MORE ‘MINIONS’

MEANS MORE FUN

DEAL IN GREECE

LAWMAKERS BACK BAILOUT PLAN

FROM SERRA
TO THE CAPE

WORLD PAGE 31

SPORTS PAGE 11

WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 282

Poll: Tax increase unlikely
Belmont residents seem unsupportive of ballot measure to address infrastructure
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The coming election will likely
pass without Belmont voters
weighing in on a sales tax
increase as city officials have
determined the results of a poll
show a ballot measure is barely
feasible.
With an all-encompassing list

of nearly $190 million worth of
repairs including of streets, storm
drains, parks, buildings and more;
the City Council is seeking means
to tend to long overdue maintenance.
Yet some argue officials are
exaggerating the city’s financial
predicament and should be more
prudent in its spending.
For the second year, Godbe

Research has polled likely voters
to determine the efficacy of instituting a utility user tax and this
year, considered a half-cent sales
tax increase as well.
After polling more than 300 residents, consultants determined the
support for a utility user tax has
diminished by nearly 20 percent
and only 52 percent of uninformed
voters said they’d support a sales

tax, according to the survey.
However, the poll also highlighted that after being educated
on the city’s infrastructure needs
and expenses, support for a sales
tax measure increased to 55 percent.
“I can think of nothing more
obvious that separates us from
developing nations than roads,
sewers and storm drains. And this

is a serious issue, because the
longer we wait, the more expensive it’s going to get to repair,”
said Councilman Charles Stone,
who serves on the city’s
Infrastructure Repair Ad-Hoc
Committee. “I’m optimistic that
with increased outreach over the
coming months that the next time

See TAX, Page 23

“I think once people are interested in something and
actually put their mind to it, they get more encouraged to do something.
So I think education is really important.”
— Olivia Enriquez

A rendering of a four-story commercial building proposed for 225
California Drive in downtown Burlingame.

Four-story office project
proposed in Burlingame
Planning officials to study mixed-use commercial
development near downtown Caltrain station
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL

Olivia Enriquez, right, shows Sherri Hoff how to use a shower timer at a drought awareness event the
14-year-old San Mateo resident arranged at the Main Library Friday.

Actively raising awareness
San Mateo girl, 14, hosts drought and conservation events
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Prompted by a passion for helping people and concern for her
community, Olivia Enriquez is
developing a taste for activism as
she works to raise awareness about
the drought.
The 14-year-old San Mateo resident has taken it upon herself to
host two educational events this
week as she strives to make a difference in how people interact
with their environment.

Enriquez’s drought awareness
campaign included organizing a
conservation expert speaker session at the San Mateo Main
Library Friday and her Save Our
Water, three-mile walk Saturday.
A recent eighth-grade graduate
from Borel Middle School, the
burgeoning activist has been
researching and working closely
with staff at the Bay Area Water
Supply and Conservation Agency.
“I have not had the opportunity
to work with anyone like Olivia
before. It’s been just really fantas-

tic and encouraging to see someone with such energy and passion
taking on a very large and impressive project,” said BAWSCA Water
Resources Specialist Andree
Johnson, who spoke at Friday’s
library event. “We’ve found that
for a lot of our education, youth is
a key audience because they pick
up on this message and bring it
home; carrying it forward. And
she’s been a prime example of that
happening in the best sense.”

See AWARE, Page 8

A massive new office and retail
building is proposed to rise near the
Caltrain station in Burlingame,
which officials will begin to examine next week.
The Dewey Land Company, a San
Mateo-based development firm, has
expressed interest in redeveloping
the current 225 California Drive
property, at the intersection of

Highland Avenue, into a four-story
commercial office building offering
retail shop space on the ground
level, according to a city report.
The project is slated to house
nearly 45,000 square feet of office
space and 1,750 square feet of retail
businesses on a nearly half-acre
California Avenue site, between
Howard and Burlingame avenues,
according to the report.

See OFFICE, Page 23

Riders with a cause
Local teens bike from Vancouver to San Francisco for charity
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

While some local teens spent
the first weeks of summer relaxing
and enjoying their free time, two
Peninsula high school students
biked a grueling trek from Canada
back to San Francisco to raise
money for charity.
Matthew Botros, 17, and Will
Horvath, 17, spent two weeks rid-

Matthew
Botros

Will
Horvath

ing more than 1,200 miles south

See BIKE, Page 8

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
"Life is a lot like jazz — it's best
when you improvise."
George Gershwin (1898-1937).

This Day in History

1955

The U.S. Air Force Academy swore in
its first class of cadets at its temporary
quarters at Lowry Air Force Base in
Colorado.

In 1 7 6 7 , John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the
United States, was born in Braintree, Massachusetts.
In 1 7 9 8 , the U.S. Marine Corps was formally re-established
by a congressional act that also created the U.S. Marine Band.
In 1 8 0 4 , Vice President Aaron Burr mortally wounded former
Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton during a pistol duel in
Weehawken, New Jersey.
In 1 8 6 4 , Confederate forces led by Lt. Gen. Jubal Early began
an abortive invasion of Washington D.C., turning back the
next day.
In 1 9 1 5 , the Chicago Sunday Tribune ran an article titled,
“Blues Is Jazz and Jazz Is Blues.” (It's believed to be one of the
earliest, if not the earliest, uses of the word “jazz” as a musical
term by a newspaper.)
In 1 9 2 2 , the Hollywood Bowl officially opened with a program called “Symphonies Under the Stars” with Alfred Hertz
conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
In 1 9 3 7 , American composer and pianist George Gershwin
died at a Los Angeles hospital of a brain tumor; he was 38.
In 1 9 5 2 , the Republican National Convention, meeting in
Chicago, nominated Dwight D. Eisenhower for president and
Richard M. Nixon for vice president.
In 1 9 6 0 , the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
was first published by J.B. Lippincott and Co.
In 1 9 7 9 , the abandoned U.S. space station Skylab made a
spectacular return to Earth, burning up in the atmosphere and
showering debris over the Indian Ocean and Australia.
In 1 9 8 9 , actor and director Laurence Olivier died in Steyning,
West Sussex, England, at age 82.
In 1 9 9 5 , the U.N.-designated “safe haven” of Srebrenica
(SREH'-breh-neet-sah) in Bosnia-Herzegovina fell to Bosnian
Serb forces, who then carried out the killings of more than
8,000 Muslim men and boys. The United States normalized
relations with Vietnam.

Birthdays

Ex-heavyweight
champion Leon
Spinks is 62.

Bon Jovi guitarist
Richie Sambora is
56.

Wildlife expert Jeff
Corwin is 48.

Actor Tab Hunter is 84. Actress Susan Seaforth Hayes is 72.
Singer Jeff Hanna (Nitty Gritty Dirt Band) is 69. Ventriloquistactor Jay Johnson is 66. Actor Bruce McGill is 65. Singer
Bonnie Pointer is 65. Actor Stephen Lang is 63. Actress
Mindy Sterling is 62. Actress Sela Ward is 59. Reggae singer
Michael Rose (Black Uhuru) is 58. Singer Peter Murphy is 58.
Actor Mark Lester is 57. Jazz musician Kirk Whalum is 57.
Singer Suzanne Vega is 56. Actress Lisa Rinna is 52. Rock
musician Scott Shriner (Weezer) is 50. Actress Debbe Dunning
is 49. Actor Gred Grunberg is 49. Actor Justin Chambers is 45.

Revellers run from the ‘Fire Bull,’ a man carrying a metal structure shaped like a bull and loaded with fireworks, during the
San Fermin festival in Pamplona, northern Spain.

A habanero pepper is up to 100
times hotter than a jalapeno pepper.
***
The Washington Monument in
Washington, D.C., stands 555 feet
tall. The monument, built in honor of
George Washington (1732-1799), was
completed on Dec. 6, 1884.
***
In the story of Cinderella, a royal
ball is held to find a wife for the king’s
only son. If the prince did not marry,
the royal bloodline would end.
***
The word dandelion comes from an
Old French word dentdelion, meaning
tooth of the lion, in reference to the
jagged edges on the leaves of the
plant.
***
Lestor Maddox (1915-2003) got
national attention in 1964 when he
refused to allow African-Americans
into his Atlanta restaurant, the
Pickrick Cafeteria. Under protest of
government interference with small
business, Maddox sold his restaurant

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

July 8 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

PITOL

CHURGO

4

15

25

30

27

18
Powerball

6

15

16

49

28

14
Mega number

July 8 Super Lotto Plus
6

25

34

41

3

7

19

27

29

7

9

7

Daily Four
5

Daily three midday
3

45

10

***
Casper the Friendly Ghost had a
friend named Wendy. She was a young
witch who lived with her aunts
Thelma, Velma and Zelma in an
enchanted forest.
***
At weddings in the Czech Republic
people throw peas, not rice, at the
bride and groom.
***
The town of Churchill Manitoba,
Canada is known as the Polar Bear
Capital of the World. Every October
and November the bears gather along
the shore of the Hudson Bay, waiting
for the bay to freeze over so they can
hunt for seal. Thousands of tourists
travel to the town to see the polar
bears in their natural habitat.
***
Answer: It was the adv ertising slogan for Bry lcreem. Introduced in 1929,
Bry lcreem was the first mass-mark eted
men’s hair care product. Fred
Flintstone’s ex clamation of “Yabba
Dabba Doo” comes from Bry lcreem’s
slogan.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

July 7 Mega Millions

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

OAKAL

rather than integrate it.
***
In the history of baseball, there
have been more than 16,000 major
league baseball players. Of those, 40
percent have hit home runs.
***
Since 1978, there have been 37
recorded incidents of people getting
killed by vending machines. In all of
the cases, people shook the machines
to get free merchandise or money, and
the machines fell on them.
***
Do you know what product had the
advertising slogan “A Little Dab’ll Do
Ya”? See answer at end.
***
One way to control poison oak and
poison ivy growing wild is to get a
goat. Goats can eat the plants with no
ill effect.
***
The tree that grows the tallest is the
California redwood tree, which grows
up to 370 feet tall. The roots of the
huge conifers spread as far as 250 feet.
***
The 17-foot tall statue of David, on
display at the Accademia Gallery in
Florence, Italy, was damaged by a vandal in 1991. David’s toe was broken
after being hit with a hammer.
***
When American explorer Donald
MacMillan (1874-1970) went on an
Arctic expedition in 1913 he brought
NECCO wafer candies with him. He
gave the candy to the Eskimo children.

8

2

Daily three evening

Mega number

9

5

4

The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic, No. 5, in first place; Hot Shot, No. 3, in
second place; and Eureka, No. 7, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:43.11.

Saturday : Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the 60s to upper
70s. West winds 5 to 10 mph increasing
to 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Saturday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the upper
50s. West winds around 20 mph decreasing to 5 to 10 mph
after midnight.
Sunday : Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 60s to
upper 70s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the upper
50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.

HORLEL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: HOUSE
GUAVA
NOTIFY
MARROW
Answer: Seeing Roman ruins all day was this for the
teenagers — ENOUGH “FORUM”

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

San Francisco sheriff
defends release of
immigrant suspect
By Paul J. Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco’s sheriff touched off a new round of fighting Friday
in the immigration enforcement blame-game
that has surrounded the shooting death of a
young woman walking with her father along a
scenic pier.
Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi ardently defended
his jail’s release of a Mexican national later
blamed for the slaying of 32-year-old Kathryn
Steinle, saying federal officials know city law
requires a warrant or court order to detain an
inmate for deportation.
U.S.
Immigration
and
Customs
Enforcement
officials
fired
back,
saying
Mirkarimi has mischaracterized the incident and
shown a “manifest misunderstanding of federal
immigration law” by
demanding a warrant for
deportation to cooperate
with federal authorities.
Ross Mirkarimi
“There is no such document, nor is there any federal court with the authority to issue one,” ICE
said in a statement. The agency has said Juan
Francisco Lopez Sanchez would have been
deported if the San Francisco jail had complied with its requests.
The latest salvos come as the case dominates the immigration debate. Top politicians
from both parties have criticized San
Francisco’s law of non-cooperation with
immigration officials and have called on the
city — and the estimated 300 other municipalities with similar laws — to revamp their
policies.
In response, Mirkarimi called Friday’s City
Hall news conference to “set the record
straight” about the sequence of events that led
to Sanchez’s April release.
Mirkarimi told a packed crowd of reporters
that he personally informed high-ranking
Department of Homeland Security officials of
the city’s requirements in February.
He also criticized San Francisco Mayor Ed
Lee and others for suggesting that the sher-

iff’s department had a minimum duty to make
a phone call to alert ICE of Sanchez’ release
from jail. “We require a warrant,” Mirkarimi
said. “I don’t think we can be subjective.”
Assisting immigration officials without a
warrant “really defeats the purpose of the law,”
Mirkarimi said.
“Our policy will continue to reflect the spirit and letter of the law,” he added.
Aside from saying no such warrants exist,
ICE has said it relies on cooperation from
jails across the nation to arrange deportations. The agency has said tracking down
immigration offenders without local assistance requires far more resources and manpower.
Investigators have said Sanchez shot and
killed Steinle as she walked with her father
and a family friend July 1. Sanchez had several drug convictions and was in the U.S. illegally after being deported several times.
Authorities have said the gun used in the
random shooting had been stolen.
Sanchez, meanwhile, has said he found the
gun wrapped in a T-shirt and that it went off
accidentally.
He remains jailed on $5 million bail awaiting trial after pleading not guilty to murder
charges.
Groups advocating stricter immigration
enforcement are hoping the episode leads to
closer collaboration between local law
enforcement and immigration authorities. In
recent years, California, Connecticut, Rhode
Island and the District of Columbia have
joined 293 cities and counties to restrict
cooperation, according to the Catholic Legal
Immigration Network Inc.
“Having to obtain a court order as suggested
by the sheriff is a waste of taxpayer dollars
and valuable court resources and time when the
real problem is the sanctuary policy,” Sen.
Chuck Grassley, the Republican chairman of
the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in a
statement. “The roadblocks that some state
and locals put up preventing cooperation
should be kicked to the curb in order to protect
public safety.”
Still, the American Civil Liberties Union
and others argue the restricted cooperation
prevents unfair deportations.

Police reports
Replace the battery
A loud beeping noise going off for several hours was found to be a smoke
alarm in a dumpster on Foster City
Boulevard before 12:50 a.m. Friday,
July 3.

