Prerequisites: EENG 310, EENG 130 or EENG 260. EENG-382 Random Signals and Statistics 3-0-3 This course covers basic probability concepts, discrete and continuous random variables, distribution and density functions, and stochastic processes. Principles of statistical inference with applications in basic engineering design are discussed. Prerequisite: EENG 341 EENG 390 Electromagnetic Theory II 3-0-3 Topics include: wave propagation in unbounded media; Transmission lines, closed and open wavequides, discontinuities, Smith chart, optical waveguides and resonators; antennas and antenna arrays. Prerequisite: EENG 330. EENG 401 Communication Theory 3-0-3 Review of Fourier transform and series, correlation and spectral densities of deterministic signals, baseband and bandpass linear systems, AM and FM modulation/demodulation schemes, elements of PCM, introduction to information theory and coding, and introduction to communication networks. Prerequisite: EENG 341, Corequisite: EENG 382.

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EENG 440 Microcomputer-Based Design 3-0-3 Development of the ability to define and design “smart” microcomputer-based instruments. Digital circuitry which augments the capabilities of a microcomputer is discussed. Designing for maintainability is emphasized. Prerequisite: EENG 370. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) EENG 450 Optical Engineering 3-0-3 Introduction to optics and optical systems as applied to modern engineering problems. Fiber optics design consideration. Fiber materials and characterization. Lasers and LED’s. Avalanche and PIN detectors, noise analysis. Receiver-transmitter design and performance. Transmission system budget analysis. State-of- the-art design for space satellite communication. Prerequisites: EENG 310, EENG 382, EENG 390. EENG 455 Quantum Electronics 3-0-3 Optical fibers, rays and beams, optical resonators. Interaction of radiation and molecular systems, laser amplification and oscillation. Harmonic generation, modulation noise, detection. Laser applications. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 390. EENG 460 Fiber Optics Concepts I 3-0-3 Introductory topics in fiber optics communication. Evolution of fiber types. Guiding, dispersive and nonlinear properties of fibers; numerical aperture, attenuation, modal properties for multi- and single-mode fibers and bandwidth characteristics. Fiber design considerations. Optical sources—laser and LED's, optical detectors—PIN and avalanche diodes. Transmitter system configuration, analysis and design. Receiver analysis and design, receiver performance. A total optical communication link design. Concepts and designs are reinforced through laboratory experiments. Prerequisites: EENG 390 or equivalent; Corequisite: EENG 450. EENG 465 Microwave Engineering 3-0-3 Transmission lines, closed microwave wave- guides, passive components, s parameters. Microwave tubes and solid state devices. Microstrip and microwave integrated circuits. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 390. EENG 470 Antennas and Propagation 3-0-3 Radiation resistance, power density, radiated power. Input impedance of antennas and antenna current. Dipole antennas and vertical wires. Quarter-wavelength and half-wavelength antennas. Arrays of radiators. Parabolic reflectors and horns. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 390. EENG 480 Communication Network Design 3-0-3 Introduction to communication networks, layered network architecture models (OSI, SNA), Datalink, network and transport layers. Routing and flow control. LANs and ISDN. Prerequisite: EENG 382. EENG 482 Advanced Communication Systems 3-0-3 Introduction to stochastic processes, narrowband noise, AM, coherent DSB and SSB, FM superheterodyne receiver, and their performance in noise. Prerequisite: EENG 382 and EENG 401. EENG 483 Introduction to VLSI Design 3-0-3 Circuit design using VLSIs will be covered using basic CMOS and NMOS circuit structures, design rules, and speed-time tradeoffs. Introduction to computer-aided design tools and design projects using top-down design methods and bottomup circuit construction design. The testability of design is emphasized. Prerequisite: EENG 310. EENG 484 Digital Communications 3-0-3 Models of digital communication systems, concepts of mutual information and channel capacity, PCM, simple digital modulation techniques (ASK, FSK, PSK, DPSK), coherent detection of binary signals in noise and the matched filter. Prerequisite: EENG 382 and EENG 401. EENG 486 Information Theory and Coding 3-0-3 Source and channel models, mutual information and entropy, channel capacity, fixed and variable codes for discrete sources, discrete memoryless channels, parity check codes (generating matrix and parity check matrix), cyclic codes and convolutional codes. Prerequisite: EENG 401. EENG 488 Telecommunication System Design 3-0-3 Various telecommunication network design issues will be addressed in this course; examples of topics will include the design of network architectures, protocols, and routing algorithms. Prerequisites: EENG 401 and EENG 480. EENG 489 Design Project 1-3-2 The course provides students with a design experience, under the guidance of a faculty advisor that draws significantly on knowledge and skills acquired in previous coursework, in areas such as digital control, microcomputers, VLSI, etc. While the projects may be self contained they will incorporate engineering standards, and realistic constraints. Prerequisite: One advanced EENG/CSCI elective and approval of the Chair

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EENG 490 Fiber Optics Concepts II 3-0-3 Advanced topics in fiber engineering. Analysis and design of optical communication systems; coherent communication design. Digital communication links, including LAN's, MAN's, WAN's, and FDDI networks-analysis and design. Multi-mode and single-mode interferometric sensors analysis and design. ERBIUM doped amplifiers, optical time domain reflectometer design and implementation. Concepts and designs are reinforced through laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: EENG 460. EENG 491 Senior Design Project 1-3-2 This is a course open to seniors which provides the major design experience as required by ABET. Students will work in teams to design a system or component of a system. This will be a comprehensive design that draws primarily on skills and knowledge acquired in previous coursework. The teams will work on an independent basis with the primary function of the instructor being that of a mentor to the students. The design will incorporate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints such as its impact on society, health and environmental considerations, literature and patent search, and project management. Weekly progress reports as well as a final oral and written presentation will be required. EENG 320, EENG 330, EENG 370, EENG 401 and approval of the Chair EENG 492 Senior Project 3-0-3 Advanced work in electrical engineering or applied science carried out under the supervision of a faculty adviser. A comprehensive, written final report is required. Prerequisite: Approval of the chairperson.

EENG 494 Special Topics I 3-0-3 The course covers topics of current interest in electrical engineering with emphasis on design. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: Approval of the chairperson. EENG 496 Special Topics II 3-0-3 The course covers topics of current interest in electrical engineering with emphasis on design. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: EENG 494. EENG 497 Wireless Communications I 3-0-3 The definition of Wireless Communication Systems (WCS) and their inherent technical difficulties are discussed. The information services delivered by WCS, their performance metrics, and their associated network control operations are considered. Various architectures such as FDMA, TDMA, and CDMA, the call management and network management procedures for these systems are discussed. The role IS-41 plays in the delivery of WCS services to subscribers, and concepts such as frames, time slots, physical and logical channels, power control, signaling protocols, and authentication are reviewed. Prerequisite: EENG 401, Corequisite: EENG 482 EENG 498 Wireless Communications II 3-0-3 Modulation and demodulation techniques used in FDMA, TDMA and CDMA systems are discussed. Topics in spread spectrum signals such as direct sequence and frequency hopping, error rate performance, processing gain and jamming margin, low detectability to unauthorized receivers, and interference estimation and suppression are presented. Spectrum efficiency, channel coding, interleaving, adaptive equalization, linear prediction coding, ISDN, and SS7 are studied. Propagation impairments and methods to overcome these difficulties are considered. Prerequisite: EENG 497

224

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences
Information Technology with concentrations in Computer Security

Faculty: S. Billis, M. Colef, A. Jafari, E. Kafrissen, F. Lee, Y.Saito, S.L. Wang, J. Wu Adjunct Faculty: H. Chin, A. Lee Today, computers are applied to every industry and every level of human interaction. IT professionals, often working with people in every walk of life, design systems, create computer- based solutions, introduce computer human interfaces, configure and manage networks, and serve as technical consultants in technical as well as non-technical fields. The primary educational objective of the Information Technology program at NYIT is to produce wellrounded graduates that have a wide range of skills, aptitudes, and interests, and who are prepared for successful careers in industry and government and/or graduate studies. This is accomplished through courses in Information Technology, Computer Science, liberal arts, humanities, and science. The sequences established are meant to provide both depth and breadth in the major areas of study, while also providing a degree of flexibility through a choice of elective courses that allow the students to specialize in areas of particular interest. The students can select a minor concentration in their area of interest such as communication arts, business, architecture, and others. The minor concentration provides the students with an opportunity to focus in an area of application and interest. In addition to our extensive computer facilities, the students have access to state-of-the-art laboratories in computer and network security, electronics, telecommunications and others. Graduates find employment in a wide variety of technical careers such as: Software Engineer, Network Administrator, Systems Analyst, Computer Programmers, Sales Engineers, Technical Consultants, and others.

I Curriculum requirements for the
ETCS 105 Career Discovery Computer CSCI 120 CSCI 130 CSCI 170 CSCI 180 CSCI 230 CSCI 260 CSCI 330 CSCI 370

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology with concentrations in Computer Security 2 Credits

Science 24 Credits Programming I 3 Computer Organization 3 Computer Architecture 3 3 Programming II Disc Structure 3 Data Structures 3 Operating Systems 3 Introduction to Computer Networks 3

Information and Network Security Option Choose 3 courses: ITEC 365 Secure Programming 3 ITEC 385 Intro to Comp & Network Sec 3 ITEC 440 Network Security and Perimeter Protection 3 ITEC 445 Operating System Security 3 ITEC 450 Seminar Project 3 ITEC 460 Topics in Information Technology 3 3 ITEC Elective or General Option CSCI/ITEC Electives 9 Credits Engineering Management IENG 251 Project Engineering IENG 400 Technology & Global Issues 9 Credits 3 3

13 Credits Information Technology ITEC 251 Applied Discrete Structures I 3 ITEC 290 Applied Database Systems 3 3 ITEC 305 Internet Programming I ITEC 320 Web-based Multimedia Development 1 3 ITEC 410 Internetworking Lab 1 Professional Concentration 9 Credits

3 Credits Management MGMT421 Cyber Law, Policy and Ethics 3 Mathematics MATH161 Basic Applied Calculus Math Elective Physics 6 Credits 3 3 3 Credits

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Life Science
(2)

3 Credits

English 15 Credits 6 Composition 3 Speech One Group A course(3) 3 WRIT 316 Writing for the Tech. Professions 3 Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Behavioral Science Minor Concentration Science and Technology Electives Liberal Arts Elective Total credits required 9 Credits 3 3 3 3 Credits 15 Credits 6 Credits 6 Credits 121-123

(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Intensive English as a second language is not acceptable as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. (3) LITR 210, 220, 230 and 240 may be selected.

226

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences
ITEC 251 Applied Discrete Structures I 3-0-3 A review of sets, functions, relations and mathematical induction as applied to information technology will be given. Graph theory, recursion, and sorting algorithmic analysis will be studied. Prerequisite: CSCI 120, MATH 161. ITEC 290 Database Systems 3-0-3 This course introduces students to the database design, implementation and administration. The students will also learn how to develop database applications using SQL. Additionally other topics such as XML and data mining will be discussed. Prerequisite CSCI 260. ITEC 305 Internet Programming I 3-0-3 This course provides students with an understanding of various Internet programming languages including HTML, Javascript, and Java server side languages, including Java Server Pages and Java Servlets. Furthermore, fundamental web site design issues will be discussed including page navigation, user interface, and web page layout. Prerequisite CSCI 260. ITEC 320 Web-based Multimedia Development I Introduction to web-based multimedia systems, digital video compression techniques, operating system support for streaming audio and video, as well as network protocols for multimedia. Emphasis will be placed on the efficient use of resources and proper design choices to achieve the required quality of service for web-based multimedia intensive content. Corequisite: ITEC 305 Prerequisite: CSCI 260. ITEC 365 Secure Programming 3-0-3 Secure programming involves the use of new methodologies in software engineering. This course provides an introduction to secure software design, development, testing and deployment. Practical approaches to secure software development are introduced. Topics related to the development of enterprise and web-based software are investigated. Secure programming for operating systems, databases, web servers, web services and their frameworks are addressed. Prerequisite: ITEC 305 or equivalent. ITEC 380 Web-based Multimedia Development II 3-0-3 In this course, the students will learn how to write simple navigational scripts used in interactive object-oriented solutions to problems from domains such as simulations, gaming, instruction and artificial life. Students will develop data structures and classes in order to navigate through screens. They will learn to implement interfaces and control media. Prerequisite: ITEC 320 ITEC 385 Introduction to Computer & Network Security 3-0-3 In this course we introduce various to aspects of computer and network security. Security concepts including but not limited to public and private cryptography, authentication, digital signatures, email system security, IP security, web security technologies, firewalls and viruses are introduced. The fundamentals of computer and networks security concepts are provided in the context of modern computer systems and services. Prerequisite: CSCI 370. ITEC 410 Internetworking Lab 0-3-1 This lab provides students with practical experience in the design, construction and maintenance of computer communication networks. Students utilize the laboratory to gain hands-on experience by applying concepts in Information Technology. Prerequisite: CSCI 370. ITEC 420 Internet Programming II 3-0-3 This course provides students with an understanding of advanced techniques in World Wide Web programming. Students are introduced to the C# programming language for use in programming sophisticated web sites and services. Topics covered include XML, Web Services, database interactions, and web site design patterns. Students will implement a significant project using the Microsoft .Net framework. Prerequisite: CSCI 305 ITEC 440 Network Security and Perimeter Protection 3-0-3 This course will cover infrastructure security issues. Network operating systems and network architectures will be discussed together with the respective security related issues. The students will learn about the threats to computer networks through exploitation of weaknesses in the design of network infrastructure and security flaws in the network infrastructure protocols. Issues related to the security of content and applications such as email, DNS, web servers will be discussed. Security techniques including intrusion detection, forensics, cryptography, authentication and access control are analyzed. Developments in IPSEC, transport protocols, secure mail, directory services, and multimedia services are discussed. Equivalent to INCS 615. Prerequisites: CSCI 370, Corequisite: CSCI 385 or equivalent. ITEC 445 Operating System Security 3-0-3 In this course students are introduced to advanced concepts in operating systems with emphasis on security. Students will study contemporary operating systems including UNIX and Windows. Topics include the application of policies for security administration, directory services, file system security, audit and logging, cryptographic enabled applications, cryptographic programming interfaces, and operating system integrity verification techniques. Equivalent to CSCI 620. Prerequisite: CSCI 370, ITEC 385 or equivalents. ITEC 450 Seminar Project 3-0-3 The student will undertake a project under the guidance of an instructor. Each student will present oral reports before the group in a seminar situation. The project will be concerned with some aspects of computer science and results will be presented in a final written report. Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. ITEC 460 Topics in Information Technology 3-0-3 Critical study of recent developments in information, network and computer security. Prerequisite: ITEC 385.

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Mechanical Engineering

Faculty: H. Fox, J.B. Lee, J. Ma, S. Lu, R. Tabi. Adjunct Faculty: S. Berri, R. Phillips, R. Gilkes, R. H. Rahemi, Saporita. The college offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering at the Old Westbury Campus in both day and evening sessions. The day and evening offerings are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. Students have the option of selecting a concentration of courses in aerospace engineering in the Mechanical Engineering option. Mechanical engineers specialize in the design and development of mechanical systems, structures, and energy conversion devices. The engineer can work in a variety of fields including aerospace, energy conversion, product design and development, manufacturing, construction, and research. With changing priorities in the energy field and the introduction of CAD/CAM processes, the mechanical engineer is at the cutting edge of new technologies that can enhance career choices and rewards. The student will take courses in mechanical engineering, science and design with an increasing emphasis on the computer as a tool to assist in homework and laboratory assignments. Laboratory activity will provide hands-on experience with instrumentation used in the measurement of physical phenomena. Courses are designed to produce a versatile engineer capable of subsequent growth within industry or prepared to pursue graduate education. The primary objectives of the Mechanical Engineering curriculum are to produce a versatile engineering graduate capable of growth within industry or prepared to pursue advanced education. The objectives which follow below are reflective of the overall mission of the college: career-oriented education to prepare students for successful careers in an information-age society; and applications-oriented research which not only expands the knowledge base of our society but also contributes to the economic development of the region, state and nation. The important mission element to emphasize is the applied orientation of the college in general, and the engineering programs in particular. Our stress is on the design/computer/applications components in the spectrum of mechanical engineering programs. Our objectives are fulfilled by courses in the sciences, in the humanities and in mechanical engineering with increasing emphasis on design. The sequences established for the students provide them with a broad education but also the flexibility to allow some specialization in an area of particular interest to them. Providing the backbone of the curriculum, the sciences, mathematics and basic levels, mechanical engineering courses develop the fundamental knowledge needed by the student for the array of advanced courses. The college’s liberal arts and humanities core curriculum is designed to provide the student with skills related to job and graduate school success. It is concerned with the student as future voter and community leader; to that end it provides a broad perspective of history, philosophy and literature. One of the major features of these courses is their emphasis on learning through written, oral and electronic presentations. These writing skills carry over effectively into the advanced mechanical engineering courses. In the mechanical engineering major students take courses in both the thermal/fluids and solid mechanics tracks. In both stems of the curriculum, the sequence of courses 228

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences
have increasing emphasis on computer usage and on design. To this end students are required to take twelve (12) credits of specifically designated design courses. These design courses include both a capstone course and electives, the latter chosen depending on the student’s interest. The design projects encompass engineering components using the skills developed throughout the curriculum, economic issues appropriate to the effective practice of engineering, language and oral communication skills. Based on this overall direction, and consistent with the mission of the college, the Department of Mechanical Engineering has set program goals and outcomes for its students. These have been developed to be comparable to the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology Engineering Criteria 2000 (EC2000) and the Program Criteria established by the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME). Within this general direction and the mission of the college as well, the faculty have determined Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) that intend to create versatile engineers who will:
I I I I

be successful in their engineering technology or chosen career path. engage in life-long learning and professional development through continued studies, professional experience, and active participation in professional organizations. be able to interact effectively with others in a collaborative team-oriented manner in the development and execution of a project. function as a responsible member of society with a willingness to act as a mentor to fellow employees and in the community with an understanding of the social, ethical and economic impact of his/her work at the local and global level.

To support these objectives, the curriculum has been developed to provide program outcomes which describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. Upon graduation students are expected to have:
I I I

An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. An ability to communicate effectively. 229

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
I I I I

The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning. A knowledge of contemporary issues. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Five-Year Combined Program—B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and M.S. in Energy Management

The college offers a five-year combined program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and a Master of Science in Energy Management. As an interdisciplinary program, the curriculum is designed to train students who intend to function in engineering and leadership roles in various energy related industries. For program details, please contact the Chairperson, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
Aerospace Engineering Concentration

The concentration in Aerospace Engineering is designed to allow mechanical engineers the opportunity to focus on aircraft and space vehicle design. Material capabilities, production, and propulsion are emphasized to enable the engineer to meet the changing priorities of the Aerospace industry.
Engineering Management

The department offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in engineering management. As an interdisciplinary program, the curriculum is designed to train students who intend to function in leadership roles in various manufacturing or service environments. Students take courses in industrial engineering as well as management and other technical and liberal arts disciplines.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering ETCS 105 Career Discovery 2 Credits 2 3 3 4 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 1 4 3 4 3 4 Mechanical Engineering MENG 105 Engineering Graphics MENG 211 Engineering Mechanics I MENG 212 Engineering Mechanics II MENG 221 Strength of Materials MENG 240 Thermodynamics MENG 270 Instrumentation & Measurement MENG 310 Introduction to Material Science MENG 320 Materials Mechanics Laboratory or MENG321 Intro to CAD MENG324 Vibrations & System Dynamics MENG 340 Fluid Mechanics MENG 343 Thermofluids Lab MENG 346 Energy Conversion MENG 349 Heat Transfer MENG 370 Machine Design MENG 373 Engineering Analysis MENG 470 Senior Mechanical Engineering Design

Liberal Arts Life Sciences CHEM 107 Engineering Chemistry I Mathematics

3 credits 4 credits

All students are required to take a mathematics placement examination prior to registration, and may have to take a developmental mathematics course (MATH 096-MATH 097, or MATH 098) before taking required mathematics courses.

MATH 170 MATH 180 MATH 260 MATH 320

Calculus I (4) Calculus II (4) Calculus III Differential Equations

4 4 4 3 15 credits

Physics PHYS 170 General Physics I (4) PHYS 180 General Physics II (4) PHYS 225 Introduction to Modern Physics

4 4 3

11 credits Social Sciences Economics PHIL 230 Technology, Society, and Values or IENG 400 Technology and Global Issues PHIL 3 3 3

47 credits Design Elective Options Select 8 credits from the following: AENG 490, MENG 486, 446, 443.

9 credits 8 credits Electives 3 credits Total credits required—134-136
(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Intensive English as a second language is not acceptable as a permissible substitution for WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. (3) LITR 210, 220, 230 or 240 may be elected. (4) M.E. students are permitted to register concurrently for Calculus I and Physics I and Calculus II and Physics II.

Elective Options Select 3 credits from non-required AENG, IENG, MENG, or graduate MENG courses with Chairperson approval. 3 credits Computer Science CSCI 120 Programming I Electrical Engineering EENG 201 Introduction to Electrical Engineering Engineering Management IENG 240 Engineering Economics IENG 245 Statistical Design I 3 credits

4 credits 3 3 6 credits

Behavioral Sciences
(2)

3 credits 6 3 3 3

English Composition Speech One Group A course (3) WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions

15 credits

231

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
MENG 105 Engineering Graphics 1-2-2 An introduction to current graphic representations. Problems chosen to develop recognition and development skills in such areas as orthographics, pictorials, auxiliaries, sections, intersections and developments. Practical applications in screws and fasteners, welds, gears, cams, pipes, and electrical conventions. AUTOCAD applications. MENG 115 Mechanical Engineering Tools 2-1-3 Introduction to fundamentals of computer tool use and machine tool use: Pro/Engineer, a 3D parametric, feature based, solid modeling package with fully detailed representation of design concepts, and Autocad with lab applications; bandsaw, milling machine, and lathe. Prerequisite: MENG 105. MENG 211 Engineering Mechanics I (Statics) 3-0-3 Statics of particles; force in plane and space; equivalent systems of forces; equilibrium of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; analysis of structures, friction; distributed forces; centroids, centers of gravity and moment of inertia; method of virtual work. Prerequisites: PHYS 170, MATH 180. MENG 212 Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics) 3-0-3 Basic concepts, fundamental laws: absolute and relative motion, work, energy, impulse, momentum. Kinematic and kinetics of a particle, or rigid bodies. Central force motion. Impact. Advanced topics. Prerequisites: MENG 211, MATH 260. MENG 221 Strength of Materials 4-0-4 Stresses and strains in members under the actions of axial and shearing forces, bending and twisting moments. Transformations of stress and strain; principal stresses. Combined stresses; pressure vessels. Deflection of beams. Statically indeterminate problems. Columns. Prerequisites: MENG 211, MATH 180. MENG 240 Thermodynamics 3-0-3 Review of dimensions, units, and fundamental concepts. Study of First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. Application to fluid dynamic processes. Energy conversion cycles. Reversed cycles. Concept of exergetic analysis. Prerequisites: PHYS 180, CHEM 107, Co-requisites: MATH 260. MENG 270 Instrumentation and Measurement 0-3-1 Introduction to measuring techniques in mechanical engineering. Analysis of experimental data with emphasis on accuracy, errors, and uncertainty. Mechanical, electrical, electronic, pneumatic, hydraulic and optical instruments are used in the experiments performed, and their design, function, and limitations are studied. Prerequisite: PHYS 170. MENG 310 Introduction to Materials Science 3-0-3 Introductory course to the science of materials. Review of atomic theory and atomic bonding. Structure of crystals and nature of crystal imperfections and atom movements. Discussion of phase diagrams, multiphase materials and equilibrium relationships. Prerequisite: CHEM 107. MENG 320 Materials Mechanics Laboratory 0-3-1 This laboratory course should be regarded as a supplement to the theoretical studies of materials and mechanical properties of engineering materials. Important mechanical properties are defined and discussed. The operation and use of the testing equipment described, i.e., universal testing machines, hardness tester, torsion, impact and cyclic load tester. Deflection, deformation, and strain gauges. Low and high temperature testings. Metallographic laboratory techniques and nondestructive testing methods introduced. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MENG 310, MENG 221. MENG 321 Introduction to Computer Aided Design 3-0-3 General overview of how CAD operates in a modern mechanical engineering design environment. Introduction to major commercial CAD software (CATIA, Pro/E, Solidworks, NX, etc.) in relation to the production of two and three dimensional images of design concepts for machinery components. Introduction to finite element techniques for structural analysis. Includes hands-on experience in the use of CAD software packages for designing and analyzing mechanical components. Prerequisites: MENG-105, MENG-221, MENG 212 MENG-324 Vibrations and System Dynamics 3-0-3 Mathematical modeling and analysis of lumped dynamic systems with mechanical elements. Topics: time domain solutions (with emphasis on one- and multi-degree-of-freedom vibration problems including free and forced vibrations), computer simulation, block diagram representation, numerical methods and frequency domain solutions. Prerequisite: MENG 212, MATH 320 MENG 340 Fluid Mechanics 3-0-3 Fundamental fluid statics: manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, Archimedes’ principle. Details of one-dimensional incompressible flow; conservation laws and application to flowing systems, cavitation, impulse-momentum problems, vanes. Pipe flows: laminar analyses, turbulent flows with emphasis on calculation of fluid properties. One-dimensional compressible flow; conservation laws, specialization to isentropic situations, nature of speed of sound. Applications including effects of area change, converging and diverging nozzles, choking phenomena, normal shock waves. Prerequisite: MENG 240.

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MENG 343 Thermofluids Laboratory 0-3-1 Introduction to basic instrumentation. Experiments involving pressure, velocity, temperature and viscosity measurements, determination of thermal properties of solids, liquids and gases. Calorimetry. Steam turbogenerator, reversed refrigeration cycles. Tests involving internal combustion engines, wind tunnel testing. Basic experiments in hydraulics. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MENG 340, MENG 240. MENG 346 Energy Conversion 3-3-4 Starting with basic principles of energy conversion, the vast area of modern energy technology is covered. Fossil, nuclear, solar, and geothermal energy resources and current and future methods of energy conversion are analyzed. State of the art and present research areas reviewed. Technical and economic feasibility of processes, equipment, and plants is analyzed. Prerequisite: MENG 240. MENG 349 Heat Transfer 3-0-3 Basic concepts. Steady-state conduction; unsteady-state heat conduction; mathematical, graphical empirical and numerical methods of analysis. Principles of convection, dimensionless numbers. Forced convection. Natural convection. Radiation heat transfer. Heat exchangers. Prerequisites: MENG 240, MATH 320. MENG 370 Machine Design 4-0-4 General concepts of machine design, such as stress and strength, stress concentration fatigue, theories of failure, deflection in machine parts. Applications of the design process, including design of shafts, fasteners, couplings, gears, bearings, springs, screws, and other machine elements. Prerequisite: MENG 221. MENG 373 Engineering Analysis 3-0-3 Numerical and analytical methods for the solution of engineering problems will be covered. In particular, applications to problems in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, flight vehicle design, and vibration theory will be discussed. Prerequisites: MATH 320, MENG 221. MENG 410 Fundamentals of Stress Analysis 2-2-3 Two-dimensional state of stress and strain. Stress equations of equilibrium. Stress and strain transformation equations. Compatibility. Three-dimensional stress-strain relations. Plane elasticity theory; plane-strain and plane-stress problems in cartesian and polar coordinates. Airy’s stress function. Verification of theoretical solutions by experimental methods using strain-gages. Photoelasticity. Birefringent coatings. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MENG 423. MENG 413 Mechatronics 3-0-3 Review of classical mechanics and electromagnetics. Analysis of electric and electromechanical components and systems. Principles and fabrication of Microsystems including microsensors and actuators. Control of mechatronic systems. Passive and active vibration compensation. Integration of microprocessors for embedded application. Prerequisite: MENG-324 MENG 420 Mechanical Metallurgy 3-0-3 Quantitative prediction of mechanical behavior of materials: plastic, viscous, plastic deformations, crack formation, and growth under monotonic and repeated loading. Deformation, viscous creep. Types of fracture and theories of fracture; fatigue. Elective for MENG students. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MENG 310, MENG 221. MENG 423 Advanced Strength of Materials 3-0-3 Theories of stress and strain. Energy methods. Deflections of structures using the method virtual work and Castigliano’s theorem. Analysis of statically indeterminate structures. Classical and modern theories of curved beams subjected to general loading. Determination of stresses and deformations of curved beams with various boundary conditions. Thickwalled cylinders; shrink fits. Flat plates. Beams on continuous elastic support. Prerequisites: MENG 310, MENG 221, MATH 320. (Elective for MENG or AENG students.) MENG 440 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3-0-3 Conservation laws, viscous flow in ducts, fully developed flow, turbulent flow, pipe networks, general theory of turbomachines including pump performance and characteristics, pump cavitation and hydraulic turbines. Laminar and turbulent boundary layer flow. Prerequisites: MENG 340, MATH 320. MENG 443 Energy System Analysis and Design 3-3-4 Fundamentals of planning and design of thermal power plants. Detailed design and performance characteristics of power plant subsystems, i.e., turbines, steam condensers, feedwater heaters, boiler plant pumps, steam generators, boiler fans, piping design, cooling water systems, water treatment. System analysis based on First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics toward optimization of power generation. Advanced (optimized) energy conversion cycles with energy/energy flows. Students are required to complete a design project of a thermal power plant and submit a report with complete system analysis, heat balance diagrams, major system/subsystem and piping drawings. Prerequisites: MENG 240. MENG 446 Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning 3-3-4 Analysis and design procedures of HVAC systems, accompanied by a design project. Prerequisites: MENG 340, MENG 240; Pre- or corequisite: MENG 349.

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MENG 470 Senior Mechanical Engineering Design 3-3-4 The course will deal with open-ended design investigations which allow the application of advanced engineering techniques to the analysis and synthesis of engineering systems or devices. Topics such as manufacturing processes, DFM, modern engineering materials reliability and liability, environmental friendliness, thermo-fluid machines and devices will be covered. Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. MENG 473 Kinematics 3-0-3 Kinematics of machines, velocity and acceleration, analysis of mechanisms using graphical, analytical, and computer methods. Synthesis of planar linkages. Study of cams and gear trains. Introduction of spatial linkages. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: MENG 212 MENG 474 Special Topics I 3-0-3 Topics of current interest in mechanical engineering involving project analysis and design are covered in the course. Prerequisite: Approval of the Chair.

MENG 478 Special Topics II 3-0-3 Topics of current interest in mechanical engineering involving project analysis and design are covered. This course may serve as continuation of, MENG 474. Prerequisite: MENG 474 or approval of the chair. MENG 483 Mechanical Engineering Workshop 0-3-1 A workshop designed to address deficiencies in transfer credit evaluation in areas such as design and computer applications in engineering and related courses. The course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Approval of the chairperson. MENG 486 Advanced Machine Design 3-3-4 Review of basic concepts, plus such considerations as impact loads, cumulative damage, reliability as a statistical concept, optimization, cost standardization, computer usage. Indepth treatment of such machine elements as clutches and brakes, special springs, roller bearings, gearing systems. Two open-end design projects, each combining various machine elements: conceptual design, feasibility, calculations, assembly drawing, detail drawings including dimensioning, fits and tolerance and parts lists. Prerequisites: MENG 370, MENG 212 (ME design elective.)

234

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences

I Curriculum requirements for the
ETCS 105 Career Discovery (1)

Mathematics
All students are required to take a mathematics placement examination prior to registration, and may have to take a developmental mathematics course (MATH 096-MATH 097, or MATH 098) before taking required mathematics courses.

Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering—Aerospace Concentration. 2 credits 2 3 3 4 3 1 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3

Mechanical Engineering MENG 105 Engineering Graphics MENG 211 Engineering Mechanics I MENG 212 Engineering Mechanics II MENG 221 Strength of Materials MENG 240 Thermodynamics MENG 270 Instrumentation & Measurement MENG 310 Introduction to Material Science MENG321 Intro to CAD MENG 324 Vibrations & System Dynamics MENG 340 Fluid Mechanics MENG 346 Energy Conversion MENG 349 Heat Transfer MENG 370 Machine Design MENG 373 Engineering Analysis

MATH 170 MATH 180 MATH 260 MATH 320

Calculus I (4) Calculus II (4) Calculus III Differential Equations

4 4 4 3 15 credits

Physics PHYS 170 General Physics I (4) PHYS 180 General Physics II (4) PHYS 225 Introduction to Modern Physics

4 4 3

11 credits Social Sciences Economics PHIL Phil 230 Tech, Soc. Val or IENG 400 Tech & Global Issues 3 3 3 9 credits

42 credits Aerospace AENG 360 MENG 343 or AENG 466 AENG 463 AENG 490 AENG 492 Engineering Aerodynamics Thermofluids Laboratory Aerospace Laboratory Propulsion Flight Vehicle Design Senior Aerospace Design 3 1 1 3 4 4 15 credits Computer Science CSCI 120 Programming I Electrical Engineering EENG 201 Intro. Electrical Engineer. Engineering Management IENG 240 Engineering Economics IENG 245 Statistical Design I 3 credits 4 credits 3 3 6 credits Behavioral Sciences 3 credits 6 3 3 3 English (2) Composition Speech One Group A course (3) WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions

Electives

3 credits Total credits required—133-135

(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Intensive English as a second language is not acceptable as a permissible substitution for WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. (3) LITR 210, 220, 230 or 240 may be elected. (4) M.E. students are permitted to register concurrently for Calculus I and Physics I and Calculus II and Physics II.

