Using the High School EduGuide in Your Classroom Lesson Plan Activities for 9th, 10th, and 11th

Grade Journalism
This resource package includes: Lesson objectives Lesson activities Listing of skills associated with each activity Support materials including:  A reading comprehension activity  Discussion questions  A writing assignment sheet  An evaluation checklist  A peer editing checklist  An invitation for students to submit their work for publication at www.EduGuide.org  A list of additional resources based on the magazine content

This lesson is designed to support the following skills: Critical reading, critical analysis, writing for different audiences and in different styles, peer editing.

1. Students will read an article and analyze for content and structure. 2. Students will review a checklist, determining their level of competency in various areas. 3. Students will interview one person in their chosen profession, or explore with research 3-5 professions in which they‟re interested. 4. Following the model in the High School EduGuide and the EduGuide Writers‟ Guidelines, students will write an “On the Road to a Career” article and an accompanying „checklist‟ for their peers. 5. Students will peer edit the work of one classmate. 6. Students will submit their article for evaluation, meeting all due dates and submission guidelines. 7. Students may submit their article for consideration by the editorial team at EduGuide for possible publication at www.EduGuide.org.

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Lesson Objectives:

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Reference:

“Wayfinding on your career path” High School EduGuide (page 6) “Do you have the skills you‟ll need for your career?” High School EduGuide (page 4)

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Integrating the High School EduGuide into Your English classroom. Lesson: Can you write an “On the Road to a Career” article for your peers? The purpose of these assignments is to engage students in inquiry surrounding the selection of a career path. Students will be led through a series of activities designed to help them choose a career path or to solidify their chosen career path. Interviewing and/or research skills will be employed. This lesson would be appropriate for journalism students in the second half of their 9th grade year, as well as 10th and 11th grade students.  Activity A: Reading Critically
Skills: Reading comprehension, critical analysis of language and structure, oral communication, drawing conclusions from analysis.

Skills: Critical analysis, planning and organizing, writing for a specific audience, writing in different styles, modeled writing, evaluating other students‟ work against a given set of criteria.

In this activity, students start writing. Teachers are encouraged to provide students with visual strategies to enhance their writing structure and provide them with the tools by which they can be successful in their writing (see Appendix 1). The composition of the “On the Road to a Career” article should begin with review of the article and checklist addressed in Activity A. Students should then proceed to develop their own ideas regarding their career path and determine whether they fall into Category A: Still Searching or Category B: Exploring my Path.

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 Activity B: Writing Inquiry

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 Note to Teachers: This activity may require more than one hour to complete. It is suggested that Worksheet 3 be assigned as homework or as independent work time in class.

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1. Students read “Wayfinding on your career path” on pages 6 and 7 of the High School EduGuide. 2. Students complete Worksheet 1 as they read the article. Students will have to read the article several times to complete the worksheet. It requires considerable reflection and critical analysis of the article. 3. Students complete the checklist entitled “Do you have the skills you‟ll need for your career?” on page 4 of the High School EduGuide. 4. Students complete Worksheet 2 after completing the checklist. Completion of Worksheet 2 may take some time as the questions contained are designed to substantiate the student‟s responses to the checklist. 5. Upon completion of the worksheets and discussion of the article, students will complete Worksheet 3, generating a plan for the writing of their article, “On the Road to a Career.”

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Category A articles should contain the following elements: A statement regarding the career paths explored in the article, resources utilized for research (and appropriate citation), as well as how the author fits into each of these potential career paths and how the author plans to proceed through the rest of his education to fit into one of these career paths. Category B articles should contain the following elements: A statement regarding the author‟s chosen career path, information garnered from an interview with someone from the author‟s chosen profession (with proper citation), any additional research completed for this article (with appropriate citation), as well as a developed plan regarding their future education. Both articles are geared toward the author‟s same-grade peers.

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 Note to Teachers: In the state of Michigan, students are required to maintain a portfolio containing information on career exploration. The tasks outlined in this plan may provide students with needed activities for insertion to this portfolio. Please check with your guidance counselor for details.