MILLBRAE
Mi s s i ng teens l o cated. Two 16-year-old
Idaho residents with outstanding warrants
who had been reported missing were found
and taken into custody on the 400 block of
Lincoln Circle before 8:30 a.m. Thursday,
July 9.
Res i denti al burg l ary. Someone forced
open a garage door and stole items worth
$6,000 on the 1100 block of Elmwood
Drive before 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 8.
DUI. A person was arrested after a hit and
run on the 200 block of Aviador Avenue
before 11:55 p.m. Tuesday, July 7.
Grand theft pro perty. A bicycle worth
$2,500 was stolen on the 500 block of
Poplar Avenue before 1:30 p.m. Tuesday,
July 7.

BURLINGAME
Fraud. A person sent an unknown suspect
money after being threatened with arrest on
Hunt Drive before 12:53 p.m. Sunday, July
5.
Vehi cl e burg l ary. A rear window of a
vehicle was smashed in on Anza Boulevard
before 8:50 p.m. Saturday, July 4.
Acci dent. A drunk driver was arrested for
causing property damage at Peninsula and
Highland avenues before 9:57 p.m. Friday,
July 3.

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

3

Ide n t i t y t h e f t . Police were contacted
when $15,000 was transferred from a person’s bank account on Cortez Avenue before
3:45 p.m. Friday, July 3.

BELMONT
Sus pi ci o us pers o n. An unknown man
with a white beard and green shirt was seen
outside a woman’s house with a bottle of
alcohol on Hallmark Drive before 8:30 a.m.
Thursday, July 9.
Hi t and run. A person’s foot was run over
by an unknown woman in a yellow sedan on
Ralston Avenue and Alameda de las Pulgas
before 5:48 p.m. Wednesday, July 8.
Sus pi ci o us pers o n. An unknown woman
came to a resident’s door and verbally
abused her at Sterling Avenue before 1:09
p.m. Tuesday, July 7.
Sus pi ci o us pers o n. A woman found a
construction worker in her apartment on
Middle Road before 3:00 p.m Saturday, July
4.

FOSTER CITY
Co mmerci al burg l ary. A door of a commercial business was kicked in and several
items were stolen on Triton Drive before
9:38 p.m. Sunday, July 5.
Heal th and s afety co de v i o l ati o n. A
woman sleeping in a parked RV was arrested
for possession of paraphernalia and being
under the influence of a narcotic on Sea
Spray Lane before 7:02 a.m. Thursday, July
2.
Vehi cl e co de v i o l ati o n. A woman was
cited and released for driving on the wrong
side of a divided highway before 12:25 a.m.
Thursday, July 2.

4

LOCAL/BAY AREA

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

Local briefs
Neck slasher gets one
year in jail, probation
A man who slashed another man’s neck after
seeing the victim with his ex-girlfriend was
sentenced to just one year in county jail
Friday.
Brenden
Leonard
Hobson, 24, admitted to
felony assault causing
great bodily injury after he
and two others attacked a
22-year-old Foster City
man at a party around 3:30
a.m. July 2013.
Hobson
has
been
Brenden
remanded to jail since last
Hobson
month when he allegedly
showed up to court under
the influence of drugs,
District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe said.
Hobson’s defense attorney claimed his client was
on a prescription drug, but
San
Mateo
County
Superior Court Judge
Leland Davis revoked his
Jason Spears bail.
The alleged methamphetamine user already has 69 days credit and
was sentenced to an additional three years of
supervised probation. Hobson’s jail sentence
could be modified if a probation officer finds
him suitable for a residential drug treatment
program, Wagstaffe said.
Hobson and his co-defendant Jason Spears,
a 22-year Redwood City resident, reportedly
encountered the victim who was seen talking
to Hobson’s ex-girlfriend on the 400 block of
Lauren Avenue. Hobson challenged him to a
fight and slashed the man’s neck and face with
a letter opener while Spears and two other

jumped in to help, according to prosecutors.
Sheriff’s deputies arrested Spears at the
scene but Hobson fled and later surrendered.
Spears pleaded no contest to felony assault in
February in exchange for three years probation and 60 days in jail, according to prosecutors.

Man arrested for
attempting to murder wife
A man was arrested for attempted murder
Thursday after stabbing his wife in a home in
the Central Neighborhood of San Mateo.
Ernest Gonzalez, 46, was arrested at an office
complex parking lot near Claremont Street and
Ninth Avenue around 8 p.m., according to San
Mateo police.
Police were called to the 600 block of South
Humboldt Street around 7:30 p.m. after a 44year-old woman reported being stabbed in the
chest by her husband. Gonzalez allegedly used a
kitchen knife to stab his wife who was quickly
taken to a hospital and is expected to make a full
recovery, according to police.

Diamond thief gets
four years state prison
A Palo Alto woman convicted of stealing
diamonds from under a jewelry store clerk’s
nose was sentenced to four years in state
prison Friday.
Angela Walker, 47, was arrested last year
after swapping a loose diamond with a cubic
zirconia and stealing a ring at Galati Jewelers
in San Mateo.
Walker has just 40 days credit for time
served and was ordered to pay $9,200 in restitution to the San Mateo business located at 35
E. Fourth Ave., District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe said.
Walker was arrested after she left contact
information with the store clerk in March
2014 and returned days later, apparently in an
attempt to steal more diamonds, according to

THE DAILY JOURNAL

prosecutors.
The clerk showed
Walker several loose
diamonds and a solitaire
diamond ring and when
the saleswoman went
into a back room,
Walker stole the diamond then switched one
Angela Walker of the loose diamonds
with a cubic zirconia of
matching size. Walker told the sales woman
she planned on coming back to view more diamonds and left her contact information,
according to prosecutors.
A few days later, the owner noticed the theft,
prompting police to set up a sting by having
the clerk contact Walker and ask her to return
to the store. Walker was found with several
cubic zirconia of different sizes in her possession, according to prosecutors.
Walker pleaded not guilty, but a jury convicted her after three hours of deliberation in
March of commercial burglary, grand theft and
possession of drugs, according to prosecutors. Walker was also found to have two prior
felony convictions and had served two prior
prison terms, according to prosecutors.

Sheriff’s Office warns
of ‘warrant scam’
A new scam is being attempted throughout
the Peninsula with calls from a man claiming
to be Sgt. Gregory Jacobs with the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office saying that payment
must be made to avoid arrest, according to
sheriff’s officials.
During the call, the man provides instructions to pay money for arrest warrants or face
prosecution. Sheriff’s officials say they would
never contact the public over the phone to
demand payment for fees or fines. They also
warn citizens to not provide personal information like Social Security numbers or credit
card information over the phone.

Inmate was cut
nearly in two,
organs missing
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Nearly 15 hours after a
riot at a Northern California prison, guards
found a missing inmate sawed nearly in two,
with his abdominal organs and most chest
organs removed, his body folded and stuffed
into a garbage can in a shower stall a few
doors from his cell.
Details of the gruesome May killing at the
medium-security California State Prison,
Solano, are laid out in an autopsy report
obtained by the Associated Press under a
public records request.
The grisly discovery raises obvious questions about the prison’s security: How could
such a gruesome killing happen inside a
locked facility with security and surveillance? How could someone obtain weapons
sharp enough to dissect a body? And why did
it take so long to uncover?
Homicides are distressingly common in
California prisons. More than 160 inmates
have been killed in the last 15 years, and the
state has one of the nation’s highest inmate
homicide rates. Yet the death of 24-year-old
Nicholas Anthony Rodriguez stands out.
Rodriguez’s missing organs are “still part
of the investigation” at the prison in
Vacaville, 40 miles southwest of
Sacramento, Department of Corrections and
Rehabilitation
spokeswoman
Terry
Thornton said Friday.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/BAY AREA

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

5

Santa Cruz deputies shoot, kill teen
Jamey Padojino
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

An allegedly armed 17-year-old boy was
shot by deputies in Boulder Creek late
Thursday night and died of his injuries early
Friday morning, a Santa Cruz County sheriff’s spokesman said.
The boy, who has not been identified,
allegedly beat his grandfather and killed a
kitten before the shooting, sheriff’s Lt.
Kelly Kent said.
Around 10:30 p.m. Thursday, deputies
responded to a reported family dispute at a
home in the 15000 block of Fern Flat Road,
sheriff’s Lt. Kelly Kent said.
Two deputies arrived and met with the

Bay Area brief
Students to unveil sculptures
for public art installation
Students at The Crucible in West Oakland
are unveiling sculptures Friday that will
make up a kinetic installation on the side of
“one big, dull gray building,” the installation’s lead artist said.
Lead artist Sudhu Tewari is referring to The

Obituaries
Marlin Derelle Gill
Marlin Derelle Gill, resident of San Mateo
for 60 years, died July 9, 2015.
Husband of Patricia Gill for 51 years.
Father of Marshele Gill, John Gill, Patrick
Gill (his wife Rebecca). Brother of Robert
Gill with Marlin being the youngest of
eight children.  Also survived by his grandson Crosby, his soon to be second grandson, and his beloved grand-dog Pearl along
with his beloved late grand-dog Ladie Girl.
A native of Sacramento, California, age
81 years.
Served U.S. Marine Corps. Past senior
vice commandant Marine Corps League,
General J. C. Breckenridge Detachment.

boy’s grandparents at the home’s driveway.
The grandparents reported their grandson,
who lives at the home, was alone inside
breaking furniture and windows and had
access to guns, Kent said.
The boy was allegedly armed with a club,
similar to one used in martial arts, that he
beat his grandfather with, Kent said.
The grandfather was treated for his
injuries in the alleged attack and did not
need to visit a hospital, according to Kent.
While inside the home the boy allegedly
killed a kitten, the spokesman said.
The deputies set up a perimeter and established communication with the boy from
outside the residence, according to Kent.
Firefighters and an ambulance were staged

nearby and hostage negotiators were called
to the scene, he said.
About 45 minutes later, the boy emerged
from the home carrying a shotgun and a
rifle, which he pointed at one of the
deputies, according to Kent.
The deputies then shot at the boy, who
was struck three times in the torso and once
in the hand, Kent said.
The deputies rendered aid to the boy, who
was conscious and talking when an ambulance arrived and took him to a helicopter
that airlifted him to Stanford Hospital,
according to Kent.
He was pronounced dead shortly before
4:30 a.m. Friday, Kent said.
The deputies, whose names have not been

released, were not injured in the shooting
and have been placed on paid administrative
leave, the spokesman said.
The involved deputies were a six-year veteran and a two-year veteran, according to
Kent.
Investigators are looking into the circumstances leading up to the incident, Kent
said.
The Santa Cruz County District Attorney’s
Office is also conducting a separate investigation into the shooting, Kent said.
“This is a tragic case for everybody
involved and my thoughts and prayers go
out to the young man’s family as well as our
deputy sheriffs involved in this case, ”
Sheriff Jim Hart said in a statement.

Crucible’s home at 1260 Seventh Street.
Fifteen students from neighborhoods all
over Oakland came together each Friday
evening during last six or seven weeks to
talk about and create the sculptures, Tewari
said.
They asked themselves whether their
work could speak for West Oakland or
whether they could express a lofty idea, he
said. In the end, he said, they decided to let
the upcoming installation speak for the
community at The Crucible.

He said the sculptures will be on display
Friday so people can look at them and offer
ideas for the installation. Students will
unveil at least five sculptures in varying
stages of completion.
Tewari said the sculptures are made mostly
of recycled bike parts, such as ones unfit for
a working bike.
We’re “kind of doing a zero waste thing,”
he said.
Some sculptures have names. Da Vinci’s
Wheel is based on Leonardo da Vinci’s

design for a perpetual motion machine.
The creation is a hand crank and spinning
wheel with arms and arrows in colors of
robin’s egg blue, royal blue and three
shades of pink, from pastel to fluorescent,
Tewari said.
“What’s especially unique about this
installation is that it was conceptualized
and executed by our youth, the next generation shaping our city,” The Crucible’s executive director David Miller said in a statement.

Member
Marine
Memorial Association
and 1st Marine Division.
Past chairman San Mateo
Personnel
Board.
Participated in the 1981
Reagan Inauguration and
Ball. Past exalted ruler of
San Mateo Elks BPOE
1112.  Past President of
Marlin Gill
the San Mateo Lions
Club. Proud member of the Olympic Club.
Family and friends may visit 10 a.m.
Tuesday, July 14 at Saint Bartholomew’s
Catholic Church, 600 Columbia Drive, San
Mateo, with funeral mass at 11 a. m.
Committal at Saint John’s Cemetery in San
Mateo.
Condolences sent via Chapel of the

Highlands, Millbrae.
Donations to the Semper Fi Fund at
www.semperfifund.org appreciated.

the loving mother of Bill (Alma), Bob
(Judy) and Gary (Lynn). Her grandchildren
Chris, Matt, Bessie, Carrie, Gino, Simone,
Nick and great-grandchildren Mario, Joy,
Trevor, Audrey, Mateo, Maximo and Maya
were her pride and joy. 

Angelina Delucchi
Angelina Delucchi died peacefully surrounded by family on July 1, 2015.
“Beloved ‘Noni,’” the matriarch of the
Delucchis was born in Troina, Sicily, Feb.
6, 1914. She came to San Francisco in 1915
and was in the second full graduating class
of Balboa High School. She was the oldest
sister of brothers Tony and Thomas Zitelli
who predeceased her.
Angie met the love of her life, Bill
Delucchi, while in high school and they
began their 70-year path together. “Nonu”
Bill predeceased her in 2006. “Noni” was

Angie loved life and was a faithful and
tough-minded friend.
The family thanks Sutter Health Hospice
for their excellent care. A special
gratitude to her care-giver, Kathy Jackson,
for her loving service.    
A memorial mass will be 11 a.m. July 14
at St. Dunstan Catholic Church, 1133
Broadway in Millbrae, California.
Condolences may be offered to her family
through Chapel of the Highlands, Millbrae.