15 credits Liberal Arts Life Sciences CHEM107 Engineering Chemistry 3 credits 4 credits

235

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
AENG 360 Aerodynamics 3-0-3 Review of basic incompressible and compressible flows, introduction to oblique shock waves, Prandtl Meyer flows. Detailed airfoil analyses including effects on lift and drag of angle of attack, Reynolds number, compressibility. Threedimensional considerations: qualitative discussion of downwash and circulation, quantitative aspects of this type of flow. Boundary layer theory: simple ideas, flat plate flows, calculation formulae. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MATH 320 and MENG 340. AENG 430 Aero Structures 3-0-3 Analysis of flight structures; compound and complex trusses. Torsion of space frameworks and box sections. Shear flow distribution in box beams; tapered beams and unsymmetrical beams. Analysis of semimonocoque structures; fuselage bulkheads and wing ribs. Multi-cell box beams. Indeterminate rigid frames. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MATH 320, MENG 221. AENG 433 Structural Dynamics 3-0-3 Natural frequency of vibrating beams by Newmark’s method. Numerical and rigorous dynamic response of one-degree of freedom systems. Dynamic response analysis of lumpedmass systems. Response of damped systems by Duhamel’s integral. Analysis of nonlinear structural response. Formulation of MDOF equations of motion; Rayleigh’s method. Normal coordinates; uncoupled equations of motion; conditions of orthogonality; mode super- position. Response spectra for earthquakes. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MENG 212, MENG 323, MATH 320. AENG 436 Aerospace Mechanics 3-0-3 Elements of spherical trigonometry and navigation. Determination of position, velocity, and acceleration on earth, in the air, and in space, celestial motion, theory of orbits. Rocket equation and elements of astronomy and guidance included. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MATH 260 and MENG 212. AENG 439 Dynamics of Flight 3-0-3 Dynamic problems of the airplane in motion. Fixed and free controls, transient motion and dynamic loads on the airplane in maneuvering flight. Design of aerodynamic characteristics, automatic control, transfer function, stability criterion of automatic control systems. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MENG 212, AENG 490. AENG 463 Propulsion 3-0-3 Review of fluid mechanics principles including shock wave. Details of air-breathing propulsion including analysis of diffusers and nozzles, compressors and turbines, and combustion processes. Matching of components is treated in depth. Over-all vehicle analysis treating turbojet, turbofans, turboprops, ram-jets. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: MENG 340. AENG 466 Aerospace Laboratory 0-3-1 Experiments involve aerospace concepts and are geared to simulate operations in a typical industrial aerospace lab. Wind tunnel testing, flow visualization, model forces, pressure measurements; boundary layers, nozzles and jets. Error analysis. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Corequisite: AENG 360. AENG 490 Flight Vehicle Design 2-4-4 Actual optimum design of an airplane meeting the specifications of load (number of passengers and/or weight of cargo), range, field length, and cruising speed. The course proceeds step by step to calculate all the design characteristics: wing sweepback, thickness ratio, wing loading, thrust loading, takeoff weight, drag, range, direct operating cost. Many of these factors are varied in order to optimize the cost. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Corequisite: MENG 340. AENG 492 Senior Aerospace Design 4-0-4 A specific field of design will be selected. The design will be open-ended and proceed from specifications using all the pertinent fields of science and engineering as well as empirical formulations. Some topics which may be selected are Supersonic Aircraft, Rocket Technology and Helicopter Design. Prerequisite: AENG 490 and approval of chairperson. AENG 494 Guidance and Control 3-0-3 The high-speed motion of modern aerospace vehicles requires extremely accurate measurements of the parameters of motion as well as the means of correcting such motion. These techniques of guidance and control are offered from first principles. Different guidance systems (gyroscopes, accelerometers, and other sensors are evaluated). (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: AENG 436.

236

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Management ETCS 105 Career Discovery (1) 2 credits Industrial Engineering IENG 240 Engineering Economics IENG 245 Statistical Design I IENG 251 Project Engineering IENG 345 Statistical Design II IENG 355 Quality Control & Reliability IENG 380 Operations Research I IENG 400 Technology & Global Issues IENG 425 Systems Simulation IENG 475 Industrial Engineering Design I IENG 476 Industrial Engineering Design I IE Electives

Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy

3 3 3 9 credits

Behavioral Sciences 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 Liberal Arts Life Sciences CHEM107 Engineering Chemistry Physics PHYS 170 General Physics I PHYS 180 General Physics II

3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 4 8 credits

36 credits Management ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 306 Cost Accounting FINC 201 Corporation Finance MGMT 205 Organizational Behavior MGMT 405 Business Policy Seminar Electives in Management (2) 3 3 3 3 3 6 21 credits Computer Science CSCI 120 Programming I Mechanical Engineering MENG373 Engineering Analysis 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3

Mathematics MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II MATH 310 Linear Algebra

4 4 3 11 credits

Technical Electives General Electives

(5)

6 credits 6 credits

Total credits required—128-130
(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) All management electives and substitutions for any required management courses must be approved by the departmental chairperson. (3) International students may be required to take Intensive credits in English (X503, 6 credits; and 098, 5 credits) prior to taking these courses. Intensive English as a second language is not accepted as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and 161 in place of 101 and 151. (4) LITR 210, 220, 230 or 240 may be selected. (5) Electives may be advanced level mathematic such as MATH 260, 320 or advanced level computer science or industrial engineering courses, or other approved electives.

English (3) Composition Speech One Group A course (4) WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions

15 credits

237

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
IENG 240 Engineering Economics 3-0-3 Economic problems relevant to the management-engineering decision-making environment, managerial costs, interest, depreciation, break-even analysis, capital budgeting, replacement decisions. Prerequisite: MATH 141. or TMAT 155, or equivalent. IENG 245 Statistical Design I 3-0-3 Fundamentals of engineering probability and statistical analysis as applied to industrial problems: sample spaces, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling techniques and design of statistical investigations, Bayesian decision making. Emphasis is on the application of these ideas to the decision-making process, rather than pure theory. Prerequisite: MATH 170 or TMAT 235. IENG 251 Project Engineering 3-0-3 In this course, we discuss development and management of engineering and technology projects. Project proposal preparation, resources and cost estimating, project planning, organizing, and controlling, network diagrams and the techniques are covered. Prerequisite: MATH 170 or MATH 161 IENG 255 Computer Aided Design (CAD) 3-0-3 General introduction to computer graphics and its application in design of physical plant layouts and the graphic arts. Practical assignments provide experience in the use of 2-D and 3-D graphics. Prerequisites: TMAT 255 and CSCI 160. IENG 260 Facilities Design and Materials Handling 3-0-3 The main objective of the facilities layout function is to increase operational efficiency of the plant through effective integration of manufacturing equipment, materials handling systems, plant facilities and labor requirements. This course will provide a thorough analysis of the various quantitative and computerized models that have been developed to cope with the increasing complexity of layout problems. Prerequisites: MENG 105 and IENG 250 or IENG 360 and IENG 255. IENG 265 Industrial Safety 2-0-2 Evaluates the fundamentals of safety engineering and accident prevention, including the industrial causes and impact of accidents and the production values of attaining an accident-free goal. Attention is paid to the meaning and interpretation of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) IENG 270 Work Measurement and Analysis 3-0-3 Work measurements techniques based on simplification of design, process, sequence, and workplace. Micromotion and memomotion evaluation of work content for improvement and training. Time study via stop watch observation, statistical sampling and synthetic time systems. Worker ratings and allowances. Job evaluation and wage determination. Laboratory work in motion and time. Prerequisite: IENG 250 or IENG 360. IENG 275 Engineering Ethics—Law and Sales 2-0-2 Philosophy of engineering; methodology of ethics; the engineer and society; communications between engineers and laypersons; continuing education and upgrading of the engineer in practice; selling engineering services; moral and statutory laws. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) IENG 280 Technology & Labor Issues 3-0-3 In this course students discuss the changing nature of work and its impact on workers and labor management relations. Also covered are the history and development of the labor movement, including current issues and perspectives, the impact of social and technical factors on the evolution of business organizations, and the theory and function of workplace skills, i.e. customer focus, quality, team work, leadership, and problem solving. IENG 340 Design for Manufacturability 2-3-3 A lecture/laboratory course designed to provide insight into manufacturing requirements. Students will analyze component/part design with a view towards improving their manufacturability. Team and individual prospects will be required. Prerequisites: IENG 445, IENG 240. IENG 345 Statistical Design II 3-0-3 Principles of modern statistical experimentation and practice in basic engineering design: statistical inference and decision problems, estimation, tests of hypothesis, regression, correlation, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, application to engineering and management data, time-series analysis. Prerequisite: IENG 245. IENG 350 Quality Control 3-0-3 The applied techniques for determining the quality of massproduced items by means of statistical analysis. The use of control charts for detecting changes in a process. Setting control limits and lot sizes for sampling inspection plans. Sampling by variables and attributes. Prediction of the probable percentage defective in a monitored process. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: TMAT 135. IENG 355 Quality Control and Reliability 3-0-3 Economic aspects of statistical quality control. Control charts for variables and attributes, acceptance sampling, operating characteristics curves, fundamentals of reliability, failure prediction. Prerequisite: IENG 245. IENG 360 Quantitative Methods in Industrial Operations 3-0-3 Linear optimization models, simplex methods and solutions, networks and applications, assembly line balancing, queueing theory with applications in production and computer simulation. Corequisite: IENG 345.

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IENG 365 Industrial Engineering Laboratory 1-2-2 Laboratory work using timing devices, work simplification techniques, and statistical sampling simulators. Data gathering and analyses methods are demonstrated. Prerequisite: IENG 245. IENG 370 Industrial Plant Operations 2-3-3 A study of current industrial engineering practices: production, layout, safety, planning, personnel management, through plant visits and class discussions. Term report. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: IENG 260. IENG 375 Production Planning and Control 3-0-3 Forecasting methods for production planning, exponential smoothing, scheduling techniques, inventory planning and control, networks, line balancing, application of various mathematical models. Prerequisites: IENG 250 and IENG 245. IENG 380 Operations Research I 3-0-3 Linear programming solution; simplex method; dual problem—its solution and economical meaning; sensitivity analysis; transportation problems and solutions. Transshipment and assignment problems, traveling salesman problems, network optimization problems, CPM and critical path, and the use of computers for problem solutions. Prerequisites: CSCI 160, IENG 375. Corequisite: MATH 310. IENG 400 Technology and Global Issues 3-0-3 In this course the relationships between technology and global concerns are explored. Topics such as sustainable development, standards, ethics, environmental concerns and public policies related to design and development, energy, transportation, air, and water facing both developed and developing nations will be discussed. Prerequisite: Senior status or approval of the Chair. IENG 420 Operations Research II 3-0-3 Introduction to nonlinear programming, dynamic programming and its applications, the branch and bound algorithm, integer linear programming, zero-one programming, applications of zero-one programming, introduction to game theory. Prerequisite: IENG 380. IENG 425 Systems Simulations 3-0-3 The use of simulation methods for the analysis and design of various types of systems. Queueing theory, queueing problems and stochastic systems are simulated using GPSS. Continuous and other discrete simulation languages will be discussed. Prerequisites: IENG 380, IENG 345. IENG 430 Nondestructive Test Engineering 3-0-3 Fundamentals of nondestructive testing techniques, including X-ray, ultrasonic, eddy current and other methods. Characterization of flaws and effects of flaws on design parameters. Applications to pressure vessels, construction and other industrial processes. IENG 435 Industrial Reliability Engineering 3-0-3 Fundamentals of reliability mathematics as applied to survival or failure of mechanical and electrical subsystems and components. Application of statistical and probability theories to predict failure rates under operational conditions. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: MENG 310, IENG 345. IENG 440 Production Process Design 3-0-3 Investigation of manufacturing processes in the metal and plastics working areas. Processes include casting, forming, joining, treatment, and material removal. Manual, semiautomatic, and automatic machine selection for process work. The plant equipment and process requirements to meet the design and manufacture of a given product will be emphasized. Plant visits may be arranged. Prerequisite: MENG 310. IENG 445 Production Process Design II 3-0-3 A continuation of IENG 440. Detailed analysis of how materials behave during production. Theories of plastic flow and plasticity of materials will be discussed, with application to a variety of production processes. A term project, requiring a detailed analysis of a particular process, will be required. Prerequisites: IENG 440; Corequisite: IENG 450. IENG 450 Production Process Laboratory 0-3-1 A laboratory course to complement the theory in IENG 440 and IENG 445. Students will perform experiments in metal working and manufacturing techniques including forming, plating, machine turning and drilling, grinding, welding and allied process. Prerequisite: IENG 440. IENG 455 Design of Man-Machine Systems 3-0-3 This course integrates concepts developed in psychology, physiology, and industrial and mechanical engineering and provides the necessary background for an optional design of the workplace. Topics to be included: systems analysis of man-machine systems, design of visual and auditory displays, design of controls, layout of workplaces, and environmental effects of human performance. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: IENG 260 and PSYC 101.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
IENG 460 Design of Industrial Enterprise 3-0-3 Focuses on a detailed design of an industrial enterprise from the concepts of a manufacturing idea, through resource allocation, to methods of distribution. Topics will include product specification, market research, equipment and process determination, plant layout, financial requirements, labor requirements, capacity planning, and organizational structure. Term project. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: IENG 375, IENG 355, IENG 260. IENG-475 Industrial Engineering Design I 3-0-3 A senior design course encompassing various phases of systems design including problem definition and analysis, synthesis, specification and implementation. The project, under the supervision of an advisor, may be conducted in an off-campus enterprise environment. Students will work in teams and be expected to present their work orally and in a written report. Prerequisite: Senior status. IENG 476 Industrial Engineering Design II 3-0-3 A senior design course encompassing where students continue projects from IENG 475 or work individually under the same format on a design project. Prerequisite: IENG-475. IENG 485 Seminar Project 2-0-2 Term project: (May be combined with IENG 490, Advanced Seminar Project, as a two-semester project if approved by the dean after selection of the project.) Student may select the design of an industrial enterprise (product and market research, production processes, plant layout, cost and profit predictions, or research into a pollution control field, magnitude and composition of the pollutant economic and physiological effects, state-of-the-science for reduction, cost effectiveness of the reduction process). Prerequisite: Approval of department chairperson. IENG 490 Advanced Seminar Project 2-0-2 Continuation of IENG 485 for project which cannot be completed in one semester. Prerequisite: IENG 485 and approval of department chairperson.

240

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences
Pre-Engineering

Students who have not chosen a specific branch of engineering as a major or who do not fully satisfy the entrance requirements for engineering, may be classified as Undeclared status in the School of Engineering and Computing Sciences up to the end of their second year. Transfer students and students who have completed more than two years of course work should check with both their academic and financial aid advisors regarding their status as majors.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology

Faculty: L. Amani, L. Amara, B. Beheshti, A. Kashani, R. Meyers, T. Moroney, E. Nelson, L. Pavlidis, Y. Saito, G. Salayka. Adjunct Faculty: T. Decanio, S. Fall, J. Fiorillo, F. Fischman, A. Golubev, M. Hoffman, J. Rogers. The college offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Technology degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology. In addition, courses lead to the A.A.S. degree in Electrical Technology. Engineering technology is the nationally accepted terminology for education programs designed to prepare engineering technologists and engineering technicians. Engineering technology is that part of the technological field which requires application of scientific and engineering knowledge and methods combined with technical skills in support of engineering activities; it lies within the occupational spectrum between the craftsman and the engineer at the end of the spectrum closest to the engineer. Entering students normally enroll directly in the program areas leading to the Bachelor of Technology degree. However, they may also enroll in the corresponding program area leading to the A.A.S. degree and upon graduation transfer to the upper two years of the four-year Bachelor of Technology program. Graduates from community colleges and technical institutes with A.A.S. degrees in engineering technology may transfer into the upper two years of the corresponding program leading to the Bachelor of Technology. Graduates of electrical and computer engineering technology programs often hold positions as electrical, computer, and electronics technologists in the area of testing, service, maintenance, sales and marketing, and research assistant. According to this general direction and mission of the college, the primary objectives of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology have been developed to create versatile engineering technologists who:
I I I I

be successful in their engineering or chosen career path. engage in life-long learning and professional development through graduate studies and active participation in professional organizations. be able to interact effectively with others in a collaborative team-oriented manner in the management and execution of a project function as a responsible member of society with a willingness to act as a mentor to fellow employees and in the community with an understanding of the social, ethical and economic impact of his/her work at the local and global level. 241

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
To support these objectives, the curriculum has been developed to provide program outcomes which describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. Upon graduation students are expected to have:
I I I I I I I I I I I

an appropriate mastery of the knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of their disciplines an ability to apply current knowledge and adapt to emerging applications of mathematics, science, engineering and technology an ability to conduct, analyze and interpret experiments and apply experimental results to improve processes an ability to apply creativity in the design of systems, components or processes appropriate to program objectives an ability to function effectively on teams an ability to identify, analyze and solve technical problems an ability to communicate effectively a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning an ability to understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement

The program in electrical and computer engineering technology leading to the Bachelor of Technology, is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Ill Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 – Telephone: (410) 347.7700.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Technology in Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology* ETCS 105 Career Discovery (1) Electrical ETEC 110 ETEC 120 ETEC 131 ETEC 231 ETEC 310 ETEC 410 ETEC 495 Technology Electrical Technology I Electrical Technology II Electronics Technology I Electronics Technology II Communication Circuits Control System Technology or CTEC 495 Seminar Project 2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 27 credits Computer CTEC 204 CTEC 206 CTEC 216 CTEC 235 CTEC 241 CTEC 247 CTEC 335 CTEC 350 Technology Programming Techniques I Programming Techniques II Digital Electronics Microcomputers I Circuit Design and Fabrication Applied Computational Analysis Microcomputers II Microcontroller Based Systems 3 3 4 4 4 3 4 3

Behavioral Sciences
(3)

3 credits 6 3 3 3

English Composition Speech One Group A course (4) WRIT 316 Writing for the Technical Professions

15 credits Liberal Arts Life Science CHEM107 Engineering Chemistry 3 credits 4 4 credits Mathematics TMAT 135 Technical Mathematics I TMAT 155 Technical Mathematics II MATH161 Basic Applied Calculus 4 4 3 11 credits Physics PHYS 130 Introductory Physics PHYS 150 Introductory Physics II 3 3 6 credits Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy 3 3 3 9 credits Electives Total credits required 3 credits 130-132

28 credits Electrical and Computer Technology Electives (Choose 9 elective credits from the following) CTEC 430 Digital Signal Processing CTEC 460 Computer Networking Technology CTEC 471 Internet Development ETEC 240 Energy Technology ETEC 420 Communication Circuits II ETEC 470 Fiber-Optic Communication Technology ETEC 490 Special Topics ETEC 491 Special Topics II MTEC 210 Intro. to Computer Aided Design
(2)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Other advanced ETEC/CTEC electives with the approval of the Chairperson. (3) Intensive English as a second language is not acceptable as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151.

9 credits Engineering Management IENG 240 Engineering Economics IENG 251 Project Engineering IENG 350 Quality Control IENG 400 Technology and Global Issues 3 3 3 3

12 credits

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
CTEC 130 Computer Hardware 3-0-3 Number systems, binary data representations, digital circuits. Boolean algebra, and minimization of combinatorial circuits are presented. Flip flops, synthesis of synchronous sequential machines, PLAs and PAL, RAM and ROMs, basic computer organizations, and assembly language programming are also discussed. Equivalent to CSCI 130. Prerequisite: MATH 141 or equivalent. CTEC 201 Computer Applications in Telecommunications 3-0-3 This course is an introductory course for students in the Verizon Next Step program. It provides a basic computer orientation to hardware and implementation of software applications in Telecommunications. Students will use various software packages to create documents, spreadsheets, graphs, databases, and presentations. The student will utilize this knowledge to solve problems and transfer information via electronic media. Lectures, interactive learning, and demonstrations will be employed. Laboratory exercises will be required. CTEC 204 Programming Techniques I 3-0-3 The course covers structured programming in a high level language such as C/C++. Topics include simple data types, expressions, statements, control statements and looping techniques. Elements of object oriented programming will be introduced by use of predefined objects. Prerequisite: TMAT-135. CTEC 206 Programming Techniques II 3-0-3 Programming techniques are expanded using an object oriented language such as C/C++ or JAVA. Fundamental data structures will be introduced. Issues such as graphic user interface design, implementation, code maintenance and reusability are also discussed. Prerequisite: CTEC-204. CTEC 216 Digital Electronics 3-3-4 This course is a study of the fundamental concepts of digital electronics. Covered topics include numbering systems, Boolean algebra and reduction techniques, logic gates, arithmetic operations and circuits, multiplexers and demultiplexers, flip-flops, counters, registers, memory circuits and programmable arrays, analog to digital and digital to analog conversion techniques and circuits. The focus of the course is SSI/MSI IC digital design and the architecture of microprocessors is introduced. A software simulation tool for digital electronics such as will be used. Laboratory work is coordinated with the lectures.Prerequisite: ETEC-131. CTEC 235 Microcomputers I 3-3-4 Building blocks of a microcomputer system: addressing, machine code formats, assembly language programming. Weekly laboratory work on the microcomputer supplements lecture material. Prerequisites: ETEC 231, Corequisite: CTEC 225. CTEC 241 Circuit Design and Fabrication 3-3-4 Students are introduced to CAD tools for schematic and PCB layout. Techniques and principles for schematic drawing and PCB artwork will be covered. Additional topics include design methodologies for multilayer boards, and effects of crosstalk and noise on PCB performance. VHDL logic synthesis is introduced with a top-down approach to design and simulate circuits. Laboratory experiments emphasize all the above techniques. Prerequisites: CTEC 216, ETEC 131. CTEC 247 Applied Computational Analysis 2-1-3 An introduction to numerical computation and visualization for the solving of problems encountered in computer and electrical technology. Topics will include applied differential equations, transform methods and discrete mathematics, as applied to electrical/computer systems in a laboratory setting A software package such as MATLAB will be used. Prerequisite: MAT 160. CTEC 305 Numerical Methods for Technology 3-0-3 A study of some of the computational problems encountered in technological practices and analysis. Topics covered include curve fitting, interpolation, solution of algebraic equations, and numerical differentiation and integration. A high level programming language will be used. Prerequisite: MAT 161, CTEC 204. CTEC 311 Introduction to Operating Systems 2-2-3 The principles of Operating Systems such as UNIX, Linux, and Windows are introduced. Access and privacy, process management in a multi processing environment, memory management and input/output (I/O) devices. Basic Operating Systems commands, tools and utilities, system operations and administration are presented. Shell programming and Operating System service calls are presented. Lectures are followed by laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: CTEC-204 CTEC 335 Microcomputers II 3-3-4 Memory subsystems, I/O methods for a microcomputer, address decoding, interrupt techniques, timing, LSI controllers such as DMA’s, UART’s, and CRT’s, analog interface, demonstration of computer graphic techniques. Weekly laboratory work is integrated to lectures. Prerequisite: CTEC 235.

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CTEC 345 Robotics Technology 3-3-4 An introduction to robotics and the current state-of-the-art science. Analysis of robotic control systems, mechanical drives, sensor and vision systems, robotic work cells. Laboratory demonstrations supplement lectures. (Offered regularly, but not every semester). Prerequisites: CTEC 235, ETEC 231, ETEC 410, approval of chairperson and completion of junior year. CTEC 350 Microcontroller Based Systems 3-0-3 In this course, we concentrate on selection criteria and hardware and software considerations for imbedded microcontroller based systems. Topics such as microcontroller resources, real time control, development tools, state machine and standard programming types, high level language cross compilers, design for manufacturability, testability, packaging and aesthetics consideration for consumer oriented products will be covered in conjunction with design examples from real life applications. Students will build their own microcontroller based system in parallel with the course lectures. Prerequisite: CTEC 235. CTEC 430 Digital Signal Processing 3-0-3 In this course, we analyze discrete time signals and systems, z-transforms, discrete Fourier transforms, digital filter design, structures for digital networks, FFT algorithms, quantization and round-off errors. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisites: Approval of chairman and completion of junior year. CTEC 460 Computer Networking Technology 3-0-3 In this course, we present the fundamental knowledge on the building blocks of data communications systems. Topics include characteristics of analog and digital transmission, networking protocols, network data flow as presented by OSI reference model, Ethernet, switching and routing technologies. Structure of the Internet and intranets, network management and security are also discussed. Prerequisite: CTEC 235. CTEC 471 Internet Development 3-0-3 Topics included are Web technologies and strategies for web site development, including architecture, web life cycle, tool and technologies, and the approach to security planning. Also covered are elements of a simple web site using HTML and XHTML, multimedia on the web, design of a user interface, server-side scripting languages, dynamic web pages, cascading style sheets (CSS), elements of JavaScript, Java applets integration and basic web security issues. Prerequisite: CTEC 204.

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Electrical Technology

The program in electrical technology leading to the Associate in Applied Science is for those individuals interested in preparing for careers as technicians in the growing fields of electronics and microcomputer repairs. Students develop a thorough foundation in electrical, electronic, and solid-state principles and may choose coursework in the rapidly expanding fields of microcomputers. Graduates of these programs can find employment as high-level technicians, often working directly with engineers or scientists. Employment opportunities include the repair and maintenance of microcomputers, and word processors. Microelectronic circuit design, analysis, testing, field service and sales are some of the additional employment areas available to graduates.

I Curriculum requirements for
ETCS 105 Career Discovery Electrical ETEC 110 ETEC 120 ETEC 131 ETEC 231
(1)

Associate in Applied Science, Electrical Technology 2 credits

English(2) Composition Speech

6 3 9 credits

Technology Electrical Technology I Electrical Technology II Electronics Technology I Electronics Technology II

4 4 4 4 16 credits

Mathematics TMAT 135 Technical Mathematics I TMAT 155 Technical Mathematics II MATH161 Basic Applied Calculus

4 4 3 11 credits

Physics PHYS 130 Introductory Physics

3 3 credits

Computer CTEC 204 CTEC 206 CTEC 216 CTEC 235 CTEC 241 CTEC 247

Technology Programming Techniques I Programming Techniques II Digital Electronics Microcomputers I Circuit Design and Fabrication Applied Computational Analysis

3 3 4 4 4 3

Total credits required—63 - 65
(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Intensive English as a second language is not acceptable as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151.

21 credits Behavioral Sciences 3 credits

ETEC 110 Electrical Technology I 3-3-4 Fundamental units, electrical components, wire calculations, work power, efficiency, Ohm’s law series and parallel resistive circuits, Kirchhoff’s laws. Introduction to electric and magnetic energy storage, capacitance, inductance, RC and RL time constants, meters, fundamentals of dc motors and generators. Lectures are followed by laboratory experiments. Corequisite: TMAT 135. ETEC 111 Electrical I 3-0-3 Fundamental units, electrical components, wire calculations, work, power, efficiency, Ohm's law, series and parallel resistive circuits, and Kirchhoff's laws are covered. Electric and magnetic energy storage, capacitance, inductance, RC and RL time constants, and meters are also discussed. Corequisite: TMAT-135.

ETEC 120 Electrical Technology II 3-3-4 Alternating-current concepts. Reactance circuits, series and parallel, power factor, complex algebra, and phasor notation. Resonance phenomena, coupled circuits and transformers. Lectures are followed by laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: ETEC 110. Corequisite: TMAT 155. ETEC 131 Electronics Technology I 3-3-4 In this course, we cover semiconductor theory, diodes, Zener diodes, rectifier circuits, filters, voltage regulators, special purpose diodes, Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) and Junction Field Effect Transistor (FET) fundamentals. BJT and FET configurations, biasing, AC models and voltage amplifiers, and small signal analysis. BJT power amplifier classification and analysis are also discussed. Laboratory work is correlated with the lectures. Prerequisite: ETEC 110. Corequisite: ETEC 120.

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ETEC 150 Electrical II 3-0-3 This course discusses alternating-current concepts. Reactance circuits, series and parallel, power factor, complex algebra, phasor notation, resonance phenomena, coupled circuits and transformers are discussed. Prerequisite: ETEC-111, Corequisite: TMAT-155. ETEC 160 Electronics I 3-0-3 In this course we cover semiconductor theory, diodes, Zener diodes, rectifier circuits, filters, voltage regulators, special purpose diodes, Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) and Junction Field Effect Transistor (FET) fundamentals. BJT and FET configurations, biasing, AC models and voltage amplifiers, and small signal analysis. BJT power amplifier classification and analysis are also discussed. Prerequisite: ETEC 111. Corequisite: ETEC 150. ETEC 231 Electronics Technology II 3-3-4 In this course, we cover Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) fundamentals, configurations, biasing and small signal analysis. Frequency response of BJT and FET circuits, Bode plots, and Oscillators are discussed. Other topics covered include Differential Amplifiers, Operational Amplifiers (op-amps) fundamentals and applications including linear and non-linear op-amp circuits. Regulated Power supplies and Thyristor devices are also considered. Laboratory work is correlated with the lectures. Prerequisite: ETEC 131. ETEC 232 Electronics II 3-0-3 In this course we cover Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) fundamentals, configurations, biasing and small signal analysis. Frequency response of BJT and FET circuits, Bode plots, and Oscillators are discussed. Other topics covered include Differential Amplifiers, Operational amplifiers (op-amps) fundamentals and applications including linear and non-linear op-amp circuits. Regulated Power supplies and Thyristor devices are also considered. Prerequisite: ETEC 160. ETEC 235 Electrical Simulation Lab 2-0-2 Laboratory experiments to complement courses covering dc circuits, ac circuits, as well as basic digital circuitry will be performed using a currently available software package. Lab reports are to be submitted for each experiment performed using word processing and circuit simulation software. Prerequisite: ETEC-150. Corequisite: CTEC-217 ETEC 236 Electronics Simulation Lab 2-0-2 Laboratory experiments to complement courses covering electronic circuits and advanced digital circuitry will be performed using a currently available software package. Lab reports are to be submitted for each experiment performed using word processing and circuit simulation software. Prerequisite: CTEC-217, ETEC-232, ETEC-235. ETEC 240 Energy Technology 2-3-3 Principles of electromechanical energy conversion, structure of typical dc and ac motors and generators, analysis of motor and generator performance characteristics, motor starting, single phase and polyphase transformers. Laboratory experiments using ac and dc rotating machines. Prerequisite: ETEC 120. ETEC 310 Communication Circuits 3-3-4 Transmission of information by wire and radiated electromagnetic waves, RF oscillators, AM and FM transmission and reception, SSB are introduced. Digital modulation, digital transmission and digital reception concepts, as well as multiplexing using FDM and TDM are presented. Typical circuits are analyzed in the laboratory. Prerequisites: ETEC 231, MATH 161. ETEC 410 Control Systems Technology 3-3-4 Open and closed loop control systems. Principles of feedback control: transducers, transfer functions, block diagrams. System response. Introduction to stability criteria, analysis, and digital control systems. Prerequisites: ETEC 231, CTEC 246, 216 ETEC 420 Communication Circuits II 3-0-3 Digital communication systems, advanced digital modulation concepts, data communications, advanced multiplexing concepts. Transmission lines, antennas and waveguides. Space communication is discussed. Prerequisites: ETEC 310. ETEC 470 Fiber-Optic Communication Technology 3-0-3 This course covers the basic topics related to optical fiber components used in telecommunication systems. It covers the bandwidth and rate capabilities of optical fibers, their properties and characteristics. Topics include light sources, lasers, semiconductors, optical detectors and their applications, principles of fiber-optic communications, modulation and multiplexing, short-haul and long-haul communication links, asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) and synchronous transfer mode (SONET) based networks. A term paper is required in this course. Prerequisite: ETEC 231, PHYS 150. ETEC 490 Special Topics 3-0-3 Advanced topics in electrical engineering technology and computer technology. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. ETEC 491 Special Topics II 3-0-3 Advanced topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering and technology. Prerequisite: Approval of chairperson. ETEC 495 Seminar Project 3-0-3 In this course we focus on a design project in an area such as fabrication, computerized control, or Internet Technology. The work will require a written and oral proposal, followed by periodic progress reports (oral and written), and culminate in a completed product and report. Prerequisites: Approval of chairperson and completion of junior year.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

Telecommunications Network Management

Faculty: L. Amani, L. Amara, B. Beheshti, M. Colef, A. Kashani, R. Meyers, T. Moroney, E. Nelson Adjunct Faculty: T. Decanio, F. Fishman, M. Hoffman The college offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science in Telecommunications Network Management. In addition, courses lead to the A.A.S. degree in Telecommunications Technology. The Bachelor of Science degree in Telecommunications Network Management meets the increasing need of the telecommunications industry for current principles, applications, technology, and regulatory policies. The telecommunications industry needs graduates who are capable of utilizing equipment to its maximum performance with a focus in network management, planning and analysis. The curriculum discusses the applications and equipment used in the industry. This includes courses in the areas of telecommunications as well as electrical and computer technology, including Internet application development. A business perspective is provided with courses in accounting, finance and law. Entering students normally enroll directly in the program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Telecommunications Network Management. However, they may also enroll in the A.A.S. degree in Telecommunications Technology and upon graduation transfer to the upper two years of the four-year Bachelor of Science degree program in Telecommunications Network Management. Graduates from community colleges with A.A.S. degrees in Telecommunications Technology may transfer into the upper two years of the Bachelor of Science degree program in Telecommunications Management.