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1. Teacher and students discuss the structure of the “On the Road to a Career” article. 2. Students read Appendix 2: EduGuide‟s Guidelines for Writers. Students should then tell a classmate what writers for EduGuide must do in five lines or less. They should compare notes and refer back to the Guidelines for Writers. This activity reinforces comprehension and helps students identify the most important information. 3. Worksheet 4 outlines the writing assignment for students. Evaluation criteria should be reviewed with students before they begin writing (Addendum 1). 4. Students peer edit their drafts. A peer-editing checklist is included (Addendum 2). 5. Students revise their articles. They submit their peer editor‟s comments, as well as any drafts, with their final draft.

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 Worksheet 1

Reading Critically Before you read “Wayfinding on your career path” on page 6 of the High School EduGuide, review these questions. As you read the article, answer the questions. Expect to read the article more than once to get all of the details required to answer the questions and draw your own conclusions. 1. What types of career preparation opportunities have you been given? What types of opportunities do you feel would be beneficial to your future?

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4. Identify at least three possible places to engage in a job-shadowing experience, and tell why you think they are appropriate for you.

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3. Identify courses you feel would be beneficial to your chosen career path in the future.

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2. Identify the courses you have taken (or are taking) that relate directly to your chosen profession. If you are thinking about more than one career, be sure to develop a list of courses for each profession.

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 Worksheet 2 Career Skills 1. After reviewing the checklist on page 4 of the High School EduGuide, are there any areas you need to work on prior to getting a job? For example, if you would like to be a teacher, can you work independently as well as a member of a team?

2. Are you stronger in one area than another? If so, does your chosen profession take into consideration your strengths? Explain.

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 Worksheet 3 On the Road to a Career Directions: When answering the following questions, be sure to provide supporting details (a minimum of three per question). 1. If you know what career you want to pursue, how did you choose it? If you‟ve not chosen a career, how did you choose the paths you intend to explore?

4. What do you need to do during the rest of your high school career to help you prepare for your chosen profession(s)?

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3. After high school, what do you plan to do? Get a job? Join the military? Go on for more education? Why?

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2. What school-related resources (career fair, printed materials, etc.) have helped you focus your career choices?

 Worksheet 4 Drafting the “On the Road to a Career” Essay Directions: Complete the form below to create a simple outline for your “On the Road to a Career” essay. SF/D = Supporting Fact/Detail. Introduction Hook: __________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 1: ________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Main Idea Paragraph 4: ________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 1: _____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ SF/D: ______________________________________________________

SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Main Idea Paragraph 2: _____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

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SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

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Main Idea Paragraph 3: ________________________________________

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Main Idea Paragraph 2: ________________________________________

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SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 3: _____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________ SF/D: ______________________________________________________

SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 4: _____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ SF/D: ______________________________________________________

SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Conclusion: ________________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 1: ________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 2: ________________________________________

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SF/D: ______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________

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SF/D: ______________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 3: ________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Main Idea Paragraph 4: ________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

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Addendum 1

Evaluation Criteria Students will be evaluated in three broad categories: Language, Organization and Content. Review the evaluation checklist before you begin writing. Students will also be responsible for peer editing the work of one classmate. Peer editors will assign a grade of 0, 1, or 2 based on the quality of the draft. Students must turn in their peer editor‟s comments and grade with their final draft. Evaluation Checklist For each criterion, grades will be given on a 4-point scale. 1 2 3 4 = = = = rarely sometimes usually always

Language Score Tone – fresh, familiar and focused; follows writer‟s guidelines Vocabulary – ____ Teacher determined grade level Spelling and grammar accurate Checklist language is very concise and direct. Organization Ideas flow logically; easy to follow Use of transitional language in article (e.g. however, but, in addition) connects thoughts effectively for reader Provides information about career planning now and future Checklist information is ordered somewhat chronologically Content Student author has carefully considered ideas prior to presenting to audience. The student author offers good advice to readers in the article and in the checklist. It is clear what a person should have learned from this article. Checklist re-states advice from article and adds one or two more pieces of advice for additional value. Content is appropriate for the intended audience. Total: Plus, 0-1-2 grade from peer editor