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6

STATE

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Court blocks water cuts for some California farmers
By Fenit Nirappil
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — A judge ruled Friday
that California regulators violated some
farmers’ rights by telling them to stop
diverting from rivers and streams, but the
state says it can still punish those who illegally take water during the drought.
The temporary restraining order by
Sacramento Superior Court Shelleyanne
Chang blocks the state from punishing
farmers who ignored a state notice issued
earlier this year to immediately stop diverting water. The ruling only applies to dozens
of farmers in the Central Valley and the irrigation districts serving them.
The two sides had divergent views of what

the ruling meant, with attorneys for the
farmers suggesting it had sweeping implications for the state’s regulatory authority,
while the state said it only meant it needed
to tweak its notices.
Residents, farmers and businesses across
California have endured water restrictions
because of the state’s four-year dry spell.
Those cutbacks include notices by the State
Water Resources Control Board that rivers
and streams are running too dry to provide
water entitled to them.
Thousands have received these so-called
curtailment notices in the last year, but
only about a third responded to confirm
they stopped taking water. The judge ruled
Friday that the water board’s notices
improperly told districts and land owners
with water rights to stop taking water with-

out holding a hearing first.
The ruling bars the state from fining people who don’t fill out paperwork responding
to notices, but regulators can still target
them for investigations of illegal water
diversions. Penalties are as high as $1,000
a day and $2,500 per acre-foot of water illegally taken.
Attorneys for water rights holders say the
ruling throws all the state’s cutbacks into
question.
“The practical implication is that the
court has reminded the state board that water
rights are a form of property rights, and
they have to use a lot more care when they
are trying to regulate them,” said Jennifer
Spaletta, an attorney for the Central Delta
Water Agency which represented dozens of
farmers with water rights.

The State Water Resources Control Board
says the ruling may require it to tweak its
notice letters, but still allows it to punish
those who illegally take water.
“As it keeps getting drier as summer goes
on, the notices have to go out to more and
more people, but the judge only took
umbrage with some of the language,” said
David Rose, an attorney with the water
board.
Rose says the board will hold hearings
before it issues any penalties for illegal
diversions. Stuart Somach, a Sacramentobased attorney whose firm has a separate
challenge to the board’s orders, says the
board faces long-drawn out challenges that
will result in little water savings.
“If the goal is to address drought and
water, it will do very little,” said Somach.

Municipal Water District
claims a tanker truck
filled up at a hydrant and
hauled water to Selleck’s
60-acre
ranch
in
Westlake Village more
than a dozen times in the
past two years.
The district said it
spent nearly $22,000 for
a private detective to

has his land is under mandatory cutbacks as
high as 36 percent.

co companies that scored legislative victories this week.
California’s current tobacco per-pack tax
is 15th lowest in the nation at 87 cents.

Around the state
Tom Selleck, water district
reach tentative settlement
LOS ANGELES — Tom Selleck reached a
tentative settlement Thursday in a lawsuit
that claims he stole truckloads of water from
a public hydrant and took it to his ranch in
drought-stricken California.
Resource manager Eric Bergh with the
Calleguas Municipal Water District in
Ventura County said he could not provide
any details about the agreement until it’s
approved.
The proposed settlement will go before
the district’s water board Wednesday.
“Staff recommendation will be to accept,”
Bergh said.
A representative for Selleck didn’t immediately return a request for comment.
Selleck’s wife was also named in the suit.
The lawsuit filed by the Calleguas

Tom Selleck

investigate.
The Ventura County Sheriff’s Department
investigated the allegations but was unable
to establish that a crime had taken place,
Capt. John Reilly said on Wednesday.
According to the district, officials sent
Selleck cease-and-desist letters to stop the
water deliveries, but as recently as March a
truck was seen filling up at a hydrant and
delivering water to the ranch.
California has been hard hit by a four-year
drought, and the community where Selleck

Proponents cleared to gather
signatures for cigarette tax
SACRAMENTO — Proponents of a $2
cigarette tax increase have been cleared to
begin gathering signatures to take the question to California voters in 2016.
Secretary of State Alex Padilla approved
two ballot initiatives Friday for signatures.
The per-pack tax would net an estimated
$1.1 billion in its first year, with revenues
slightly decreasing each year after. It would
go to pay for health care programs and services.
The effort is backed by the California
Medical Association, the American Lung
Association and the Service Employees
International Union.
Voters have rejected two other proposals
to tax cigarettes in the last decade, and the
latest tax plan faces opposition from tobac-

Waters closed after
‘aggressive’ shark bumps surfer
HUNTINGTON BEACH — Lifeguards have
ordered everybody out of the water in
Huntington Beach after a shark bumped a
surfer.
The surfer told authorities a 5-to-8-footlong shark bumped the underside of his
board Friday morning as he sat waiting for a
wave.
The surfer paddled about 30 yards back to
shore and alerted lifeguards.
Authorities say the bump qualifies as
aggressive shark behavior. They’ve closed
the waters along a 2-mile stretch of beach
until Saturday morning. However, beachgoers can still use the sand.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

7

Obama gives monument status to 100-mile range in California
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BERRYESSA SNOW MOUNTAIN NATIONAL
MONUMENT — As a stretch of gold and green
coastal range spanning more than 100 miles
became California’s newest national monument
on Friday, geologist Bob Schneider couldn’t
stop himself from jigging for joy.
“I’m doing little Snoopy dances,” Schneider
said just before the ceremony in Washington
where President Barack Obama established the
Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument
— 331,000 acres that cover inner-coast mountains, wetlands and waterways and are home to
bears, otters, eagles and a host of other wildlife.
With the preservation from development that
the designation as a monument brings, “I’m
happy that my grandchild will be able to come
here and visit this place” in decades to come,
said Schneider, who has climbed the region’s
peaks for half a century.

Obama created the new
California national monument Friday along with one
in Texas and another in
Nevada, altogether protecting more than 1 million
acres. With Friday’s signing, Obama now has made
19 national monuments,
Barack Obama using his executive powers
after opposition from some
Republican lawmakers slowed congressional
designations of new conservation areas.
Schneider and other members of a Northern
California preservation group called Tuleyome
successfully campaigned for monument status
— with broad support from federal lawmakers
and local officials — in part by assuring hunters
and others they would not push to limit recreational use of the area.

There’s boating, kayaking, hiking, birdwatching, U.S. Rep. John Garamendi, a
Democrat from Fairfield, said by telephone from
Washington. “Just about every kind of recreation.”
On Friday, gray fog hugged the range’s ridges
of summer-yellow grass and oak trees swathed
in dried moss.
Climbing from reedy marshes to mountain
peaks more than 6,000 feet above, the monument will give bears, badgers, otters, mountain
lions, bald and golden eagles, and other wildlife
room to move as climate change alters habitat,
supporters said.
The monument designation excludes the landmark for which the area is best-known locally
— Lake Berryessa, a reservoir created in the
1950s
by
damming
Putah
Creek.
Photographers Dorothea Lange and Pirkle
Jones chronicled the damming in a book called
“Death of a Valley.”

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For some Californians who most associate
the area with the manmade lake, ringed by signs
advertising bingo, jet-ski rentals, and “mobile
villas,” the monument designation Friday was
puzzling.
“Yes, we’re in the country, we have animals,
but to make us a monument?” asked Marcia
Ritz, behind a counter at a general store on the
edge of the reservoir. “What have we done to
deserve that?”
Schneider, by phone, spoke of standing on
the ridge where the North American and Pacific
tectonic plates meet, and of 12,000-year-old
Indian sites that the public could now more easily learn about.
“When you designate something like this,
you create a sense of place,” he said. “This isn’t
about Yosemite. It doesn’t have that grandeur
like Half Dome and El Capitan. But it does have
incredible places. And there are stories here.”

8

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

AWARE
Continued from page 1
Enriquez said after learning more about
the severity of the drought, Gov. Jerry
Brown’s conservation mandates as well as
how people can cut back both indoors and
outdoors, she decided she wanted to become
a tool for conservation awareness.
Recognizing how her own family has adapted their behaviors to reduce water use,
Enriquez said knowledge is a key to change.
“Just talking to people and educating
them on certain issues will get them interested and thinking about what they can do to
make a difference. I think once people are
interested in something and actually put
their mind to it, they get more encouraged to
do something. So I think education is really
important,” Enriquez said.
Nearly 50 people signed up for her weekend walk, to which she’s unable to publicly
promote due to city permitting restraints.
Enriquez said she designed and had bright
colored Save Our Water T-shirts made that
participants will wear as they walk or run
near the Bayfront Saturday afternoon. While
not raising any funds through her events,
having passersby see the bright colored
shirts will hopefully trigger awareness
about the drought and the need to conserve,
Enriquez said.
Enriquez said her own experience after
seeing the visual impacts the drought is
having on things like reservoirs and water
bodies encouraged her to make lifestyle
changes.
“When I would travel, I would be like ‘oh
wow, that’s where the water used to be, now
it’s really low.’ And just going through the

LOCAL/NATION
process of learning about water conservation, there’s a lot of things I was shocked to
learn about. Because there’s a lot of small
things we can do to conserve a lot of water,”
Enriquez said. At her home, “we changed out
front yard to drought tolerant plants, we are
letting the grass in our backyard die and
we’re doing full loads of laundry and all that
good stuff.”
The soon-to-be high school student’s
recent work has been encouraging to her
mother Lourdes Enriquez, who’s well versed
in conservation efforts as she too works for
BAWSCA.
“It’s been quite interesting and it’s actually been quite fulfilling for me because she’s
a very quiet person, an introvert,” Lourdes
Enriquez said. “So this year, when she told
me she really likes helping people and
issues challenging people in the community here, I was happy to hear that. It was a big
step for her to admit that to me and to put it
in words.”
Olivia Enriquez said her passion for helping others started simply, just by listening
and consoling her friends who were struggling. Still young and learning what it
means to be an activist, Olivia Enriquez said
she’d like to consider a career in psychology. But in the short term, she plans to continue to stay involved in the community,
current events and plan another campaign
on another relevant topic next year.
“A lot of things that people are dealing
with, they can’t deal with on their own,”
Olivia Enriquez said. “So I think it’s important to ask for help, or to offer help to those
that need it.”

samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106

Around the nation
Defense in Colorado theater shooting
trial rests; closings next week
CENTENNIAL, Colo. — The defense in the
Colorado theater shooting trial rested its
case Friday after trying to show James
Holmes was legally insane when he opened
fire at a midnight movie and was suffering
from delusions that each person he killed
would increase his self-worth.

BIKE
Continued from page 1
along the Pacific coast, after flying
Monday, June 15, with their bikes to
Vancouver, British Columbia and striking
out on their journey.
During their trip, the two raised roughly
$2,000 in donations which will be granted
to the Saint Francis of Assisi Youth Club in
East Palo Alto, where Botros and Horvath
help coordinate recreation programs.
Botros, a Redwood City native who will
be a senior at Carlmont High School next
year, said with the money they raised, he and
Horvath plan to purchase bikes for the club,
which will be used to start a riding program
for local children.
He said the youth club offered tremendous
appreciation and emotional backing for the
riders while they were headed south through
Washington, Oregon and Northern
California.
“We got huge support from them throughout,” he said.
The upliftment was appreciated by Botros
and Horvath, as they rode between 50 and 70
miles a day and braved a variety of obstacles, such as illness, equipment malfunction, extreme heat and inconsiderate
motorists.
“It was a tremendous opportunity for personal growth,” said Horvath, a Woodside
resident who is going into his senior year at
Sacred Heart Preparatory in Atherton.
The two would spend between eight and 10
hours riding on an average day, but at times
less, such as periods of the trip when Botros
fell sick, which limited their progress.
Botros said the beginning of the ride was
plagued with challenges, as he suffered two
popped bike tires in the first three days,

THE DAILY JOURNAL
Holmes’ public defenders ended their case
after playing two silent surveillance videos
of Holmes taken in the months following the
attack. One showed him in his jail cell, running and slamming his head against the wall,
then falling backward and sitting down.
The other, taken at a hospital, showed
Holmes naked and tethered to a bed, repeatedly trying to cover his head with a blanket and
then a sheet. Uniformed officers and hospital
workers pull them off and try to cover the
lower half of Holmes’ body with them.
which made him question whether they
would ever make it to their destination.
The longest day of riding during their trip
was a stretch along Highway 101 from
Willits to Santa Rosa, which is roughly 80
miles, in temperatures as hot as 109 degrees
Fahrenheit, according to Botros.
Just as the trip was nearing its end, and the
bikers were approaching San Francisco, a
careless driver backing their car out of a
driveway struck Horvath, which damaged his
bike but left him relatively unscathed.
“It was kind of scary at times,” Botros
said.
The myriad challenges the riders endured
proved difficult, but ultimately served to
build character, said Horvath.
“I found that I could do it,” he said. “It was
very challenging at times.”
Learning to appreciate the kindness of
strangers, who aided the riders periodically
by helping them fix their bikes or offer
local expertise, was one of the elements
Horvath said he enjoyed the most.
“People are just really helpful,” he said.
Botros, who had taken a previous long
distance bike trip by himself to Los Angeles
last year, said one of the great unanticipated
challenges of this ride was coordinating a
daily game plan, since the two did little
advance planning charting their course.
“This trip taught me a lot of things, like
being able to live with someone for two
weeks,” he said. “That was interesting. We
had to compromise a lot, like where to stop,
fill up water bottles, or eat and sleep.”
He said more than anything, the trip
taught him to appreciate the joys of modern
amenities he had previously taken for granted.
“Basically it made every complaint I have
at home seem really trivial, because riding a
bike for two weeks was harder than I
thought,” said Botros. “It really made me
cherish the ability to drive.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Obama’s personnel chief steps down
By Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The embattled head of
the government’s personnel office abruptly
stepped down Friday, bowing to mounting
pressure following the unprecedented
breach of private information her agency
was entrusted to protect.
Katherine Archuleta had served as director
of the federal Office of Personnel
Management since November 2013. The
former national political director for
President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election
campaign, Archuleta came under scathing
criticism amid revelations this year that
hackers — widely believed to be China’s
government — had infiltrated her agency’s
databases as well as background-check
records for millions who applied for U.S.
security clearances.
On Thursday, Archuleta had rebuffed
demands that she resign, declaring she was
“committed to the work that I am doing.”
But her continued tenure at the agency grew
untenable as calls from lawmakers —
including members of Obama’s own party

— mushroomed. On
Friday morning, she
came to the White House
to personally submit her
resignation to Obama.
He named Beth Cobert,
currently deputy director
for management at the
White House’s Office of
Management and Budget,
Katherine
to step in as acting direcArchuleta
tor at OPM.
“It’s quite clear that new leadership, with a
set of skills and experiences that are unique
to the urgent challenges that OPM faces, are
badly needed,” said White House spokesman
Josh Earnest.
Archuleta’s resignation came one day
after the administration disclosed that the
number of people affected by the federal data
breach was far greater than previously
known. In addition to 4.2 million people
whose records were stolen in an initial hack
first revealed earlier this year, more than
21.5 million had their Social Security numbers and other sensitive information stolen
in a second hack, believed to be the biggest
in U.S. history.

