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Operations Management Simulation

BENIHANA V2

FOR COURSES IN:


Operations

Management

Service Management
Strategy

Version 2

UPDATED
EDITION

by W. Earl Sasser, Jr., Harvard Business School,


and Ricardo Ernst, Georgetown University

Operations Management Simulation: Benihana V2

Students explore the principles of operations


and service management while working through
a series of challenges set during a simulated
evening at a busy Benihana restaurant. Customers
start in the bar area for drinks and then move into
the dining room where chefs prepare food right
at the table. Each challenge allows students to
uncover how aspects of the restaurant operation
contribute to profitability. A final challenge

requires students to consider the lessons learned


and design a strategy that maximizes utilization,
throughput, and total profit for the evening. The
second release of this single-player simulation
retains the immersive experience of the original
while enhancing the animation and analysis tools
available to students and the debrief tools for
instructors.

An interactive animation shows the flow of customers from the bar into the dining room.

hbsp.harvard.edu

UNDERSTANDING THE CHALLENGES


The simulation has six challenges. The
first five challenges allow students
to explore individual principles of
operations management related
to demand variability and process
variability. Customers arriving in the
restaurant at varying times create
demand variability while the variations
in dining time for groups of customers
creates process variability.
The first five challenges include:

 atching dining room customers


B
Customers can be sent from the bar
into the dining room in groups of
eight or they can be seated based
on the size of their party.

 esigning the optimal bar size


D
The bar is a source of revenue as
well as a place for customers to wait
until their table is ready. Changing
the bar size also changes the
capacity of the dining room.
 educing dining timeThe chefs
R
can be encouraged to alter the
dining time during peak and offpeak periods.
 oosting demand with promoB
tionsAdvertising campaigns,
special promotions, and an earlier
opening time can boost demand
and prompt customers to dine at
off-peak hours.

 ltering batching strategies at


A
different timesUsing different
batching strategies for early
customers, peak-period customers,
and late customers can have
different effects on utilization and
profitability.

The sixth challenge asks students


to consider the previous results
to come up with the best overall
restaurant strategy for maximizing
profitability. Students must consider
a balance between demand variability
and process variability to achieve an
optimal solution.

VIEWING RESTAURANT DATA AND ANIMATION


For each challenge, students choose options to explore
and the simulation generates data for 20 runs representing
20 possible evenings at the restaurant. The dinner and drink
costs in the simulation match the Benihana of Tokyo case
study (#673057) to facilitate teaching the two together.

For any run, students can analyze the data or view


animation of customer traffic through the restaurant.
The animation helps students identify bottlenecks and
better understand how customers flow through the bar
into the dining room.

Students review data generated in each challenge to determine the drivers of profitability.

ADMINISTRATION TOOLS ON NEXT PAGE

Administration Tools for Faculty

A comprehensive Teaching Note


covers key learning objectives:

 nalyzing capacity, demand rates,


A
cycle time, and throughput in a
service operation
 nderstanding how batching
U
strategies improve throughput
and how increasing capacity
improves bottlenecks
 inimizing or eliminating demand
M
variability (cyclical, stochastic,
batch size, and service time)
 ptimizing multiple variables in an
O
operation and ensuring consistency
in the overall strategy

NEW Dynamic Debrief SlidesInstructors can download


presentation-ready debrief slides of class results including
best strategy results.

NEW Teaching MaterialsAn updated Teaching Note


reduces the time required for faculty to learn the simulation.

NEW Simulation StatusSimulation status information


can be viewed from within the instructors coursepack
and from within the simulation itself. This includes whether
the simulation is open to students and the number of runs
allowed for the final challenge.

Product #7003 | Single-player | Seat Time: 90 minutes | Developed in partnership with Forio Online Simulations

FREE TRIAL ACCESS

Premium Educator access is a free

Visit hbsp.harvard.edu

service for faculty at degree-granting

A Free Trial allows full access to the


entire simulation and is available to
Premium Educators.

Educator Copies, Teaching Notes,

institutions and allows access to


Free Trials, course planning tools,
and special student pricing.

ALSO AVAILABLE
IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
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Supply Chain Management Simulation:


Root Beer Game #3101

Customer service is available 8 am to 6 pm ET, Monday through Friday


Phone: 1-800-545-7685 (1-617-783-7600 outside the U.S. and Canada)
Fax: 617-783-7666
Email: custserv@hbsp.harvard.edu
Web:

hbsp.harvard.edu

Product #M10923

NEW DesignUpdated visuals and enhanced animation


allow students to systematically explore the elements of
profitability at a service organization.

Printed on recycled paper.

New to this edition:

MC1690401011

Detailed class summary results allow faculty to discuss the results of each challenge
with students.