248

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Telecommunications Network Management ETCS 105 Career Discovery(1) 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 4

12 credits Mathematics MATH151 Fundamentals of Calculus TMAT 135 Technical Mathematics I TMAT 155 Technical Mathematics II 3 4 4

Telecommunications TELE 110 Telecomm. Fundamentals TELE 210 Data Networking Fundamentals TELE 220 Applied Telecommunications TELE 310 Telecomm. Law and Policy TELE 321 Cellular and Wireless Technologies TELE 420 Internetworking Technology I TELE 431 Internetworking Technology 2

11 credits English (3) Composition 6 Speech 3 3 One Group A course (4) WRIT 316 Writing for the Technical Professions 3 15 credits Liberal Arts Electives Physics PHYS 130 Introductory Physics 3 credits 3 3 credits Life Sciences CHEM107 Engineering Chemistry 4 4 credits Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy 3 3 3 9 credits General Electives 3 credits

22 credits Telecommunications Networks (Choose 6 elective credits from the following) TELE 330 High Speed Information Networks TELE 340 Advanced Topics in Telecomm. TELE 345 LAN and Internetworking ETEC 470 Fiber-Optic Communication Technology ETEC 490 Special Topics Electives (2) Computer CTEC 204 CTEC 206 CTEC 216 CTEC 311 CTEC 471 Technology Programming Techniques I Programming Techniques II Digital Electronics Introduction to OS Internet Development

3 3 3 3 3 3

6 credits 3 3 4 3 3 16 credits Electrical ETEC 110 ETEC 120 ETEC 131 Technology Electrical Technology I Electrical Technology II Electronics Technology I 4 4 4 12 credits Tech Electives (CS, IT, ET, CT, Tele, etc.) 3 3 credits Engineering Management IENG 400 Technology and Global Issues Behavioral Sciences 3 3 credits 3 3 3 3

Total credits required — 125-127
(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Electives must be approved by the department chairperson. (3) Intensive English as a second language is not accepted as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151. (4) LITR 210, LITR 220, LITR 230, or LITR 210 may be selected.

Management ECON 201 Money and Banking ACCT 101 Accounting I QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Telecommunications Technology

Faculty: L. Amani, L. Amara, B. Beheshti, A. Kashani, R. Meyers, T. Moroney, E. Nelson Adjunct Faculty: T. Decanio, F. Fishman, M. Hoffman, K. Ryan The college offers courses leading to the Associate in Applied Science degree in Telecommunications Technology. Currently, the Associate in Applied Science program is offered as a general option and a corporate-specific option for Verizon. The Associate in Applied Science degree in Telecommunications Technology meets the increasing need of the telecommunications industry by preparing students for careers as telecommunications technologists. The curriculum discusses the applications and equipment used in the telecommunications industry. This includes courses in the areas of telecommunications as well as electrical and computer technologies. Graduates with the Associate's degree may choose to work immediately in industry or continue their academic studies in a Bachelor of Technology program or a Bachelor of Science program in Telecommunications Network Management. The credits earned in both the general and the Verizon options can be transferred to the Bachelor of Science degree program in Telecommunications Network Management at NYIT.

I Curriculum requirements for
ETCS 105 Career Discovery
(1)

Associate in Applied Science, Telecommunications Technology 2 credits 3 3 3 3

Mathematics TMAT 135 Technical Mathematics I TMAT 155 Technical Mathematics II

4 4 8 credits

Telecommunications TELE 110 Telecomm. Fundamentals TELE 210 Data Networking Fundamentals TELE 220 Applied Telecommunications Elective(2)

Physics PHYS 130 Introductory Physics

3 3 credits

Social Sciences Economics

3 3 credits

12 credits Computer CTEC 204 CTEC 206 CTEC 216 or CTEC 217 Technology Programming Techniques I Programming Techniques II Digital Electronics Digital Electronic Applications 3 3 4 Management QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory

3 3 credits

10 credits Electrical ETEC 110 ETEC 120 ETEC 131 or ETEC ETEC ETEC ETEC ETEC ETEC Technology Electrical Technology I Electrical Technology II Electronics Technology I 4 4 4 12 credits 111 150 160 232 235 236 Electrical I Electrical II Electronics I Electronics II Electrical Simulation Lab Electronics Simulation Lab 3 3 3 3 2 2 16 credits

English Composition Speech
(3)

6 3 9 credits Total credits required — 60 - 62

(1) This course may be waived for students and transfers with sophomore or higher status. For course description, see computer science course listing. All course substitutions must be approved by the department chairperson. (2) Electives must be approved by the department chairperson. (3) Intensive English as a second language is not accepted as a substitution for any of these requirements. The only permissible substitution is WRIT 111 and WRIT 161 in place of WRIT 101 and WRIT 151.

250

School of Engineering and Computing Sciences

I Curriculum requirements for the

Associate in Applied Science, Telecommunications Technology Verizon Next Step Program

Computer Technology CTEC 201 Computer Applications in Telecommunications Mathematics TMAT 135 Technical Mathematics I TMAT 155 Technical Mathematics II

3 credits 4 4 8 credits

The A.A.S. degree program in Telecommunications Technology: Verizon option, an eight semester day sequence, is offered exclusively for selected employees at Verizon. All credits earned toward the A.A.S. degree program can be transferred to New York Institute of Technology's Bachelor of Science degree program in Telecommunications Management.

Physics PHYS 165 Physics for Telecomm.

4 credits

Telecommunications TELE 181 Telecommunications I - Voice TELE 286 Telecommunications II - Data TELE 291 Telecommunications III - LANs TELE 296 Telecommunications IV

4 4 4 4

Industrial Engineering IENG 280 Technology and Labor Issues 3 credits English WRIT 101 College Composition I WRIT 151 College Composition II 3 3 6 credits Total credits required—60

16 credits Electrical TELE 165 TELE 171 TELE 271 TELE 276 TELE 281 Technology Telecomm. Electrical Circuits Intro to Electronics I Intro to Electronic Comm. Digital Systems for Telecomm I Digital Systems for Telecomm II 4 4 4 4 4

20 credits

TELE 110 Telecommunications Fundamentals 3-0-3 A broad examination of fundamental concepts in telecommunications. Topics include a discussion on signal and channel bandwidth, digitization of voice (with emphasis on PCM), data transmission, analog and digital modulation techniques (AM, FM, PSK, FSK, etc.), multiplexing (FDM, TDM, T1 multiplexing, SONET and SDH), and switching (circuit, packet, and cell). The role of the Public Switched Telephone Network is also examined. An introduction to data networking is presented. Prerequisite: TMAT 135 or equivalent. TELE 165 Telecommunications Electrical Circuits 3-3-4 In this course the Verizon Next Step students learn to analyze DC and AC passive circuits using the Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s laws, and Superposition. RC and RL circuits are analyzed for impedance and phase angles. Troubleshooting, analysis by computer simulation using simulation software, and telecommunication applications are stressed throughout. Prerequisite: TMAT-155, CTEC-201. TELE 171 Introduction to Electronics 3-3-4 In this course the Verizon Next Step students are taught the characteristics of amplifiers using opamps with respect to amplification, dB, frequency response, and input and output impedance. Opamp applications such as inverting and noninverting amps, summing amps, and comparators are introduced with emphasis on the uses of these devices in the tele-

com industry. Electro-optical devices, such as LEDs, laser diodes, and photodiodes, are studied including their use by the telecom industry. Diodes and transistors are conceptually introduced. Transformers are introduced in connection with power supplies. Diodes are applied as switches in linear and switching power supplies. The frequency response of passive networks and amplifiers is measured. Cutoff frequencies, rolloff, bandwidth, and magnitude and phase are discussed and visualized via Bode plots. Troubleshooting and analysis by computer simulation software is stressed throughout. Prerequisite: TELE 165, PHYS 165. TELE 181 Telecommunications I 3-3-4 The Verizon Next Step students will be introduced to the techniques, principles, and terminology of voice telecommunications. Public and private telecommunication networks will be examined. Telecommunication equipment, switching and transmission technology will be demonstrated. The frequency spectrum, modulation schemes and multiplexing techniques will be explored. Lectures and demonstrations will be employed. Laboratory exercises will be required. Prerequisite: TELE 165. Corequisite: TELE 171 TELE 201 Traffic Data Management and Call Analysis 3-0-3 Business analysis of data provided by modern computerbased switches. Interpretation and validity analysis of call and traffic management data. Call and traffic data analysis. Prerequisites: QANT 301.

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TELE 210 Data Networking Fundamentals 3-0-3 Topics discussed include the DTE to DCE physical connection (with emphasis on EIA-232), data link protocols (BISYNC, DDCMP, HDLC), the OSI reference model, LANs, MANs, LAN interconnection and the role of bridges and routers, X.25, TCP/IP, Frame Relay, SMDS, SNA, ISDN, SS7, BISDN, and enterprise networks. An introduction to traffic engineering is also provided. Prerequisite: TELE 110, TMAT 155, QANT 301 or equivalent. TELE 220 Applied Telecommunications 3-0-3 An overview of the fundamentals of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) and broadband ISDN architecture and protocols is presented. The Signaling System 7 (SS7) network structure and architecture is described. Packet switching, Frame Relay and the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) are introduced and compared. Network Management, an introduction to the Internet and traffic engineering are also covered. Corequisite: TELE 210 TELE 265 Telecommunications Workshop 0-3-1 This course is a project course to supplement the Telecommunications and Electrical Technology courses in the Verizon Next Step program. The course can be repeated. TELE 271 Electronic Communication 3-3-4 The Verizon Next Step students will be introduced to the analysis and application of advanced electronic circuits as applied to the telecommunications industry. Topics include frequency response of active filters, oscillators, amplitude modulation, frequency modulation, phase locked loops, pulse modulation concepts, and introduction to television. Theoretical and hands-on troubleshooting of test circuits, and analysis by computer simulation is also covered. Prerequisite: TELE 171. TELE 276 Digital Systems for Telecommunications I 3-3-4 In this course the Verizon Next Step students are introduced to topics in hardware and systems as used in the telecommunications industry. Digital and electrical circuits are explored. Binary numbers systems as applied to telecommunications equipment are discussed. Students will explore hardware to the modular level. Students will demonstrate and simulate digital circuits. Prerequisite: TMAT-135, CTEC-201. TELE 281 Digital Systems for Telecommunications II 3-3-4 In this course the Verizon Next Step students will be introduced to the hardware and software of the personal computer. The course will cover managing and supporting Windows, Configuration, customization, maintenance and troubleshooting. Students will connect a personal computer to a network and install and setup a printer. An optional topic would cover Home Technology Integration including surveillance and home automation. The course is composed of lecture and in-class demonstrations. Prerequisite: TELE 276. TELE 286 Telecommunications II 3-3-4 This course is designed to train students in the organization, architecture, setup, hardware and software aspects of interconnecting local area networks (LANs). Topics include: introduction to networks, types and characteristics of different network architectures and network topologies, intra and inter-network devices, network operating systems, peer-topeer and client/server environments, LAN setup and maintenance, network printing, and internal web servers. A handson approach will be taken, with team projects throughout. Prerequisite: TELE 181 and 281. Corequisite: TELE 271. TELE 291 Telecommunications III 3-3-4 This course is the continuation of Telecommunications II. The Verizon Next Step students are introduced to the organization, architecture, setup, hardware and software aspects of interconnecting local and wide area networks (WANs). Topics include: introduction to intra and inter-network devices, network operating systems, client/server environments, LAN/WAN setups, network printing, and internal web server. A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout. Prerequisite: TELE 286. TELE 296 Telecommunications IV 3-3-4 A survey of current and emerging technologies in Telecommunications will be presented. Lectures, interactive learning. Demonstrations, and site visits will be employed. Prerequisite: TELE 291. TELE 310 Telecommunications Law and Policy 3-0-3 The domestic and international regulatory framework of telecommunications including telephone, broadcasting, cable and private radio is discussed. Historical, economic and legal aspects of telecommunications regulation will be included. First Amendment rights, privacy, copyright, antitrust, contract and product liability, and developing areas such as satellite communications networks and integrated services digital networks (ISDN) are presented. Prerequisite: TELE 110 or equivalent. TELE 321 Cellular and Wireless Technologies 3-0-3 The fundamental concepts of wireless networks, physical layer (air interface) issues and cell planning are introduced. Access technologies, including FDMA, TDMA and CDMA, in Cellular Systems, first Generation Cellular Systems (AMPS), and second Generation Digital Systems are also discussed. The course concludes with a coverage of paging systems and satellite communications. Prerequisites: TELE 110. TELE 325 Network Engineering and Management 3-0-3 Approaches for solving telecommunication network design problems are given. A network simulation program is used. The technical and management issues associated with the administration of complex integrated networks is examined. Case studies are used to illustrate practical situations. Prerequisites: TELE 220, CTEC 204.

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School of Engineering and Computing Sciences
TELE 330 High Speed Information Networks 3-0-3 The application, architecture, and protocols of high speed information networks are examined along with their unique challenges and opportunities. Included in this examination are frame relay networks, BISDN/ATM, high speed LANs and MANs, and the emerging user applications in this environment. Prerequisites: TELE 110 TELE 335 Telecommunications Seminar 3-0-3 Critical analysis of telecommunications management within the framework of generation, dissemination and utilization of information. Corporate, national and international communication systems are examined. Integration of telecommunications principles by examining current issues and future trends with emphasis on the strategic use of telecommunication systems. Offered regularly, but not every semester. Prerequisite: Approval of department chairperson. TELE 340 Advanced Topics in Telecommunications 3-0-3 This seminar-based course will examine emerging trends in telecommunications and networking. May be repeated once. Prerequisite: TELE 220. TELE 345 LAN and Internetworking 3-0-3 The interconnection of dissimilar data networks to provide users with access to network resources from anywhere at anytime is discussed. The role of the Internet and intranets is examined along with the internetworking devices: routers, bridges, and gateways. Important internetworking protocols arediscussed and their application is examined. Selected user applications made possible by this environment will be presented. Prerequisite: TELE 220. TELE 350 Telecommunications Project 3-0-3 This capstone course will focus on the analysis of a telecommunications system from an economic or managerial point of view. The work will require a written and oral proposal, followed by periodic progress reports (oral and written). The project will culminate in a document suitable for publication. Prerequisite: Approval of department chairperson and completion of junior year. TELE 410 Advanced Cellular and Wireless Systems 3-0-3 Cellular and wireless systems are reviewed. Fixed Wireless Systems such as wireless local loop (WLL), wireless LANS (802.11) and packet data over wireless are discussed. Evolution of second Generation Cellular Systems to packet based technologies (GPRS and EDGE) is presented. Third Generation Systems (3G) are introduced. Prerequisite: TELE 321. TELE 420 Internetworking Technology I 3-3-4 Commonly used networking terminology and topologies, fundamental network devices, and internetworking fundamentals are covered. The OSI model and local area network (LAN) protocols are discussed. Network components such as repeaters, hubs, bridges, routers and switches will be used in basic network design. Prerequisite: CTEC 204, TELE 210. TELE 431 Internetworking Technology 2 3-3-4 The design, configuration and maintenance of switches, local area networks (LANs), virtual local area networks (VLANs) and wide area networks (WANs) are covered. Advanced router configurations, network management and security are also discussed. Working on a class project provides critical handson experience. Lectures followed by lab sessions. Prerequisite: TELE 420

253

VANESSA ALI NEW YORK COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences
Chukuka S. Enwemeka, Ph.D., FACSM, Dean

Behavioral Sciences Life Sciences Nursing Nutrition Science

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences

The School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences offers baccalaureate degrees in Behavioral Sciences, Psychology, Criminal Justice, Life Sciences, Nursing, Nutrition Science, Physician Assistant Studies, combined baccalaureate degrees in Life Sciences with the Doctor of Osteopathy degree from NYCOM, and with master’s degrees in Occupational and Physical Therapy, and a master's degree in Clinical Nutrition. The school collaborates with the NYIT New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYCOM) in its academic endeavors. The Dean of NYCOM also heads the School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences.
Behavioral Sciences

(Psychology, Sociology/ Social Work, and Criminal Justice) Faculty: W. V. Calabro, D. KarafantisE. Maggio, S. Gray, M. LaPadula, L. Levitt, C. Ortiz, L. Tester. Adjunct Faculty: T. Abramson, V. Amato, J. Brukman, A. Cantiello, J Davis, A. DiCaprio, M. Finkelstein, S. Golos, J. Karmen, P. Lauren, A. Logallo, J. Maher, W. Magnuson, J. McGuire, A. Michaels, A. Mulrain, P. Pardine, R. Pepper, L. Rangell, S. Ross, P. Schoenberger, G. Schoenewolf, V. Stephan, D. Tricamo, S. Turkel, M. Woods. The Behavioral Sciences department offers a B.S. degree in Psychology, a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice, and a B.S. degree in Behavioral Sciences-social work/sociology option. These programs prepare students for a wide variety of careers in clinical, social, educational, industrial, and law enforcement environments. Graduates become eligible for numerous positions such as human relations specialist, addiction counselor, caseworker, psychological technician, police officer, investigator, corporate security positions, emergency management positions, and various government positions. Similarly, graduates are prepared by means of these programs for post-graduate study and advanced training in the fields of psychology, sociology, social work, counseling, special education, criminal justice, and law. Qualified seniors may complete their baccalaureate requirements and concurrently pursue a Master of Professional Studies in Human Relations, a graduate program directed toward developing a working understanding of the dynamics underlying human behavior and the helping skills needed to function as a professional in a variety of settings. Law enforcement scholarship programs make it possible for law enforcement and related criminal justice personnel to earn a bachelor’s degree in behavioral sciences or to take noncredit courses for personal and job enrichment. Four eight-week cycles and summer sessions are offered. Behavioral sciences promotes the various research fields of its faculty, such as biofeedback, drug abuse, group interactions, self-help, social ecology, psychological-physiological interrelationships, relationships between personality and academic achievement, and program evaluation.

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Combined Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science (Criminal Justice Option)/Juris Doctor (from Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center)

The Combined Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science (Criminal Justice)/Juris Doctor (B.S./J.D.) is for talented, highly motivated students. Students in this program complete their baccalaureate preparation in three years and may then be admitted directly into the Touro Law Center, which requires three years to complete the J.D. degree. Admission into the baccalaureate portion of the program requires an overall high school average of 80 or above, a combined SAT score of 1100 or above, or ACT composite of 26, an essay detailing the student's desire to have a career in criminal law, and a successful interview with the Admissions Committee. Because of the special nature of this curriculum, no transfer credits will be awarded. In order to remain in good standing in the combined program, a student's grade point average may not fall below 3.0 in two consecutive semesters while at NYIT. In the first three years, students will complete 95 of 128 credits for the NYIT B.S. degree in Behavioral Sciences (Criminal Justice Option). Assuming they maintain a satisfactory grade point average and achieve a qualifying score on the LSAT of 152 or higher, they will then apply to Touro Law Center to commence their law degree studies. During the first two years of the J.D., 33 credits will be applied from Touro Law Center to NYIT in satisfaction of the remaining requirements for the B.S. The J.D. will be awarded the following year upon successful completion of 87 credits. The separate requirements of both degrees must be met. Acceptance into the J.D. portion of the program at Touro Law Center is based upon the following criteria: Candidates must have a strong academic record as reflected by their cumulative grade point average at NYIT (generally 3.0 is required); and above-average aptitude for law study, as reflected by their Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) score (generally 152 is required); and a high level of motivation and maturity, as evidence in their personal statement and any supporting documentation. The Touro Law Center's admissions process does not require letters of recommendation, but the Admissions Committee will review up to three letters if submitted. Similarly, the Law Center's admissions process does not ordinarily require interviews, but an Admission counselor is available to meet with prospective students. The Touro Law Center's admissions process seeks to review each student on the totality of his/her application and, therefore, takes a flexible approach to evaluating each candidate's statistical predictors as circumstances warrant.

WHEN CAN YOU START?

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

I Curriculum requirements for the

Additional Course in History or Political Science

3

Bachelor of Science in Psychology, Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice and Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Sciences

15 credits English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 2xx WRIT 3xx Composition I Composition II Speech Group A English Course Group B English Course 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits Electives: Liberal Arts Electives Behavioral Sciences Electives Two courses chosen from Behavioral Sciences 3 6

Required Core for Psychology, Criminal Justice and Social Work/Sociology: Behavioral PSYC 101 PSYC 205 PSYC 210 PSYC 310 PSYC 370 PSYC 410 SOCI 101 Sciences Intro. to Psychology Theories of Personality Statistical Analysis Abnormal Psychology Introductory Research Methods Physiological Basis of Behavior Introduction to Sociology 3 3 4 3 4 3 3

23 credits Computers, Science and Mathematics Physical Science Life Science MATH 115 Introductory Concepts of Math MIST 101 Computer Applications 3 3 3 3

General Electives 6-33 credits (May include College Success Seminar) Required Core Behavioral Science Option Total for Degree 80-107 credits 21-48 credits 128 credits

12 credits Social Sciences and Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics PHIL 110 Problems of Philosophy PHIL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy or PHIL 260 Philosophy of Science PSCI 110 American Government and Politics 3 3 3 3

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I Requirements for Psychology
Psychology PSYC 251 Measurement Concepts Select any six courses from below: ANTH 101 Anthropology PSYC 220 Child Psychology PSYC 240 Educational Psychology PSYC 245 Learning Theory PSYC 250 Environmental Psychology PSYC 260 Social Psychology PSYC 265 Organizational Psychology PSYC 330 Communication and Interviewing Techniques PSYC 335 Personnel Psychology PSYC 425 Introduction to Counseling PSYC 431, 432, 440, 443, or 445 Seminar 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

I Requirements for Criminal
Justice Criminal Justice CRIM 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice CRIM 301 Criminal Investigation CRIM 303 Police Psychology CRIM 305 Police and Community Relations CRIM 320 Probation and Parole CRIM 330 Patrol Function CRIM 354 Organized Crime CRIM 375 Criminal Law and Proceedings CRIM 415 Crisis Intervention PSYC 330 Communication and Interviewing Techniques SOCI 150 American Urban Minorities SOCI 378 Criminology 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

I Requirements for Social
Work/Sociology Social Work/Sociology Option PSYC 495 Fieldwork

21 credits Criminal Justice Electives

36 credits Select any four courses from below: CRIM 201 Police Administration CRIM 215 Law of Evidence CRIM 310 Modern Police Management CRIM 325 Forensic Technology CRIM 360 Principles of Correction CRIM 370 Correction Administration CRIM 379 Special Problems in Crim Justice CRIM 380 Private Security Seminar CRIM 420 Computers and Crime CRIM 430 Constitutional Case Law CRIM 470 Skills Training PSCI 240 Basic Legal Concepts PSCI 350 Government and Metro Problems SOCI 210 Social Problems SOCI 373 Juvenile Delinquency

4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Select any six courses from below: ANTH 101 Anthropology PSYC 330 Communication and Interviewing Techniques SOCI 150 American Urban Minorities SOCI 210 Social Problems SOCI 301 Marriage and the Family SOCI 373 Juvenile Delinquency SOCI 376 Medical Sociology SOCI 378 Criminology SOCI 410 Introduction to Social Work SOCI 460 Social Work II

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

12 credits

22 credits

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I Curriculum Requirements for the
Major Requirements Behavioral Science Core Complete PSYC 101 PSYC 210 PSYC 330 PSYC SOCI SOCI SOCI 410 101 210 378 all seven (7) of the following: Intro. to Psychology Statistical Analysis Communication and Interviewing Techniques Physiological Basis of Behavior Introduction to Sociology Social Problems Criminology

Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Sciences—Criminal Justice/Juris Doctor Option 52 credits

English WRIT 101 WRIT 151 SPCH 105 LITR 2xx WRIT 3xx

Composition I Composition II Speech Group A English Course Group B English Course

3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

3 4 3 3 3 3 3

History/Poli. Sci./Eco. ECON 101 Basic Economics (HIST/PSCI) History or Political Science course PHIL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy

3 3 3

9 credits College Success Seminar Liberal Arts Elective General Elective Total Credits at NYIT B.S. degree credits to be completed at Touro Law Center Civil Procedure I & II Torts I & II Legal Methods I & II Criminal Law Constitutional Law I & II Evidence Law Electives
(1)

2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 96 credits

22 credits Select four (4) courses from the following: PSYC 205 Theories of Personality PSYC 230 Intro to Effective Comm PSYC 310 Abnormal Psychology PSYC 360 Group Dynam. & Interper. Processes PSYC 370 Research Methods for BES SOCI 150 American Urban Minorities SOCI 340 Social Stratification SOCI 373 Juvenile Delinquency 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3

12 credits Criminal Justice Option Complete CRIM 101 CRIM 201 CRIM 301 CRIM 305 CRIM 320 CRIM 360 all six (6) of the following: Introduction to Criminal Justice Police Administration Criminal Investigation Police and Community Relations Probation and Parole Principles of Correction 3 3 3 3 3 3

6 6 4 3 6 4 4 33 credits

Total credits for B.S. degree (NYIT and Touro combined)

129 credits

(Additional 26 credits at Touro Law Center required for Juris Doctor degree)
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

18 credits Liberal Arts Requirements 44 credits 3 3 3 3 Math/Science/Computer BIOL 101 Life Science MATH 115 Introductory Concepts of Math MIST 101 Introduction to EDP Business PHYS 115 Physical Science

12 credits

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ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology 3-0-3 An introduction to the study of ancient man and primitive cultures. Major topics include: the origins and evolution of man; the evolution of different cultural forms in terms of craft and technology, magic, religion, and government. ANTH 205 Anthropology of Health 3-0-3 This course focuses on the anthropological approach to health, in which the student develops a holistic perspective by integrating biological, ecological, sociocultural, and historical aspects of health and illness. Examples are taken from societies throughout the inhabited world and in various time periods. Specific topics include human reproduction, nutrition, the use of psycho active drugs, and the relationship between caregivers and their clients. The relationship of minority cultural systems within larger pluralistic societies are also studied. Prerequisite: ANTH 101. PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology 3-0-3 An introduction to selected concepts, methods, and vocabulary of psychology. Focus of study will be on the individual and the conditions that influence behavior. Topics that will be covered include: growth and development, learning and thinking, emotions and motivations, personality and assessment, maladjustment and mental health, groups and social interaction, and social influence and society. PSYC 205 Theories of Personality 3-0-3 A survey of the major theoretical approaches to understanding the development, structure, and dynamics of personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 210 Statistical Analysis 4-0-4 This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, frequency distributions, percentile rank, measure of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression and tests of significance. Using computer software students will directly apply these statistics to specific problems common to the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 115 PSYC 220 Child Psychology 3-0-3 The study of human growth and development. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of children and how they change while passing through the major phases of growth. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and personality development with an aim toward understanding the period of human growth on which adulthood is founded. Special topics include: identification of conditions in childhood leading to normal psychological development. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 221 Human Development 3-0-3 The study of human growth and development. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of children and adolescents and how they change while passing through the major phases of growth. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and personality development with an aim toward understanding the period of human growth on which adulthood is founded. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (Prerequisite or corequisite for teacher certification: EDUC 201.) PSYC 223 Adolescent Psychology 3-0-3 An introduction to the study of that portion of human development called adolescence. Some of the topics treated: significance of puberty, biological and social sex roles, adolescent image, the emergence of new figures such as peers and idols, society at large as agents of socialization in place of parents and family, the extinction of old habits and practices and their replacement with new behavioral patterns. Theoretical consideration will be supplemented with observational experience. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 225 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 3-0-3 The study of human aging and changes during adulthood. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of early, middle, and later adulthood. Topics include physical changes, social-life changes, identity and interpersonal behavior, family life, and retirement, as well as the pathologies of old age. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 230 Introduction to Effective Communication 3-0-3 The communication process is basic to all interaction, cutting across all other areas of managerial knowledge and skill. Indepth training in the concepts and skills needed for effective oral and written communication between individuals and in groups. Interpersonal effectiveness in listening, responding and presenting. Models of effective communication are examined, and attention is given to the impact of language on behavior, particularly on personal decision making. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSYC 235 Behavioral Sciences in Marketing 3-0-3 An investigation of the behavioral sciences disciplines as they affect marketing decisions. Consideration of such fields as psychology, sociology, and anthropology as the bases for studying consumer motivation and behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 240 Educational Psychology 3-0-3 Emphasis on human learning. Consideration of concepts of readiness, individual differences, motivation, retention, transfer, concept development, reasoning, mental health, and measurement as related to learning. Psychological principles of teaching-learning technology are examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 245 Learning Theory 3-0-3 Learning theory is a fundamental science course. The student is asked to trace the emergence of modern cognitive learning theory (neo-behaviorism) from the original works of Pavlov, Thorndike, and Watson through the “blackbox” Skinnerian school of thought. The course emphasizes theoretical rather than methodological issues and, as such, is designed to give the student a firm grasp of the conditions under which per-

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manent behavior change occurs. Prerequisite: (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSYC 101. equipment); preparing and presenting proposals (both written and verbal); delivering and installing equipment (taking into consideration physical space and training of the customer personnel who will operate this equipment); satisfying existing customers. Individual sales skills will be stressed, as opposed to the larger scale marketing tactics of a marketing division. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101. PSYC 335 Personnel Psychology 3-0-3 Examines the important role of individual differences in selecting and placing employees, in appraising the level of employee’s work performance and in training recently hired and veteran employees to improve various aspects of jobrelated behavior. Emphasis is placed on job analysis, measurement of performance and methods used in selection, i.e., tests and interviews. Special attention to the legal issues involving fairness in selection of employees. Prerequisites: PSYC 101; previous coursework in elementary statistics recommended. PSYC 340 Community Psychology 3-0-3 The broad range of activities of psychologists and counselors in community settings will be examined. An intensive study will be made of between twenty and twenty-five special areas of community involvement, including hospitals, rehabilitation services, halfway houses and outreach clinics, crisis intervention centers, and correctional institutions. Emphasis is on the prevention, recognition, and remediation of problems, including field experience. The social, professional, and personal rationales for community psychology as a separate academic and professional entity will be considered. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101, PSYC 345. PSYC 345 Community Mental Health 3-0-3 An analysis of the current status of the community mental health movement which attempts to define and anticipate future trends. Topics include health and social environment, preventive health education, type and quality of community mental health services, organizational complexities, manpower, consumer attributes, consumer participation, and impact on other mental health organizations. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101. PSYC 356 Rehabilitation Psychology 3-0-3 Review of contemporary theories, practices, and research in rehabilitation of the emotionally, mentally, and physically disabled. Selected topics will include various addictions, mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional disorders, and physical incapacities. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101, PSYC 205, and PSYC 310. PSYC 360 Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Processes 3-0-3 Improvement of interpersonal skills needed in managing people. The nature of small groups, group formation and development, group composition and structure, the nature of group goals, leadership in groups. Application of the concepts of small group functioning to improving the individual’s ability to accurately perceive and diagnose problems, compare interpersonal problems and adjust personal behavior to situational demands. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101.