Archuleta offered her resignation “of her
own volition” and wasn’t forced out,
Earnest said. At the same time, he conceded
that Americans affected by the breach are
still “due additional information” from the
agency about what happened and how to
protect themselves.
Republican lawmakers who had fueled the
growing calls for her resignation, including
House Speaker John Boehner, said it was
too little, too late. Sen. Ben Sasse of
Nebraska responded to the news with a twoword statement: “Not enough.”
“It’s a Band-Aid, but it’s not going to stop
the bleeding,” said Rep. Jason Chaffetz of
Utah, chairman of the House Oversight and
Government Reform Committee. He said in
an interview that OPM still lacks a functional system to protect private data held by
what is effectively the largest human
resources department in the world.
“It’s time to bring in the nerds,” he added.
But J. David Cox Sr., president of the
American Federation of Government
Employees, put part of the blame on
Congress for failing to adequately fund
OPM. “Firing one individual solves nothing,” he said.

$10 bill change rankles descendant of Alexander Hamilton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Doug Hamilton is just
fine with plans to put a woman’s portrait on
U.S. paper money, but he’d prefer that the
Treasury Department leave the $10 bill alone
— particularly the prominent visage of his
great-great-great-great-great
grandfather,
Alexander Hamilton.
The 10-spot is a source of family pride in
Hamilton’s house in suburban Columbus, a dignified symbol of the historical importance of
his ancestor, whose picture has been on it since
1929. So naturally, Hamilton started making
some noise when he heard about the proposal
that has Alexander Hamilton sharing the note
with a deserving woman yet to be chosen.
The 64-year-old salesman for IBM has joined
a growing number of voices in a backlash
against what he calls the “diminishing” of
Hamilton, the first secretary of the Treasury
who founded the nation’s banking system.
“He’s the father of paper money,” says Doug
Hamilton, who has a son and grandson carrying the name of their famous ancestor. (His
daughter, Elizabeth, was named for Alexander
Hamilton’s wife.)
He’s urging people to sign a petition on the
White House “We The People” website, and this
weekend he’ll be preaching the Hamiltonian

gospel at a series of annual events in New York
and New Jersey planned around the anniversary
of Alexander Hamilton’s death on July 12,
1804, a day after his duel with Aaron Burr.
The trip also will include a preview of the
hip-hop musical “Hamilton,” based on Ron
Chernow’s biography of Alexander Hamilton,
opening on Broadway.
Outcry over Hamilton’s possible demotion
has been somewhat lost in the wave of excitement over the inclusion of a woman’s portrait
on paper currency. The Treasury Department
says the $10 bill was chosen because it’s up
next for a redesign to improve anti-counterfeiting features. The new bill would go into circulation in 2020.
Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said this week
that he’s sticking with the plan, despite critics
arguing that a woman should be featured on the
$20 bill in place of Andrew Jackson, whom
many historians view less favorably because of
his treatment of Native Americans and his ownership of slaves.
“Right now is the time to call that out,” says
Barbara Howard, founder of the group Women
on 20s, which advocates replacing Jackson
with a deserving woman from history. Doug
Hamilton has joined forces with Howard’s
group and others trying to change Lew’s mind.
Meanwhile, former Federal Reserve chairman

Ben Bernanke wrote in a blog that he was
“appalled” at the idea of adding a woman to the
$10 bill at Hamilton’s expense. The New York
Times wrote in a Fourth of July editorial that
it’s a much better idea to bump Jackson, an
undistinguished president who, ironically,
hated the idea of paper currency.
“The announcement has really befuddled people,” says Rand Scholet, president of a group
called The Alexander Hamilton Awareness
Society, which planned some of the events this
weekend expected to draw hundreds.
According to the Treasury Department, putting Hamilton’s portrait on the $10 bill was
included in the changes made by the government “to restore faith in economic power of the
United States and currency” after the economic
crash of 1929 and into the Great Depression.
Doug Hamilton has known since he was a kid
that he was related to the founding father. His
grandmother first told him, and he confirmed it
later through genealogical studies. But all that
aside, he says his ancestor’s towering achievements have earned him a permanent place on
the bill, and the picture should remain
untouched.
“We think,” Doug Hamilton says, “he is
somebody the younger generation should look
up to.”

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

9

Around the nation
FBI: Church gunman shouldn’t
have been able to get gun
WASHINGTON — The gunman charged in
the Charleston, South Carolina, church
massacre should not have been allowed to
purchase the weapon used in the attack, FBI
Director James Comey said Friday as he outlined a series of “heartbreaking” missed
opportunities and background check flaws
that allowed the transaction to take place.
“We are all sick that this has happened,”
Comey told reporters at an unusual, hastily
scheduled meeting at FBI headquarters. “We
wish we could turn back time, because from
this vantage point, everything seems obvious. But we cannot.”
He said he had ordered a review into what
happened and that FBI officials would meet
Friday with victims’ relatives to explain the
errors.
The cascading set of problems began with
the drug-related arrest of Dylann Roof in
South Carolina weeks before the shooting,
touching off miscommunication between
local and federal officials and revealing
potential shortcomings in the government’s background check process.
At issue was a police report from Roof’s
arrest in which authorities say he admitted
to possessing illegal drugs. Under federal
rules, that admission alone would have been
enough to disqualify him from an April gun
purchase even though he wasn’t convicted
of the charge.

Big House vote to speed drug
approvals, boost research
WASHINGTON — For the second time this
year, the House used overwhelming bipartisan
unity Friday to approve health legislation,
this time voting to bolster biomedical
research and streamline how the government
approves drugs and medical devices.
The chamber’s 344-77 vote sent the measure to the Senate, where a bill is unlikely until
later this year. It is unclear how different the
Senate version will be.
“Hopefully it will in fact trigger a similar
reaction in the Senate, where families know
that there really is hope,” Rep. Fred Upton, RMich., chief author of the bill with Rep. Diana
DeGette, D-Colo., said of the lopsided House
vote. Upton chairs the House Energy and
Commerce Committee.
Supporters said that with medicine rapidly
creating new treatments, it was time to modernize how the federal Food and Drug
Administration assesses the safety of new
products and allows their use by patients. The
bill was backed by the pharmaceutical,
biotechnology and medical device industries
and research universities.

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks rise on Greece hopes
Dow
17,760.41 +211.79 10-Yr Bond 2.42 +0.12
Nasdaq 4,997.70 +75.360 Oil (per barrel) 52.81
S&P 500 2,076.62 +25.31 Gold
1,163.30

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Barracuda Networks Inc. (CUDA), down $7.57 to $31.55
The cloud-based security and storage services provider didn’t sign as
many large and lengthy storage deals in the first quarter.
Gannet Co. (GCI), up $1.31 to $13.37
Activist investor Carl Icahn increased his stake in the newspaper and
publishing company from 6 percent to 6.5 percent.
Dover Corp. (DOV), down $1.96 to $65.28
The industrial equipment company cut its full-year profit forecast, citing
lower demand in the North American energy market.
Gap Inc. (GPS), down 20 cents to $37.58
The retailer reported flat June same-store sales, which were held down
by lackluster results from its namesake brand.
Nasdaq
Zillow Group Inc. (Z), down $6.59 to $78.67
The real estate marketplace company’s chief financial officer resigned as
it continues its integration with former rival Trulia.
Helen of Troy Ltd. (HELE), down $10.37 to $86.71
The personal and household products company reported a fiscal thirdquarter financial results that disappointed Wall Street.
American Airlines Group Inc. (AAL), up $1.54 to $41.21
The airline reported growth in June of passenger traffic, which is a key
measure, and reaffirmed its outlook for passenger revenue.
Baidu Inc. (BIDU), up 18 cents to $187.75
The Internet search services company’s stock rose as efforts by China to
stop a rout in the stock market met with some success.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks logged
their best day in two months Friday as
Greece appeared to move closer to
securing a bailout deal that will enable
it to avoid bankruptcy and keep the
country in the euro.
Greece and its creditors appeared to
be narrowing their differences after
Athens offered reform proposals in
order to secure a third bailout of around
53 billion euros ($59.5 billion). A
final decision could be made on Sunday.
A second day of gains for Chinese
stocks also encouraged investors. U.S.
stocks had fallen sharply on
Wednesday, in part on concern that a
monthlong slump in China’s stock
market could crimp growth in the
world’s second-largest economy.
“This is a giant collective exhaling,”
said Kristina Hooper, U.S. investment
strategist at Allianz Global Investors.
The Greek deal “is not done, but we’re
closer than we have been in a while.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
rose 25.31 points, or 1.2 percent, to
2,076.62. The Dow Jones industrial
average climbed 211.79 points, or 1.2

percent, to 17, 760. 41. The Nasdaq
composite gained 75.30 points, or 1.5
percent, to 4,997.70.
The gains pushed the S&P 500 back
into positive territory for the year.
On Friday, stocks in China jumped
before the U.S. market opened. China’s
Shanghai Composite Index jumped 4.5
percent, paring its losses for the
month to 24 percent.
The Chinese market is only recovering after the government intervened
heavily and about half of the companies listed in mainland China suspended trading in their stocks.
That’s making some investors cautious.
“The policy makers appear to have
some success in stabilizing values, but
fifty percent of Chinese stocks are not
currently trading,” said Jim McDonald,
chief investment strategist at Northern
Trust.
Back in the U.S., airline stocks rallied after American Airlines, the
nation’s largest carrier, signaled that it
was cutting back on its growth plans
this year amid signs that average fares
are declining. American said it expects
to increase passenger-carrying capaci-

Yellen: Fed still on track to
raise interest rates this year
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve
Chair Janet Yellen said the Fed is on
track to start raising interest rates
later this year but expressed multiple
concerns over headwinds that are still
holding back the U.S. economy.
She described the outlook for the
economy and inflation as “highly
uncertain,” amid lingering weakness
in the labor market and new potential
threats overseas.
Yellen, speaking on the economy
for the first time since the Fed’s June
meeting, saw reasons for encouragement. Consumer spending appears to
be picking up, and employment is
likely to keep expanding, she said.
“Based on my outlook, I expect
that it will be appropriate at some
point later this year to take the first
step to raise the federal funds rate,”

Yellen
said,
referring to the
Fed’s key shortterm
interest
rate, which has
been at a record
low near zero
since December
2008.
But she also
Janet Yellen
outlined a host
of concerns, from weak wage growth
to a low labor participation rate to
“disappointing” productivity. She
reiterated that inflation is still well
below the Fed’s 2 percent target.
Yellen also noted that cautious business owners “have not substantially
increased their capital expenditures.”
Yellen, whose comments came in a
speech in Cleveland, said even when
the Fed does start raising rates, the
increases will be gradual.

New potential risks have emerged
since the Fed’s June 16-17 meeting,
including the on-going Greek debt
crisis and a sharp plunge in China’s
stock market over the past month.
Yellen noted in her speech that the
“situation in Greece remains unresolved.” But she also said that the
economic recovery in the 18-nation
Eurozone “appears to have gained a
firmer footing.” She did not mention
developments in China at all, nor was
she asked about Greece or China during a question-and-answer period following the speech.
The recent developments have
prompted many economists to push
back their projections for the Fed’s
first rate hike from September to
December. The Fed’s next meeting
takes place on July 28-29, but there is
no expectation the Fed will make a
move then.

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ty by 1 percent this year, down from an
earlier forecast of 2 percent. American
Airlines rose $1.54, or 3.9 percent, to
$41.21. Delta Air Lines jumped $1.91,
or 4.7 percent, to $42.46.
Investors also followed a speech by
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on
Friday.
Speaking in Cleveland, Ohio, Yellen
said that the Fed is on track to start
raising interest rates later this year, but
expressed concerns over headwinds
that are still holding back the U.S.
economy, in particular lingering weakness in the labor market and new
potential threats overseas.
David Kelly, chief global strategist
at JPMorgan Asset Management, said
after the speech that he expected the
Fed to lift interest rates in September,
provided that Greece reaches a deal with
its creditors and there were no major
financial crises between now and then.
Investor start focusing on secondquarter earnings next week as the pace
of company reporting picks up.
Among the companies reporting are
banks, including JPMorgan, Bank of
America and Wells Fargo, as well as
Delta, Netflix and Intel.

Business briefs
Last US Airways flight
expected to be in October
DALLAS — The last flight for US
Airways will take place this fall, and
one more name in airline history will
disappear.
The farewell flight for US Airways
will be a red-eye — Flight 434 is
scheduled to leave San Francisco
around 10 p.m. and land in
Philadelphia after 6 a.m. on Oct. 17.
The US Airways website will be turned
off. Airport kiosks and signs will
change to American Airlines.
The two airlines merged in
December 2013 and decided to keep
the better-known American name.
Vestiges of the carrier will survive for
some time, however, as some planes
won’t be repainted yet in American’s
colors and logo.
In the last 10 years, mergers have
eliminated Northwest, Continental
and AirTran. Before that, Pan Am,
TWA and many smaller carriers disappeared.

Reddit interim CEO Pao
resigns; Huffman regains title
NEW YORK — Reddit says interim
CEO Ellen Pao resigned from the
company, and co-founder Steve
Huffman is back as its CEO.
The social networking and news
site has been rocked by unrest recently.
This month Reddit fired a staffer
who was popular with the volunteers
that help run the site. Some volunteer
moderators protested by shutting
down sections of the site.
Reddit also announced anti-harassment guidelines this year and in June
it banned a few groups for violating
those rules.
A statement posted on Reddit by
Reddit board member Sam Altman
says Pao, who became interim CEO in
November, resigned from Reddit by
mutual agreement and will continue to
advise the board for the rest of 2015.
Altman also says Reddit moderators should have better tools and communication from the company.

STABLER REMEMBERED: FORMER RAIDERS COACH JOHN MADDEN REFLECTS ON THE LIFE OF KENNY STABLER >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 12, Women’s World Cup team
parades down Broadway in New York City
Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

Federer advances to 10th Wimbledon final
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON — If Roger Federer was going to
allow Andy Murray to gain a foothold in the
Wimbledon semifinals, this seemed as if it
might be the moment.
Murray delivered a 129 mph ace to pull out
an epic seven-deuce, 15-minute game, saving
five set points along the way, to get to 5-all
in the second set. As he strutted near the
Centre Court stands, shaking his fist and
roaring, spectators loudly saluted the effort
with a standing ovation.
“I,” Federer would say later, “was screaming inside.”
Was Murray suddenly making a match of it?