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Addendum 2

Peer Editing Checklist Use this checklist to give a classmate feedback on his or her “Finding the Perfect Fit” article. For each evaluation criterion, indicate Yes or No. After you‟ve finished, give your classmate a grade using the following scale: 0 = needs a lot of work 1 = needs some revisions 2 = needs a little editing, but it‟s in pretty good shape Language Tone – fresh, familiar and focused; follows writer‟s guidelines Vocabulary – ____ Teacher determined grade level Spelling and grammar accurate Checklist language is very concise and direct. Organization Ideas flow logically; easy to follow Use of transitional language in article (e.g. however, but, in addition) connects thoughts effectively for reader Provides information about career planning now and future Checklist information is ordered somewhat chronologically Content Student author has carefully considered ideas prior to presenting to audience. The student author offers good advice to readers in the article and in the checklist. It is clear what a person should have learned from this article. Checklist re-states advice from article and adds one or two more pieces of advice for additional value. Content is appropriate for the intended audience. 0-1-2 grade from peer editor (part of final grade) Comments: Yes/No

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Appendix 1 Visual Strategies for Organizing Writing Graphic Organizers Students who have difficulty generating ideas can benefit from graphic organizers designed for the purpose of the writing assignment. Concept webs, chain-of-events, and KWL charts are frequently well-received with students. Good graphic organizers can be found for free on the Web. A good search phrase to try is “graphic organizers writing free.” This will eliminate many (but not all) of the sites that will charge you fees to access their content.

Detail _______________________________________________________

When composing a typical five-paragraph article, the first Main Idea will also need to be noted as the Introduction. The last Main Idea will need to be noted as the Conclusion. All three body Main Ideas should be contained within the Introduction and Conclusion (i.e., the outline for those paragraphs will look identical).

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Detail _______________________________________________________ Detail _______________________________________________________

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Supporting Fact ______________________________________________________

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Detail _______________________________________________________

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Supporting Fact ______________________________________________________

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Main Idea _________________________________________________________________

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Forms Students who struggle with writing organization frequently do very well when given a form to complete that serves as a template for their rough draft. The best tool around is the standard five-paragraph outline form. To simplify the outline concept, utilize the following format:

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Tip: As you compile and teach the use of various graphic organizers, put extra copies in a hanging file system so students can help themselves when a writing opportunity presents a challenge. Use a yellow highlighter to mark ORIGINAL on one copy that is in the hanging file, or keep a binder with originals. You‟ll see which organizers are the most popular and will be able to keep more of them on hand.

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Appendix 2

EduGuide Writers’ Guidelines
Tone Fresh, familiar, and focused. EduGuide publications are written in plain English and deal with the real concerns and decisions our readers wrestle with. They provide a magazine style forum for parents, students, and educators to share what they‟ve learned and to spread effective strategies and insider know-how to a wider and wider circle. In addressing any topic, we start by brainstorming what would I want to know if I had to make that choice or resolve that issue? What questions or worries might I need to address? What models of success or failure could I learn from? Our content is designed to motivate readers to take action using hands-on strategies. Perspective Our readers like to hear how other people have wrestled with an issue. Where relevant, authors are encouraged to use a personal perspective in their writing and to build real life stories and quotes into their coverage of an issue. For most of our publications, parents, especially moms, are our largest readership. Literacy levels EduGuide publications aim at a grade-six reading level, common in popular magazines and newspapers. Some word processing programs can help you measure this. The publications involve a range of techniques, to make adult learning easier and more enjoyable. Technical terms should be explained briefly and simply to make readers aware of jargon they may run into. Avoid complex sentences and three syllable words where a shorter one will do. Publications often include self-tests, learning activities, resources to tap, comparative shopping guides, and questions to ask others. Independence EduGuide publications are designed to provide readers with the information they need to feel confident making choices, addressing challenges and managing changes to boost children‟s learning. While authors and interviewees are encouraged to share their opinions, articles should recognize the diversity of perspectives on an issue even if they focus primarily on one perspective. Providing pros and cons helps people to make up their own minds. EduGuide does not endorse products, programs or political positions and seeks to be impartial between public and private educational providers at the preschool, k-12 and higher education level, speaking honestly about the strengths and weaknesses of each. Style We use the Chicago Manual of Style. Text should be provided as a Microsoft Word file and include a suggested title and word count. Illustrations are welcome and are usually best provided in JPEG format.

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Byline Where possible we provide a brief biography for our authors with information that will help our readers to relate to them or recognize relevant expertise. Please provide up to 50 words of relevant information that we‟ll trim down as needed. To submit articles for consideration, email them to jenny@eduguide.org or mail them to: EduGuide Attn: Editor 321 N. Pine Street Lansing, Michigan 48933

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