PSYC 250 Environmental Psychology 3-0-3 A study of man’s relationship to the physical environment. Topics include the effects of architecture on behavior, design in selective environments, social uses of space, urban and environmental stressors, encouraging ecological behaviors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 251 Measurement Concepts 3-0-3 The construction, validation, and interpretation of test results. Group and individual tests of aptitude, intelligence, and personality are analyzed. Each student will develop and administer a measure for a specific diagnostic or research purpose. Prerequisite: PSYC 101, PSYC 210. PSYC 260 Social Psychology 3-0-3 An analysis of the structures and properties of human groups. Topics include: group formation, development of role relationships, intra-group and inter-group conflict, factors influencing group effectiveness, the role of motivation, and attitudes in group processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 265 Organizational Psychology 3-0-3 A study of the impact of organizational structure, leadership and group dynamics on role-related behaviors, on personal feelings of motivation and commitment and communication within the organization. The course stresses theories of work motivation and job satisfaction and linkage of these factors with worker performance. A major focus of organizational psychology concerns the means by which organizations, supervisory and work-group factors can facilitate or interfere with the individual worker’s feelings and behaviors on the job. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 310 Abnormal Psychology 3-0-3 A study of mental health and abnormal behavior. The topics covered include: definitions of mental health and mental illness; problems of adjustment; the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate the theoretical parts of the course material. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. PSYC 330 Communication and Interviewing Techniques 3-0-3 The examination of communication from various standpoints, as illustrated by different types of interviews. Interviewing techniques employed for personnel selection are compared with those used in interrogation and those used for the therapeutic purposes. Practice in interviewing. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101. PSYC 333 Psychology of Salesmanship 3-0-3 Although the course will be largely focused on technical sales, large segments of the course will have applicability to general sales skills. Major topics will be: developing new customers (which includes making approach calls and demonstrating

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PSYC 370 Introductory Research Methods for BES 3-2-4 This course stresses the classical approach to experimental research on human behavior. Students conduct and report on experiments in the fields of psychophysics, psychomotor learning, memory, and perception. These laboratory experiments permit the student to apply knowledge gained in former courses about measurements, statistical inference, and the design of experiments. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 210. PSYC 380 Advanced Quantitative Methods for the BES 3-0-3 Provides a foundation in statistics for the student who will pursue advanced training in the behavioral sciences. The major topics included in this course are correlational techniques, regression analysis, simple and factorial analysis of variance, power analysis, and nonparametric statistics. Prerequisite: PSYC 210. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSYC 381, 383, 490, 495 Workshop Workshops are designed to broaden the educational experience of students through appropriate applied and experiential learning coupled with academic instruction. Workshop focus will vary from semester to semester covering such areas as interpersonal communication, group dynamics, and biofeedback. Students may reenroll up to a maximum of 12 credits, but are not permitted to repeat workshops on the same topic. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. PSYC 410 Physiological Basis of Behavior 3-0-3 A basic course to familiarize students with the bodily processes involved in various aspects of human behavior. Physiological psychology studies the biological basis of psychological functions such as sleeping, emotions, motivations, perceptions, learning, memory, and problem solving. The two major biological systems most relevant to psychology are the nervous system and the glandular system. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 (BIOL 110 and BIOL 150 are recommended.) PSYC 425 Introduction to Counseling 3-0-3 Theories and practical techniques of counseling, including advisement, guidance, and supportive psychotherapy, by both directive and non-directive methods. Counseling is considered both as a career in itself and as a component of one’s job in such fields as teaching, business and personnel management, health occupations, social work, and the law. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 205. PSYC 431, 432 Seminar Students may enroll for up to a maximum of 8 credits, but are not permitted to repeat a seminar on the same topic. Topics studied will vary from semester to semester, but include: alienation, generation gap, drugs, sexual revolution, interpersonal dynamics, self-actualization, social commitment, individual freedom, religion, human encounter. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) PSYC 440 Psychology Seminar—Emotions & Motivations 3-0-3 PSYC 443 Psychology Seminar—History & Systems 3-0-3 PSYC 445 Psychology Seminar—Sensation & Perception 3-0-3 The content focus of these seminars will change in a sequential manner from semester to semester and will cover the areas of history and systems of psychology, emotions and motivations, and sensation and perception. Students may elect to take up to 6 credits, but may not repeat a seminar on the same topic. Suggested for students who are planning to go on to graduate school. Prerequisite: 12 credits of BES courses. PSYC 470 Advanced Research Methods for BES 3-2-4 An advanced course in current topics of experimental psychology. Emphasis is placed on individual research projects in areas of perception, learning, motivation, emotion, and psychophysiology. Prerequisites: PSYC 251. PSYC 480 Individual Research and Study 3-3-4 An advanced behavioral science project in an area of interest to the student. A final report is required. Prerequisites: Completion of 24 BES credits, including PSYC 370. PSYC 495 Field Placement 1-6-4 This course will provide students with a structured and supervised work activity where they will observe and participate in the application of the principles and methods of the behavioral sciences in a variety of settings which are human-service oriented. The course will also promote the development of skills in the application of behavioral principles and stimulate insight into the specific problems of such application to specific settings. Examples of settings include homes for disturbed children, counseling centers, facilities for the retarded, crisis centers, and other social service agencies. Prerequisite: 24 credits of BES courses. SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology 3-0-3 An analysis of the social and cultural forces which govern human behavior. The principal topics include: social interaction and organization, socialization processes, primary groups and the family (associations, bureaucracy, and other social institutions), collective behavior, population, and ecology. SOCI 150 American Urban Minorities 3-0-3 An in-depth analysis of the diverse ethnic structure of the urban community. Major attention is given to black, Puerto Rican, and Mexican groups. Topics include: a survey of each group’s social and economic structure, an examination of ghetto conditions and their effects, the impact of urban conditions on the new arrival, a comparison with the adaptation and treatment accorded earlier migrants, the validity of the melting pot concept, and a comparison of the life styles of various minority groups. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.

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SOCI 210 Social Problems 3-0-3 A sociological analysis of social problems in American society. All social problems will be viewed from a structural perspective, i.e., the root cause of a social problem lies in the institutional arrangements of a given society. Various institutional arrangements of American society that give rise to social problems will be evaluated in terms of value-conflicts, power structures, and economic institutions. Major topics include: inequality, poverty, environmental destruction, ageism, educational institutions, social deviance, unemployment, problems of the city. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 Behavioral Science credits including PSYC 101 and SOCI 101. SOCI 301 Marriage and the Family 3-0-3 The course covers historical changes in family patterns, contemporary family life in different cultures and subcultures, evolution of the American family pattern, functions of the family, the family as primary group, kinship patterns, and nuclear and extended families. Other topics include: dating, mate selection, family disorganization, and marital success. Prerequisite: SOCI 101. SOCI 340 Social Stratification 3-0-3 The nature of caste and class in societies. Topics include: theories of social differentiation and stratification; comparison of caste, estate-class, and class systems; social mobility; and structural change. Emphasis is given to local and national stratification systems in the United States. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101, or permission of the dean. (Offered regularly, but not every semester.) SOCI 348 Introduction to Sociological Theory 3-0-3 The development of sociological theory in Europe and the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from Comte to the present day. Emphasis is given to comparing and contrasting various schools of theoretical thought. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and SOCI 101 or permission of the dean. SOCI 355 Urban Society 3-0-3 A sociological analysis of modern urban ways of life. The formation of a core city, suburbs, metropolitan areas, and a giant urban area (megalopolis). The development of slums and the social problems which attend slum conditions. Also, problems of urban renewal, transportation, integration of community functions, ethnic distribution, social stratification, and land usage. Major emphasis is on the New York metropolitan area as compared with other major cities. Prerequisite: SOCI 101. SOCI 373 Juvenile Delinquency 3-0-3 An inquiry into the causes of juvenile delinquency and the social and psychological factors involved in the predictive studies and theories concerning the development of delinquency. Topics also include formation of youth gangs, methods of coping with gang activity, the types of crime committed by children and youths, narcotics problems, neglected and retarded children, the youthful offender and wayward minor, the operation of the Children’s Court, crime prevention programs. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101, and CRIM 378. SOCI 376 Medical Sociology 3-0-3 This course examines the social structure of health care service and the interplay of the various health-related professions. Special attention will be given to the institutional pattern of health care, including the social aspects of health, sickness, dying, types of practitioners, and the social organization of therapeutic settings. Prerequisite: 12 credits of BES courses. SOCI 377 Political Sociology 3-0-3 This course will discuss the nature and various dimensions of power in society, with emphasis on some of the ideas of Karl Marx and Max Weber. It will survey the theoretical and empirical material dealing with power structures on a national and community level. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and SOCI 101. SOCI 378 Criminology 3-0-3 An examination of crime and theories of crime causation. Topics include: the white collar criminal, the professional criminal, and the structure of organized crime. The criminal-justice process is analyzed, including the role of the police, the criminal courts, the probation officer, correctional services, and the re-entry of the offender into society. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and SOCI 101. SOCI 379 Social Policy 3-0-3 A theoretical and empirical analysis of the development and implementation of social policies relating to health, education and welfare. Examination of the socioeconomic, legal, and political contexts within which social policy is formed. Analysis and evaluation of the present social service system and possible changes for the future. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and SOCI 101. SOCI 410 Introduction to Social Work 3-0-3 A survey of the various approaches and orientations to the general field of social work. Consideration is given to case work, group work, and community organization as well as to the interrelationship of psychology, sociology, and anthropology, with the social work profession, (with accompanying field placements). Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and SOCI 101. SOCI 460 Social Work II 3-0-3 This is the second social work course open to students who have completed SOCI 410. It is designed to meet the dual purpose of providing students with a framework for assessing and understanding the range of policy issues posed in the current organization, financing, and delivery of social services in the United States, and for evaluating proposals being made in the arenas of public policy for more comprehensive systems of social service. Emerging models of social service delivery systems will be reviewed. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101, SOCI 410.

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Criminal Justice Option, Specialty Courses:
CRIM 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3-0-3 An introduction to the contemporary American criminal justice system. Discussion of the role of police, courts and prisons. Also examined is the juvenile justice system. General issues considered include: police discretion, due process and change as an integral element of the American criminal justice system. CRIM 201 Police Administration 3-0-3 An introduction to the organization and structure of a police department. Topics include an overview of the police departments, an analysis of the police function, tables of organization, chains of command and lines of authority, division of labor, and the informal police organization. Attention centers on typical problems of police administration and the coordination of police services. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. CRIM 215 Law of Evidence 3-0-3 An explanation and analysis of the rules of evidence. The course treats recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning the rights of the citizen against unreasonable search and seizure, and the rules of giving testimony and the protecting and safeguarding of evidence. In addition to instruction in the law of evidence, time is devoted to visiting court and to demonstrations of proper and improper presentation of evidence. Prerequisite: CRIM 375 or approval of the dean. CRIM 301 Criminal Investigation 3-0-3 Introduction to criminal investigation in the field. Analysis and explanation of conduct at the crime scene, strategies for interviewing and interrogating witnesses and suspects, techniques of surveillance and preservation of evidence for presentation in court. CRIM 303 Police Psychology 3-0-3 The focus of the course will be on the personality, character, behavioral changes and social isolation that result from the inherent high levels of stress and trauma associated with police work (from entry level to retirement). Factors such as managerial planning, supervision, specialized assignments, high hazard work, tour changes, work environments, alcoholism, substance abuse, other addictive behavior patterns, suicide, and codependent family issues will be identified and addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. CRIM 305 Police and Community Relations 3-0-3 This course analyzes the complex relationship between police and community, community attitudes toward police, the efforts of the police organization to create a more favorable public image, the emergence of a civil rights and civil liberties movement, and the contribution of the individual police officer to police-community relations. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. CRIM 310 Modern Police Management 3-0-3 The essentials of personnel management and fundamentals of supervision and leadership as applied to the administration of police organizations. The course will examine such issues as decision making processes, leadership styles, budgetary and union problems, motivation, discipline, public policy, performance measurement, and organizational development. CRIM 315 Forensic Anthropology 3-3-4 The application of anthropological and archeological methods and theory to solving legal and other problems of public concern. Topics include the location and recovery of human remains, and their identification; the analyses of skeletonized and decomposing bodies, especially the determination of age, sex, race, stature and other biological categories, as well as the individual identification of such remains; the determination of time elapsed since death; the recognition and analyses of evidence relevant to criminal investigations associated with human remains. Laboratory exercises focus on human osteology. CRIM 320 Probation and Parole 3-0-3 An examination of organization and management in probation and parole systems. Topics include: distinctions between probation and parole in terms of organizational function and types of clients served; client relationships and interactions with other social control agencies; case loads, case work methods, and case supervision; problems in pre-sentence investigation; and job requirements and performance standards for probation and parole officers with particular emphasis on recruitment, training, and assignment. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101. CRIM 325 Forensic Technology 3-0-3 An introduction to problems and techniques of scientific criminal investigation. Emphasis on value and assistance of various scientific aids to the investigator. Included are such topics as fingerprint identification, lie detector usage, hypnosis, blood typing, hair analysis, DNA typing and crime scene analysis. CRIM 330 Patrol Function 3-0-3 A course devoted to an analysis of the objectives and functions of the uniformed police. Emphasis is placed on detailed examination of many typical patrol problems and consideration of both the sociological and psychological factors which facilitate or impede effective performance. CRIM 354 Organized Crime 3-0-3 This course examines traditional and nontraditional organized crime group. Topics to be covered include the role of law enforcement in investigating organized crime groups, the external relations (police, courts, prisons) within the law enforcement community as they relate to organized criminal groups. Also, the history of organized crime as it relates to the domestic and international law enforcement community will be covered. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

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CRIM 360 Principles of Correction 3-0-3 The development of modern correction ideology. Topics include: the growth of humanitarianism in treatment of the offender, the concept of resocializing the offender as a productive member of society, principles and procedure for reintroducing the offender to society, and systems and practices employed by other nations. The effects of correctional practices upon the inmate, probationer, and discharged offender are analyzed, and trends in correctional services are also reviewed. Prerequisite: CRIM 370. CRIM 370 Correction Administration 3-0-3 An analysis of the organization of various types of correction agencies. Among the agencies to be compared are local detention and county jails, short-term custodial institutions, and state and federal correction systems. Topics include: theories of prison administration, inter-agency and public relations, planning and budgeting, laws governing the treatment of inmates, and security considerations. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. CRIM 375 Criminal Law and Proceedings 3-0-3 A study of the elements of the Penal Law particularly relevant to police officers, including a review and analysis of major criminal offenses with consideration given to the available defenses and judicial interpretations. CRIM 379 Special Problems in Criminal Justice 3-0-3 This course will provide students with the opportunity to investigate topics within the field of criminal justice. Topics may be timely or political in nature and may cover areas as police brutality, evidence mishandling, immigration laws, police corruption, forensic abuses or any other topic relevant to an issue within the criminal justice field. This is a senior level course and students must have approval by the department chairperson. Prerequisite: CRIM 101, CRIM 305, CRIM 325. CRIM 380 Private Security Seminar/Workshop 3-0-3 Addresses specific issues and problems in private security management. Topics to be covered include: specialized crime typologies such as white-collar, electronic, commercial, and

organized crime; legal aspects of security management; and principles of occupational safety. (Senior course) Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. CRIM 415 Crisis Intervention for Public Safety Personnel 3-0-3 Examines the concepts and techniques used by criminal justice practitioners in handling crisis situations. The focus of the course will be the development of skills to intervene effectively with specific types of crises, thereby diffusing the immediate conflict situation. Topics to be covered include: landlord/tenant disputes, family fights, suicide attempts, civil disorder and demonstrations, labor/management relations, and common crises occurring at institutional and corporate sites. (Junior course). CRIM 420 Computers and Crime 3-0-3 This course will examine the use of computers in the commission of crimes, the use of computers in tracking criminal activity, and computer security. Prerequisite: At least 12 credits of Crim 215 series. CRIM 430 Constitutional Case Law 3-0-3 An in-depth examination of significant Supreme Court decisions which impact on the interpretation and application of the Bill of Rights. Special attention is given to those decisions which affect law enforcement practices and procedures at the state and local level. CRIM 470 Skills Training 3-0-3 The practical application of learned theoretical principles. Students will be presented with training devices such as films, tapes, statistical data, and in-basket materials designed to simulate a practicum experience. These training devices will depict criminal, quasi-criminal, and noncriminal situations and require students to prepare cases as both prosecutor and witness (moot court) and justify decisions, types of intervention, and procedures to follow in the examples provided. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean.

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Life Sciences
Faculty: G. Carney, H. Diener, C. Gagna, C. Hummel, E. Mitacek, N. Nath, J. Ringen. Adjunct Faculty: J. Connor, D. Deal, F. Feldmann, E. Gutierrez, N. Gutierrez, B. Hallas, D. Kershan, Y. Li, G. Mintz, G. Sobel, G. Torres. Health and environment-related studies are the basis for dealing effectively with the characteristic complexities of the modern world. Solutions to worldwide problems call for deep understanding and the intelligent application of chemical, medical, bioengineering, and environmental sciences and technologies. With expanded facilities to fulfill the modern student’s needs in this field of broad new dimensions, the School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences offers a variety of interrelated programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences degree. The curriculum provides a wide choice of courses toward options in biology, biomedical engineering, chemistry, environmental sciences, premedical preprofessional preparation in the health sciences, and certification for teaching secondary-school biology or chemistry. NYIT offers two separate programs to students who wish to attend medical or other professional schools: a Premedical Program or the Combined Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program.
Premedical Studies

All students accepted into any of the premedical programs will receive ongoing assistance, advice and consultation by all School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences and NYCOM faculty. In some cases students will take medical courses with medical students in the medical school and participate in interdisciplinary training programs. Students should meet with the departmental Chairperson in order to discuss the complete requirements of the program most suited to their needs. The Life Sciences Department has a special relationship with the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of NYIT (NYCOM). Students who graduate within the Life Sciences premedicine and other preprofessional option will be given preferential treatment in the Admissions process at NYCOM. The premedical program provides thorough training in all required subjects for medical school or other health professional school admission, and general preparation for the medical college admission test (MCAT) which is required for admission to almost all medical schools. The premedical program is a 4-year program designed for talented and motivated students who are willing to work hard to achieve their goals. The premedical program requires that students submit SAT or ACT results, and their High School transcripts. To qualify for preferential treatment for admission to NYCOM, the student must meet all of the following requirements: 1) have a 3.30 overall cumulative average and a 3.0 in the sciences; 2) have a combined MCAT score of 24 and at least an N on the writing sample; and 3) obtain favorable letters of recommendation from the Departmental Preprofessional committee.

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B.S./D.O.—Combined Bachelor of Science in Life Science/Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine

The Combined Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program (B.S./D.O.) is an accredited program for talented, highly motivated students. Students in this program complete their baccalaureate preparation in three years and may then be admitted directly into the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, which requires four years for the D.O. degree. To be admitted into this special program, students must submit SAT and/or ACT results with a combined SAT score of 1200 or above or an ACT total of at least 28. In addition they must have a High School average of 90 or above and a high class standing. Following the completion of three years at the undergraduate school, students may qualify for admission into NYCOM only if they have maintained a 3.50 overall cumulative average and a 3.0 in the sciences, received a combined MCAT score of 26 and at least an N on the writing sample, obtained favorable letters of recommendation from the departmental premedicine committee and received a supportive interview from NYCOM’s admissions committee. The B.S. degree will be conferred upon successful completion of the first year at NYCOM.
Admission Requirements for High School Graduates and Transfer Students without a Bachelor’s Degree

The combined B.S./M.S. occupational therapy degree program provides preparation for students entering the professional program. To be eligible for admission into the combined B.S./M.S. program, applicants must possess a high school degree or equivalency. To be competitive, students must have an overall GPA of 2.5. Preference is given to applicants with a 3-4-year sequence in high school math and science regents courses. In addition, students are required to provide the following:
I I I I I I I

Documentation of 100 hours of volunteer or paid employment under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist. An essay (350-500 words) detailing the desire to pursue occupational therapy as a career. A second professional letter of reference (the first letter is the letter from the licensed occupational therapist documenting the volunteer hours). Official transcripts from high school and all post-secondary schools attended. A personal interview (for qualifying candidates). An on-site essay on an assigned topic. Competence in written and spoken English and computer skills (preparation of documents, spreadsheets, graphs, databases, research and presentations). To be competitive, applicants should have an overall GPA of at least 2.5, with no science or math grade below C and a combined SAT score of 850. The Department of Occupation Therapy Admissions Committee will review completed applications and render the final admission decision for review by the NYIT Office of Admissions.

I I

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B.S./M.S.—Combined Bachelor of Science in Life Science, Health Professions—Occupational Therapy Option/Master of Science in Occupational Therapy

The combined Bachelor of Science in Life Science/Master of Science in Occupational Therapy is a 5 1/2 year program (3 + 2 1/2: 3 years of pre-professional courses and a 2 1/2 year professional phase). The master’s degree program provides entry-level professional education in occupational therapy. For details on the professional phase of the program, please consult the NYIT Graduate Catalog. The occupational therapy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824 1220; (301) 652-AOTA; www.aota.org. The program is approved by the New York State Education Department. Graduates of the master’s degree program are eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an occupational therapist registered (OTR). Most states also require licensure in order to practice; however, eligibility for state licenses is usually based on the results of the NBCOT examination as well as on other requirements.
In order to enter the professional phase of the program, applicants must have completed the following undergraduate courses:

8 credits in chemistry with lab 8 credits in physics with lab 8 credits in biology with a lab 4 credits in human physiology with lab 3 credits in general or introduction to psychology 3 credits in developmental or child psychology 3 credits in abnormal psychology College algebra and trigonometry OR introduction to calculus One course in statistics One course in anthropology OR sociology One course in ethics This combined program is designed for undergraduates, freshmen or transfer students, who wish to be admitted to the Master of Science program in Occupational Therapy following three years of undergraduate work. Students may apply for admission into the master’s program (professional phase) after completion of all prerequisite courses, if they have maintained an overall GPA of 2.5, received no science or math grade below a C and received the recommendation of the Occupational Therapy Admissions Committee after a personal interview. The B.S. in Life Science will be conferred after successful completion of the first professional year of the Occupational Therapy master’s degree program. See NYIT’s Graduate Catalog for details of the Master of Science in Occupational Therapy program. Students in this option who are not accepted into the professional phase of the Occupational Therapy program must complete the requirements for another Life Science option in order to receive a Baccalaureate degree. Students are advised that two semesters of organic chemistry with lab are required for admission to medical schools and to most other professional and graduate programs in the health professions, behavorial and life science fields. In addition, employment in the life sciences usually requires knowledge of organic chemistry and biochemistry at a 269

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level greater than that offered by the single semester of bioorganic chemistry (CHEM 215). Therefore, it is strongly recommended that students who do not complete the B.S./|M.S. in Occupational Therapy take CHEM 210/250 and BIO 340.
B.S./M.S.-Combined Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Health Professions—Physician Assistant Option/Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies

The combined Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences/Master of Science in Physician Assistant (PA) Studies is a 6 year program (3 + 3: 3 years of preprofessional courses and a 3 year professional phase). The program in Physician Assistant Studies is a master’s degree program that provides an entry-level physician assistant professional education. This combined BS-MS program is specifically designed for exceptional high school students entering directly from high school who wish to be admitted to the Master of Science program in PA Studies. High school students applying to the undergraduate preprofessional phase are required to have a minimum SAT score of 1100 or an ACT of 24 and a high school minimum cumulative average grade of 85. Students may qualify for admission into the Master of Science in PA Studies (professional phase) upon completion of all prerequisite undergraduate courses and maintained a minimum 2.75 overall cumulative GPA, received no math or science grade lower than C+, have verification of a minimum of 100 hours of direct patient health care experience, submit two professional letters of recommendation, at least one from a DO, MD, or PA, a one-page typewritten narrative on reasons for wanting to be a PA, had an in-person progression evaluation and recommendation by the program director and the Academic Review Committee for Physician Assistant, and met the Technical Standards of the PA Program (Technical Standards are available in the PA Program office and on the Program web site). The Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences will be conferred after successful completion of the first professional year of the Physician Assistant master’s degree program. See NYIT’s Graduate Catalog for details on the Master of Science in PA Studies. Students in this option who are not accepted into the professional phase of the PA program must complete the requirements for another Life Science option in order to receive a Baccalaureate degree. Graduates of the master’s degree program are eligible to sit for the physician assistant national certification examination (PANCE) administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA). Almost all states require applicants for Physician Assistant licensure to pass the certification examination. The Physician Assistant program is accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA).
B.S./D.P.T.—Combined Bachelor of Science in Life Therapy Health Professions-Physical Science, Option/Doctor of Physical Therapy

The Combined Bachelor of Science in Life Science/Doctor of Physical Therapy is a 6 year long program (3 + 3 model allowing for 3 years of pre-professional courses and a 3 year professional phase). The program in Physical Therapy is a Doctorate program providing entry-level professional education in Physical Therapy. The Physical Therapy program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy (CAPTE). This combined degree program is designed for freshman who wish to be admitted to the Program in Physical Therapy following the completion of three years of undergraduate work. Students may qualify for admission into the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program 270

School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences
(professional phase) if they have maintained a 3.0 overall cumulative average, received no science grade lower than C+, and received a recommendation from the NYIT Physical Therapy Admissions Committee. The B.S. in Life Science will be conferred upon successful completion of the first professional year of the Physical Therapy master’s degree program. See NYIT's Graduate Catalog for details of the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program. Students in this option who are not passed into the professional phase of the Physical Therapy Program will be required to complete the requirements for another Life Science option in order to receive a Baccalaureate degree. Students are advised that two semesters of Organic Chemistry with lab are required for admission to medical schools and most other professional and graduate programs in the health professions, behavioral and life sciences fields. In addition, employment in the life sciences usually requires knowledge of organic chemistry and biochemistry at a level greater than that offered by the single semester of bioorganic chemistry (CHEM 215). Therefore, it is strongly recommended that students who do not complete the B.S./M.S. in Physical Therapy take CHEM 210/250 and BIO 340.
Science Programs

In addition to the premedical programs, the Department of Life Sciences also offers programs which prepare graduates for immediate posts in the major new industries that have been created by contemporary environmental needs—careers in chemistry, health, ecology, industrial hygiene, and for graduate study. Facilities include a full quota of biology and chemistry laboratories and modern instrumentation for advanced study and research. Full-time faculty include scientists holding doctorates in biology and chemistry and a range of interests that encompasses anatomy, biochemistry, environmental and marine biology, ecology, immunology, microbiology, pathology, physiology, and analytical, organic, and physical chemistry. The flexible curriculum—comprising a required core of basic studies in pertinent sciences, the humanities, and advanced courses in chemistry and biology—includes a broad selection of electives wherever possible to fulfill the baccalaureate goals of each student.
Science Teacher Education Programs

The Life Science Department collaborates with the School of Education to offer rigorous science content study for students preparing to be teachers of Biology or Chemistry in grades 7 to 12. The sciences, including Biology and Chemistry, are one of the areas identified by the NYS Department of Education as having a shortage of teachers, making job prospects in this field very promising. The sequence of required science courses provides teacher candidates with maximum exposure to the basic sciences as well as a strong knowledge base in the subject area (Biology or Chemistry) they will teach. The requirements for NYS certification are very specific and will affect students’ selection of core curriculum and elective courses. Students pursuing a degree in Adolescence Education (Biology or Chemistry) should meet with advisors in the Department of Life Sciences as well as their advisor in Teacher Education to plan their class schedules in order to meet degree requirements in the core curriculum, science, and teacher education. For additional information, please see the School of Education section, beginning on page 173.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Chemistry Option College Success Seminar(1) Life Sciences BIOL 107 Environmental Science BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 340 Biochemistry CHEM110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II 2 credits 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 31 credits Chemistry Option BIOL 420 Instrumentation I BIOL 425 Biomedical Research I BIOL 455 Biomedical Research II CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis CHEM 410 Physical Chemistry I CHEM 450 Physical Chemistry II 3 4 4 4 4 4 23 credits Behavioral Sciences English Composition One Group A course SPCH 105 Basic Speech WRIT 315 Technical Writing 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH141 Precalculus MATH170 Calculus I MATH180 Calculus II MATH260 Calculus III 4 4 4 4 16 credits Physics PHYS 170 General Physics I PHYS 180 General Physics II PHYS 220 General Physics III Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Electives At least 14-16 credits must be taken. Total credits required128 4 4 4 12 credits 3 3 3 9 credits

I Curriculum requirements for the
College Success Seminar
(1)

Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences 2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 credits

Life Sciences Core BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 340 Biochemistry* CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I * CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II *
* Students in the Health Professions Option may substitute CHEM 215 for these courses

Additional required Life Science courses according to option: 28-52 credits Behavioral Sciences PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits 6 3 3 3

English Composition Speech One Group A English course WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions Liberal Arts Mathematics

15 credits 3 credits

All students are required to take a mathematics placement examination prior to registration, and may have to take a developmental mathematics course (MATH 096-MATH 100, or MATH 101) before taking required mathematics courses, which will reduce elective credit accordingly.

See Mathematics requirements for specific options Physics PHYS 170 General Physics I PHYS 180 General Physics II PHYS 220 General Physics III

7-15 credits 4 4 4

12 credits or PHYS141/140 Physics for Life Sciences I 4 PHYS161/160 Physics for Life Sciences II 4 8 credits or PHYS 175 Physics for PreMed I PHYS 185 Physics for PreMed II Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Electives 5 5 10 credits 3 3 3 9 credits 0-16 credits Minimum total credits required—128
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p.83).

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(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p.83).

School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Biology Option College Success Seminar (1) Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 340 Biochemistry CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 250 Organic Chemistry II 2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

I Curriculum requirements for
the Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Premedical and Health Professions College Success Seminar (1) Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 340 Biochemistry CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II 2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 credits Preprofessional Option BIOL 220 Comparative Anatomy BIOL 230 Ecology BIOL 240 Embryology BIOL 245 Histology BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 330 Microbiology BIOL 410 Genetics BIOL 425 Biomedical Research I (Capstone) BIOL 430 Cell Physiology CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

28 credits Biology Option BIOL 107 Environmental Sciences 3 BIOL 220 Comparative Anatomy 4 BIOL 230 Ecology 3 BIOL 240 Embryology 4 BIOL 310 Human Physiology 4 BIOL 330 Microbiology 4 BIOL 425 Biomedical Research I (Capstone) 4 BIOL 430 Cell Physiology 4 CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis 4 Behavioral Sciences English Composition Speech One Group A course WRIT 316 Technical Writing Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 141 PreCalculus MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II Physics PHYS 175 Physics for Pre-Med I PHYS 185 Physics for Pre-Med II Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Electives 34 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 4 4 4 12 credits 5 5 10 credits 3 3 3

39 credits Behavioral Sciences 3 credits English Composition 6 Speech 3 One Group A course 3 WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions 3 Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II Physics PHYS 175 Physics for Pre-Med I PHYS 185 Physics for Pre-Med II Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy 15 credits 3 credits 4 4 4 12 credits 5 5 10 credits 3 3 3

9 credits 12-14 credits Total credits required—128

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

9 credits Electives At least 7-9 credits must be taken outside specialty area. Total credits required—128
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Combined Baccalaureate/Osteopathic Physician Program.

Total credits required—115*
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). *Additional 13 credits granted upon successful completion of 1st year at NYCOM.

College Success Seminar (1) 2 credits Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I 4 BIOL 150 General Biology II 4 BIOL 155 Osteopathic Principles and Practices 1 BIOL 220 Comparative Anatomy 4 BIOL 310 Human Physiology 4 BIOL 315 Neuroscience 3 BIOL 330 Microbiology 4 BIOL 340 Biochemistry 4 BIOL 410 Genetics 4 BIOL 425 Biomedical Research I (Capstone) 4 CHEM 110 General Chemistry I 4 CHEM150 General Chemistry II 4 CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II 4 Choose one of the following: BIOL 240 Embryology BIOL 244 Histology BIOL 430 Cell Physiology CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis Behavioral Sciences ANTH 101 Anthropology PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology English Composition Speech LITR 230 Art of Fiction WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions Liberal Arts PHIL 220 Ethics and Society Mathematics MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II MATH 235 Applied Statistics Physics PHYS 175 Pre-Med Physics I PHYS 185 Pre-Med Physics II Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Electives 4 4 4 4 56 credits 3 3 6 credits 6 3 3 3

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Health Professions, Occupational Therapy Option

College Success Seminar (1) Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 345 Medical Microbiology CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 215 Bioorganic Chemistry*

2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 credits

*See page 299 regarding chemistry requirements for medical and graduate school admissions.

Behavioral PSYC 101 PSYC 210 PSYC 220 or PSYC 221 or PSYC 223 or PSYC 225 PSYC 310 ANTH 101 ANTH 205

Sciences Intro. to Psychology Statistical Analysis Child Psychology Human Development Adolescent Psycholgy Psycholgy of Adulthood & Aging Abnormal Psychology Anthropology Anthropology of Health

3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

15 credits 3 credits 4 4 3 11 credits 5 5 10 credits 3 3 3 9 credits 3 credits

19 credits English SPCH 105 Speech 3 WRIT 101 Composition I 3 WRIT 151 Composition II 3 Group A English 3 WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions 3 15 credits Mathematics MATH 141 PreCalculus MATH 161 Basic Applied Calculus 4 3

7 credits Physics PHYS140/141 Physics for Life Sciences I/Lab 4 PHYS160/161 Physics for Life Sciences II/Lab 4 8 credits Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science PHIL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy 3 3 3 9 credits

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Electives 3 credits B.S. degree credits to be completed within the M.S. in Occupational Therapy program OCTH 601 Community Health 3 OCTH 602 Gross Anatomy 5 3 OCTH 605 OT Theory I 3 OCTH 610 PsySoc Studies I OCTH 613 Neuroscience 3 OCTH 615 Kinesiology 4 OCTH 620 Human Growth and Development I 3 OCTH 625 Group Process 2 OCTH 655 OT Theory II 3 OCTH 660 PsySoc Studies II 3 OCTH 665 Pathophysiology 3 OCTH 670 Human Growth and Development II 3 OCTH 690 Fieldwork II PsySoc 3 41 credits Total credits for degree 132
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

Physics PHYS140/141 Physics for Life Sciences I/Lab PHYS160/161 Physics for Life Sciences II/Lab Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy/Ethics Electives

4 4

8 credits 3 3 3 9 credits 7-9 credits Total credits required—90 B.S. degree credits to be completed within the Doctor of Physical Therapy program PHTH 601 Introduction to Physical Therapy 1 PHTH 603 Gross Anatomy 5 PHTH 605 Kinesiology 4 PHTH 607 Neuroscience 3 PHTH 610 Biomechanics 2 PHTH 615 Modalities 3 PHTH 620 Massage 1 PHTH 626 Physical Therapy Practice I 4 PHTH 630 Motor Learning 2 PHTH 635 Rehab/ADL 2 PHTH 640 Administration and Delivery of Health Care 2 PHTH 645 Seminar in Physical Therapy I 1 PHTH 650 Physical Therapy Practice II 4 PHTH 655 Prosthetics and Orthotics 2 PHTH 665 Pathophysiology 3 39 credits Total credits for degree—129
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). *See page 285 regarding chemistry requirements for medical and graduate school admissions.