Swinging the momentum
his way? Not against
Federer. Not on this day.
Displaying the impeccable serving he produced
all match — indeed, all
fortnight — Federer held
at love right away, then
broke Murray in the next
Roger Federer game. And that, essentially, was that.
Federer’s 7-5, 7-5, 6-4 victory Friday, built
by taking 70 of 91 points he served and
breaking Murray in the last game of each set,
moved him into his 10th Wimbledon final.
One more win would make Federer the first
man with eight titles at The Championships,

as the grass-court tournament first held in
1877 is known around these parts.
“Doesn’t matter whether it’s No. 8 or No.
1,” Federer said, “Wimbledon finals is always
a big occasion.”
On Sunday, the No. 2-seeded Federer faces
No. 1 Novak Djokovic in a rematch of last
year’s final. Djokovic won that one in five
sets to keep Federer stuck on seven trophies
at the All England Club, tied with Pete
Sampras and 1880s player Willie Renshaw,
and a record 17 Grand Slam trophies overall.
Djokovic, who also won Wimbledon in
2011 and owns eight major titles, advanced
by beating No. 21 Richard Gasquet 7-6 (2),
6-4, 6-4.
Nine of Gasquet’s first 10 winners came via

his smooth, one-handed backhand, but that
stroke eventually let him down. At 2-all in
the tiebreaker, Gasquet’s backhand sailed
long, and he wouldn’t take another point in
the set. When he was broken right away to
begin the second, any suspense about who
would win dissipated.
About the only intrigue concerned
Djokovic’s left shoulder, which was massaged by a trainer during second-set
changeovers.
“It’ll be fine for the next match, ”
Djokovic said.
After reaching his fourth Wimbledon
final in five years, Djokovic called Federer

See TENNIS, Page 12

Giants
set
Watkins
blossoming
new home
Serra alum making
surprising strides as
hits record
collegiate freshman
By Rick Eymer

By Terry Bernal

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

During his career at Serra, Sean Watkins
was known as an all-around athlete. He was
a basketball and baseball standout, and even
logged a few games on the Padres freshman
football team.
Since the start of his collegiate career this
season at Loyola Marymount University,
Watkins has been going fulltime on the
baseball diamond for the first time in his
life. Actually, make that double-time.
As a true freshman, Watkins was the only
two-way player on the LMU roster. And he
had an impact both sides of the ball. Not
only did he hit .266 while tying for the
team lead with six home runs, he also
emerged as one of LMU's best pitchers,
posting a 4-1 record while tying for the
team lead with a 1.89 ERA.
“We asked a lot of Sean because he’s a
very talented kid,” LMU manager Jason Gill
said. “He’s got the best bat speed on our
team and has one of the better arms.”
Watkins was a surprise on the mound at
LMU — even to himself — after being
assigned to the bullpen to start the year. He
earned the nod as the Lions’ opening-day
right fielder, then was promoted to the starting rotation entering into West Coast
Conference play.
Allowing just 41 hits through 57
innings, he did struggle with his control,

COURTESY OF JOHN SHAFFER

Former Serra two-sport standout Sean Watkins dedicated himself to baseball as a freshman
at Loyola Marymount this season. As a two-way player, he helped the Lions to the postseason
See WATKINS, Page 18 and earned a roster spot with the Orleans Firebirds in the prestigious Cape Cod League.

SAN FRANCISCO — Hunter Pence hit a
grand slam as part of an eight-run fourth
inning against former All-Star Cole
Hamels, and the Giants
beat the Phillies 15-2
Friday night.
Joe Panik had four
hits, including a two-run
homer, and drove in three
runs. Justin Maxwell,
who also had four hits,
tripled and doubled in
Hunter Pence runs and was a home run
shy of the cycle. Matt
Duffy recorded a career-high four hits as the
Giants accumulated 22 hits, their most in
AT&T Park history.
All-Star Madison Bumgarner (9-5) went 5
2-3 innings, allowing two runs on eight
hits. He failed to finish six innings in backto-back starts for the first time this season.
Bumgarner, who received more run support than his last five starts combined, had
a pair of hits and drove in a run. He leads all
pitchers with 10 hits.
Bumgarner and Hamels were the first former World Series MVPs to meet in four
years.
Hamels (5-7) got the first out of the
fourth and then surrendered seven hits and
walked a batter before Jake Diekman came
in to finish the inning.

See GIANTS, Page 14

12

SPORTS

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Women’s World Cup winners parade through NYC
By Jonathan Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Fresh off its World Cup
championship, the U.S. women’s soccer
team got a hero’s welcome on Friday with a
ticker-tape parade in lower Manhattan
mobbed by young girls and other flag-waving fans, followed by a City Hall ceremony
where each player was given a key to the
city.
“All of this for us started when we were little and we had a dream,” star forward Abby
Wambach told a crowd of 3,500 at City Hall
Plaza. “In my opinion, all the women up on
this stage believed in that dream, kept
believing in that dream. “
Head coach Jill Ellis called the celebration
“mind-blowing.” And midfielder Carli
Lloyd, named the World Cup’s most valuable
player after scoring three goals in the final,
told the crowd, “Well I’m a Jersey girl ... but
New York City, you guys are awesome.”
Parade-goers — many wearing red, white
and blue — started gathering at 3:30 a.m.
along the Canyon of Heroes, a stretch of
Broadway where the nation’s largest city has
honored its legends. When the parade got
underway at 11 a.m., the crowd was as much
as 10 deep along the route. Chants of “USA!
USA!” were distinctly high-pitched.
It was the first-ever ticker-tape parade in
New York for a women’s sports team — a fact
not lost on the crowd. A 4th floor window
on a building near the route was decorated
with a homemade sign that reads “Girl
Power” with four American flags.
“I’m glad to see girls getting a parade,”
said 9-year-old Christinah Delesine, who
wore a blue soccer shirt. “There should be
more.”
Robert Sanfiz, who brought his three chil-

ROBERT DEUTSCH/USA TODAY SPORTS

Approximately 3,500 people turned
out to celebrate the United States’
Women's World Cup championship
Friday in New York City. The U.S.
defeated Japan Sunday in Vancouver,
British Columbia to capture their first
World Cup since 1999.
Above: Carli Lloyd, left, Megan
Rapinoe, center, and USA head coach
Jill Ellis make their way up Broadway
in a ticker tape parade.
Left: Excited soccer fans watch the
ticker tape parade.
dren — Julia, 8, Chris, 7 and Tommy, 2 —
had a similar take.
“It’s great for her to see women finally be
represented,” Sanfiz said. “It’s great for her
self-esteem.”

Ireland Giaquinto, 13, held a sign reading,
“Thank you for letting me dream.”
All 23 players from the team — none of
whom are from New York City, though four
hail from nearby New Jersey — were riding

on four of 12 floats. One of the floats was
carrying the World Cup trophy, along Lloyd
and Mayor Bill de Blasio. Gov. Andrew
Cuomo was on a separate float.
The players could be seen taking selfies
and shooting photos of the crowd. As the
parade started, goalkeeper Hope Solo tweeted: “We couldn’t be more excited be here!”
with a photo of herself and five teammates.
The southern end of Broadway is the traditional spot for New York City for the parades
where workers in tall officer buildings once
tossed ticker tape — strips of paper with
stock price information — onto celebrants
below. The tape has been replaced by shredded paper.
The New York Yankees have gotten
parades when they’ve won the World Series,
and the New York Giants have been celebrated when they’ve won the Super Bowl, most
recently in 2012. Among the famous people
honored: Theodore Roosevelt, John F.
Kennedy, Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas
MacArthur and Albert Einstein.
Even though the women’s soccer team is a
national team instead of local, the push to
honor the players with a parade had been
fervent. Manhattan Borough President Gale
Brewer had written to de Blasio, saying it
was a good opportunity to showcase female
athletes.
“When they brought back that trophy,
they also brought back the message of the
power of women,” de Blasio said at City
Hall.
The United States has returned to the top
of the FIFA women’s rankings after winning the World Cup. The U. S. toppled
Germany before beating Japan 5-2 in
Sunday’s final in Vancouver to collect the
top prize in women’s soccer for the first
time in 16 years.

Stabler’s death a ‘shock to
all of us’ says John Madden
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Ken Stabler’s death came as a shock to John
Madden. The Hall of Fame coach, like almost everybody else,
had no idea the former Oakland Raiders quarterback had Stage 4
colon cancer.
“If you know Kenny Stabler, that’s Kenny Stabler,” Madden
said Friday, a day after Stabler’s family announced his death.
Madden, the coach of those great Raiders teams in the
1970s, recalled fond memories of Stabler but was still reeling

from the news when he spoke to reporters
on a conference call.
Madden said Stabler’s death came as a
“shock to all of us” because Stabler kept
his cancer diagnosis a secret. He said that
Stabler was the ultimate tough guy and
never wanted people to watch him at a time
of weakness.
“He didn’t want any of his teammates to
ever
see him in the training room getting
Ken Stabler
treatment, and I think that probably followed him through life,” Madden said.
Stabler’s family said he died as a result of
complications from colon cancer, which he
was diagnosed with in February. He was 69.
“You just think that Kenny’s one of
those guys that whatever you throw in
front of them it’s not going to get them
down. And then when you hear Kenny
Stabler died, it’s like a kick in the gut,”
John Madden Madden said.
The 79-year-old Madden said that Stabler
should be in the Hall of Fame. He believes people get too
caught up in comparing statistics from different eras and should
understand Stabler was among the best of his generation along
with Pittsburgh’s Terry Bradshaw and Miami’s Bob Griese, who
are both enshrined in Canton.
Stabler was the NFL’s Most Valuable Player in 1974 and a
four-time Pro Bowl selection who led the Raiders to consistent
success throughout the decade, including a 32-14 victory over
the Minnesota Vikings in the 1977 Super Bowl.
The Snake’s sly demeanor and flair for the dramatic delivered
famous games that earned nicknames such as “Holy Roller,”
“Sea of Hands” and “Ghost to the Post.” Not to mention leading the Oakland Raiders to a touchdown that set up the
Pittsburgh Steelers for the “Immaculate Reception.”
“He was involved in more games that have names than probably anyone,” Madden said.
One of Madden’s most cherished memories came in a doubleovertime playoff game at Baltimore in 1977 that he said showcased the best in Stabler, who was known for his calmness
under pressure and ability to come through in the clutch.
During a timeout on the winning TD drive, Madden said he
was anxiously trying to draw up a play when Stabler cut him off.
“I’m there and I’m thinking and I’m talking to Kenny during the timeout and he has his helmet cocked back and he’s

See STABLER, Page 18

TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS

Roger Federer hits a backhand while downing Andy Murray
in straight sets Friday to advance to Sunday’s final.

TENNIS
Continued from page 11
“the greatest player of all time on grass courts, and maybe
greatest player of all time.”
Sure looked that way against No. 3 Murray, who lost to
Federer in the 2012 Wimbledon final — the last time Federer
won a major — but beat him a few weeks later for gold at the
London Olympics.
Entering Friday, Federer had been broken only once during
Wimbledon. So it was noteworthy that Murray won the coin
toss, elected to receive and then, a minute into the match,
smacked a backhand winner for break point.
Federer responded with a service winner, an ace and another
service winner. Murray never got another break chance; he
got to deuce on Federer’s serve only once more.
“The guy served unbelievable,” Murray said. “That was the
difference.”
Federer’s 20 aces were part of his 56-winner performance,
compared with 11 unforced errors.
“Definitely one of the best matches I’ve played in my
career,” Federer said, adding moments later: “One of my best
serving days of my career, for sure.”
Now that’s saying something.
The highlight was the second set’s 10th game, when Murray
trailed love-40, dealt with two more break points, and eventually held. There were 20 points in all, lasting so long that
both men changed rackets during the game, with Federer eliciting boos when he sneaked a sip from a water bottle.
Federer and Murray each used the word “unbelievable” to
describe their terrific exchanges.
“It felt like every point was getting finished with a winner,”
Murray said.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

13

14

SPORTS

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

MLB All-Star Game
Royals, Cardinals combine
for Missouri sweep in fan vote

Trainer’s room

GIANTS
Continued from page 11

NEW YORK — Royals third baseman Mike
Moustakas and Cardinals right-hander Carlos
Brandon Belt doubled,
Martinez are going to the All-Star Game as
Maxwell walked and
winners of the final fan vote.
Bumgarner singled to
Moustakas becomes the seventh Royals
load the bases ahead of a
player set to participate in Tuesday’s Midtwo-run single from
Summer
Classic
in
Angel Pagan. Panik sinCincinnati. He beat out
gled to re-load the bases
Minnesota’s Brian Dozier,
before Duffy singled
Tigers outfielder Yoenis
home two more runs.
Cespedes and Red Sox
shortstop
Xander Justin Maxwell Buster Posey singled
ahead of Pence’s slam.
Bogaerts for the last
It was Hamel’s shortest
American League spot.
outing
since going three
Yankees outfielder Brett
innings on Sept. 8,
Gardner was in the final
Mike
2011. The nine earned
five, but he replaced
Moustakas
runs were a career high
Moustakas’ injured teamand the 12 hits allowed
mate Alex Gordon on the roster Wednesday.
matched his career worst.
Martinez surged ahead of Reds pitcher
Carlos Ruiz homered
Johnny Cueto late in the voting to become
and
Domonic Brown
the sixth Cardinals player to make the NL rosMatt Duffy
drove in a run for the
ter. Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw, Colorado
shortstop Troy Tulowitzki and Mets closer Phillies, who have lost 13 of 16 on the heels
of a three-game winning streak June 21-23.
Jeurys Familia were also in contention.

Twilight Open House:
Friday 4-7 PM
Open Saturday/Sunday 1- 4 pm

1587 Roberta Drive, San Mateo

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Right-handers Tim Hudson and Tim
Lincecum each pitched a bullpen session. Lefthander Jeremy Affeldt also threw a bullpen and
is scheduled for another on Sunday.

Time for a dip

Joe Panik

Panik’s two-run homer
in the seventh bounced
into McCovey’s Cove,
followed quickly by a fan,
who grabbed it and proudly displayed the ball
while trending water. He
was eventually allowed to
enter the ballpark.

Up next
Phillies Right-hander David Buchanan (05, 8.76) returns to the big leagues for his first
start since April 30. He went 3-0, with a 2.43
ERA in seven minor league appearances. He
lost his only career start against the Giants,
last August, despite allowing just two earned
runs in 6 2/3 innings. Giants right-hander
Ryan Vogelsong (6-6, 4.10) was ejected from
his last start for arguing balls and strikes after
allowing a run on three hits in four innings.

Giants 15, Phillies 2
Phillies
CHrndz 2b
Revere cf-lf
Franco 3b
Francr lf
DeFrts p
Asche ph
JGomz p
Neris p
Ruf 1b
Ruiz c
DBrwn rf
Galvis ss
Hamels p
Diekmn p

ab
4
4
4
3
0
1
0
0
3
4
4
4
1
0
Hrrera ph-cf 3
Totals 35

r
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
2

h bi
0 0
2 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
3 1
2 1
1 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
10 2

Giants
ab r h bi
Pagan cf
6 3 3 2
Panik 2b
6 2 4 3
Duffy 3b
6 1 4 2
Posey c
4 1 2 0
Susac c
2 0 0 0
Pence rf
4 1 1 4
Adrianza ss 1 0 0 0
Crwfrd ss 4 0 0 0
Machi p 1 0 0 0
Petit p
0 0 0 0
Belt 1b
3 3 2 0
Maxwll lf 4 3 4 2
Bumgarner p 3 1 2 1
Kontos p 0 0 0 0
Blanco ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Totals
45 15 22 14

Philadelphia 000 101 000 — 2 10 0
San Francisco 100 811 22x — 15 22 0
DP—Philadelphia 1, San Francisco 1. LOB—Philadelphia 10, San Francisco 10. 2B—Ruiz (9), Pagan (11),
Belt 2 (23), Maxwell 2 (7). 3B—Maxwell (2). HR—Ruiz
(2), Panik (7), Pence (3). SB—Revere (21).
Philadelphia
Hamels L,5-7
Diekman
De Fratus
J.Gomez
Neris
San Francisco
Bumgarner W,9-5
Kontos
Machi
Y.Petit

IP
3.1
.2
2
1
1
IP
5.2
.1
2
1

H
12
0
4
3
3
H
8
0
2
0

R
9
0
2
2
2
R
2
0
0
0

ER
9
0
2
2
2
ER
2
0
0
0

BB
2
0
1
0
1
BB
2
0
0
0

SO
4
1
1
3
1
SO
7
0
1
1

HBP—by Bumgarner (Ruf, Franco).WP—Hamels. PB—Ruiz.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

Tribe’s Salazar shuts down slumping A’s
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — After losing the last two
games to the Yankees in New York, Oakland
struggled again in its weekend series opener
in Cleveland.
The Athletics were able to get only five
hits off Danny Salazar in a 5-1 loss to the
Indians on Friday night. Oakland has
dropped three straight and nine of its last 14.
“We’re getting some well-pitched games
against us,” Oakland manager Bob Melvin
said. “You go through periods where you
swing really well and others where you’re not
swinging it as well.”
Oakland is fourth in the American League
in hitting with a .257 batting average, but
the Athletics are batting .189 (25 for 132)
through the first four games of its road trip.
The Athletics’ only run came in the first
after an error by second baseman Jason
Kipnis. After Billy Burns led off with a single, Mark Canha reached on Kipnis’ error on
a fielder’s choice. Canha was forced at second
on Josh Reddick’s grounder and Ben Zobrist
walked to load the bases. Billy Butler then
had a sacrifice fly.
Salazar (8-4) came within one out of his
second career complete game.
“He was throwing well. My last at-bat in
the eighth inning I think he threw me five

different pitches for
strikes,” said catcher
Josh Phegley. “It seemed
like he had everything
going.”
Kendall Graveman (65) allowed four runs with
six strikeouts and three
walks in 6 2/3 innings
Danny Salazar for his first loss since
June 13. Graveman’s 19inning scoreless streak ended on Yan Gomes’
RBI double in the fourth that tied the score.
The Indians, who have won four straight,
broke through in the sixth with four runs.
Carlos Santana singled off Graveman to start
the inning and took third on Giovanny
Urshela’s two-out single. Michael Bourn
walked to load the bases.
Drew Pomeranz replaced Graveman but
issued a five-pitch walk to Kipnis for the goahead run. Francisco Lindor walked on a fullcount pitch, prompting a visit from pitching
coach Curt Young. Michael Brantley lined
the next pitch into center field for a 5-1 lead.
It was the first time in nine outings that
Pomeranz has allowed a run. The left-hander
has given up only three earned runs in 18
relief appearances since he was reinstated
from the disabled list on June 3.
“That’s our best lefty and the guy we’ve

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Indians 5, Athletics 1
Oakland
Burns cf
Canha lf
Reddck rf
Zobrist 2b
Butler dh
Davis 1b
Lawrie 3b
Phegly c
Semien ss
Totals

ab
4
4
4
3
2
4
3
3
3
30

Oakland
Cleveland

r
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

h
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
5

bi
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1

Cleveland
Kipnis 2b
Lindor ss
Brantly lf
Murphy dh
Santana 1b
Moss rf
Gomes c
Urshela 3b
Bourn cf
Totals

ab
3
4
5
4
3
4
4
4
2
33

r
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
5

h
0
2
1
1
2
0
1
1
0
8

bi
1
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
5

100 000 000 — 1 5 0
000 104 00x — 5 8 1

E—Kipnis (4). DP—Cleveland 1. LOB—Oakland 5,
Cleveland 10. 2B—Canha (9), Zobrist (17), Lindor (3),
Y.Gomes (7). SB—C.Santana (4). CS—Semien (3).
SF—B.Butler.
Oakland
Graveman L,6-5
Pomeranz
Fe.Rodriguez
Abad
Cleveland
Salazar W,8-4
Allen S,19

IP
5.2
.1
1
1
IP
8.2
.1

H
7
1
0
0
H
5
0

R
4
1
0
0
R
1
0

ER
4
1
0
0
ER
0
0

BB
3
2
1
0
BB
1
0

SO
6
1
2
2
SO
8
0

HBP—by Salazar (B.Butler). WP—Abad.
Umpires—Home, Laz Diaz; First, Alan Porter; Second,
Chris Segal; Third, Jeff Nelson.
T—2:57. A—28,539 (36,856).

been using in our best situations,” Melvin
said. “With the workload of (Eric)
O’Flaherty the past two nights that’s the
guy who we wanted.”

15

Palomino baseball
San Mateo White Sox travel to Reno
Slumps are part of baseball. And manager
Lenny Souza is hoping a road trip will help
right the ship for his San Mateo White Sox.
The White Sox boast an overall record of
17-5, but have lost four of their last six, including a pair of one-run loses over the past week.
“We’re not playing bad ball,” Souza said.
“It just seems like once we get a lead, we
kind of take our foot off the gas a little bit.”
San Mateo opens a four-game swing
through Reno Saturday to play doubleheaders
on back-to-back days. The White Sox open
with a twin bull Saturday at Wooster Park
against the Sierra Sun Devils. Sunday, they
play two at Golden Eagle Park, wrapping up
weekend play against the Reno Muckdogs.
With 15 players taking Friday’s drive to
Reno, Souza has a solid, but not spectacular, amount of depth for the weekend schedule at hand. In each of the previous two
years, the White Sox have traveled to The
Biggest Little City in the World to play
tournament style, but the fatigue became a
factor so late in the season.
“We’d just come back beat up and then we’d
come back and playoffs start,” Souza said.
The White Sox — in first place with a 101 record in league — have already clinched a
postseason berth. They are shooting for a
No. 1 seed for the playoffs beginning July
20 at Santa Clara’s Washington Park.

16

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Yang takes lead at
U.S. Women’s Open
By Bob Lentz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LANCASTER, Pa. — Amy Yang has experienced success at
the U.S. Women’s Open. Now, she wants the ultimate prize.
The 25-year-old South Korean went on a four-birdie run
Friday, charging to a three-stroke lead after two rounds at
Lancaster Country Club and putting her in position — again —
to make a run at her first major championship.
The day started early for 55 players, who
resumed their opening round after play was
suspended late Thursday due to a powerful
storm. The second round ended with the
bulk of the field still trying to solve the
speedy and sloping greens of the hilly
William Flynn layout in the heart of Amish
country.
Ultimately, the day belonged to Yang.
She took control on her inward nine
Amy Yang
with birdies on the 11th, 12th, 13th. She
hit her approach to within a foot on No. 14 and punctuated the
4-under-par run. She was at 7-under 133.
“I just enjoy it out here,” Yang said. “And I know the golf
courses are very tough; I just enjoy the tough condition of the
golf courses.”
Stacy Lewis, last year’s runner-up, and Japan’s Shiho Oyama
were tied for second at 4-under 136.
Yang has had her share of success on the LPGA Tour, earning
two victories since turning pro in 2006. But some of her finest
golf has been played in the U.S. Open, where she has finished
in the top 10 four times in the last five years.
She tied for fifth in 2010, shared 10th place the following
year and placed second in 2012. Last year at Pinehurst No. 2,
she was third after 36 holes and first after 54 before closing
with a 74 and finishing fourth.
She was paired with eventual winner Michelle Wie in the
final round at Pinehurst and believes that experience can only
help over the final two rounds.
Lewis birdied four of eight holes in the middle of her round,
but bogeyed her last and settled for a 3-under 67.
Lewis’ patience was tested early in the first round as she
struggled with four bogeys and two birdies before breaking out
of her funk. That carried over into the second round and she
went on a tear that propelled her near the top of the leaderboard
— again — in the biggest event in women’s golf.
“I just started playing golf, is really what it was,” Lewis said,
“I was thinking a lot those first 10, 11 holes, thinking a lot
about my golf swing and just not playing. So I got to just playing golf ... and it’s what you’re seeing in the scores.”
The 38-year-old Oyama had an opening 70 and was 2 over
early in her second round before shooting up the leaderboard.
She made six birdies in a 12-hole stretch, including four on her
second nine on the way to a 4-under 66.
She has a total of nine victories in Japan. She played in the
2007 and 2009 U.S. Opens, but said surgery kept her from
playing golf for a year.
Marina Alex, part of a three-way tie for the lead after one
round, carded a 1-over 71 and was in fourth place at 3-under
137.
Karrie Webb, also first-round co-leader, had a 2-over 72 and
was in a large group at 2-under 138. That group includes topranked and two-time champion Inbee Park (70), first-round coleader Jane Park (72) and Michelle Pressel (70).
Inbee Park and Jane Park were among the players forced to
finish their first rounds early Friday.
Jane Park, the 2004 U.S. Women’s Amateur champion, used
a birdie and four pars to earn a share of the lead after one round.

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

17

Froome has good week at Tour de France
By Jerome Pugmire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOUGERES, France — Staying in
front has meant staying out of trouble so
far for Chris Froome at the Tour de
France.
After a crash-marred first week of the
race, the 2013 champion is exactly in
the position he wants to be — healthy
and wearing the yellow jersey.
The British rider’s title defense ended
early last year, when he fell three times
in two days and, battered and bruised,
went out of the Tour on stage 5. This
year, he has avoided all three big crashes so far after making up his mind to
push ahead of any potential dangers.
“Given what happened last year, it
was a big goal for me mentally rather
than physically to arrive with the attitude that I’m here to ride at the front of
the race,” Froome said after Friday’s seventh stage. “We’ve been proactive in
doing more work than normal in order to
try and stay safe.”
Mark Cavendish won a sprint finish
Friday for his 26th career Tour stage victory — his first since 2013 after also
crashing out last year. He dedicated his
win to his Etixx-Quick Step teammate
Tony Martin, who broke a collarbone in
a crash in Thursday’s sixth stage, forcing him to withdraw while wearing the
race leader’s yellow jersey.
Froome inherited the lead, but did not
wear the yellow jersey during stage 7 as
a mark of respect for Martin.
“It wasn’t ideal to get the yellow in
this way,” Froome said.
With the tough mountain stages still
to come — starting with the Pyrenees
next week — Froome is in a strong position. He leads two-time Tour champion

STEFANO RELLANDINI/REUTERS

The pack of riders cycle during the 190.5-km seventh stage from Livarot to Fougeres.
Alberto Contador by 36 seconds,
defending champion Vincenzo Nibali by
1:38 and Nairo Quintana, the 2013 runner-up, by 1:56.
American rider Tejay Van Garderen, a
strong climber with a best overall Tour
finish of fifth place, is shaping up as a
dangerous outsider.
“He’s ridden really well this first
week,” Froome said. “Quintana’s lost a
lot of time already, that’s a big blow for
him but I do expect him to be up there in
the mountains.”
Meanwhile, the race was hit by its
first doping case as Italian rider Luca
Paolini was thrown out after testing
positive for cocaine on July 7, the day
of the fourth stage, Cycling’s governing body said.
The Katusha rider can request a “B”
sample to be tested. In accordance with

UCI anti-doping rules, Paolini has been
provisionally suspended. In March, the
one-day classics specialist posted his
first victory in nearly two years to win
Gent-Wevelgem.
On a roasting hot afternoon,
Cavendish timed his attack to perfection
to catch German sprinter Andre Greipel
near the line. Only Eddy Merckx with 34
stage wins and Bernard Hinault with 28
have won more Tour stages than
Cavendish.
Stage 7 started from Livarot — a town
in the Normandy region — and ended
190.5 kilometers (118 miles) later in
Fougeres, nestled in the Brittany region.
Saturday’s eighth stage, which stays
in Brittany, is a mostly flat 181.5-kilometer (112.5-mile) trek starting from
Rennes and finishing with a short climb
up Mur de Bretagne.

U.S. clinches group title with win over Haiti
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Clint
Dempsey scored in the 47th minute to
give the U.S. a 1-0 victory over Haiti in
the CONCACAF Gold Cup Friday night.
Brad Guzan made two point-blank
saves in the second half for the U.S.
The defending champs improved to 20 in the opening round and clinched
the group title. They will play in the
quarterfinals at Baltimore July 18.
Gyasi Zardes entered as a substitute
for Jozy Altidore at the start of the second half, and the move immediately

Expires 7/31/15

paid off. Greg Garza
played the ball forward to Zardes, and
Zardes cut a pass
back to Dempsey,
who scored with a
right-footed shot
from about 12
yards.
Dempsey
has
Brad Guzan
scored in the last
four games he’s played for the U.S.
national team, one shy of the record
Altidore set two years ago. Dempsey’s
44 international goals are 13 shy of
Landon Donovan’s American record.

The Americans have won six in a
row, are 30-1-2 in Gold Cup group
play and have reached the knockout
stage of all 13 Gold Cup tournaments.
They have one game remaining in the
group stage, against Panama on
Monday in Kansas City, Kansas.
Haiti, which is 0-1-1, will play
Honduras on Monday, with the loser
finishing last in the group.
The U.S. nearly went ahead in the
34th minute, when Aron Johannsson
beat goalkeeper Johny Placide.
Johannsson was ruled offside, but
replays showed he was onside when
Altidore passed the ball to him.