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Health Professions Physical Therapy Option.
(1)

College Success Seminar

2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 credits

Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 245 Histology BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 345 Medical Microbiology CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 215 BioOrganic Chemistry* Behavioral PSYC 101 PSYC 210 PSYC 310 Sciences Intro. to Psychology Statistical Analysis Abnormal Psychology

3 4 3 10 credits

I Curriculum requirements for the
College Success Seminar
(1)

Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Biomedical Engineering Option 2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 40 credits

English SPCH 105 Speech WRIT 101 Composition I WRIT 151 Composition II Group A English WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus MATH 161 Basic Applied Calculus

3 3 3 3 3

15 credits 4 3 7 credits

Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 340 Biochemistry BIOL 430 Cell Physiology CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II

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Biomedical Engineering Option: BIOL 495 Bioinstrumentation (Capstone) CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis CHEM 410 Physical Chemistry I EENG 211 Electrical Circuits I EENG 270 Intro to Electronic Circuits EENG 275 Electronics Lab I EENG 281 Electrical Circuits II EENG 310 Electronic Circuit Applications EENG 315 Electronics Lab II EENG 370 Microprocessors Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 340 Biochemistry BIOL 425 Biomedical Research I (Capstone) BIOL 430 Cell Physiology CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis Biomedical Engineering Technology Option CTEC 215 Digital Computer Fundamentals CTEC 225 Digital Computing Systems ETEC 110 Electrical Technology I ETEC 120 Electrical Technology II ETEC 130 Electronics Technology I ETEC 230 Electronics Technology II Behavioral Sciences Computer Science CSCI 110 Intro. to Computer Science

3 4 4 3 3 1 3 3 1 3

Behavioral Sciences Computer Science CSCI 120 Programming I 3 CSCI 180 Programming II 3 EENG 130 Introduction to Computer Hardware 3 9 credits English Composition 6 Speech 3 One Group A English 3 WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions 3 Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II MATH 260 Calculus III MATH 320 Differential Equations Physics PHYS 170 General Physics I PHYS 180 General Physics II PHYS 220 General Physics III Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy 15 credits 3 credits 4 4 4 3 15 credits 4 4 4 12 credits 3 3 3

28 credits 3 credits

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

48 credits 3 4 4 4 4 4

23 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3

English Composition Speech One Group A English WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions Liberal Arts Mathematics TMAT 135 Technical Math I TMAT 155 Technical Math II TMAT 235 Technical Math III Physics PHYS140/141 Physics for Life Sciences I/Lab PHYS160/161 Physics for Life Sciences II/Lab Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Electives

15 credits 3 credits 4 4 4 12 credits 4 4

9 credits Total credits required —134-136
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83)

8 credits 3 3 3 9 credits 2-4 credits Total credits required—128
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

I Curriculum requirements for the
College Success Seminar
(1)

Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Biomedical Engineering Technology Option 2 credits

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Bioinformatics Option
(1)

Physics PHYS 170 Physics I PHYS 180 Physics II Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy Electives At least 6-8 credits must be taken.

4 4 8 credits 3 3 3 9 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 credits

Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 340 Biochemistry CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II Bioinformatics Option BIOL 230 Ecology BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 330 Microbiology BIOL 401 Intro to Bioinformatics BIOL 410 Genetics BIOL 430 Cell Physiology CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis Computer CSCI 120 CSCI 180 CSCI 260 CSCI 300 CSCI 401 Sciences Programming I Programming II Data Structure Database Management Database Interface & Programming

Total credits required—130-132
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

3 4 4 3 4 4 4 26 credits 3 3 3 3 3

15 credits Behavioral Sciences 3 credits 6 3 3 3 English Composition Speech One Group A course WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions Liberal Arts Mathematics MATH 141 Precalculus MATH 170 Calculus I MATH 180 Calculus II MATH 225 Biostatistics

15 credits 3 credits 4 4 4 3 15 credits

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I Curriculum requirements for the

Bachelor of Science in Life Sciences, Health Professions — Physical Assistant Studies Option (For combined BS/MS-PA students)
(1)

Physics PHYS141/140 Physics for Life Sciences I/Lab Social Sciences Economics History or Political Science Philosophy/Ethics Liberal Art Elective General Electives Total Undergraduate credits required:

4

4 credits 3 3 3 9 credits 3 credits 6-8 credits 92

NYIT 101 College Success Seminar Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 220 Comparative Anatomy BIOL 245 Histology BIOL 270 Pathophysiology BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 345 Medical Microbiology CHEM110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM215 BioOrganic Chemistry* Behavioral PSYC 101 PSYC 210 PSYC 310 Sciences Intro. to Psychology Statistical Analysis Abnormal Psychology

2 credits 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 39 credits 3 4 3 10 credits

English SPCH 105 Speech WRIT 101 Composition I WRIT 151 Composition II Group A English WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions Mathematics MATH141 Precalculus

3 3 3 3 3

The BS/MS students must complete the following courses during the Professional Phase of the Master of Physician Assistant Studies program in order to be awarded the B.S. degree PHAS 600 Advanced Anatomy & Physiology 6 PHAS 606 Advanced Clinical Pathophysiology 5 PHAS 610 Clinical Medicine I (HEENT, Derm, ID, Pul) 5 PHAS 620 Pharmacology I 3 PHAS 621 Pharmacology II 3 PHAS 625 Clinical Skills I 2 PHAS 626 Clinical Skills II 2 PHAS 630 Clinical Laboratory Medicine 3 PHAS 660 PA Professional Issues 1 PHAS 640 Behavioral Medicine 2 PHAS 675 Informatics in Medicine 1 30 credits Total credits for degree 122 credits

15 credits 4 4 credits
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). *See page 285 regarding chemistry requirements for medical and graduate school admissions.

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BIOL 101 Humanity and the Biological Universe 3-0-3 This course acquaints students with basic biological, health and environmental issues of the modern world. To achieve intended awareness, students will study basic anatomy, physiology, genetics and microbiology. Special attention will be given to contemporary problems such as AIDS, genetic engineering, cancer, heart disease and pollution. The student will use basic mathematical, computer and quantitative reasoning skills to present cohesive written summations of learning. BIOL 102 Basic Concepts in Life Science 2-2-3 In this course, a multi-disciplinary hands-on approach to biological and chemical issues relating to environmental and ecological problems in the world is taken. Students will study the human condition in relation to health and environmental issues experienced in biology, chemistry and other life science areas utilizing inquiry-based learning. Students will examine scientific concepts and theories that are interrelated to mathematics, biology, chemistry and technology in order to recognize the historical development of these ideas. Collaborative laboratory experiments will examine biological, chemical and environmental concepts. Students will be required to prepare a written paper or project which will examine a real-life environmental, health, engineering or technological problem in order to make informed personal decisions about the safety and health of the population. All explorations will conform to NYS standards and will be aligned with safety outcomes at the elementary through commencement levels. BIOL 103 Nutrition and Society 3-0-3 An introduction to the principles of nutrition in food management. Includes food customs, patterns and habits, nutrients in foods, applied nutrition, and world nutrition problems and programs. BIOL 105 Food Microbiology 3-0-3 A one-semester course in basic food microbiology outlining important micro-organisms, food preservation and spoilage, food contamination, enzymes produced by micro-organisms, foods in relation to disease, food sanitation, control and inspection, and microbiological laboratory methods. BIOL 107 Environmental Sciences 3-0-3 A multi-disciplinary approach is taken to the environmental and ecological sciences emphasizing principles, problems, and alternative approaches to solutions. Students study how the equilibrium and stability of ecosystems are affected by human activity. Current models are examined for their efficacy in solving environmental degradation problems. The issues are treated in sufficient depth to permit quantitative reasoning and assessment, especially in such vital topics as demographic trends of humanity in a resource-limited biosphere. Human physiological and behavioral requisites are interwoven with the fabric of culture and technology in modern society. Information systems and models are used. In addition to lectures and seminars, students are required to become involved in a term activity, project or paper, which may integrate several disciplines. BIOL 110 General Biology I 3-3-4 The similarity in living things is demonstrated by a molecular and cellular approach to biology. After introductory biochemistry, the cell as the basic unit of life is studied structurally and metabolically. Life functions are examined from a cellular and from a vertebrate-organismic viewpoint. The central theme is the flow of energy between the biosphere and the ecosphere. The scientific method and hypothesis-testing are stressed as a means of investigation and forming conclusions. Collaborative laboratory assignments will include microscopic studies of the cell, its functions, and the dissection of a fetal pig. Corequisite: CHEM 110 or approval of the chairperson. BIOL 150 General Biology II 3-3-4 The variety of living things is demonstrated by a study of representative plants and animals, emphasizing the viewpoints of taxonomy, phylogeny, morphology, and physiology. The continuity of life is demonstrated through studies in reproduction, genetics, and organic evolution. Scientific inquiry and critical thinking strategies are emphasized. Collaborative laboratory assignments include the dissection and study of fixed and living specimens representing the whole range of life. Prerequisite: BIOL 110; Corequisite: CHEM 150. BIOL 155 Introduction to Osteopathic Principles and Practices 1-0-1 These sixteen one-hour sessions will be used to present history, philosophy and neurophysiological integration with biomechanical principles of osteopathic methodology. Restricted to B.S./D.O. students or permission of chairperson. BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy 3-3-4 A structural study of the human body. Topics include cells and tissue, skeleton, articulation, muscles, body systems, special organs, and surface anatomy. Prerequisite: BIOL 110, BIOL 150, BIOL 240. Health Professions majors waive Biology I and II as prerequisites. BIOL 220 Comparative Anatomy 3-3-4 The structure, development, and evolution of vertebrates are studied. Laboratory work emphasizes the development of structure in vertebrates, using dissection specimens including the shark, cat, and monkey. Prerequisite: BIOL 240. BIOL 230 Ecology 3-0-3 Study is made of the relationships among living things and species and how they reflect changes in their environments. Students study how the equilibrium and stability of ecosystems are affected by human activity. Current models are examined for their efficacy in solving environmental degradation problems. Other topics studied include trophic dynamics, habitats, resource management, and the ecological niche. Visits to field sites may occur. Prerequisite: BIOL 150.

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BIOL 240 Embryology 3-3-4 A study of the development of the vertebrate organism from ovum to adult. Topics include cleavage, organogenesis, fertilization, regeneration, and comparative developmental patterns. Laboratory exercises include work with living and preserved specimens. Prerequisite: BIOL 150; Corequisite: CHEM 210. BIOL 245 Histology 3-3-4 A structural study of human cells, tissues, and organs with reference to their physiology and pathology. Special consideration is given to physiochemical principles in the identification of cellular components, as well as to principles of histological techniques. Laboratory exercises include the systematic study and preparation of normal and pathological tissues, emphasizing the practice of routine and special staining techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, CHEM 150. BIOL 260 Nutrition and Diet Therapy 3-0-3 The purpose of this course is to provide theoretical knowledge that will be useful in clinical practice concerning the roles of food in maintaining health and in treatment of disease. Topics include the physiology of digestion, absorption and metabolism; the nutrient contents of foods, the nutritional requirements of people in health and in illness, and through the life cycle. Specific nutritional requirements of individual diseases will also be covered, as well as the various responsibilities of various health professionals, such as dietitians, nurses and physicians in comprehensive care of the patient. Prerequisite: CHEM 215 Corequisite: BIOL 310. BIOL 270 Pathophysiology 3-0-3 This course focuses on the basic physiological mechanisms and principles involved in the development of illness. It is intended to relate specific lesions and dysfunctions to the Origins of specific diseases. Topics include the role of microbial infection in disorders of the immune system, disorders of the vascular system and heart, especially as affected by nutritional factors; the origin and effects of tumors; the study of the gene dysfunctions. The latter part of the course provides brief descriptions of the more important diseases of organs and organ systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, hematopoietic, etc.) with emphasis on pathogenetic mechanisms. Prerequisites: BIOL 310. BIOL 310 Human Physiology 3-3-4 An introductory course in the functions and mechanisms of the human body. Laboratory exercises include the detection and measurement of these functions using modern methods. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and CHEM 250 or CHEM 215. BIOL 315 Neuroscience 3-0-3 The student will acquire a basic understanding of the anatomy of the nervous system and its functioning. Histology of nervous tissue, major divisions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and embryological development are introduced. The topographic and intimal anatomy of the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, brain stem, midbrain, diencephalon and forebrain, are then discussed. Functional aspects are emphasized and examples of common clinical problems are given. A systems approach is also used to introduce the special senses, including vision, audition, olfaction, and the general systems of sensation and motor functioning. The hypothalamus, the autonomic nervous system and the limbic areas are also presented. Neuroscience and clinical subjects are also emphasized, as well as higher cognitive functioning, reflex activity and circadian rhythms. Prerequisites: BIOL 310. BIOL 330 Microbiology 3-3-4 A first course in microbiology which treats the anatomy, physiology, and relationships of bacteria, fungi, viruses, Rickettsiae, and protozoa. Included are discussions of the role of microorganisms in the food industry, in the environment, and in health. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 and CHEM 210 or CHEM 215. BIOL 335 Seminar in Biomedicine I 2-0-2 A seminar on selected topics of current interest in the fields of life science and biomedical engineering. Students are required to attend meetings of professional societies. Prerequisite: BIOL 340. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 340 Biochemistry 3-3-4 A practical introduction to the fundamentals of the structure and properties of the biomolecules in close context with their metabolism. Major emphasis is placed on the dynamic nature of biochemistry and the interrelationships of the various metabolic pathways that make up the totality of life. Work in the laboratory illustrates the more common biochemistry techniques and principles encountered in the lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 250, BIOL 150. BIOL 345 Medical Microbiology 3-3-4 The purpose of the course is to acquaint students entering the health professions with basic understanding and skills in Microbiology, especially dealing with agents of infectious disease. In addition, chemical methods of controlling microbial growth, immunity, parasitology, nosocomial infections, microbial metabolism and chemotherapeutic agents will be discussed. Prerequisites: CHEM 215, BIOL 310. BIOL 401 Introduction to Bioinformatics 3-0-3 An introduction to specific uses of computers in biology. The course will survey a wide range of software written to aid research in the Life Sciences and examine the general design of this software. The course will provide examples of biocomputer analysis using software available from various sources. Class assignments will provide first hand experience in the use of these tools. Prerequisites: BIOL 340.

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BIOL 410 Genetics 3-3-4 A study of the fundamental theories, methods, and application of genetics. Mendelian genetics, the foundation for the discipline, will be discussed as well as recent advances, including recombinant DNA research and cloning. Operational or modern genetics will be compared to traditional theories. Other topics will include: the operon, microbial genetics, the triplet code, complementation analysis, extra chromosomal inheritance, and population genetics. Prerequisites/ Corequisite: BIOL 310. BIOL 415 Pathology 3-3-4 A study of the mechanisms of disease in man, emphasizing the processes of inflammation and repair, disorders of growth, and general consideration of systemic disorders. Immunopathologic processes. Laboratory exercises study histopathological and physiopathological changes during the disease process. Prerequisites: CHEM 150, BIOL 245. BIOL 420 Instrumentation I 2-3-3 Fundamental principles of instruments including analysis of data used in the separation, identification, and quantification of compounds. Partial emphasis is placed on biomolecules, environmental pollutants, food additives, etc. Lab work revolves about the various photometric, chromatographic, and electrochemical instruments available. Spectroscopy, theory, and laboratory practice is covered in both semesters. Prerequisites: CHEM 310, PHYS 270. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 425 Biomedical Research I (1st Semester of Biomedical Research) 1-6-4 An advanced biomedical project under the supervision of a faculty member. In some cases students may be permitted to pursue programs in hospitals or industrial research organizations. A final report covering the problem, approach, and results is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 310 or BIOL 340 (Offered only if there is sufficient demand). BIOL 430 Cell Physiology 3-3-4 Biochemical and biophysical aspects of cellular structures and functions are covered. Laboratory exercises demonstrate the fundamental life processes at cellular level. Prerequisites: BIOL 340, BIOL 310 (Spring only). BIOL 445 Seminar in Biomedicine II 2-0-2 A continuation of BIOL 335 on selected topics of current interest in the fields of life science and biomedical engineering. Prerequisite: BIOL 335. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 455 Biomedical Research II (2nd Semester of Biomedical Research) 1-6-4 An advanced biomedical project under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 460 Instrumentation II 2-3-3 A continuation of BIOL 420. Prerequisite: BIOL 420. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 465 Biomedical Research III (3rd Semester of Biomedical Research) 1-6-4 An advanced biomedical project under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 485 Seminar in Biomedicine III 2-0-2 A continuation of BIOL 445 on selected topics of current interest in the fields of life science and biomedical engineering. Prerequisite: BIOL 445. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 490 Biomedical Research IV (4th Semester of Biomedical Research) 1-6-4 An advanced biomedical project under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. (Offered only if there is sufficient demand.) BIOL 495 Bioinstrumentation 3-0-3 The course consists of selected biological instrumentation covering such modalities as electromyography, thermography, cardiography, electroencephalography, and the means by which they can be interfaced to computers for applications to health care and research. Prerequisite: EENG 370. CHEM 105 Applied Chemistry 2-3-3 For bachelor of technology majors. An introduction to basic chemical concepts and their application to industrial technology. Studies will include basic chemical concepts and calculations, the relationship of atomic structure and bonding to chemical and physical properties and the state of matter, and the role of thermal chemistry, thermodynamics and oxidation-reduction in determining the rates and extent of chemical reactions. The laboratory work will illustrate common laboratory techniques and the lecture materials presented. Corequisite: TMAT 135 or MATH 141.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
CHEM 107 Engineering Chemistry I 4-0-4 For electrical engineering and computer science majors. An introduction to theoretical and inorganic chemistry. Studies include basic chemical concepts and calculations, atomic structure, periodicity and bonding, states of matter, metals, solutions, acids and bases, thermal chemistry and introductory thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction reactions, reaction rates and nuclear reactions. Corequisite: MATH 141 or TMAT 135. CHEM 110 General Chemistry I 3-3-4 An introduction to theoretical and inorganic chemistry. Studies include: types of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, gas laws, and chemical calculations. Laboratory work illustrates common laboratory techniques as well as chemical principles. Corequisite: TMAT 135 or MATH 141. CHEM 150 General Chemistry II 3-3-4 A continuation of CHEM 110. Topics to be covered include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, ionic equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions, and electrochemistry. Laboratory work illustrates the principles discussed in the lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 110, TMAT 135 or MATH 141. CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I 3-3-4 This course includes the study of the stereochemistry and electronic structure of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, and the properties of their functional groups. Laboratory work consists of the determination of physical constants and the preparation of various organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 150. CHEM 215 Bio-Organic Chemistry 3-3-4 The basic concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry are covered. Topics include hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, alcohols, phenols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, amines, amides, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, nucleic acids and the relationship of these chemicals to metabolic pathways. This course does not satisfy the organic chemistry or biochemistry course requirements for other science majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or equivalent. CHEM 250 Organic Chemistry II 3-3-4 A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Studies include: the advanced theoretical treatment of reaction mechanisms, spectroscopic properties of organic compounds, and configurations of some important biological systems. Laboratory work consists of more advanced organic syntheses and qualitative organic analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 210. CHEM 260 Toxicology 3-3-4 A survey of the terminology and biochemical and biophysical phenomena associated with chemicals in the environment. Concepts of dose-response relationships, threshold limit values, route of administration, and biomodes of entry will be discussed. Methods used to determine levels of toxicity in animals and man will be studied. CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis 3-5-4 An introduction to the principles and calculations of quantitative analysis. Topics include: chemical stoichiometry, acid and base concepts, ionic equilibria, acid-base titrations, spectrophotometry, oxidation-reduction reactions, complex compounds, gravimetric analysis, and precipitation titrations. Laboratory work consists of elementary gravimetric, volumetric, and instrumental analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 150. CHEM 410 Physical Chemistry I 3-3-4 A study of the fundamental principles of modern physical chemistry. Topics include: the kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics, thermochemistry, properties of solutions, and chemical kinetics. Laboratory work is designed to illustrate the fundamental laws and basic physicochemical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 310, PHYS 220 (Offered only if there is sufficient demand). CHEM 450 Physical Chemistry II 3-3-4 A continuation of Physical Chemistry I. Topics include: electrochemistry, chemical bonding, spectroscopy, photochemistry, physical biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work consists of electrode phenomena, spectrophotometric measurements, chemical catalysis, and radiochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 410. (Spring term only, offered only if there is sufficient demand).

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282

School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences

Nursing
Faculty: M. Cardoza, P. Hood, S. Neville, H. Ballestas, C. Caico, C. Dolan, A. Ganzer, N.Nelson, P. Montano, C. Zauderer. Adjunct Faculty: A.T. Bersamin. J. Kelshe, C. Hunt, K. Melore, K. McLore (Lab Manager, Old Westbury), C. Mueller, N. Rickspun, L. Sparacino, (Lab Manager, Manhattan), D. Tanzi, T. Tobias, G. Wilde. As health care professionals who focus on immediate, hands-on patient care, nurses are critically important members of health care teams, providing patient education and diagnosing and treating human responses to illness. Nursing is a science and an art and is one of the most respected professions within the health care system. The Department of Nursing offers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree available at the Old Westbury and Manhattan Campuses. The vision and mission of the Department of Nursing is to promote and demonstrate excellence in nursing practice. The course of study includes traditional courses in the Liberal Arts and Sciences, such as chemistry, sociology, anatomy and physiology and courses in Nursing Science and Clinical Practice. State of the art nursing labs, including patient simulation models for clinical practice, enhance the teaching-learning environment. In addition, this program offers a number of unique features not found in most other Nursing programs. First, the program is founded on the concepts and theories of transcultural nursing. The NYIT nursing student will take courses that take into consideration the multi-cultural experiences of both patients and health care professionals. To this end, anthropology courses have been incorporated into the curriculum and transcultural topics into the core nursing courses. Second, clinical practice locations are varied in scope and are not limited to the hospital setting. Students will also learn how professional nursing has expanded its practice into community-based facilities, such as home care agencies, school based clinics, extended care facilities, rehabilitation centers and ambulatory care clinics. These foci, i.e., transcultural nursing and community based nursing practice, will prepare the student for the realities of nursing practice in the 21st century. The faculty consists of highly experienced professionals who have vast educational, clinical and leadership experience and who are committed to teaching, advising and mentoring students to foster academic and professional success. Upon graduation, students are eligible to take the NCLEX-RN licensure exam. We believe our program enables graduates to be highly effective as professional nurses. 283

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
This four-year program is composed of two phases. The pre-professional phase (years 1 and 2) consists of courses in the liberal arts and sciences and the Professional phase (years 3 and 4) consists of core nursing and supportive courses. All nursing students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 for admission to and continuation in the nursing program. Students are required to complete all pre-requisite courses listed as freshman and sophomore courses on the Nursing Degree Map with no required prerequisite course below a grade of C+ and show evidence of good ethical, moral and personal character. Please be advised that admission into the pre-professional clinical phase is competitive. The number of students accepted into this phase depends on accreditation requirements, available resources, class cap limits and College GPA. Progression will be based on overall highest ranked college GPA and meeting fully the established criteria. Students may repeat a required prerequisite course that they receive a grade of C or below only once. Students may be required to take nationally normed tests throughout the curriculum. Students will be required to meet all requirements of the Department of Nursing and affiliating agencies and provide evidence of specific immunizations and health clearance, student nurse malpractice insurance and current certification in Basic Cardiac Life Support before clinical placement. Students should be advised that requirements may change during the program and that they will be required to meet current standards for clinical affiliation placements and progression in the major irrespective of date of program admission. Students will be required to purchase the official NYIT student uniform which will be worn for clinical rotations. All Health Professions and Life Science students have access to the library and other facilities of the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. Please check this catalogue’s Admissions Section: Special Requirements for Nursing for more detailed information on admission and progression in the nursing major. Policy: Progression in the Nursing Major In order to continue in the Nursing major, students must receive minimum grades of C+ in all required Nursing courses and maintain a minimum cumulative College GPA of 2.75. Students who earn a grade of C or lower or who fail any segment of a nursing course, clinical nursing course or lab (NURS 102, 301, 310, 315, 351, 360, 401, 410, 430, 421, 451, 461, 470, 480) will be allowed to repeat the course or clinical lab rotation only once. Students who earn a C or lower for a required nursing course or clinical lab rotation for a second time will be dismissed from the Nursing Program. Withdrawal from a course is only permitted in the case of a documented illness, personal emergency or unusual circumstance and not because of a course/clinical/lab rotation failure or anticipated failure. Given the nature of nursing practice, students will not be permitted to use a withdrawal from a course to avoid a failure. Policy for Clinical Absence: Clinical time is limited; therefore, no unexcused clinical absences are permitted. In the event of a clinical absence due to an emergency, personal illness or unusual circumstance, the student is responsible for contacting the faculty member before the clinical or within 24 hours of the absence. The student must submit a written explanation along with appropriate documentation for the absence. The student who has an unexcused clinical absence will be at risk for not meeting the requirements of both the course and the program and will be at risk for clinical failure.

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I Curriculum Requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
(1)

College Success Sem.

2 credits

English College Composition I and II One Group A English WRIT 316 Writing for Technical Professions SPCH 105 Basic Speech Communication

6 3 3 3

Nursing NURS 102 Introduction to Nursing and Nursing Process NURS 301 Nursing Therapeutics I NURS 310 Transcultural Nursing I NURS 315 Pharmacology for Nursing NURS 351 Nursing Therapeutics II NURS 360 Transcultural Nursing II NURS 401 Nursing Therapeutics III NURS 410 Transcultural Nursing III NURS 421 Nursing in the Community NURS 430 Research in Nursing NURS 451 Nursing Therapeutics IV NURS 461 Transcultural Nursing IV NURS 470 Leadership in Professional Nursing NURS 480 Nursing Capstone

15 credits 2 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 5 3 4 4 3 4 Life Sciences BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy BIOL 260 Nutrition & Diet Therapy BIOL 270 Pathophysiology BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 330 Microbiology or BIOL 345 Medical Microbiology CHEM 105 Applied Chemistry CHEM 215 Bioorganic Chemistry 4 3 3 4 4 3 4 25 credits Mathematics TMAT 135 Technical Math 1 Physics PHYS 115 Humanity/Physical Universe Social Sciences PHIL 220 Ethics & Social Philosophy History or Political Science 4 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits Liberal Arts Elective 3 credits 3-5 credits Total credits required—129
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

49 credits Behavioral ANTH 101 ANTH 205 PSYC 101 PSYC 210 PSYC 221 Sciences Introduction to Anthropology Anthropology of Health Introduction to Psychology Statistical Analysis Human Development 3 3 3 4 3

16 credits Economics ECON 101 Basic Economics 3 credits

NURS 102 Introduction to Nursing and Nursing Process 2-0-2 This course lays the foundation for professional practice by introducing theoretical concepts that provide the foundation for contemporary nursing. An in-depth presentation of the nursing process, especially as it relates to Transcultural Nursing and Global Heath is emphasized. Students learn about the American Health Care System and the role of the professional nurse as a member of the health care team. Students will be introduced to the concepts and principles related to communication, critical thinking teaching and learning. NURS 301 Nursing Therapeutics I 0-12-4 This course focuses on the assessment and the care of persons with minimal health variations. The student is

introduced to the basic interpersonal and technical skills which form the foundation of safe nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and problem solving within the context of a multicultural client community. Topics include methods of data collection, the identification of risks to health, and the formulation and application of preventative interventions. Prerequisites: NURS 102, Biol 270. Corequisites: NURS 310. NURS 310 Transcultural Nursing I: Introduction 3-0-3 This course focuses on the application to nursing of theoretical and clinical evidenced based outcomes derived from anthropology, sociology and other cross-cultural investigations. The development of a conceptual framework from which the nurse can approach the care of individuals, families, non-family groups, institutions and communities whose

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culture differs significantly from that of the care-givers is emphasized. Important broad dimensions of culture are explored in order to produce a fully holistic view of people. These dimensions include biophysical state, physical environment, language, religious or spiritual orientation, kinship patterns, material and nonmaterial cultural phenomena, politics, economics, law, and educational, technological and professional care practices. Prerequisites: NURS 102. Corequisites: NURS 301. NURS 315 Pharmacology for Nursing 3-0-3 This course emphasizes the principles of pharmacology that are pivotal to rational, safe and effective drug therapy for clients with potential or actual health problems. Emphasis is on the nursing management of patient care designed to prevent complications and to promote optimal well-being in the well or ill patient. Open only to nursing students. Prerequisite NURS 102. Pre/Corequisites: NURS 301, NURS 310 NURS 351 Nursing Therapeutics II 0-12-4 This course focuses on the assessment and care of adults with acute health and mental health problems. Emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse as a member of the health care team in the planning, implementation and evaluation of client centered care. Attention is paid to the psychosocial aspects of disease within the context of a multicultural patient community. Nursing care skills relevant to specific methods of intervention are mastered. Prerequisites: NURS 102, NURS 301, NURS 310, NURS 315, Pre/Corequisites: NURS 360. NURS 360 Transcultural Nursing II 3-0-3 This course expands and applies the principles developed in Transcultural Nursing I. The acute and mental health needs of adults and the interactions between the nurse and the adult client are explored. Students investigate the conflicts that arise among the variable expectations of adults within western society in general, within western health care institutions in particular and within non-western cultures. The course content is crucial in preparing the nursing student in the planning and the implementation of medical-surgical and mental health nursing care interventions within a multicultural context. It specifically investigates methods of accommodation and negotiation, of enculturation, and of behavioral restructuring of adults, their families and communities. Prerequisites: NURS 301, NURS 310, NURS 315Co-requisites: NURS 351 NURS 401 Nursing Therapeutics III 0-12-4 This course focuses on the nursing care of childbearing and childrearing families. Students are introduced to actual or potential health care problems encountered in a variety of gynecologic, obstetric and pediatric settings. The student is introduced to the interpersonal and nursing care skills necessary for the assessment of risks to health among members of these families. Emphasis is placed on the planning and the implementation of preventive and educational interventions and health promotion and maintenance strategies within a multicultural patient community. Prerequisites: NURS 360 Corequisites: NURS 410 III. NURS 410 Transcultural Nursing III 3-0-3 This course expands and applies the principles developed in Transcultural Nursing II as it focuses on the health needs of different families and their interactions with the nurse. It investigates the conflicts that arise among the variable expectations of family members within western society in general, within western health care institutions in particular, and within non-western cultures. It especially focuses on the health needs of women and children, and helps to prepare the nursing student in the planning and the implementation of gynecological, obstetrical, and pediatric nursing care interventions within a multicultural context. It specifically investigates methods of accommodation and negotiation, of enculturation, and of behavioral restructuring of women, children and their families. Prerequisites: NURS 360 Corequisites: NURS 401, NURS 421 NURS 421 Nursing in the Community 3-6-5 This course focuses on the multicultural community as the client system, within which nursing care is delivered to individuals, families and aggregate groups. The student integrates advanced nursing science concepts and social, cultural, political, economic and environmental considerations in order to develop a transcultural community perspective in nursing practice. The student applies this knowledge in defining a community, assessing the health status, identifying health care needs, planning for the health of populations in the community and evaluating the potential effects of the community health plan. Prerequisites: NURS 360. Pre/Corequisites: NURS 401,NURS 410 NURS 430 Research In Nursing 3-0-3 This course introduces the student nurse to scientifically based research methodologies. Research is viewed as an integral aspect of professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on developing the ability to evaluate critically nursing research literature and in utilizing research strategies and evidenced based nursing care outcomes in order to solve nursing care problems. In addition, topics include cultural biases in health research and ethical issues of human subject research. Prerequisites: NURS 301, NURS 310, NURS 315. NURS 451 Nursing Therapeutics IV 0-12-4 This course focuses on persons with complex health problems. The student nurse interacts with clients who have multiple health problems within the context of an underlying acute or chronic illness. Students administer nursing care in a variety of health care settings. Emphasis is placed on the assessment of clients, and the planning and implementation of health care strategies within a multicultural patient community. Prerequisites: NURS 401, NURS 430, NURS 410, NURS 421 Corequisities; NURS 461, NURS 470, NURS 480

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NURS 461 Transcultural Nursing IV 4-0-4 This course expands and applies the principles developed in Transcultural Nursing III as it focuses on health needs of individuals, their families and communities as they experience chronic illness and their acute exacerbations. It investigates the conflicts that arise among the variable expectations of family members within western society in general, within western health care institutions in particular, and within non-western cultures. Principles of family theory, health teaching and research are used by the student, as strategies for planning nursing care. Knowledge of cultural patterns is integrated into the coping and change process. It specifically investigates methods of accommodation and negotiation, of enculturation, and of community patterning for adults and their families experiencing medical, surgical, and psychiatric problems. Prerequisites: NURS 401, NURS 410, NURS 430, NURS 421. Corequisites: NURS 451, NURS 470, NURS 480. NURS 470 Leadership in Professional Nursing 3-0-3 This nursing course is designed to assist the professional nurse in utilizing current leadership and management theories and strategies during the planning and implementation of professional nursing practice. Students investigate and discuss the unique issues associated with nursing health care management. Potential areas of conflict are identified and strategies for conflict resolution are investigated. Topics include political, legal, economic and psychosocial aspects of nursing management. Prerequisites: NURS 401, NURS 410, NURS 421, NURS 430. Pre/Corequisites: NURS 451, NURS 461, NURS 480

NURS 480 Nursing Capstone 3-2-4 This senior capstone course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore and examine contemporary nursing practice, an issue, topic, problem or trend relevant to nursing practice within a multicultural context. Students will work in groups on selected professional/civic engagement clinical projects (15 hours) and will be assigned a faculty mentor who will serve as a facilitator to guide and assist in the development of project objectives, resources and related research, implementation strategies and evaluation outcome criteria specific to the project. It is expected that the students will consult with various agencies and individuals who are expert in the particular issue, problem or topic that the students are exploring. Various course requirements related to the selected project must demonstrate knowledge, comprehension, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis. Prerequisites: NURS 401, NURS 410, NURS 421, NURS 430, NURS 470. Co requisites: NURS 451, NURS 461, NURS 470

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Nutrition Science
Faculty: D. Donaldson-Kaiser, M. Haar, M Kranyak, . Adjunct Faculty: J. Chabla, V. Fischer. The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science prepares students to enter the biomedical arena as nutrition professionals, graduate students or students in another health profession. Students admitted to the program take rigorous pre-professional courses in life sciences, math and physics. These sciences form the foundation for a spectrum of nutrition science courses designed to prepare them for entry level dietetic practice, advanced study in nutrition science and/or any of a wide variety of biomedical careers. In this curriculum, students are exposed to the excitement of cutting-edge nutrition teaching, active nutrition research projects and other opportunities to apply nutrition concepts in clinical field practica under direction of nutrition support faculty. By fostering interdisciplinary interactions between students in the health professions, pre-professional and pre-doctoral programs, the program enhances future communication among health care professionals. The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science provides all science and math requirements for application to schools of allopathic and osteopathic medicine, dentistry, podiatry and other specializations in biomedical professional education. The emphasis on nutrition biochemistry and pathophysiology provides an excellent preparation for understanding metabolic regulation, maintenance of optimal health and strategies to prevent and control disease. Alternatively, students with a research focus who wish to pursue graduate work in biomedical science will find the emphasis on critical analysis of current literature to be challenging and useful in future studies. Elective credits are available to allow students to pursue clinical or bench research practica under faculty supervision. The B.S. in Nutrition Science is currently accreditated by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetic Education (CADE) of the American Dietetic Association. As a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) the program is approved to provide a didactic Verification Statement, attesting that the student has met entry-level didactic competencies set by ADA for credentialing as a Registered Dietitian (RD). The Baccalaureate and didactic Verification Statement are required for application to any CADE-accredited supervised practice program. Post baccalaureate students from other disciplines may join the DPD and take up to 32 credits of nutrition science to complete didactic preparation. While many of the science and humanities courses may be taken during the day, the nutrition courses are offered in the evenings and on weekends to accommodate working students. Interactive class discussions with working nutrition professionals enhance the program and bring clinical issues into the nutrition classroom.