18

SPORTS

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

NL GLANCE

AL GLANCE
East Division

East Division
W
New York
47
Baltimore
44
Tampa Bay 44
Toronto
44
Boston
41
Central Division
W
Kansas City 51
Minnesota 47
Detroit
44
Cleveland
42
Chicago
40
West Division
W
Houston
49
Angels
47
Texas
42
Seattle
40
A’s
39

L
39
42
45
45
46

Pct
.547
.512
.494
.494
.471

GB

3
4 1/2
4 1/2
6 1/2

L
33
40
42
44
44

Pct
.607
.540
.512
.488
.476

GB

5 1/2
8
10
11

L
40
39
44
47
50

Pct
.551
.547
.488
.460
.438

GB

1/2
5 1/2
8
10

Friday’s Games
Chicago White Sox 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Baltimore 3, Washington 2
Tampa Bay 3, Houston 1
N.Y. Yankees 5, Boston 1
Cleveland 5, Oakland 1
Texas 4, San Diego 3
Minnesota 8, Detroit 6
Kansas City 3, Toronto 0
Angels 7, Seattle 3
Saturday’s Games
Jays (Buehrle 9-5) at K.C. (C.Young 7-4), 11:10 a.m.
ChiSox (Sale 7-4) at Cubs (Lester 4-7), 1:05 p.m.
Detroit (Simon 8-5) at Twins (Hughes 7-6), 1:05 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 11-3) at Rays (Odorizzi 4-5),1:10 p.m.
A’s (Bassitt 0-2) at Tribe (Carrasco 10-7), 3:35 p.m.
NYY (Nova 1-2) at Boston (Rodriguez 4-2), 4:15 p.m.
Nats (Zimmermann 7-5) at O’s (Gonzalez 7-5),4:15 p.m.
Pads (Shields 7-3) at Texas (Lewis 8-4), 6:05 p.m.
Angels (C.Wilson 7-6) at M’s (Iwakuma 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Houston at Tampa Bay, 10:10 a.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, 10:10 a.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 10:35 a.m.
Washington at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m.
Toronto at Kansas City, 11:10 a.m.
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
San Diego at Texas, 12:05 p.m.
Angels at Seattle, 1:10 p.m.
Monday’s Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday’s Games
All-Star game at Cincinnati, 4 p.m.

W
Washington 46
New York
45
Atlanta
42
Miami
36
Philadelphia 29
Central Division
W
St. Louis
56
Pittsburgh 51
Chicago
46
Cincinnati
39
Milwaukee 37
West Division
W
Los Angeles 50
Giants
44
Arizona
42
San Diego 39
Colorado
37

L
39
42
45
51
60

Pct
.541
.517
.483
.414
.326

GB

2
5
11
19

L
31
35
39
45
51

Pct
.644
.593
.541
.464
.420

GB

4 1/2
9
15 1/2
19 1/2

L
38
43
43
49
49

Pct
.568
.506
.494
.443
.430

GB

5 1/2
6 1/2
11
12

Friday’s Games
Chicago White Sox 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 2
Baltimore 3, Washington 2
N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 2
Cincinnati 1, Miami 0
Texas 4, San Diego 3
Colorado 5, Atlanta 3
L.A. Dodgers 3, Milwaukee 2
San Francisco 15, Philadelphia 2
Saturday’s Games
ChiSox (Sale 7-4) at Cubs (Lester 4-7), 1:05 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 1-0) at NYM (Harvey 7-6), 1:10 p.m.
Atl. (Wisler 3-1) at Rox (J.De La Rosa 6-3), 1:10 p.m.
Cinci (R.Iglesias 1-1) at Miami (Latos 3-6), 1:10 p.m.
St. L. (Lackey 7-5) at Bucs (Burnett 7-3), 4:15 p.m.
Nats (Zimmermann 7-5) at O’s (Gonzalez 7-5),4:15 p.m.
Pads (Shields 7-3) at Texas (Lewis 8-4), 6:05 p.m.
Phils (Buchanan 0-5) at S.F.(Vogelsong 6-6), 7:05 p.m.
Brews (Jungmann 3-1) at L.A. (Beachy 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Miami, 10:10 a.m.
Washington at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m.
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
San Diego at Texas, 12:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Colorado, 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m.
Monday’s Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday’s Games
All-Star game at Cincinnati, 4 p.m.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Street League opens 6th season

Pro skateboarding

Want gnarly?
Chris Cole and his fellow competitors will have plenty of it when
the sixth season of Street League
Skateboarding begins Saturday at
USC’s Galen Center in Los Angeles.
Cole claimed the $200,000, win-

ner-take-all final in 2013 before
tumbling to ninth place overall last
season, when Nyjah Huston
reclaimed the top spot.
Cole, 33, says the competition
“is heavier than ever, which is really great for the whole of skate-

KYLE TERADA

Sean Watkins tied for the LMU team
lead with six home runs this season.

WATKINS
Continued from page 11
issuing 23 walks against 49 strikeouts. The command has been a work
in progress though, as Watkins
refines his secondary pitches to
compliment his hard-and-heavy 90mph heater.
“Throughout high school I was
really just a gunslinger,” Watkins
said. “I could throw the fastball hard
and then I had a good slider. I didn’t
have that great of command. So, the
whole purpose of my freshman year

was working … so I can command
the strike zone from both sides of
the plate.”
Even more surprise followed, as
Watkins earned a roster spot for the
Orleans Firebirds of the prestigious
Cape Cod League — as a pitcher.
The 5-10 right-hander made his first
start of the summer Tuesday with
three innings of work against the
Falmouth Commodores.
Landing in the Cape is even more
prestigious for Watkins than most.
Manager Kelly Nicholson has
coached a handful of freshmen in his
11 years at the helm of the Firebirds.
Currently, however, Watkins is the
only freshman on the Orleans roster.
“We don’t have a lot of freshmen
up here,” Nicholson said. “They
usually go to another league, and
come up here as sophomores.”
The Firebirds — who entered into
play Friday with the league’s best
record at 18-7 — own a depth of
position players. So Nicholson,
who teaches at Loyola High School,
15 miles away from LMU, asked
Watkins to work primarily as a
pitcher for the summer season.
“He’s a legit two-way guy, but
right now we just have a lot of hitters,” Nicholson said.
Through seven outings for the
Firebirds, Watkins has yielded just
one earned run to notch a 1.03 ERA.
He has seen some ups and downs
with his control, allowing six
walks through 8 2/3 innings. And
while Nicholson said he plans to
utilize Watkins mainly as a lateinning reliever, the righty gave a
solid performance in his startingpitching debut, working three
innings on a limited pitch count to
take a no-decision in the Firebirds’
11-2 win.
“He’s super, super competitive our
there,” Nicholson said. “He loves to
compete and he takes it as a challenge, and he’s a bulldog out there.”
Watkins is staying in the swing
as a two-way player by working
with Benny Craig, the hitting coach
at Orleans, on a daily basis. And
Watkins has plenty of experience
with the two-way drill.
At Serra, he earned an All-West
Catholic Athletic League honorable
mention as a utility player in his
debut varsity season of 2013. The
following year, as a senior, he was
hindered by arm fatigue, but finished the year strong to etch a 2.88
ERA despite posting a 0-3 record;
while at the plate, he hit .375 while
garnering All-WCAL second-team
honors as a shortstop.
“He’s just a great athlete all the
way around,” Serra manager Craig
Gianinno said. “The thing that was
challenging in the short-term at
Serra, but exciting in the long-term
for college, was that he also played
basketball. So he rolled in late into
baseball.”
Gianinno said Watkins’ resume as

STABLER
Continued from page 12
looking up at the stands and I’m talking to
him, ‘Let’s do this, let’s do this,”’ Madden
said. “And he goes, ‘You know what, John?
And I thought, ‘Oh, great. He has a play.’ And
I said, ‘What?’ And he said, ‘These fans are
getting their money’s worth today.’
“That’s the way he was. I’m going all over
the board over what we should do. And he’s
just coolly looking up at the stands.”

boarding as well as the contest.
Each year I say I can’t imagine these
guys being any gnarlier, any better,
and each year they come out crazier
and heavier. This is intense.”
The winner will pocket $100,000
and earn a golden ticket into the SLS
Nike SB Super Crown World
Championship in Chicago on Oct. 4.
a multi-sport high school athlete
helped him as college recruit. But
there was also a drawback, according to Gill, who said Watkins’ erratic control is rooted in his dedication
as a two-way player.
“If he was a full-time pitcher,
those walk numbers would have
dropped quite a bit,” Gill said. “We
asked a lot of him.”
Watkins was busy on both sides
of the ball down the stretch of
LMU’s playoff run. The Lions
closed the regular season with a
three-game series at University of
San Francisco. LMU needed to
sweep to qualify for the West Coast
Conference
Championship
Tournament.
Watkins — a San Bruno native, he
moved to Pacifica his senior year at
Serra—- had a hearty homecoming.
Through LMU’s first two wins at
USF, he was 4 for 8 with a home run
and four RBIs. The Lions swept with
a win in the finale. Watkins pitched
five innings to take a no-decision,
then scored the go-ahead run in a 127 extra-inning win.
LMU advanced to the WCC
Championship
Tournament.
Through three games, the Lions
rolled to two straight wins, downing University of San Diego 21-3 in
the May 21 opener. The following
day,
they
triumphed
over
Pepperdine 4-2 with Watkins generating three legs of the cycle, including his sixth homer of the year.
In what would be their season
finale, however. LMU fell to
Pepperdine in the tourney championship game 4-2, with Watkins lasting just three innings on the mound
to take his only loss of the year.
“He shows flashes of being great,
it’s just a matter of him being consistent,” Gill said.
Through his freshman campaign
at LMU, Watkins refined his fourpitch repertoire with LMU pitching
coach Dan Ricabal. Watkins features
a fastball with a slider, changeup
and a curveball, that has admittedly
been a work in progress.
“It’s good stuff,” Nicholson said.
“It’s 90 (mph) with a good slider.”
And he has shown flashes of brilliance with the curveball, according
to Gill.
“At times it’s a top-end DivisionI breaking ball,” Gill said. “It’s
sharp and it’s late.”
When Watkins got word near the
end of his freshman year he’d be
joining the Firebirds, he knew it
was solely as a pitcher. But he is
still taking daily reps as a hitter to
continue his two-way duty at LMU.
He has taken four at-bats for the
Firebirds, but has yet to log a hit.
“We’ll see what the future holds
for me,” Watkins said. “But personally I like hitting because I like to
swing the bat. But no matter what
they tell me to do in the near future,
professionally, then I will do it.”

Madden said he went to Alabama to talk to
coach Paul “Bear” Bryant before drafting
Stabler, who led the Crimson Tide to an undefeated 1966 season and was chosen the Sugar
Bowl MVP after a 34-7 rout of Nebraska.
Madden said Stabler enjoyed life, but stories of his off-the-field fun were “vastly
exaggerated.” He said Stabler is “at the top of
the class” of the great players he coached and
somebody he could always lean on when
times were tough.
“The hotter the game, the hotter I got. And
Kenny was truly, truly just the opposite,”
Madden said. “The hotter the game, the cooler he became.”

Comida bueña
Go inside the food
scene of Puerto
Vallartaʼs Pitillal
neighborhood
SEE PAGE 22

Iconic actor,
Omar Sharif,
passes away
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAIRO — In “Lawrence of Arabia,” Omar
Sharif is first seen in the distance, a speck in
the swirling desert sand. As he draws closer,
he emerges first as a black figure on a galloping camel, slowly transforming into a handsome, dark-eyed figure with a gap-tooth
smile. It wasn’t unlike the Egyptian-born
actor’s debut in Hollywood.
Sharif was Egypt’s biggest box-office star
when David Lean cast him in 1962’s
“Lawrence of Arabia,” but he was a virtual
unknown elsewhere. He wasn’t even the director’s first choice to play Sherif Ali, the tribal
leader with whom the enigmatic T.E.
Lawrence teams up to help
lead the Arab revolt
against the Ottoman
Empire.
Lean had hired another
actor but dropped him
because his eyes weren’t
the right color. The film’s
producer, Sam Spiegel,
went to Cairo to search for
Omar Sharif a replacement and found
Sharif, already a heartthrob in his own country playing brooding
romantic heroes. After passing a screen test
that proved he was fluent in English, he got
the job.
The film brought him a supporting-actor
Oscar nomination and international stardom.
Three years later, Sharif demonstrated his
versatility, playing the leading role of a doctor-poet who endures decades of Russian history, including World War I and the Bolshevik
Revolution, surviving on his art and his eternal love of Lara, in “Dr. Zhivago.”
Lean’s adaptation of the Boris Pasternak
novel had a rocky beginning in its first U.S.
release. Attendance was sparse and reviews
were negative.
After MGM removed it from theaters and
Lean re-edited the sprawling tale, it was rereleased and became a box-office hit. Still,
Sharif never thought it was as good as it could
have been.
“It’s sentimental. Too much of that music,”
he once said, referring to Maurice Jarre’s luscious Oscar-winning score.
Although Sharif never achieved that level
of success again, he remained a sought-after
actor for many years, partly because of his
proficiency at playing different nationalities.
He was Argentine-born revolutionary
Ernesto “Che” Guevara in “Che!”, Italian
Marco Polo in “Marco the Magnificent” and
Mongol leader Genghis Khan in “Genghis
Khan.” He was a German officer in “The Night
of the Generals,” an Austrian prince in
“Mayerling” and a Mexican outlaw in
“Mackenna’s Gold.”

See SHARIF, Page 21

More ‘Minions’
means more fun
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sidekicks rarely shine when thrust into the
spotlight, but what about a few hundred of
them?
The Minions, having been the best part of
the two previous “Despicable Me” movies,
have swarmed the screen in “Minions.” As candidates for center stage, they are seemingly illsuited. Slavishly — if rarely competently —
devoted lackeys, they’re underlings by both
definition and verticality.
They don’t speak intelligibly, which, to be
fair, isn’t a bar all of Hollywood’s leading men
reach. Instead, they talk in a bright babble that
belies their fondness for colorful phonetics.
“Banana” and “piñata” are their kind of words.