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I Curriculum Requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science
(1)

8 credits English SPCH 105 Basic Speech Communication WRIT 101 College Composition I WRIT 151 College Composition II WRIT 316 Technical Writing One Group A English Course 3 3 3 3 3

College Success Sem.

2 credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 44 credits

Life Sciences BIOL 110 General Biology I BIOL 150 General Biology II BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy BIOL 310 Human Physiology BIOL 330 Microbiology BIOL 340 Biochemistry BIOL 430 Cell Physiology CHEM 110 General Chemistry I CHEM150 General Chemistry II CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I CHEM250 Organic Chemistry II

15 credits Social Sciences PHIL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy One Course in History/Political Sci. 3 3 6 credits Economics ECON 105 Principles of Economics I Electives One Course in Liberal Arts 6 credits of Free Electives 3 credits 3 6 6 credits Total credits required— 134
(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). * Students who do not plan to apply to medical school may elect to substitute MATH 161—Introduction to Calculus and a Statistics course for these courses

Professional Nutrition Courses NTSI 101 Introduction to Food Science NTSI 102 Food Science Laboratory NTSI 201 Intro Clin Nutr Practice NTSI 301 Dietetic Management Pract NTSI 303 Food Service Systems NTSI 310 Nutritional Biochemistry NTSI 401 Patho Biomedical Nutrition NTSI 402 Nutritional Therapy NTSI 410 Nutrition and the Life Cycle NTSI 412 Commun.Nutr./Nutr. Ed. NTSI 414 Methods Nutrition Counseling NTSI 420 Methods Nutr. Research

3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2

32 credits Behavioral Sciences PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology Mathematics MATH 141 College Algebra and Trig. MATH 170 Calculus I * MATH 180 Calculus II * 3 credits 4 4 4 12 credits Physics PHYS 140 PHYS 141 PHYS 160 PHYS 161 Physics I for Life Sciences/Lab Physics I for Life Sciences/Lab Physics II for Life Sciences/Lab Physics II for Life Sciences/Lab 3 1 3 1

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Admission Requirements:

Admission to the B.S. in Nutrition Science program requires that students submit SAT or ACT scores, their high school transcripts and three letters of recommendation, at least two of which are from teachers. Students with completed applications will be interviewed prior to admission.
Graduation Requirements (Didactic Program in Dietetics):

Students must pass a comprehensive examination in nutrition and dietetic knowledge to receive a Didactic Verification Statement. One re-take without added coursework is allowed.
Premedical Students:

To qualify for preferential treatment for admission to NYCOM, the student must meet all of the following requirements: l) have maintained a 3.3 overall cumulative average with at least a 3.0 in the sciences; 2) have a combined MCAT score of 24 and at least an N on the writing sample; 3) obtain favorable letters of recommendation from the Departmental Preprofessional Committee, and 4) received a supportive interview from NYCOM’s Admissions Committee.
Pre-Graduate Students:

Full matriculation to the graduate program in clinical nutrition requires the following: 1) at least a 2.85 overall cumulative average in undergraduate work and satisfactory scores in science; 2) an admissions essay; 3) favorable letters of recommendation from faculty and the Departmental Preprofessional Committe; and 4) an admissions interview. Students who are denied admission based on inadequate undergraduate academic performance may qualify for provisional admission on the basis of satisfactory Graduate Record Examination scores and become fully matriculated after passing the first four graduate courses with a B or better.
Students with a non-science Baccalaureate: Didactic Verification Sequence

Students with a baccalaureate degree in another discipline may elect to complete didactic requirements through a combination of undergraduate science and nutrition prerequisites as part of the DPD.

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Didactic Science and Humanities Prerequisites

The following undergraduate courses may be obtained from any accredited undergraduate or graduate school. The courses need not be transferred to NYIT to be evaluated.
I I I I I I I I I I

2 semesters inorganic (general) chemistry 1 or 2 semesters organic chemistry 1 semester biochemistry (or bio-organic chemistry) 2 semesters anatomy-physiology one semester microbiology Introduction to psychology Communications - writing and speaking courses Economics Sociology Anthropology (includes study of cultural diversity and group dynamics)

Nutrition Science and Practice Competencies (available at NYIT):

Students may have their transcripts evaluated to determine which of the following courses they require to meet the Internship prerequisites.
NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI NTSI 101 102 201 301 303 310 401 402 410 412 414 420 Introduction to Food Science...............................................3 credits Food Science Laboratory........................................................1 credit Introduction to Clinical Nutrition Practice ......................3 credits Dietetic Management Practices..............................................3 credits Food Service Systems .............................................................3 credits Nutritional Biochemistry .......................................................3 credits Pathologic Basis of Biomedical Nutrition.........................3 credits Nutritional Therapy .................................................................3 credits Nutrition and the Life Cycle.................................................3 credits Community Nutrition & Nutrition Ed................................3 credits Methods in Nutrition Counseling .......................................2 credits Methods in Nutrition Research .............................................2 credits Total Nutrition Science and Practice 32 credits

Upon completion of the required nutrition and science courses, the student may apply for the Dietetic Internship.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

NTSI 101 Introduction to Food Science 3-0-3 The structure and physical properties of foods are examined with respect to nutrient content and distribution in the food supply. The effects of agricultural methods, market handling, processing and home preparation on nutrient quality are considered. The interactions of food components in food preparation and processing methods are discussed and factors that influence food taste, texture, appearance and nutritive value, are explored. NTSI 102 Food Science Laboratory 0-3-1 This course provides students with actual experience with basic techniques and principles of food preparation and processing. The course demonstrates and applies basic scientific methods of food preparation and identifies source information for nutrient composition of food. NTSI 201 Introduction to Clinical Nutrition Practice 3-0-3 This course is intended to introduce students to nutrition practice. Students develop knowledge and skill in clinical and dietary assessment methodologies and develop facility with medical terminology and practices. Beginning with current nutritional therapies, students construct dietary intervention protocols using whole foods to meet the dietary prescription and discuss implementation of these protocols in diverse cultural groups and within confines of institutional food service systems. Attention will be placed on development of dietary practices to prevent and/or ameliorate disease.

NTSI 301 Dietetic Management Practices 3-0-3 This course incorporates traditional techniques and tools of management as they apply to human resource management in the food service operation. Examination of the effects of technological advances and organizational goals as they impinge on interpersonal relationships as well as on employee growth, creativity, and development of leadership potential are discussed. The course covers issues of legal and ethical questions, conflict resolution and interpersonal communication in various food service operations. NTSI 303 Food Service Systems 3-0-3 The course familiarizes students with day-to-day operation of a food service and the operations necessary to turn out timely meals. Menu development and recipe conversion to institutional quantity are discussed. Food preparation and processing methods for safe and efficient handling of raw and cooked foods to reduce waste and spoilage, as well as use of the computer to facilitate receiving, storing, inventory and reordering food are reviewed. Issues in food preparation for multicultural populations as well as issues of legal liability in food service are discussed. NTSI 310 Nutritional Biochemistry 3-0-3 Mechanisms of nutrient digestion, absorption, transport, utilization and excretion will be reviewed with emphasis on the role of specific nutrients in maintaining biochemical and physiologic integrity in body systems. Prerequisite: Biol 340

292

School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences
NTSI 401 Pathologic Basis of Biomedical Nutrition 3-0-3 This course integrates pathologic processes of disease with nutrient function. On the basis of lectures of general pathologic mechanisms, students search the biomedical literature to identify nutrient-disease mechanisms, derive hypotheses for clinical nutrition application and critique evidence in support of these hypotheses. Topics include cell cycle regulation and neoplastic progression, inflammation, repair and immune function, neurotransmitters, neuronal structure and brain function, and regulation of fuel homeostasis. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NTSI 310 NTSI 402 Nutritional Therapy 3-0-3 This course is an overview of the practice of clinical nutrition. The pathogenesis, altered requirements due to disease states and/or concomitant therapeutic measures, interactions between drugs and nutrient requirements and subsequent rationale for nutritional management of the patient will be explored. Methods for patient feeding including parenteral, as well as enteral routes are discussed with respect to advantages and disadvantages of each technique, concerns regarding the cost efficiency, and formula composition and preparation methods. Students will learn to chart nutrition notes in medical charts using the SOAP system. Prerequisite: NTSI 401 NTSI 410 Nutrition and the Life Cycle 3-0-3 Factors influencing nutrient requirements from preconception to old age will be considered, including physiologic and biochemical alteration of the maternal and fetal organism during pregnancy, specific factors influencing growth and development, physiologic alterations with aging and the effect of diet in preventing degenerative changes. Special requirements imposed by work, emotional stress and environmental change will be discussed as well as regulation of food intake, pathogenesis of obesity, anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders. Prerequisite: NTSI 402 NTSI 412 Community Nutrition and Nutrition Education 3-0-3 This course will help students develop practical skills needed to become effective public health nutritionists and nutrition educators. Students will learn to assess nutrition status in the field and to access community resources, to develop plans and grant proposals, develop nutrition education plans and curricula and to evaluate these programs. The course will discuss current nutrition legislative issues in light of the history of government nutrition programs and the American food supply. Methods for stimulating consumer nutrition activism will be considered. Prerequisite: NTSI 401 NTSI 414 Nutritional Counseling Lectures 2-0-2 In this course, students will learn basic counseling skills and how to apply them to nutrition counseling situations. Several different counseling orientations will be considered, including behavior modification, cognitive therapy and family systems theory. Students engage in role playing to gain practice in these techniques. Prerequisite: NTSI 401 NTSI 420 Nutrition Research and Analysis 2-0-2 This course explores methodological variables that affect the outcomes of systems for assessment of diet intake and nutrient data analysis using a variety of manual and computerbased tools . The relationships among dietary nutrient intake, absorption, and utilization with biochemical nutrient assessment markers are explored. Factors that mediate nutrient homeostasis and impact on nutrient biomarkers are identified. Students prepare a grant proposal in NIH format on a specific research project. They search the literature and write a concise background, define a research hypothesis, specify appropriate testing methodologies, predict probable results and discuss the significance of the project. Prerequisite: NTSI 401

293

JAYPRAKASH MISTRY BUSINESS MAJOR

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

School of Management Scott Liu, Ph.D, Dean

Accounting Business Administration

Culinary Arts Hospitality Management

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
School of Management
Faculty: D. Afxentiou, F. Alali, L. Applewhaite, K. Chandrasekar, A. Deerson, R. Dibble, I. Gray,P. Harris, S. Hartman, N. Hayes, C. Kilic, A. Kleinstein, M. Kroumova, P. Kutasovic, W. Lawrence, S. Liu, S. Oberstein, K. O’Sullivan, M.T. Ozelli, A. Poczter, V .Ribiere, C. Schwartz, R. Tibrewala, N. Weiss, J. Xu, J. Zeng. Adjunct Faculty: E. Athanastos, A. Bender, J. Capela, V. Carotenuto, P. Chang, M. Chowdhury, A. Cipoletti, G. Cotsonas, J. D’Antone, J. DeFelippe, G. DeMarco, C. Doughty, A. Fox, J. Frey, T. Fried, W. Gravitz, M. Gregorek, M. Johansen, H. Kohanim, S. Kohn, L. Konits, A. Kovesdy, D. Liao, J. Matza, E. Maurer, P. Mourdoukoutas, W. Ninehan, S. Nzeako, W. Oates, H. Pacht, J. Passanante, W. Rebolini, R. Rockower, P. Taverniv, R. Turner, E. Tyrkko, S. Valenti, J. Verdon, D. Weinreb. The nature of the economy and the increasing complexity of the business world make sophisticated training vital to all spheres of endeavor within this career area. Productive members of the business community must combine specific skills with a broad understanding of the environments of business and industry. Programs at NYIT are directed toward preparing graduates to enter the modern business world equipped to make immediate contributions in a specialized capacity and capable of advancement to top-management levels. Baccalaureate degrees are offered in accounting and business administration. Associate in Applied Science degrees are also offered in accounting and business administration. Within business administration, major options are available in: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) Marketing Management (general, small business, human resources) Finance Applied Economics International Business Management of Information Systems Business Education (secondary level) Managerial Accounting

In addition to the major option, students may select a minor in another option. Degree candidates are prepared for a variety of career opportunities: The Professions Certified Public Accountant: Holders of a baccalaureate degree with a major in professional accounting whose studies fulfill the requirements of the New York State Education regulations are admitted to the Group 1 subjects of the CPA examination. Information on admission to CPA examinations in other states may be obtained from the dean or from local state education departments. Business and Marketing Teacher Education The School of Management collaborates with the School of Education to offer rigorous content study for students preparing to be teachers of Business and Marketing in grades P to 12. The requirements for NYS certification are very specific and will affect students’ selection of core curriculum courses and electives. Students pursuing their teaching certification in Business and Marketing should meet with advisors in both schools to plan their class schedules in order to meet degree requirements in the core curriculum, business, and teacher education. For additional information, please see the School of Education section.

296

School of Management
Government and Industry Extensive government career opportunities are available to the college graduate with a degree in business. At the federal level, the Internal Revenue Service and the General Accounting Office (GAO) recruit directly on campus, with the result that numerous graduates now hold supervisory positions in these agencies. Industry’s critical need for graduates with majors in accounting has provided excellent placement for the school’s alumni. National corporations and major business concerns maintain regular contact with the college’s placement service for graduates majoring in marketing, management, finance, and management of information systems. Graduate Study A graduate business program offering the Master of Business Administration is available at New York Institute of Technology. Holders of the baccalaureate degree are prepared to seek advanced degrees. Students interested in enrolling at NYIT or at other recognized graduate colleges throughout the country may obtain applications for the GMAT test from the M.B.A. director. Complete information on the M.B.A. and the M.S. in Human Resources Management/Labor Relations is offered through the School of Management at NYIT and may be obtained from the Graduate Admissions Office.
Business Administration

A comprehensive course of study, the business administration program offers students a wide choice of career objectives. Beyond the required core of business and humanities, students can choose courses directed toward a particular goal. Options include marketing, general management, small business management, human resource management, finance, international business, management ofinformation systems, and education for teaching business subjects in secondary schools. All programs lead to the Bachelor of Science degree and, in the case of business education, to teacher certification. Management Any institution must be organized and managed if it is to achieve organizational goals. The level of goals attainment depends to a large degree on the quality of management. The Management Option allows students to explore the concepts and processes leading to quality management and achievement of personal and organizational success. There are three specializations available in the Management Option: general management, small business and entrepreneurship and human resources management. Career paths vary from personnel administration and other management positions in large organizations to starting one’s own business. Marketing Marketing comprises all functions of a business, with the exception of actual production, from initial idea for a product or service through its final consumption. Every organization, profit or nonprofit, relies on marketing for generating revenue. The career opportunities are varied and include sales, product management, marketing research, advertising, retailing, physical distribution, customer relations and specialties within these fields. Marketing majors receive extensive exposure in all these areas. Management of Information Systems The Management of Information Systems program is the application of technology in business operations and management. It prepares students for rewarding careers in systems 297

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
analyses and project management in a highly dynamic field. Students have the opportunity to pursue various options such as, the application of technology in managerial functions, management of information resources, training and consulting or entrepreneurial endeavor at the leading edge of technology in business. Finance The finance curriculum prepares students for the multi-dimensional field of financial management. In addition to the study of financial aspects of managerial decisions, this option explores the growing sector of financial services provided by brokerage firms, commercial and investment banks, insurance companies and other financial intermediaries. Students are provided with the basic financial management tools and background to prepare for careers in finance. Applied Economics The applied economics curriculum prepares students for graduate studies and for careers in business and government. Attention centers on the key public policy issues and major economic forces that affect business activity and on the tools necessary to evaluate and understand them. A central focus of the option is the use of economic indicators and statistical packages to track the performance of the economy and individual industries. International Business Rapid expansion of international business makes it difficult to envision a firm which would not be affected by opportunities and threats originating beyond U.S. borders. International Business curriculum prepares future managers capable of understanding and functioning in the global economy of the increasingly borderless world. Managerial Accounting This curriculum prepares students for the private sector (industrial or institutional) or governmental fields of accounting. It is designed for students who want a career in accounting but do not plan to pursue the public accounting field.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in General Management
(1)

Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON 105 Prin. of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH 125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts* 3 3 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting MATH151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Bus. Organization & Admin MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

3 3 6 credits

3 3 6 credits 10-12 credits 6 credits 9 Electives 120 credits

39 credits

Courses Required for General Management Option MGMT 301 Intro to International Business MGMT 305 New Product Management MGMT 310 Small Business Management MGMT 311 Knowledge Management MGMT 315 Human Resources Management MGMT 401 Product & Operations Mgmt Total Required Option Courses

Business Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 Free Electives Total Credits Required

18 credits

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits and students on probation are required to complete NYIT101. * Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exempt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

I Curriculum requirements for the
College Success Seminar
(1)

Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts+ *Business Electives *Free Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 Total Credits Required 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits 10-12 credits 6 credits 9 credits 120 credits

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration—Marketing Option 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

39 credits

Courses Required for the Marketing Option MGMT305 New Product Management MRKT 201 Sales Management MRKT 301 Management of Promotion MRKT305 Direct Response Marketing MRKT 401 Marketing Research MRKT205 Retailing Management or MRKT405 International Marketing Total Required Option Courses

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). +Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exempt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives.

18 credits

300

School of Management

I Curriculum requirements

for the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration— Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship Option
(1)

Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts+ *Business Electives *Free Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Total Credits Required

3 3 6 credits 10-12 credits 6 credits 9 credits 120 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives.

39 credits

Courses Required for the Small Business Option MGMT305 New Product Management 3 MGMT 310 Small Business Management 3 MGMT315 Human Resources Management 3 MRKT 201 Sales Management 3 SBEM 410 Business Practicum 3 SBEM 420 Business & Professional Ethics 3 Total Required Option Courses Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 18 credits

301

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration—Applied Economics Option
(1)

ECON 105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 MATH 125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts Elective+ *Business Electives *Free Electives Total Credits Required

3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits 3-5 credits 6 credits 16 credits 120 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

39 credits

Courses Required for the Applied Economics ECON 203 Economic Indicators and Sources of Economic Information ECON 311 Applied Microeconomics ECON 320 International Economics and Finance ECON 405 Macroeconomic for Managers ECON 421 Applied Business Forecasting ECON 450 Current Economics Policy Issues Total Required Option Courses Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences

3 3 3 3 3 3

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives.

18 credits 3 credits

302

School of Management

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration—Human Resources Management Option
(1)

Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts+ *Business Electives *Free Electives Total Credits Required 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits 10-12 credits 6 credits 9 credits 120 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

39 credits

Courses Required for the Human Resources Option MGMT301 Introduction to International Business MGMT 310 Small Business Management MGMT315 Human Resources Management MGMT320 Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations MGMT 410 Employment Law MGMT415 Compensation Management Total Required Option Courses

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives

18 credits

303

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar
(1)

Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts+ *Business Electives *Free Electives Total Credits Required 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits 7-9 credits 6 credits 12 credits 120 credits

for Bachelor of the Science in Business Administration— International Business Option 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

39 credits

Courses Required for the International Business MGMT301 Introduction to International Business 3 ECON 320 International Economics 3 and Finance MRKT 310 Fundamentals of Exporting & Importing 3 MRKT405 International Marketing 3 INTL 440 Cross-Cultural Promotional 3 Concepts & Practices MIST 450 E-Commerce 3 Total Required Option Courses 18 credits

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives

304

School of Management

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration—Finance Option
(1)

College Success Seminar

2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts+ *Business Electives *Free Electives Total Credits Required

6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits 7-9 credits 6 credits 12 credits 120 credits

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

39 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3

Courses Required for the Finance Option FINC 205 Financial Management FINC 210 Principles of Investments & Security Analysis ECON 320 International Economics and Finance FINC 401 Working Capital Management FINC 405 Modern Portfolio Theory ACCT 315 Financial Statement Analysis Total Required Option Courses Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option. Note: All finance majors are urged to take FINC 201 before the end of their sophomore year. Transfer students entering as juniors should take FINC 201 in their first semester. (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives

18 credits 3 credits 3 credits

305

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I Curriculum requirements for the
College Success Seminar
(1)

Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts+ *Business Electives *Free Electives Total Credits Required 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits 10-12 credits 6 credits 9 credits 120 credits

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration — Management of Information Systems Option 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

39 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3

Courses Required for the MIS Option MIST 215 Application Program Development I MIST 305 Database Program Development MIST 320 Managing Data Communications and Networks MIST 325 Structured Systems Analysis and Design MIST 401 MIS Seminar MIST 430 Information Resource Management Total Required Option Courses

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option. (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives

18 credits

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I Curriculum requirements for the
Associate in Applied Science, Business Administration
(1)

Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Science Total Credits Required

3 credits 3 credits 6 3 9 credits 3 credits 3 credits 68 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II or ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory MATH151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking Total Business Core Courses Select One Option Group Required Courses for the Marketing Option MRKT 201 Sales Management MRKT 205 Retailing Management MRKT 301 Management of Promotion PSYC 235 Behavioral Science in Marketing Total—Marketing Option or Required Courses for the General Management Option History or Political Science MGMT305 New Product Management MGMT 310 Small Business Management MGMT315 Human Resources Management

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

33 credits

3 3 3 3

12 credits

3 3 3 3

Total—General Management Option 12 credits or Required Courses for the Finance Option ECON 320 International Economics and Finance FINC 205 Financial Management FINC 210 Principles of Investments and Security Analysis FINC 302 Insurance and Risk Management Total—Finance Option Other Required Courses 3 3 3 3

12 credits

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

I Curriculum requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Managerial Accounting Option
(1)

ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science Liberal Arts+ *Business Electives *Free Electives Total Credits Required

3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits

College Success Seminar

2 credits

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses Courses Required for the Managerial Accounting Option ACCT 201 Financial Accounting I ACCT 302 Federal Taxation I ACCT 306 Cost Accounting ACCT 311 Not for Profit Accounting ACCT 402 Federal Taxation II ACCT 406 Internal Auditing Total Required Option Courses Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences

10-12 credits 6 credits 9 credits 120 credits

39 credits

3 3 3 3 3 3 18 credits 3 credits

*May use 12 credits of Free or Business Electives to obtain a Minor in a second option. (1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives

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Professional Accounting

The accounting program prepares students for rewarding careers in this highly desirable field of public accounting. Graduates are qualified for admission to New York State CPA examinations in Business Law and Professional Responsibilities; Auditing; Accounting and Reporting - Taxation, Managerial, and Governmental and Not-For-Profit Organizations; Financial Accounting and Reporting - Business Enterprises. A period of experience following graduation is required for certification. It is recommended that out-of-state students consult with specific state education departments for variations in examination requirements. Accounting students are required to maintain a minimum 2.5 QPA. In order to meet the professional educational requirements for public accountancy licensure as specified in the recent amendments to sections 52.13, 70.1, and 70.2 of the NYSED Regulations of the Commissioner, NYIT has registered two interrelated licensure-qualified programs in Accountancy: (a) B.S.-M.B.A. and (b) M.B.A.-CPA track. Completion of a 5-year accounting program of at least 150credit hours will be required to qualify for admission to the NYS CPA examinations after August 1, 2009. Our combined B.S.-M.B.A. program is a registered licensure-qualifying curriculum. It awards two degrees: (1) Bachelor of Science in Accounting and (2) Master of Business Administration with a Concentration in Professional Accounting. This degree program will require 90 undergraduate credits and all 60 credits of the M.B.A.-CPA Track degree program. Students will receive their bachelor’s degree after completion of the 90 undergraduate credits and the first 30 graduate credits, and their M.B.A. after completing the remaining 30 credits; in total, they will complete 150 credits. The two degrees (B.S. and M.B.A.) may be completed within 5 years of full-time concentrated study, but parttime students may take considerably longer. Students may qualify for unconditional admission into our M.B.A. Program provided that they meet the following requirements: (1) completion of 90 credit hours with an overall GPA of 2.80, (2) no accounting grade below C, and (3) a satisfactory composite score as established by the graduate faculty. The composite score consists of a weighted combination of the applicant’s undergraduate grade point average and the score received on the GMAT. Students in the above combined degree Option, who are denied admission into the M.B.A. Program, must complete the requirements of Business Administration Option in order to earn a Baccalaureate degree. Only students who are currently at an advanced stage of their studies and who expect to complete the CPA examinations prior to August 1, 2009, may complete their studies within our transitory 120credit accounting program. Others must meet the requirements of the Combined B.S.-M.B.A. program. Students who want a career in accounting but do not plan to pursue the public accounting field may wish to enter the B.S. in Business Administration, Managerial Accounting Program. A two-year degree program leading to an associate in applied science in accounting is available for anyone who is not interested in a four-year degree program.

Visit us at www.nyit.edu

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I Combined B.S./M.B.A. Degree in
Accounting Professional Licensure–Qualifying Curriculum for 150 Credit Hour Program Undergraduate and Graduate Requirements A. Undergraduate Courses 90 credits

B. Graduate M.B.A. Courses

60 credits

a. Liberal Arts 60 credits WRIT 101 English Composition 3 WRIT 151 English Composition II 3 WRIT 310 Writing for Business 3 LITR Group A English 3 SPCH 105 Basic Speech Comm 3 ECON 105 Principles of Economics 3 ECON 110 Principles Economics II 3 ECON 201 Money and Banking 3 MATH125 Finite Mathematics 3 MATH151 Fundamentals of Calculus 3 MIST 101 Intro Computer Applications 3 ANTH/PSYC/SOCI Behavioral Science 3 BIOL 101 Humanity in the Bio Univ 3 PHYS 115 Humanity in the physl Univ 3 PHIL Philosophy 3 HIST/PSCI History or Political Science 3 2 NYIT 101 College Success Seminar+ Liberal Arts Electives+ 10 b. General FINC 201 MRKT 101 MGMT201 QANT 301 QANT 305 Business 15 credits Corporation Finance 3 Introduction to Marketing 3 Business Organization 3 Statistical Samplinmg Theory 3 Quant Apps Making Mgmt Decns 3 15 credits 3 3 3 3 3

a. Graduate Accountancy: 30 credits ACCT 601 Managerial Accounting 3 3 ACCT 701 Financial Statement Analysis 3 ACCT 702 Intermediate Financial Acct ACCT 705 Financial Accounting Theory* 3 ACCT 710 Tax Aspects of Mgmt Decns* 3 ACCT 711 Federal Taxation 3 ACCT 716 Advanced Accounting 3 ACCT 725 Professional Auditing 3 ACCT 731 Cmptr-Based Audit/Research 3 ACCT 735 Fund Accounting 3 b. General LLAW 701 LLAW 750 QANT 601 FINC 601 ECON 601 MRKT 601 MGMT601 MIST 705 MGMT610 MGMT690 Business 30 credits Business Law 3 Business Law II 3 Quantitative Methods II 3 Financial Management 3 Managerial Economics 3 Marketing Management 3 Environment of Business 3 Information Resource Management 3 Operations Management 3 Business Policy Seminar 3 150

Total Program Credits**

+ Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives. * Students may elect to substitute other M.B.A. courses for either ACCT 705 or ACCT 710 or both. ** Exit Requirement: Comprehensive Oral Exam (no credit)

c. Accountancy: ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II ACCT 201 Financial Accounting I ACCT 306 Cost Accounting ACCT 406 Internal Auditing

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I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar
(1)

Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech One Group A Course One Group B Course Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Life Science Physical Science Total Science Social Science Philosophy History or Political Science Total Social Science 3 Liberal Arts Electives+ Free Electives Total Credits Required 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 3 3 15 credits 3 credits 3 3 6 credits 3 3 6 credits 10-12 credits 3 credits 120 credits

for the Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Professional Accounting Option* 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II MATH 151 Fundamentals of Calculus ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking LLAW 101 Business Law I FINC 201 Corporation Finance QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MGMT405 Business Policy Seminar MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications Total Business Core Courses

39 credits

Courses Required for the Professional Accounting Option ACCT 201 Financial Accounting I ACCT 302 Federal Taxation I ACCT 306 Cost Accounting ACCT 311 Not for Profit Accounting ACCT 402 Federal Taxation II ACCT 411 Auditing ACCT 416 Advanced Accounting ACCT 420 Accounting Seminar FINC 210 Investment & Securities Analysis LLAW 150 Business Law II Total Required Option Courses

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83). * Only students who are currently at an advanced stage of their studies and who expect to complete the CPA examinations prior to August 1, 2009, may complete their studies within our transitory 120-credit accounting program. Others must meet the requirements of the Combined B.S.-M.B.A. program. + Transfer students who are admitted with more than 11 credits are exampt from NYIT 101, but must make up the 2 credits of liberal arts electives

30 credits

311

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

I Curriculum requirements for the
Associate in Applied Science, Accounting
(1)

College Success Seminar

2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Core Courses ACCT 101 Accounting I ACCT 105 Accounting II LLAW 101 Business Law I MGMT201 Business Organization and Administration MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing FINC 201 Corporation Finance MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory MATH150 Quantitative Methods in Business ECON 110 Principles of Economics II ECON 201 Money and Banking Total Business Core Courses Required Accounting Courses ACCT 201 ACCT 302 ACCT 306 LLAW 150 Financial Accounting I Federal Taxation Cost Accounting Business Law II

33 credits

3 3 3 3 12 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 3 9 credits 3 credits 3 credits 68 credits

Total Required Accounting Courses Other Required Courses Behavioral Sciences ECON105 Principles of Economics I English Composition Speech Total English MATH125 Finite Mathematics Science Total Credits Required

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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School of Management

ACCT 101 Accounting I 3-0-3 A study of accounting fundamentals. Topics include the accounting cycle, statement preparation, systems, asset valuations, accounting concepts, and principles for the sole proprietorship. ACCT 105 Accounting II 3-0-3 Continues the study of accounting fundamentals. Topics include partnership, corporations, liabilities, manufacturing, accounting, and statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 101. ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting 3-0-3 Special emphasis is placed on the collection and interpretation of data for managerial decision-making purposes. A study is made of cost concepts used in planning and control, cost- profit-volume analysis, and budgeting. This course carries no credit for the public accounting major. Prerequisite: ACCT 101. ACCT 201 Financial Accounting I 3-0-3 Stresses the theoretical and analytical aspects of financial accounting. Attention is directed to asset valuations with emphasis on current controversies and opinions of the AICPA and other professional organizations. This course is required in the public accounting and finance options, as well as the business education option in accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 105.

ACCT 210 Financial Accounting 3-0-3 Stresses the theoretical and analytical aspects of financial accounting, with emphasis on asset valuation, liabilities and corporate proprietary equities. Principles of income determination and financial statement analysis are examined. Prerequisite: ACCT 105. ACCT 302 Federal Taxation I 3-0-3 A study of federal tax structure as it applies to the taxation of individuals. The course will include elements of tax research and the preparation of tax forms. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. ACCT 306 Cost Accounting 3-0-3 Examines the importance of cost accounting to the various levels of management and the dual function of cost as an information system and as a tool for planning and control. Concepts in the accumulation of manufacturing costs, job order, and process costs systems are stressed. A study of budgets and standard cost systems as a function for planning and control; direct costing, break-even and cost-volumeprofit analysis, as an aid to decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 105; for IE majors: ACCT 101.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
ACCT 311 Not for Profit Accounting 3-0-3 Fund accounting for nonprofit organizations such as governmental units, universities, hospitals, foundations and charitable institutions. Prerequisite: ACCT 105. ACCT 315 Financial Statement Analysis 3-0-3 A critical review of corporate financial reports and associated footnotes from the perspectives of different potential users including: creditors, management and investors. Use of financial statements in the assessment of business performance. Exposure to methods for the adaptation of financial statements for decision- making. Topics include: statements of income, balance sheet, cash flow from operation and free cash flow; financial ratio analysis, cash budgets, pro forma statements, forecasting growth potential and financial requirements; quality of earnings, inventory valuation and depreciation methods. Prerequisite: Acct 201, FINC 201. ACCT 402 Federal Taxation II 3-0-3 Federal Income taxation for partnerships, corporations, estates and trusts: Preparation of returns. Introduction to federal income tax procedure. Prerequisite: ACCT 302. ACCT 406 Internal Auditing 3-0-3 Internal control, behavioral aspects, audit reporting, the management of internal auditing, its status as a profession, internal auditing techniques such as: internal control questionnaires, flowcharting, interviewing and statements and standards of major professional auditing and accounting bodies. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. ACCT 411 Auditing 3-0-3 Fundamentals of auditing principles and procedures, form and content of auditor’s reports, professional ethics and legal responsibilities, EDP considerations, statistical sampling applications in auditing, the role of internal control in relation to the auditor and substantive audit procedures of assets, liabilities and equity capital. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. ACCT 416 Advanced Accounting 3-0-3 Methods for arranging business combinations; merger, consolidation, acquisition of common stock and acquisition of assets. Methods of accounting for business combinations, purchase and pooling of interest. Specialized topics include partnership and branch accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. ACCT 420 Accounting Seminar 3-0-3 Discussion of contemporary problems in accounting theory and practice drawn from articles, periodicals, and bulletins issued by the Accounting Principles Board and the Financial Accounting Standards Board. A review of current examination problems. Prerequisite: ACCT 416. ECON 100 The Origins of Economic Though 1-0-1 This course will survey the history of economics from the time of Adam Smith and some of his predesessors to the time of Karl Marx. Students will be exposed to the major schools of thought and shown the relevance of basic economic ideas to the great debates of our own times. ECON 101 Basic Economics 3-0-3 A basic introduction to economic analysis, with emphasis on the problems and issues of a modern economy. This course is not available to business, economics, and political science majors. ECON 105 Principles of Economics I 3-0-3 A study of basic economic concepts emphasizing analysis of the aggregate economy. The fundamental concepts of national income and its determination, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policies, and economic growth are covered. ECON 110 Principles of Economics II 3-0-3 An examination of the processes of price determination, output, and resource allocation in perfect and in imperfect competition. Also covers labor economics, international trade and finance, and alternative economic systems. ECON 201 Money and Banking 3-0-3 The structure and function of the banking system and financial markets in the United States. The use of monetary policy in the regulation of the national economy. The role of the Federal Reserve System. Prerequisite: ECON 105, or ECON 101 with permission of the dean. ECON 203 Economic Indicators and sources of Economic Information 3-0-3 This course provides a detailed review of the relevant economic indicators, enabling the student to track the performance of the US economy and individual industries. The indicators are based on a system of leading, coincident and lagging variables that are widely used to appraise the state of the business cycle. These indicator can be used to forecast many critical economic and financial barometers measuring the health of an economy, including: economic growth, trade flows, inflationary pressures, interest rates and exchange rates. The course also reviews the sources of economic information including various economic publications, government data sources and internet websites. Prerequisite: ECON 105. ECON 205 Macroeconomics 3-0-3 The theory of national income determination, employment, distribution, price levels, and growth. Prerequisite: ECON 105.

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ECON 210 Microeconomics: Price Theory 3-0-3 A presentation of price theory: supply and demand analysis, production, cost, and distribution theory. Students also will be introduced to welfare economics and general equilibrium theory. Prerequisite: ECON 110. ECON 215 Labor Relations 3-0-3 This course covers the history and development of the labor movement and labor management relations. The history and contribution of business organizations in the context of social, economic, and political focus will be discussed. ECON 301 Monetary Theory and Policy 3-0-3 An advanced course in monetary theory and policy making. The role of monetary policy in regulation of the economy, agencies responsible for policy making, the structure and role of the Federal Reserve Bank. Prerequisite: ECON 201. ECON 305 Labor Economics 3-0-3 A study of the structure of labor markets with particular emphasis on current U.S. economy and presentation of relevant empirical data. Topics include: employment, wage determination, human capital and productivity, unionism and inflation. Prerequisites: ECON 110, or ECON 101 with approval of the dean.

ECON 311 Applied Microeconomics 3-0-3 Applied Microeconomics is an economic course at the advance undergraduate level. It is a study of supply and demand analysis, consumer theory, cost of production, price and output determination under perfect and imperfect competition. The course focuses on empirical applications of microeconomic theory including the measurement of price elasticity of demand, assessment of minimum wage laws, effects of taxation on labor supply, game theory, optimal pricing and output strategies, and government policies. Prerequisite: Econ 110. ECON 315 Financial Institutions and Markets 3-0-3 Organization and functions of the principal money, investment and capital markets. Analysis of sources and uses of member bank funds, role played by stock exchanges, investment bankers, insurance companies and mutual funds, flow of funds, analysis and other topics, all related to the social, political and theoretical implications of policy-making decisions. Prerequisite: ECON 201. ECON 320 International Economics and Finance 3-0-3 This course provides the conceptual framework that forms the basis of global commerce. Why do countries engage in worldwide commerce? What are the gains from international exchange? Barriers to trade are reviewed and analyzed. The case for and against free trade is presented. International agreements that spur and deter commerce are discussed. Policies influencing flows of goods, services and investments are evaluated. The international monetary system and the foreign exchange markets are studied in the context of alternative international adjustment mechanisms. Balance of payments concepts are examined. Prerequisite: Econ 201.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
ECON 325 Economic Development 3-0-3 An analytic survey of the theories of economic growth in developing countries, the problems of technological change, capital accumulation, and economic planning. Diversification of the economy, inflation, and human investment are studied, along with the different historical paths to development. Prerequisite: ECON 110. ECON 405 Macroeconimics for Managers 3-0-3 The main goal of this course is to analyze and understand the economy in which business operates today. Attention, therefore, centers on the key policy issues and major economic forces that affect business activity and on the tool necessary to evaluate these issues and forces. The former includes unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy and the true nature of budget deficits, monetary policy and the changing financial environment, the role of the U.S. dollar, productivity and international trade. The tools of analysis include the portfolio approach, Keynesian and modern monetarist approaches, rational expectations, and the real business cycle. The course also explores the role placed by the U.S. and world financial markets in influencing the domestic and global economic environment. Prerequisite: ECON 201. ECON 421 Applied Business Forecasting 3-0-3 This course studies the various business and economic forecasting methods and techniques. Single and multiple equation regression and time-series methods are studied. The techniques are used to forecast the cyclical behavior of the overall economy as well as industry production and sales. The course will utilize applied quantitative techniques and employ software packages and internet-based applications. Prerequisites: Econ 201 and Qant 301. ECON 450 Current Economic Policy Issues 3-0-3 The main goal of this course is to analyze and understand the key economic policy issues currently facing the US economy. Issues at the macro, micro and global levels are studied. Students will learn how to employ the tools of economic analysis in order to understand the impact of these issues on the US economy. The course will examine the problems of unemployment, inflation, globalization, social security, heath care, urban transportation, poverty, housing, land use and urban sprawl. The course also explores the role placed by the U.S. and world financial markets in influencing the domestic and global economic environment. Prerequisites: ECON 201. FINC 201 Corporation Finance 3-0-3 An overview of the financial management function in modern business, emphasizing the time value of money and financial analysis. The financial and economic environment and capital markets and securities are covered. Prerequisites or corequisites: ECON 201 and ACCT 101, MATH 125; for EM majors: ACCT 101. FINC 205 Financial Management 3-0-3 Focus is on corporate financial decisions and policy. Topics include: capital budgeting and financing decisions, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions and financial failures. Risk/ return considerations are examined in the context of value maximization. Prerequisite: FINC 201. FINC 210 Principles of Investment and Security Analysis 3-0-3 An introduction to the investment process. An understanding of how individuals and institutions make their investment decisions. A broad exposure to a range of topics including selection of securities, security analysis, instruments, and investment trends. The risks and returns involved in investing in different financial instruments are examined. Prerequisite: FINC 201. FINC 301 International Financial Management 3-0-3 This course introduces students to the modern concepts and techniques of decision making in a multi-currency setting. Topics will include international monetary systems, foreign exchange markets, foreign exchange risk management, international taxation, multinational investment decisions, and international financial markets and instruments. Prerequisite: FINC 201. FINC 302 Insurance and Risk Management 3-0-3 An introduction to current insurance principles and theory. Management of risk and the role of insurance. Fundamentals of property and liability insurance and insurance contracts for management. The scope of the insurance industry will be explored. FINC 310 Fundamentals of Financial Planning 3-0-3 This course deals with basics of financial planning. Topics include the financial planning process; measuring client risk propensities communication skills: using time-value analysis in financial planning; basics of income, estate and gift tax planning; basics of insurance, investment and retirement planning; the regulatory and ethical environment information technology; and a sample financial planning case. FINC 401 Finance: Working Capital Management 3-0-3 An introduction to the management of short- term or current accounts of the firm to optimize the risk/return profile. Management of the liquid assets of the firm which comprise a substantial portion of total assets has become more significant because of the increasing range of management techniques and technologies. Prerequisite: FINC 201.

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FINC 405 Modern Portfolio Theory 3-0-3 A detailed examination of portfolio management and capital market theory including a review of material on efficient markets, the basic Markowitz portfolio model and the capital asset pricing model. The above concepts in terms of international diversification and the evaluation of portfolio performance are covered. Traditional equity and bond valuation techniques will also be investigated. Prerequisite: FINC 201. FINC 407 Introduction to Derivative Markets and Instrument 3-0-3 This course is an introduction to Futures and Options contracts and markets for both commodities and financial assets. The course is designed to introduce you to the economic rationale of derivative markets as well as to provide you with the concepts and tools for practical operation in these markets. The course is designed to provide an integrated view of deferred delivery markets with a balanced blending of concepts, empirical evidence, and practical tools for options and futures trading. Utilization of option and futures contracts, as vehicles for investment and risk-shifting, will be explained. Spreads, hedges, and arbitrages will also be taught. Prerequisite: FINC 210 INTN 420 Internship in Business I 3-0-3 Provides the student with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge in a real world setting. Applicability of a given internship position is to be determined by a faculty committee. Term paper is required. Prerequisite: Approval of the dean. INTN 425 Internship in Business II 3-0-3 A continuation of INTN 420, when the internship position requires considerable technical and/or supervisory skills. Applicability of a given internship position is to be determined by a faculty committee. Term project is required. Prerequisite: INTN 420, approval of the dean. INTL 440 Cross-cultural Promotional Concepts and Practices 3-0-3 The course is designed to sensitize the student to the cultural antecedents of managing promotional activities in international settings. Of special concern are the areas of advertising, public relations, publicity, personal selling and negotiations. Management of these functions will be investigated within the context of methodologies applicable to "measurement and understanding of cultures, customs and business practices." Prerequisite: MRKT 101. LLAW 101 Business Law I 3-0-3 An introductory course with emphasis on the law of contracts and agency. Designed to give a basic understanding of the legal aspects of contractual obligations and agency relationships. LLAW 150 Business Law II 3-0-3 Law of property, application of Uniform Commercial Code to sales transactions and secured transactions, bankruptcy and related subjects. A study of government regulations as applied to business activities. Designed to give a basic understanding of legal problems in the marketing and transportation of goods. Prerequisite: LLAW 101. MGMT 101 Introduction to Business 3-0-3 Broad overview of functions, institutions, principles and practices of business; provides basic foundation for the student who will specialize in some aspect of business in college and emphasizes dynamic nature of business and role of change as evidenced by current events. MGMT 201 Business Organization and Administration 3-0-3 A study of organizations and of the activities of the manager in an organization. The course follows a functional approach, analyzing such management concepts as organizing decentralization, use of staff, human relations, conflict, decision making, planning, supervision, communication, and financial and production control systems such as budgeting and PERT. To enable the student to develop skills in analysis and judgment, the case method is used as an integral part of this course. MGMT 205 Organizational Behavior 3-0-3 An introduction to the fundamental concepts of human behavior within organizations. Topics covered include: motivation, group dynamics, informal organization, formal organizational design, leadership, performance measurement, organizational changes, conflict management and organizational development. Prerequisite: MGMT 101 or MGMT 201; for IE Majors: PSYC 101. MGMT 301 Introduction to International Business 3-0-3 Techniques for analyzing and understanding the world of international business. Students will examine the challenges posed by the multinational firm and the dynamic nature of international business. Case studies and discussions will complement lectures. Prerequisites: MGMT 101 or MGMT 201, MRKT 101 and ACCT 101

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MGMT 305 New Product Management 3-0-3 Techniques and practices applied to conceiving, developing, launching, and managing new products. An in-depth evaluation of the life cycle concept will analyze various stages and how careful planning and managing can extend it. The product management concept and its effectiveness as a management tool will also be studied. Prerequisites: MRKT 101. MGMT 310 Small Business Management 3-0-3 An examination of required skills, resources, and techniques which transform an idea into a viable business. Entrepreneurial decision making will be stressed and the role it plays in idea generation, conception, opportunity analysis, marshalling of resources, implementation of plans, management of ongoing operations, and providing for growth will be stressed. Prerequisites: MRKT 101 or MRKT 201, ACCT 101. MGMT 311 Knowledge Management 3-0-3 This survey of Knowledge Management examines the prevailing trends in Knowledge Management. Areas covered include Knowledgeware Technologies, The Learning Organization, Knowledge Management and Leadership and Organizational Design, introduction to systems approach and systems thinking, Knowledge Management Payoffs, the four underlying pillars of Knowledge Management. The course is delivered through a combination of case studies, lectures and demonstrations. MGMT 315 Human Resources Management 3-0-3 An introduction to the management of human resources for the effective support and achievement of an organization’s strategies and goals. The major functions of planning and staffing, employee development and involvement, compensation and reward and employee relations are examined. Decision-making skills in these areas are developed through class assignments. Prerequisite: MGMT 201.

MGMT 320 Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations 3-0-3 The course is designed to meet two objectives: to introduce the student to the background and relationships between economics, public policy, unionism, and business management and their impact upon management-labor relations; to provide a basic orientation to the framework, processes, and strategies involved in collective bargaining and the resolution of labor grievances and arbitration in management-labor relations. Prerequisite: MGMT 315. MGMT 325 Management of Technology— based Ventures I 3-0-3 The course is designed to provide the students of engineering, technology and computer science with the management skills and tools necessary for new business development, in the context of a formation and management of a new company, or within the context of an existing organization. The emphasis will be on forecasting technological, competitive and market trends and marketing opportunities analysis. Students will explore the methodology and techniques for ideation, conceptualization, design, development and testing of new products for domestic and international markets. Organizational arrangements and design of the production process, within the context of ISO 9000 will be discussed. Legal aspects of intellectual property (patents, trademarks, trade secrets, etc.) and product liability will be explored. Accounting and financial tools for evaluation of the business viability of new ventures will be studied. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing in School of Engineering and Computing Sciences.

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MGMT 330 Management of Technology—based Ventures II 3-0-3 This course is designed as a continuation of MGMT 315. The process of launching a new business venture will be analyzed. Specifically, topics such as: legal and tax aspects of various forms of ownership, development of strategic and operational business plans, set up of accounting and financial systems, forecasting cash flow and capitalization needs, venture capital and other sources of funding, the due diligence process and valuation of the new venture will be explored. In partial fulfillment of the course requirements, the students will develop and present a comprehensive plan for turning a specific new product idea into a business venture. Prerequisite: MGMT 315. MGMT 401 Production and Operations Management 3-0-3 Operations Management deals with activities required in the process of production of products and delivery of services. Background of concepts, processes and institutions in the production of goods and services will be covered. Computer applications are an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: MGMT 101 or MGMT 201; QANT 305. MGMT 405 Business Policy Seminar 3-0-3 This is a capstone senior-year course in which the disciplines of business and economics will be focused on the solution of specific business problems. Case studies and a computerbased management game will be employed in this course. Prerequisite: upper senior standing. MGMT 410 Employment Law 3-0-3 The management of human resources takes place in a complex legal environment which places obligations and responsibilities on the employer and extends protections and rights to the employee. Federal and state requirements in EEO, employment standards, wages, job security, safety and health, workers compensation and other benefits will be covered. Integration of such requirements into day-to- day management practices is emphasized. Prerequisite: LLAW 101. MGMT 415 Compensation Management 3-0-3 Elements of a rational and objective compensation system are examined. Review of economic and behavioral science theories underlying modern compensation systems. Wage and salary administration, techniques of job evaluation, performance appraisal and wage surveys, role of employee benefits are studied. Prerequisite: MGMT 315. MGMT 421 Cyber Law, Policy & Ethics 3-0-3 The Internet raises a multitude of legal issues in many areas. Among the issues covered in this course are privacy, electronic contracts, trademarks and domain names, content protection, jurisdiction, regulation, civil and criminal liability, and cyber crime. Equivalent to MGMT 706. Prerequisite: senior status. MIST 101 Introduction to Computer Applications 3-1-3 This course provides an introduction to computer applicationsinformation systems. Topics include hardware and software, networks, the Internet, information systems and productivity tools used in business including word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation programs. Other applications may be discussed depending on the background of the students while projects requiring database and spreadsheet applications may be required. MIST 215 Application Program Development I 3-0-3 Introductory problem solving and programming, to develop deterministic business systems. Development activities may include business applications such as accounts payable, order entry or the use of professional support applications such as spreadsheet, database file management, and graphic functions. Prerequisites: MIST 101 and MATH 125. MIST 220 Application Program Development II 3-0-3 This course teaches advanced techniques of problem solving and programming using various generation languages to develop semi-structured or probabilistic business systems. Development activities emphasize the user approach and may include the use of professional support applications such as integrated software packages or generators. Prerequisite: MIST 215. MIST 303 Introduction to Data Structures 3-0-3 This course teaches fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, linked lists, multiple linked lists and graphs/heteroachies, including but not restricted to array strings and hash tables. Storage management, along with some elementary principles of software engineering will be the covered. Prerequisite: MIST 220. MIST 305 Data Base Program Analysis 3-0-3 Survey of the techniques and methodology used in data base design, development and management. Analysis of the software design and programming in a relational and object-oriented data base environment. Prerequisites: MIST 101.

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MIST 307 Database Management Systems Applications 3-0-3 This course presents a hands-on introduction to database management systems using core components of state-of-the art DBMS software. Topics Topics include Oracle database architecture, Enterprise Manager, SQL, Precompilers, Assistants, and WebDB. Coverage is consistent with the current certification standards standards for Database Administrators. Prerequisites: MIST 305 MIST 310 Introduction to Decision Support and Expert Systems 3-0-3 Analysis of the human-machine interplay which utilizes decision rules, decision-models, databases, and the decision maker’s own insights to aid the manager in the decision making process. General topics covered are: Theories of organization, decision theories, quantitative methods, information systems, and DSS software and hardware. Prerequisite: MIST 305. MIST 320 Managing Data Communications and Networks 3-0-3 Advanced topics in network applications. Analysis of data transmission, system configuration, policies and procedures, and security of network systems. Modern network requirements, analysis and design are covered focusing on customer centric networking solutions supporting the management in formation system of the business enterprise. Prerequisites: MIST 101. MIST 323 Networks Systems Planning and Operations 3-0-3 This course focuses on the advanced techiques for network planning, design and implementation to support the business processes of organizations in the 21st century. Coverage includes requirement for guaranteed performances network security and privacy mechanisms, quality of service and priority of services. MIST 325 Structured Systems Analysis and Design 3-0-3 This course involves use of the systems approach to analysis and design of various information systems, including, but not limited to database systems, networking systems, programming systems, accounting information systems, and decision support systems. Structured, as well as object-oriented methods of system design are treated. Prerequisite: MIST 101. MIST 330 Software and Hardware Survey 3-0-3 An introduction to middleware encompassing Operating Systems and compilers Operating systems such as Unix, Windows, and Linex are introduced and compared. Other topics include network security, and the relationships between hardware architecture systems software and application software. Prerequisite: MIST 305 and MIST 320. MIST 401 Seminar 3-0-3 Crucial study of information systems related to advanced topics such as IS in the manufacturing environment, IS in the legal environment, IS in the finance environment and, IS in the health service environment. A comprehensive MIS research project is a major deliverable of this course. Specific topics will be determined by interest of both the students and the instructor. Prerequisites: Approval of the Undergraduate Director, MIST 215, MIST 305 and MIST 325. MIST 405 Distributed Data Processing 3-0-3 All introduction to the features of data communication systems and microelectronics and their impact in the business enterprise. Topics include microprocessors, microcomputers, minicomputers, interfacing file security, equipment configurations, and required organizational structure. Prerequisites: MIST 305.

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MIST 410 Introduction to Systems Simulations and Modeling 3-0-3 The role of simulations and modeling in decision support systems and computer based information systems. Examination of features, kinds, uses, construction and simulation of models in the decision making process. Various quantitative methods and simulation languages are covered. Prerequisites: QANT 305, MIST 215. MIST 420 EDP Audit and Control 3-0-3 An introduction to EDP auditing with emphasis on audit of efficiency, audit of effectiveness and audit of control security. Other topics include audit techniques and their effect on information system development. Prerequisite: MIST 310. MIST 425 Computer Security 3-0-3 This course introduces fundamentals of computer and network security and its implementation in the corporate information system infrastructure. Emphasis will be put on the creation of security plans, architectures, and measures as they apply to protecting information from unauthorized access and illicit use, accident, disasters or intentional theft. Prerequisite: MIST 320. MIST 427 Internet Applications Programming 3-0-3 This course covers the different current Web programming languages, tools and techniques used to develop professional web sites. Client-side and Server-side web programming are introduced. Web authoring is reviewed. Prerequisite: MIST 215 MIST 430 Information Resource Management 3-0-3 This course examines management of information systems including how to acquire, organize, monitor and control computer resources with emphasis on management problems unique to computer based information systems environments. Prerequisites: MIST 215. MIST 435 Information Systems Planning 3-0-3 An introduction to the planning process with emphasis on financial, technical, and strategic aspects of information guidelines, priority settings, resistance to change, and preparation for implementation. Prerequisite: MIST 325. MIST 450 E-Commerce 3-0-3 This course involves study of Internet technology and applications of e-commerce in various areas of management and its global use in commerce and industry. Application of ecommerce to various areas within management is discussed. Prerequisite: MIST 101. MRKT 101 Introduction to Marketing 3-0-3 Study of the process by which consumers needs and wants are analyzed and satisfied within the context of a modern marketing system. Investigation of current developments in the external environment affecting the marketing process. The role of marketing institutions in facilitating the flow of goods and services from producers to consumers is analyzed. MRKT 201 Sales Management 3-0-3 Planning, supervising and evaluation of sales force efforts within the guidelines set by strategic marketing planning are the principal responsibilities of sales managers. This course examines both the theory and practices which are encompassed within the role of sales manager. Prerequisite: MRKT 101. MRKT 205 Retailing Management 3-0-3 An investigation of the organization of the retail function. Consideration of managerial problems in the operation of large and small retailing organizations, control of retail operations, design of retailing facilities, retailing strategies and current developments in the field. Prerequisite: MRKT 101. MRKT 301 Management of Promotion 3-0-3 A firm’s promotional efforts focus on developing and managing integrated marketing communications. This course studies the planning and implementation of demand stimulating promotion, i.e., advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and publicity/public relations. Promotion is seen as a key element of the marketing mix which contributes to an organization’s cohevise marketing strategy. Prerequisite: MRKT 101. MRKT 305 Direct Response Marketing 3-0-3 Provides students concentrating in the field of marketing with an understanding of this relatively unpublicized but highly important growth industry. Organizational utilization, markets served, promotional media employed and strategic approaches as they apply to direct marketing (DM) are studied. Prerequisite: MRKT 101. MRKT 310 Fundamentals of Exporting and Importing 3-0-3 An introduction to the export/import practices of small and medium sized firms. The course will provide a guide through the stages of the export/import process; from an assessment of its feasibility to successful completion. Students will develop a familiarity with international trade regulations and requirements, procedures and documentation, intermediaries facilitating the acquisition of information, the flow of goods and services, and financing. Prerequisite: MRKT 101.

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MRKT 401 Marketing Research 3-0-3 Research activity in the field of marketing, methods of data collection and analysis thereof, quantitative techniques in marketing, the role of the computer in marketing research, control and evaluation of the marketing function. Prerequisite: MRKT 101 or HOSP 306. MRKT 405 International Marketing 3-0-3 Designed to develop a systematic approach for analyzing trends shaping the global marketplace. Among others, physical, cultural, socio-demographic, legal/political and technological factors are explored. Emphasis is placed on development and implementation of optimal marketing programs to capitalize on emerging market opportunities as well as the avoidance of the pitfalls inherent in cross-national marketing activities. Prerequisite: MRKT 101. QANT 301 Statistical Sampling Theory 3-0-3 This course provides an introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics in business. Topics covered include sampling, binomal and normal distribution, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, chi-square and regression. Business problems are solved in a computing assisted environment. Prerequisite: MIST 101 and MATH 125. QANT 305 Quantitative Applications to Making Managerial Decisions 3-0-3 Quantitative techniques for managerial decision-making are covered. These techniques include decision theory, forecasting, inventory models, linear programming, and simulation. Realistic business problems are solved using computer software. Prerequisite: QANT 301 and MATH 151. SBEM 410 Business Practicum 3-0-3 This course is designed as a capstone course to the Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management concentration. Specific cases in finance, management, marketing and leadership will be explored as an integral part of the course through hands on approach to problem solving and field experience. The field work will be accomplished by having students work with actual operating businesses. Students will also be assigned to professional business consultants for each project. Addition related business cases will also be explored in class. Prerequisite: Finc 201, Mrkt 101, Acct 101 and Acct 105 and MGMT 310.

SBEM 420 Business and Professional Ethics 3-0-3 This course is designed to provide new entrepreneurs and business leaders with a solid background of ethical behavior as it relates to issues they will face in many aspects of their professional, as well as personal lives. Building on the fundamentals of ethics as evolved from great thinkers who explored issues of evil, duty, and right, from a moralist viewpoint, Business Ethics will bring those eternal questions to current topics in business through in class debate and analysis. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 220.

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Hospitality and Culinary Arts
Faculty and Chef Instructors: J. Dunne, J. Dvorsky, A. Fairbairn, G. Grossmann, P. Hornik, R. Koenig, B. LaManna, B. Spivak, J. Turley, C. Walsh Adjunct Faculty and Chef Instructors: A. Borgese, C. Fideli, T. Field, M. Lipstein, R. Rizzuto, T. Ferro Office Assistants/Staff Associates: S. Hinds, A. Manthos The hospitality industry is one of the fastest growing, most exciting, and most varied career fields. This multi-trillion dollar global industry encompasses hotel management, entertainment event planning, travel and tourism, casino management/gaming, resorts management, conference planning, health and sports club management, country club management, entertainment clubs, pastry and bakeshops, and the spectrum of culinary arts positions, including restaurant owner/manager, executive chef, sous chef, baker, garde manger, caterer, institutional food service, in-store baker, kitchen manager, and dining room manager. In the US, the restaurant and food service sector alone employs more than 9 million skilled and professional workers and has annual revenues of over $4 billion and over 12 million are employed in other leisure and hospitality-focused jobs generating annual revenue of over $100 billion. NYIT’s Hospitality and Culinary Arts programs offer a Bachelor of Professional Studies (B.P.S.) degree in Hospitality Management at Old Westbury and in Manhattan. In addition, two culinary certificates are offered at the Culinary Arts Center in Central Islip: Culinary Arts, and Pastry and Baking Arts. The programs are professionally oriented, blending theoretical foundations, industry best practices, and hands-on experience in class that prepare individuals for career success. In addition, professionalism, teamwork, customer focus, and high standards—critical elements in successful hospitality/culinary careers—are stressed and developed. Faculty and chef instructors in the programs are experts in their fields having trained at prestigious culinary institutes throughout the world and they have had personal success in the industry. Students in the programs have access to on-campus experience in several venues including two acclaimed public restaurants: the Epicurean Room on the Central Islip campus and the de Seversky Center on the Old Westbury campus. The programs’ New York City and Long Island locations provide prime opportunities for externships, networking, and employment.

Hospitality Management
The program in Hospitality Management is designed to enable graduates to accelerate their careers, whether they are preparing to enter or to significantly advance in the industry. It leads to a Bachelor of Professional Studies (B.P.S) in Hospitality Management. Graduates of the program secure positions in hotels, restaurants, casinos, health clubs, cruise ships, convention centers, event planning companies, country clubs, sports clubs, tour companies, travel agencies, parks and recreation departments, and adult living communities. The program is offered in several formats to meet student needs: parttime, full-time with classes scheduled day, evening, weekend, and online. There is also a fully online option for students who want the flexibility of 24/7 learning opportunities. In addition to a well-rounded liberal arts foundation, the program encompasses the key areas of business planning, sales and marketing, financial management, property management and human resource administration. The program emphasizes the use of technology in all phases of planning, designing, marketing, management, accounting, and communications. Opportunities to take culinary arts courses are provided to give the hospitality management student practical knowledge of food preparation and food service operations—important elements in many hospitality management positions. In addition, the "soft skills" or professional dispositions and habits of customer service, teamwork, multicultural understanding, and positive interpersonal skills are highlighted and developed 323 throughout the program.

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Externships

Externships (paid or unpaid) provide opportunities to apply the knowledge and skills gained in the program and many lead to employment. The externship is taken before HOSP 401 Seminar in Hotel/Restaurant Administration, the program’s capstone course. Externships require a minimum of 800 hours of approved, documented work experience in the industry and may be completed in an area of the students’ career interest. Externships may be completed on a part-time basis during the school year or in summers only. Students should plan to begin their externships early so they are completed by the end of junior year in order to register for HOSP 401 in senior year. The program’s locations at Columbus Circle in New York City and in central and eastern Long Island are unparalleled for opportunities in the hospitality industry. Program faculty are experts in their field and have had personal success in the industry and provide practical interpretations for theory and an understanding of industry standards and practices.
Transfer Articulation

The Hospitality Management program has agreements with many local colleges that enable students to transfer credits from their previous college coursework in related subjects. These colleges include: Borough of Manhattan Community College, LaGuardia Community College, Kingsborough Community College, Westchester County College, Nassau County College, Suffolk County College, Hudson County (NJ) College, and Katherine Gibbs College. Special scholarships are available to transfer students. Students who complete one or both of the Culinary Arts certificates may be eligible for college credit. Consult the Admissions section of NYIT’s website for information or speak with an advisor.

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I Curriculum requirements for the
College Success Seminar
(1)

Bachelor of Professional Studies in Hospitality Management 2 credits 3 3 3 3 3 15 credits

English WRIT 101 College Comp I WRIT 151 College Comp II SPCH 105 Basic Speech Group A course WRIT 310 Business Writing

Liberal Arts Option Life Sciences BIOL 103 Nutrition BIOL 105 Food Microbiology

3 credits 3 3 6 credits

Hospitality Management Core HOSP 101 Hospitality Management HOSP 102 Front Office Management HOSP 201 Convention and Meeting Planning HOSP 202 Fundamentals of Purchasing HOSP 204 Food and Beverage Operations HOSP 206 Principles of Beverage Management HOSP 301 Facilities Maintenance HOSP 302 Hospitality Managerial Accounting HOSP 306 Hospitality Industry Marketing HOSP 308 Labor-Management Relations HOSP 401 Seminar in Hotel Restaurant Administration HOSP 404 Facilities Layout and Design II HOSP 406 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry HOSP 408 Law for the Hospitality Industry HOSP 410 Menu Design and Planning

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

45 credits Hospitality Electives 12 credits 10-12 credits 3 3 3 Open Electives

Mathematics MATH 115 Intro. Concepts of Mathematics Behavioral Sciences PSYC 101 Intro. to Psychology SOCI 101 Intro. to Sociology

3 3 3

6 credits Social Sciences ECON 101 Basic Economics HIST 210 History of Political Science PHIL 101 Philosophy 3 3 3 9 credits

General Business ACCT 101 Accounting LLAW 101 Business Law I MIST 101 Intro. to Computer Applications

9 credits Total Credits 120

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

Two acclaimed working restaurants that are open to the public, the Epicurean Room on the Central Islip campus and the de Seversky Center on the Old Westbury campus, provide on-campus experience for students. The faculty and chef instructors have trained at prestigious institutions throughout the world including: the Campbell Institute, the Certificate Cooking School of China, the Culinary Institute of America, Cornell, New York Institute of Technology, New York University, and Johnson and Wales University. Program graduates interested in progressing toward management positions may apply to the B.P.S. in Hospitality Management (See next section.) Note: the Hospitality program is also offered in an online format. The course of study includes the 24 courses listed below and a three-month paid externship in an approved culinary setting. The externship is an important component of the program as it provides the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills already learned and to gain additional practical knowledge on-the-job as an apprentice chef. The final portion of the program occurs after the externship when students return to campus to refine their skills.

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Culinary Arts
Careers in the food service industry are among the most in-demand in the United States and across the globe. In addition, food preparation has become one of the fastest growing leisure pursuits in the nation. The programs in Culinary Arts provide the knowledge and trade skills needed for preparing and service food in commercial and institutional settings. They address the training needs of individuals who want to take advantage of the excellent employment opportunities available to Long Island’s and metro New York’s food service workforce as well as the needs of current workers who seek intermediate skill levels. Graduates may find employment in the food service industry where quantity food production is required. Program graduates, having developed intermediate level skills, are in very high demand by a variety of employers including hospital, catering facilities, private and public sector institution, restaurants and hotels. The certificate programs in Culinary Arts offer career-minded students three options:
I I I

certificate in Culinary Arts; certificate in Pastry and Baking Arts; or dual certificate in Culinary, Pastry and Baking Arts.

Certificate in Culinary Arts
The certificate in Culinary Arts is a 750-hour, 15-course program, including an externship, that teaches basic culinary skills, food science and safety, modifications for dietary needs, and the preparation and presentation techniques of American and world cuisine. The 600 hours of courses and labs are offered days or evenings to accommodate individuals’ work and family schedules. Day courses are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.; evening courses are held Monday through Friday from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Required courses:
I I I I I

Food Science Hot Foods Pantry Baking II Italian Cuisine

I I I I I

Purchasing and Cost Control Baking I American Cuisine Garde Manger Classical Cuisine

I I I I I

Culinary Theory Sauces/Condiments/Relishes Externship International Cuisine Catering and Event Planning

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Certificate in Pastry and Baking Arts
The certificate program in Pastry and Baking Arts is a 500-hour, 14 course program including a 150 hour externship, that teaches basic and advanced skills for mastering a wide variety of pastry, baking, and desserts. The preparation and presentation techniques range from the simple to the sublime. The 350 hours of courses and labs are offered days, evenings, and weekends to accommodate individuals’ work and family schedules. Day courses are Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.; evening courses are held Monday through Friday from 6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.; and weekend courses are held Saturday and Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Required courses:
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Basic Principles of Baking and Pastry Arts Doughs, Bread and Breakfast Pastries Artisan Breads Cookies, Mini Pastries and Petit Fours Intermediate Principles of Baking and Pastry Arts International and American Desserts and Cakes Classical Desserts and Cakes Ice Cream, Sorbets and Frozen Desserts Low-Fat, Diabetic and Allergy-specific Desserts and Cakes Plated Desserts and Dessert Sauces Externship Advanced Principles of Baking and Pastry Arts Pastillage, Gum Paste and Mold Construction Wedding Cakes and Special Occasion Cakes.

Dual Certificate in Culinary, Pastry and Baking Arts
The dual certificate option offers a unique comprehensive culinary preparation experience for serious students interested in professional careers in culinary arts. Students complete both certificates as above. The dual option blends theoretical knowledge with practical training to develop essential knowledge and skill in baking and cooking techniques; traditional and innovative cuisines; restaurant management; nutrition; safety and sanitation; uses of technology; and industry standards. In addition professional dispositions and habits of teamwork, customer service and positive interpersonal skills are developed through hands-on classroom experience and externships. In keeping with industry practice, courses may be offered at any hour of the day from early morning until evening. The program also emphasizes the use of technology in the field—a critical element as kitchen, purchasing, planning, and management tasks increasingly involve industry specificcomputer applications. Students who complete the programs are prepared for a range of culinary positions in restaurants, food service, catering, and bake shops.

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Externship
The 150-hour externship provides the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills already learned and to gain additional practical knowledge on-the-job as an apprentice chef or baker. These experiences are also professional resume-starters and often lead to job offers. The final portion of the program occurs after the externship when students return to campus to refine their skills.

I Curriculum requirements
College Success Seminar
(1)

for the Associate in Occupational Studies in Culinary Arts 2 cr 3-4 credits

English Determined by placement test

CULY CULY CULY CULY CULY CULY CULY CULY

150 210 215 220 225 230 235 240

Sauces Advanced Baking Garde Manger/Buffet Catering Externship Kitchen I – International Foods Kitchen II – International Foods American Cuisine Advanced Classical Cuisine

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Culinary Arts CULY 100 Basic Food Science CULY 105 Purchasing and Storeroom CULY 110 Introductory Baking CULY 115 Pantry CULY 120 Dining Operations I CULY 125 Nutrition CULY 130 Software Applications for Culinary Arts CULY 135 Culinary Theory and Skills Development CULY 140 Dining Operations II CULY 145 Luncheon Hot Foods Production

54 credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Restaurant Management HOSP 204 Food and Beverage Operations HOSP 206 Principles of Beverage Management HOSP 304 Facilities Layout and Design HOSP 410 Menu Design and Planning 3 3 3 3

12 credits Total credits 69-72

(1) All entering first-year freshmen, transfer students with less than 12 credits, and students on probation are required to complete the College Success Seminar (see p. 83).

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CULY 100 Basic Food Science 2-2-3 Informs students of the skillful and efficient handling of raw ingredients as pertains to the preparation and quality of meals. Instruction deals with preparing and storing foods used in cooking and sauce bases. Emphasis is placed on making the best use of ingredients to eliminate waste and spoilage. CULY 105 Purchasing and Storeroom Operations 1-4-3 Staffing and operating a storeroom and participation in receiving, storing, reordering, inventory control and requisition systems. An integral part of the course is control and report procedures including preparation of daily and weekly reports and their purposes. An introduction is provided to variation in the quality of products, the most common product packing counts and methods of freezing. CULY 110 Introductory Baking 1-4-3 Study of the fundamentals of baking science, terminology and equipment. The student learns the use of basic baking ingredients, the importance of weights, measures, types of flour, cake mixing, decorating, icing, puddings, cake finishing and yeast products. CULY 115 Pantry 1-4-3 Basic cold food preparation and its place in the kitchen. Topics of instruction include: salad dressings, salad classifications, cold soups, canapes, cold food presentations, sandwich varieties, fruit salads, fruit sculptures, fruit mousses, sanitation methods, storing of foods, planning, the use and handling of aspics, chaud froids, and an introduction to forcemeats. CULY 120 Dining Operations I 2-3-3 Basic dining room operations with emphasis on personnel, organization and supervisory skills and service principles and techniques used in front of the house. Basic skills used in relation to table side service, salads and desserts will be taught utilizing the gueridon. CULY 125 Nutrition 3-0-3 Understanding of nutrition by identifying human needs through functional nutritional concepts. An introduction to several interrelated areas of social and scientific nutritional needs, problems and priorities are explored and tested. Prerequisite: CULY 100, 105, 110, 115, 120, 135. CULY 130 Software Applications for Culinary Arts 2-2-3 A survey of computer software and hardware used by the foods service industry, including hands-on applications. CULY 135 Culinary Theory and Skills Development 1-4-3 Introduction to sauteing, broiling, simmering, pan frying, and poaching through the graduated method technique of commencement at a simple level and increasing in complexity as the course progresses. Food products and recipes related to breakfast cooking are introduced to include eggs, meats, farinaceous products and appropriate fruits and vegetables. Prerequisite: CULY 145. CULY 140 Dining Operations II 2-3-3 Advanced dining room service and operations by being exposed to an actual operating dining room including organization and responsibilities of the staff positions. Prerequisite: CULY 120. CULY 145 Luncheon Hot Food Production 1-4-3 Utilizing the graduated method technique, the student will develop fundamental skills and techniques in the preparation of classical luncheon cuisines. Food products and recipes related to luncheon cooking are introduced including eggs, beef, pork, veal, poultry, lamb, game, fish, vegetables and farinaceous products. Prerequisite: CULY 115. CULY 150 Sauces 1-4-3 Students are taught the method of making stocks as the foundation of sauces and soups. Instruction deals with stock, sauce and soup preparation to include the basic vegetable cuts, waste management and emphasize the proper handling and storage of all foods used and prepared. CULY 210 Advanced Baking 1-4-3 Experience in the use of various baking ingredients. Advanced baking methods in relation to various sugars, cakes, decorating, cooking and pastries, as well as batters, pastes and creams are utilized. Prerequisite: CULY 110.

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CULY 215 Garde Manger/Buffet Catering 1-4-3 Cold buffet presentations, piece montees, ice carvings, tallow sculpture, salt dough sculpture, advanced salads, preparation and presentation of pates, galantines, terrines, ballotines, classical platter presentations, aspic decorations and use, the decorating of various meats, poultry, game, fish, and shellfish, utilizing food products and recipes related to the art of the Garde Manager. Prerequisite: CULY 115. CULY 220 Externship 0-6-3 Provides an opportunity to apply skills learned in the culinary laboratories to supervised employment at a Culinary Arts Center (CAC) approved food service facility for a multi- month interval. Approval of the CAC director is required prior to registering for this course. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters. CULY 225 Kitchen I — International Cuisine 1-4-3 Vocabulary and the production and presentation techniques of regional Italian traditional and modern cuisines. Prerequisite: CULY 235. CULY 230 Kitchen II — International Cuisine 1-4-3 Vocabulary and the already acquired production and presentation techniques of the foods of China, Japan, Korea, Russia, Germany, Poland, Yugoslavia, Albania, Spain, Hungary and Hawaii. Prerequisite: CULY 225 or 145. CULY 235 American Cuisine 1-4-3 Vocabulary, preparation and presentation of various native American cuisines including New England, Middle Atlantic, Southern, Midwestern, Northern Plains, Southwestern, Western and Northwestern states. Prerequisite: CULY 145. CULY 240 Advanced Classical Cuisine 1-4-3 Preparation, planning and execution of coordinated menus from a variety of classical recipes from all food groups; history and source of recipes and the proper restaurant use and presentation. Recipes variations and plate and service presentations will be stressed along with student input on their practical application. Prerequisites: CULY 230 or 235.

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HOSP 101 Hospitality Management 3-0-3 The basic principles of management and their relationship to the hospitality industry. The future of the restaurant industry, travel and tourism, hotel/motel operations, leadership and the directing function in hospitality management. Many other current topics will also be discussed. (CULY 100 may be substituted.) HOSP 102 Front Office Management 3-0-3 Develops an understanding of front office procedures with emphasis on new methods of group reception, registration and billings. Other areas that will be covered are the structure of front office management, credit and collection procedures. Prerequisite: HOSP 101. HOSP 104 Travel and Tourism 3-0-3 Acquaints students with various principles, practices and philosophies of tourism. Areas of concentration include sociology and psychology of tourism, tourism demand development and research, and marketing tourism. HOSP 150 Personnel Management for the Hospitality Industry 3-0-3 Study of the realities in industry and the procedures which would be helpful in addressing problems relating to the personnel function. Areas that will be covered include administration, human resource development, labor relations and placement procedures. Prerequisite: HOSP 101. HOSP 154 Casino Management 3-0-3 Operation of casinos from the hospitality management per-

spective. Topics include the theories of operation, games management, legal restrictions and service functions. Student will also learn loss control and rules of the most popular games in casinos. HOSP 201 Convention and Meeting Planning 3-0-3 Theory and operation of convention meeting planning for hotels and conference centers. Principles of bookkeeping, account processing, sales, banquet/catering management as they apply to these operations. Other related current topics will be covered. Prerequisite: HOSP 101. HOSP 202 Fundamentals of Purchasing 3-0-3 Fundamental principles and purchasing techniques will be studied with a greater emphasis on product information needed to purchase in a special field. Areas of concentration include purchasing of vegetables, poultry, beef, fish, and alcoholic beverages. CULY 105 may be substituted. Prerequisite: HOSP 101 or CULY 100. HOSP 204 Food and Beverage Operations 3-0-3 Comprehensive study of the control process in food and beverage operations, with a look at various alternatives and available solutions and methods. Areas of study include cash receipts, receiving, menu pricing and labor cost controls. Prerequisite: HOSP 101. HOSP 206 Principles of Beverage Management 3-0-3 Detailed comprehensive study of the origins, production and characteristics of all types of alcoholic beverages. Other areas that will be explored include purchasing beverages, merchandising, beverage control. Prerequisite: HOSP 101.

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HOSP 221 Travel Management 3-0-3 Acquaints students with two major components of Travel and Tourism: hospitality (hotels, motor inns, resorts, alternative accommodations and related occupations: bus operations, land arrangers and tour operators) and retail travel agency organization, operation, administration, personnel and sales. HOSP 228 Touristic Geography 3-0-3 A survey course of the field of geography as it relates to tourism planning. Two general areas will be surveyed: cities, land use and values, resource management, transportation patterns and tourism developments; and tourism destination planning including customs of areas, festivals, museums and historical sights related to travel/tourism. HOSP 230 Tourism Marketing 3-0-3 Acquaints students with both a practical application and theory of sales and marketing, including advertising and public relations strategies, as they relate to the travel tourism industry. Examines marketing mix, tourism product, consumer behavior, communications and media uses and procedures for advertising and public relations campaigns. Prerequisite: HOSP 306.

HOSP 250 Housekeeping Management 3-0-3 The functions of the housekeeping department, the most labor intensive department in most hotels, will be studied including personnel, sanitation, maintenance and materials as they relate to the management of the building and property. Prerequisite: HOSP 101. HOSP 251 Quantity Food Production 3-0-3 Concepts and nature of food preparation in large quantities. A systematic presentation of all the phases in food service operations. Areas of nutrition, sanitation and equipment analysis will also be covered. HOSP 301 Facilities Maintenance 3-0-3 Introduction to maintenance and engineering principles required to today’s lodging and food service operations including technical information necessary to establish effective preventive maintenance programs. Study includes engineering and maintenance department roles and responsibilities, blueprint reading, electric, plumbing, sewer, swimming pool, HVAC, elevator, acoustic and sound control and elimination of pollution problems. Prerequisite: HOSP 101. HOSP 302 Hospitality Managerial Accounting 3-0-3 Application of practical accounting techniques relating to the hospitality industry with concentration in financial statements, internal control, payroll and cost accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 101.

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School of Management
HOSP 306 Hospitality Industry Marketing 3-0-3 Study of what marketing is, what it can accomplish for the organization, and how to establish and operate a marketing plan. Includes product development, personal selling, market planning and pricing. Prerequisite: HOSP 101. HOSP 308 Labor-Management Relations 3-0-3 Analysis of labor-management relations in the hospitality industry through historical reference, case studies and onthe-job incidents. Includes material on contract provisions, negotiations and interpretation. Prerequisite: Junior status. HOSP 350 Externship in Hospitality Management I 3-0-3 Provides the student with an opportunity to apply skills learned in the classroom to an on-the-job situation. Jobs will be provided in hotels, motels, restaurants, country clubs and in the travel/leisure industry at large. Approval of the dean needed prior to registering for course. HOSP 351 Externship in Hospitality Management II 3-0-3 A continuation of HOSP 350 wherein the student can apply classroom skills and knowledge to on-the-job situations. Prerequisites: Interview by the externship committee and HOSP 350 as prerequisite or corequisite. HOSP 352 Externship in Hospitality Management III 3-0-3 Upper level course which acts as a continuation of HOSP 350 and HOSP 351. Prerequisites: Interview by the program dean and the externship committee and completion of HOSP 350 and HOSP 351. Approval of the dean needed prior to registering for course. HOSP 401 Seminar in Hotel/Restaurant Administration 3-0-3 This is the senior “capstone” course calling for a broad range of skills and knowledge learned both in the major and in the college. The class is divided into teams each of which prepares one or more solution(s) to a given large problem in the Hotel Restaurant Institutional industry. Coursework will involve information gathering, methods of presentation to a jury of advisers and actual peer jury presentations. A key element is the presentation of solutions to faculty and advisers to the major. The presentations mandate appropriate oral, written, visual and numerical aspects demonstrating communication skills, integration of knowledge, application of computer skills, teamwork skills and job readiness through the panel critique. Prerequisite: Senior status. HOSP 404 Facilities Layout and Design II 3-0-3 Individual student effort in the development of a restaurant from concept to operation. A major project will include blueprints for dining rooms, bars and kitchens developed after the concept and menu have been established. Prior industry experience or 30 credits in culinary arts, food service or restaurant courses are recommended as a prerequisite to this course. Prerequisites: HOSP 204 and HOSP 410. HOSP 406 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry 3-0-3 Comprehensive study on the different objectives in financial management. Deciding on company goals, ways of obtaining the funds to meet these goals and effective uses of the funds. Ratio analysis working capital and long term financing will also be included. Prerequisites: HOSP 101, ACCT 101. HOSP 408 Law for the Hospitality Industry 3-0-3 The legal aspects of running a hotel. Designed to give a basic understanding of preventative tactics and what must be done to avoid lawsuits. Also includes legal research, licensing and hotel keepers obligations. Prerequisite: LLAW 101. HOSP 410 Menu Design and Planning 3-0-3 Comprehensive study of all phases of menu preparation. The menu is broken down into several different elements such as art and design layout, copy and others. Each is analyzed as it applies to food service operations, nutritional requirements and balanced presentation. Term project: preparation of a menu. Prerequisites: HOSP 204, HOSP 202 or CULY 105.

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Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008

Additional Programs

Extended Education

Non-Credit Certificates and Courses Pre-College Summer Program Professional Development Courses

Undergraduate Catalog I 2007-2008
Extended Education

Extended Education responds to the ever-changing global marketplace by providing intensive educational programs—for both professional and personal enhancement—that often complement degrees and degree pathways. Extended Education reacts quickly to changes in the workplace, providing solutions to corporate needs. Program offerings help individuals retrain and enhance their skills so they may advance in their careers in emerging specialties, or as they redefine their chosen fields. Both non-credit and certificate programs are available. For a catalog please call 1.800.886.NYIT or visit www.nyit.edu.

Non-Credit Certificate Programs and Courses

Extended Education offers quality programs designed to meet the needs of part-time, nontraditional adult student populations. Non-credit certificates and courses draw upon the curricular strengths of NYIT to provide professional training and personal enrichment in architecture, art and design, business management, computer annimation, computer technology, corporate training, engineering, interior decoration and much more. Professional Development courses are offered for architects and engineers that meet continuing education requirements. For more information call 1.800.886.NYIT. These are offered at convenient times and affordable rates at convenient campus locations in the New York metropolitan area. For a catalog please call 1.800.886.NYIT or visit www.nyit.edu.

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Extended Education

Pre-College Program for High School Students

NYIT offers a pre-college program for high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. Students participate in college level study at one of New York’s premier colleges while earning three college credits in fields such as architecture, behavioral science, business and industry, communication arts, computer graphics, criminal justice, culinary arts, interior design, and pre-medical. For more information call 1.800.886.NYIT.

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Global Programs

Global Programs

As part of its mission to offer access to opportunity to all qualified students, NYIT has created several offsite programs outside the New York metropolitan area. Cooperating institutions provide facilities and management services, but NYIT faculty teach all courses, and the degrees are granted according to NYIT's academic policies. Degrees granted by NYIT’s Global programs are the same degrees one would receive at any of our three New York campuses or online via the Internet. Undergraduate Programs are offered in Manama, Bahrain; and in Amman, Jordan; and in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Graduate Programs are offered in the above locations, as well as in China and Canada. For further information about any of these program, contact the Vice President for Global Programs, New York Institute of Technology, Northern Boulevard, P.O. Box 8000, Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000, Tel 516.686.7409, Fax 516.686.7411.

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Aerospace Studies Lt. Col. Mark A. Russell United States Air Force

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Aerospace Studies
Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps

The Air Force ROTC education program provides preprofessional preparation for future Air Force officers. It is designed to develop men and women who can apply their education to their initial active duty assignments as Air Force commissioned officers. The two major AFROTC curriculum offerings spanning the student’s college career are: General Military Course (GMC), freshman and sophomore years, and Professional Officer Course (POC), junior and senior years. Graduate students are eligible for the two-year program. As an AFROTC cadet, students are eligible to compete for AFROTC scholarships in selected academic areas. All scholarship students, as well as cadets in the last two years of the program, receive a tax free stipend of $200 a month. Upon graduation, students are commissioned second lieutenants in the United States Air Force. AFROTC field training is offered during summer months at selected Air Force bases throughout the United States. Students in the four-year program participate in four weeks of field training, usually between sophomore and junior years. Students applying for entry into the two-year program must successfully complete five weeks of field training prior to enrollment in the Professional Officer Course. Major areas of study in the Field Training Program include junior officer training, aircraft and aircrew orientation, career orientation, survival training, base functions and Air Force environment, and physical training. Leadership laboratory is taken an average of two hours per week throughout the student’s period of enrollment in AFROTC. The first two years of the Leadership laboratory include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, issuing military commands, instructing, directing, and evaluating the preceding skills, studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers. The last two years consist of activities classified as advanced leadership experiences. They involve the planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps; the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications; and the providing of interviews, guidance, and information which will increase the understanding, motivation, and performance of other cadets. For more information call the main office at (718) 862-7201. Students may register for AFROTC at the same time and in the same manner as for other college courses at NYIT.
General Military Course (GMC)

The General Military Course (ROTC 101, 102, 201, 202) is the first half of the four-year program and it is taken during your freshman and sophomore years. This program provides an examination of the broad range of U.S. Military forces in the contemporary world with particular attention to the United States Air Force, its organization, and its mission.
Professional Officer Course (POC)

The Professional Officer Course (ROTC 301, 302, 401, 402) is available to juniors who have at least two years of college remaining. This program is highly completive, therefore it is important to apply early in your sophomore year. The program provides an examination of the broad range of U.S. civil-military relation, the environmental context in which the U.S. defense policy is formulated and implemented, and the principles and practices of leadership as they relate to the U.S. Air Force.

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Aerospace Studies
ROTC 101 The Foundation of the United States Air Force 1-2-1 This course is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provides an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. ROTC 102 Continuation of ROTC 105 1-2-1 This course continues the teaching begun in ROTC 101. ROTC 201 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power 1-2-1 This course features topics on Air Force heritage and leaders; introduction to air and space power through examination of competencies and functions; and continued application of communication skills. Its purpose is to instill an appreciation of the development and employment of air power and to motivate sophomore students to transition from AFROTC cadet to Air Force ROTC officer candidate. In addition, aspects of the 200 course begin to prepare cadets for their experiences at field training. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. ROTC 202 Continuation of ROTC 201 1-2-1 This course continues the teaching begun in ROTC 201. ROTC 301 Air Force Leadership Studies 1-2-1 This course teaches cadets advanced skills and knowledge in management and leadership. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing leadership skills. Cadets have an opportunity to try out these leadership and management techniques in a supervised environment as juniors and seniors. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advance leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. ROTC 302 Continuation of ROTC 301 1-2-1 This course continues the teaching begun in ROTC 301. Prerequisite: ROTC 301. ROTC 401 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty 1-2-1 This course is designed for college seniors and gives them the foundation to understand their role as military officers in American society. It is an overview of the complex social and political issues facing the military profession and requires a measure of sophistication commensurate with the senior college level. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advance leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Prerequisite: ROTC 301 and 302. ROTC 402 Continuation of ROTC 401 1-2-1 This course continues the teaching begun in ROTC 401. Prerequisite: ROTC 401.

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Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps Lt. Col. C. William Gaylor, Chairperson

Army ROTC At NYIT

Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a program which provides college students the skills and leadership training to become officers in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard. Cadets develop maturity, responsibility, leadership ability, self confidence and other qualities essential to success in any field. Upon successful completion of ROTC, cadets receive commissions as Second Lieutenants in one of the Army’s specialized branches. NOTE: If eligible you can apply for an ROTC Scholarship worth up to $16,000 a year for tuition, $450 for books and $150 spending allowance while in school. Contact Major Mitch Hadad at (516) 463-5648 or E-Mail at mlsmeh@hofstra.edu.

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Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps
Military Science

Chairperson/Senior Professor: C. Henderson. Assistant Professors: G. Cleland, R. Callender, A. Herring, C. Murray, V. Rea, S. Rubenstein. The Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) program qualifies students for appointment as an officer of the United States Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard. Students attend military science classes during their regular course of studies. Students develop maturity, responsibility and dependability while earning the Gold Bar of an Army Second Lieutenant. Army ROTC offers two different programs to all qualified college and university students. The traditional four-year program gives students the opportunity to take ROTC courses in each of their four years of college. The four-year program consists of the Basic Course (ROTC 103, 104, 203, 204) and the Advanced Course (ROTC 303, 304, 403, 404). The Basic Course is open to all students. It consists of training in leadership, management, military skills and physical fitness. Students learn to apply these skills in and outside the classroom. In addition, a variety of outside social and professional enrichment activities are available. ROTC textbooks, uniforms, and other essential materials for the Basic Course are furnished to the students. Sophomores who did not take ROTC 103 and 104 may compress ROTC 103 and 104 and ROTC 203 and 204 to complete the Basic Course. There is no military obligation for enrolling in the basic ROTC Course. After they have completed the Basic Course, students who have demonstrated the potential to become an officer and who have meet the physical and scholastic standards are eligible to enroll in the Advanced Course. The Advanced Camp is usually taken during the final two years of college. It includes instruction in management, tactics, ethics and further leadership development. Textbooks and uniforms in the Advanced Course are also furnished to students. During the summer between their junior and senior years of college, Advanced Course cadets attend a paid six-week training session called Advanced Camp. Advanced Camp gives cadets the chance to practice what they have learned in the classroom, and introduces them to Army life “in the field.” The two-year program is designed for students who did not take ROTC during their first two years of school or students entering a two-year post-graduate course of study. To enter the two-year program, students must first attend a paid five-week Basic Camp, normally held during the summer between their sophomore and junior years of college. After they have successfully completed Basic camp, students who meet all the necessary enrollment requirements are enrolled in the Advanced Course. To receive full semester credit for the Advanced Course and Advanced Camp (12 semester hours) a student must be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Army upon course completion. Partial credit may be awarded at the chairperson’s discretion if the student fails to complete the Advance Course. NOTE: all basic Military Science courses include the appropriate number of class hours, plus a required leadership laboratory and additional classes in physical training each week. A field trip of approximately three days provides practical experience in small organization leadership. All students are expected to attend the leadership laboratory, physical training and the field trip.

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Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps
Army ROTC Scholarship Program

The Army reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) Scholarships offer assistance to meet the rising costs of school. Scholarships are awarded for two, three, and four years, strictly on merit to the most outstanding students who apply as follows:
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Tuition and mandatory educational fees up to $16,000. A specific amount for miscellaneous fees such as laboratory, student activity, transcript and graduation fees. A flat rate for textbooks, classroom supplies, and equipment (approximately $225 per semester). An allowance of $150 a month each school year the award is in effect.

Like other organizations, the Army is oriented towards technological advancement. Eligible students may apply for an Army ROTC Scholarship worth up to $16,000 per year. For further information write or call the Hofstra University Military Science Department, 265 Physical Fitness Center, Hempstead, New York 11549-1300, (516) 463-5648 or FAX (516) 463-4937, as per the NYIT/Hofstra cross-town agreement.
Credit Toward a Liberal Arts Degree

ROTC 103, 104 and 203, 204, totaling two semester hours credit, are designated non liberal arts credit. These credit are acceptable toward a baccalaureate degree if they fall within the total non liberal arts credits allowed for that degree. ROTC 303, 304, Summer Camp, and ROTC 403, 404 total l2 semester hours credit. These credits are acceptable toward a degree as determined by advisement with the department chairperson.
Army Commissioning Requirements

In order to be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, students must satisfactorily complete the Basic Course, Advanced Course and Advanced Camp or their equivalents. Students must also receive their college degree and ensure they have taken an approved course in written composition, human behavior, military history, computer fundamentals and mathematical reasoning. Cadets must be recommended for a commission by the department chairperson.

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Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps
Basic Course:
ROTC 103 Introduction to the United States Army 1-2-1 Fall. Course offers an in-depth look at the organization and mission of the United States Army. An introduction to the basic techniques of leadership in small organizations is provided, as well as an introduction to military skills. No liberal arts credit. ROTC 104 Foundations of Leadership 1-2-1 Spring. Course continues the discussion of effective leadership. Leadership and basic ethical principles are discussed. An introduction to military skills is provided by instruction in first aid and land navigation. No liberal arts credit. ROTC 203 Leadership Principles 1-2-1 Fall. Course continues the discussion of effective leadership through a study of personal skills and historical examples. Emphasizes the principles of war as a tool of analysis, Continues instruction in the basic military skills of first aid, communications and land navigation. No liberal arts credit. ROTC 204 Requirements of the Junior Officer 1-2-1 Spring. Course examines the fundamental requirements of the decision making process as it relates to the Junior Officer. The ability to supervise and motivate the small organizations is examined. No liberal arts credit. ROTC 304 Advanced Camp Preparation II 3-2-3 Spring. Course examines the problems associated with situational ethics and control of the small organization. Continues to develop the leadership and military skills necessary to succeed at Advanced Camp. Throughout this semester the students are required to draft and develop correspondence, conduct oral presentations and prepare management programs which they will develop, conduct and evaluate. Leadership laboratories, field trips and pre-camp are required. Prerequisites: ROTC 103, 104, 203, 204, or Basic Camp and ROTC 303 or approval of department chairperson.

Advanced Camp:
Advanced Camp training gives the student an understanding of the practical aspects of Army life and supplements the theoretical work given during the school year. This is a fiveweek camp conducted at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Successful completion of the Advanced Camp is a commissioning prerequisite. Subjects covered include practical exercises in the following:
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leadership weapons familiarization land navigation infantry tactics and techniques drill, parades, and ceremonies physical training

Training is intensive in character, and methods are the same as followed in training units under field conditions. Emphasis on the development of leadership and individual confidence as may be required of any officer regardless of branch. ROTC 403 Organizational Command 3-2-3 Fall. Responsibilities of command at the organizational level. Provides detailed fundamentals of’ training, supply and personnel management techniques within the large organizations. Emphasis on application and evaluation of command and staff relationships. Leadership laboratories and field trips are required. Prerequisites: ROTC 103, 104, 203, 204, or Basic Camp, ROTC 303, 304, and Advanced Camp or the approval of department chairperson. ROTC 404 Organizational Effectiveness 3-2-3 Spring. Ethical standards are discussed as the guide for effective leadership. Applications of leadership dimensions are taught. They fall into six categories: communications (written, oral, oral presentation); personal motivational behavior, interpersonal behavior (influence); administrative skills (planning and organization, delegation); and decision-making skills (problem analysis, decisiveness, judgment). Leadership laboratories, field trips and a written essay on professional ethics are required. Prerequisites: ROTC 103, 104, 203, 204, or Basic Camp, ROTC 303, 304, 403 and Advanced Camp or the approval of department chairperson.

Basic Camp:
Basic Camp Training is used to give students who were not enrolled in the Basic Course (ROTC 103, 104, 203 or 204) an opportunity to receive placement credit to enter the Advanced Course. This is a voluntary five-week camp conducted at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The Basic Camp gives the student an in-depth look at the organization of the United States Army. Students receive instruction in basic military skills and leadership techniques. Successful completion of Basic Camp allows the student to enroll in the Advanced Course.

Advanced Course:
ROTC 303 Advanced Camp Preparation 3-2-3 Fall. Course examines in detail the leadership and military skills necessary to succeed at Advanced Camp. The leadership and military skills learned in the Basic Course are thoroughly reviewed. Emphasis on planning and controlling a small organization. Leadership laboratories, field trips and a written essay in military history are required. Prerequisites: ROTC 103, 104, 203, 204, or Basic Camp or the approval of department chairperson.

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Vocational Independence Program Ernst VanBergeijk, Ph.D., Executive Director, Associate Dean

Vocational Certificate Program NYIT Degree Program

Vocational Independence Program
Vocational Independence Program (VIP)

Director: D. Finkelstein; Senior Administrator: N. Nelson. Faculty: L. Alpern, C. Alter, E. Bailey, M. Burner, P. Cappellino, L. Cittadino, C. Colson, R. Devaney, A. Feigelson, F. Gerdis, G. Gilbert, D. Ginter, S. Incorvaia, L. Jacobson, L. JeanMary, C. Jockel, J. MacDonald, D. Malloy, J. Morda, S. Murphy, B. Mushol, M. Ranaldo, N. Rocker, C. Rose-Tomo, D. Rosen,W. Russell, M. Safran, J. Saunders, I. Solomon, R. Stein, M. Ventura, R. Ventura, T. White, L. Zucker. VIP at NYIT is designed for students with moderate to severe learning disabilities as well as functioning autism and spectrum disorders. The certificate program offers over 20 vocational majors; the NYIT degree program places students on an Associate or Bachelor’s degree track. Students in either program are full-time residential students and have the opportunity to participate in the full range of NYIT student life, including fraternities and sororities, intramural sports teams, and all campus clubs and organizations. Unless VIP students meet all requirements of the NCAA, they are not eligible to play on NYIT varsity athletic te