For thousands of years, we see, they’ve been letting
down their evil masters, from a Tyrannosaurus Rex
accidentally tipped into a volcano, to Dracula, whom they
excitedly wake with a birthday cake and wide-open blinds.
Their unsuitability for the lead role, or just
about anything else, is much of the fun of
“Minions,” a happy henchmen overload that
largely succeeds in its simple mission: More
Minions!
Directed by Pierre Coffin (who co-directed
“Despicable Me” one and two and voices the
Minions) and Kyle Balda, “Minions” begins in
fine form. The little yellow ones are already
humming the Universal theme as the film

begins.
With Geoffrey Rush narrating, we get the history of the Minions, which stretches back
across eons and begins with them — a curios
early mammal — literally walking out of the
sea.
But the evolution stops there. For thousands
of years, we see, they’ve been letting down

See REVIEW, Page 21

First chapter of new Harper Lee novel is previewed
By Hillel Italie
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — We know this much so far
about Harper Lee’s new book: Atticus Finch
is 72 and suffering from rheumatoid arthritis; Scout is a grown woman who has a suitor most anxious to marry her.
And Scout’s older brother, Jem, apparently has died.
“Go Set a Watchman” begins with Scout,
otherwise known as Jean Louise Finch,

Harper Lee
Guardian.

returning by train to
Lee’s
legendary
Maycomb, Alabama, on
one of several annual visits she makes from New
York, where she is greeted by young Henry
Clinton. The first chapter
ran in Friday’s editions
of The Wall Street
Journal
and
The

“Go Set a Watchman,” the most unexpected second novel in memory, is coming out
July 14. It takes place in the 1950s, 20
years after the setting for “To Kill a
Mockingbird,” Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning
book. U.S. publisher HarperCollins has
said that pre-orders for “Go Set a Watchman”
are the highest in company history and
bookstores worldwide are planning events
to celebrate the book’s release.
Anticipation and apprehension have surrounded news of “Watchman” since it was

announced in February. The surprise and
ecstasy of a new work from Lee have been
shadowed by suspicions the book doesn’t
measure up to “Mockingbird” and was
approved without the 89-year-old author’s
full awareness.
Lee has poor hearing and vision and
resides in an assisted living facility in her
hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. But
her lawyer Tonja Carter; literary agent

See BOOK, Page 21

20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cassidy Gifford hopes to prove Grande still
her acting chops in ‘The Gallows’ backpedaling
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Alicia Rancilio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — From Johnny Depp in “A Nightmare on
Elm Street” to Jamie Lee Curtis in “Halloween,” horror
films have been a good way for actors to cut their teeth in
Hollywood.
“The Gallows,” which opened Friday, features a cast of
relatively unknown actors hoping to make their mark,
including Cassidy Gifford, the 21-yearold daughter of TV personality Kathie
Lee Gifford and former football player
Frank Gifford.
Gifford says she’s known since she
was a young child that she wanted to
perform.
“I did the ‘Three Little Pigs’ when I
was in first grade, and I was the pig with
Cassidy Gifford the brick house, so I technically was
the smart pig, not to toot my own
horn,” she joked in a recent interview.
“The Gallows” is set at a high school where a student died
in a horrific accident during a school play in 1993. Twenty
years later, the school tries to resurrect the production. The
night before the play is to open, a few students break in to
trash the set, but find themselves trapped inside the
school. The movie is presented like footage recorded by
one of the students.
Gifford said the film was largely improvised with the
actors playing characters who share their first names.
“They wouldn’t tell us what we were going to shoot until
the morning we got there, sometimes the night before if
we were lucky, but they would give us the outline and say,
‘These are the points that we want to hit,’” she said. “There
were a few things that needed to be said for plot (points)

Sunday news shows
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Carly Fiorina, a Republican presidential candidate;
Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J.

NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
Gov. Nikki Haley, R-S.C.; Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.

CBS’‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio; Sens. Bernie Sanders,
D-Vt., a Democratic presidential candidate, and Tom Cot-

that would come out later in the movie, but ultimately it
kind of came down to us kind of playing off one another.”
Made on a small budget, Gifford said getting studio backing and a summer opening makes the film “an underdog
story.”

ton, R-Ark.

CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a Republican presidential candidate; former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, a
Democratic presidential candidate; Alex Walker and Scott
Walker, sons of Gov. Scott Walker, R-Wis., a Republican presidential candidate.

‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.; former Sen.
Jim Webb, D-Va., a Democratic presidential candidate; Gov.
Bobby Jindal, R-La., a Republican presidential candidate.

NEW YORK — Ariana Grande has apologized for a second time
for licking doughnuts and saying “I hate America.”
The singer said in the video clip posted late Thursday that she’s
“disgusted” with herself. She adds that she didn’t clearly convey
her true feelings in her first apology — a written statement in
which she ranted about obesity in America.
“Seeing a video of yourself behaving poorly that you had no
idea was taken is such a rude awakening. It’s
like you don’t know what to do. I was so disgusted with myself, I wanted to shove my
face in a pillow and just disappear,” she said
in the four-minute clip.
Grande came under fire this week when
TMZ posted a video of her licking doughnuts
and saying “I hate Americans. I hate America”
inside a doughnut shop in Southern
California.
Ariana Grande
“I’m going to come forward and own up to
what I did and take responsibility and say I’m
sorry,” she said in the video, which had close to 1 million views
on YouTube by Friday morning.
Meanwhile, the doughnut shop has had its health rating reduced
from an “A” to a “B” because of the incident. Riverside County
health officials said the shop violated state food laws by leaving
the doughnuts out unprotected and exposed to customers.
And police in Lake Elsinore, where the doughnut shop is located, said Friday their investigation into Grande’s doughnut-licking” continues. They wouldn’t comment on the specifics of their
probe.
“I’m 22. I’m human. I still got a lot to learn. I make mistakes,
and that’s how I’m gonna learn,” Grande continued. “It’s all a
process and I want to be as good as I possibly can be for my
babes.”

Alcohol and ignorance led
teen to Broadway stage
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — It’s nearly every day that a politician or
CEO or government official or celebrity displays contrition
for their wrongdoings. On Friday it was the turn of a New
York teen who bizarrely clambered onto a Broadway stage to
try to recharge his phone in a prop outlet.
Nick Silvestri, of Seaford, New York, held a press conference Friday outside the Booth Theatre, where on July 2 he
had to be pulled off the stage by ushers moments before the
play “Hand to God” started.
He apologized, blaming ignorance and alcohol. He said it
wasn’t a stunt, even though his buddy took video of the
attempt. Silvestri, nicknamed the
Broadway “Juice Jackal,” describe it as
just bad decision-making.
“Ultimately, before coming to see
‘Hand to God,’ I downed a few drinks and I
think that clearly impaired my judgment,”
said Silvestri, 19. “Before the show started, I noticed that my phone’s battery was
low, and the only power outlet I saw was
on stage.”
Nick Silvestri
The attempt to recharge was, in the end,
pointless: The onstage outlet was just a
prop, created by Tony Award-winner Beowulf Boritt, whose
set is a realistic depiction of a Texas church basement.
“I didn’t know the stage is considered off limits,” Silvestri
said, adding he now felt terrible for the performers. The
Nassau Community College student vowed never to get
onstage again “unless I decide to be an actor.”
The act was at least in keeping with the anarchic nature of
the show. Playwright Robert Askins’ bracing comedy mixes
violence, swearing, brutal honesty, parental failure, church
hypocrisy and plenty of sex — of both human and puppet
varieties.
Silvestri, who caught the show from the orchestra with
family members, did want to impart a lesson from the whole
experience: “If I want to give one message to folks out there
it’s that you should give your complete attention to the
actors on stage,” he said. “I’m sorry for my actions, and I
hope that I can become an example of a great theatergoer in
the future.”
His theatrical faux pas has been part of a month of bad
behavior on Broadway. On Wednesday, the beloved Patti
LuPone endured the buzz of hearing aids improperly turned up
and several ringing phones during the matinee of “Shows for
Days” at Lincoln Center. That evening, she caught someone
texting during the play and swiped the phone out of the
patron’s hand.
“I am so defeated by this issue that I seriously question
whether I want to work on stage anymore,” she said in a
statement. “Now I’m putting battle gear on over my costume
to marshal the audience as well as perform.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

BOOK

SHARIF

Continued from page 19

Continued from page 19

Andrew Nurnberg; and publisher have insisted she is
delighted the book is coming out. State officials, responding to at least one complaint of possible elder abuse, determined she was alert and capable of deciding on the release
of “Watchman.”
“To Kill a Mockingbird,” published in 1960, is set in the
1930s in the fictional town of Maycomb and introduced
Atticus Finch, Scout, Boo Radley and other beloved literary
characters. The book was adapted into an Oscar-winning
movie starring Gregory Peck as Atticus and has become
standard reading in schools and other reading programs,
with worldwide sales topping 40 million copies.
In the years that followed “Mockingbird,” Lee struggled
to write a second book and eventually determined that the
one novel could stand on its own, apparently never considering “Watchman” a possible successor. She has not spoken to the media in decades and her absence from any promotion for “Watchman” marks a rare time that such a highprofile work is being released without the participation of a
living author.
Much of Friday’s excerpt touches upon the landscape and
history of the Maycomb region and the banter between
Clinton and Scout, who playfully resists his marriage proposals. He is known as one of Maycomb’s finest men, a
World War II veteran and law student who has long been
close to the Finches, assists Atticus in his law practice and
regards Atticus as a father figure. Clinton, in turn, is a surrogate son to Atticus. The excerpt refers to the day Jean
Louise’s brother and heir apparent at the law practice, presumably Jem, “dropped dead in his tracks,” forcing Atticus
to find another successor.
According to HarperCollins, Carter came upon the
“Watchman” manuscript at a “secure location where it had
been affixed to an original typescript of ‘To Kill a
Mockingbird.”’ The new book, which Harper has said did
not undergo any new revisions, is set in Maycomb during a
time when the civil rights movement was taking hold in
Lee’s home state. The Supreme Court had ruled unanimously
in 1954 that segregated schools were unconstitutional, and
the arrest of Rosa Parks in 1955 led to the yearlong
Montgomery bus boycott.
“In the mid-1950s, I completed a novel called ‘Go Set a
Watchman,”’ Lee said in a statement issued by Harper in
February. “It features the character known as Scout as an
adult woman, and I thought it a pretty decent effort,” she
said. “My editor, who was taken by the flashbacks to
Scout’s childhood, persuaded me to write a novel (what
became ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’) from the point of view of
the young Scout. ... I am humbled and amazed that this will
now be published after all these years,” said Lee.

He was also the Jewish gambler Nick Arnstein opposite
Barbra Streisand’s Fanny Brice in “Funny Girl.” The 1968
film was banned in his native Egypt because he was cast as a
Jew.
In his middle years Sharif began appearing in such films as
“The Pink Panther Strikes Again,” “Oh Heavenly Dog!,” “The
Baltimore Bullet” and others he dismissed as “rubbish.”
The drought lasted so long that finally, beginning in the
late 1990s, Sharif began declining all film offers.
“I lost my self-respect and dignity,” he told a reporter in
2004. “Even my grandchildren were making fun of me.
‘Grandpa, that was really bad. And this one? It’s worse.”’
In 2003 he accepted a role in the French film “Monsieur
Ibrahim,” portraying a Muslim shopkeeper in Paris who
adopts a Jewish boy.
The role won him the Cesar, the French equivalent of the
Oscar, and he followed with “Hidalgo,” a lively western starring Viggo Mortensen. In that one he was a desert sheikh who
duels 11 assailants with a sword. His career was back on track.
He suffered a public embarrassment in 2007, however,
when he pleaded no contest to misdemeanor battery and was
ordered to take an anger management course for punching a
parking valet who refused to accept his European currency.
Born Michael Shalhoub in Egypt’s Mediterranean coastal
city of Alexandria, Sharif was the son of Christian SyrianLebanese parents.
After working three years at his father’s lumber company,
he fulfilled his longtime ambition to become a movie actor,
going on to appear in nearly two dozen Egyptian films under
the name Omar el Sharif.
His fame only increased when he married Egypt’s then-reining movie queen and screen beauty, Faten Hamama, in 1955.
Some of Egypt’s most iconic film posters are of Hamama and
Sharif. Sharif converted to Islam to marry her, and they had a
son, Tarek. Hamama died in January.
They divorced in 1974, and Sharif never remarried.
In a 2003 interview with the AP, Sharif struck a wistful note

REVIEW
Continued from page 109
their evil masters, from a Tyrannosaurus Rex accidentally tipped
into a volcano, to Dracula, whom they excitedly wake with a
birthday cake and wide-open blinds.
The Minions have their own Ice Age, however, ending up leaderless in Antarctica. After a few hundred years, the joy of snow
ball fights beginning to dim, three of them — Kevin, Bob and
Stuart — set out on a quest to find a new supervillain to idolize.
Soon, they’re on their way to Villain-Con, a riff on ComicCon only a convention celebrating the likes of Scarlet Overkill
(Sandra Bullock), an evil world-conqueror in a beehive. The trio
inadvertently wins a job in Overkill’s entourage, and they’re
soon enmeshed in her plan to take the British throne, along with
Overkill’s inventor, Herb (Jon Hamm).
There are, it should be noted, more ambitious seats of power to
set one’s diabolical sights on. But this is 1960s Swinging
London, a colorful if over-familiar backdrop, and the gogglewearing Minions could just as well be chipper Mods.
The irreverent slapstick unfortunately gives way to the kind of
action set pieces that have now even corrupted children’s
movies. The bombast, though never serious, is still loud enough
to, for too long, drown out the best thing the movie has going
for it: The chuckles and squeaks of the Minions.
It also makes it harder to hear the other key sound accompanying the Minions: the laughter of children. What are the
Minions but stand-ins for kids? Mumbling half-understood
words by the mouthful, they plunge headlong into any task, usually wielding a dangerous object they shouldn’t. Nothing makes
them double over like a good pratfall, and they will insist on a
goodnight kiss or bedtime story. Teaming and relentless, they
will melt the heart of any guardian, even a supervillain.
Coming on the heels of Pixar’s “Inside Out,” an emotional
wallop that most knocks out misty-eyed adults, “Minions” is a
different beast. This one’s for the kids.
“Minions” is rated PG by the Motion Picture Association of
America for “action and rude humor.” Running time: 91 minutes.
Two and a half stars out of four.

Baptist

Lutheran

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM

Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650) 342-2541

Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

Non-Denominational

Church of the
Highlands

“A community of caring Christians”

1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...

To know Christ and make him known.

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

21

Omar Sharif rose to fame in ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ left, in 1962
and cemented his status as Hollywood elite with‘Dr. Zhivago’
in 1965.
about how “Lawrence of Arabia” vaulted him to fame. “It separated me from my wife, from my family ... We didn’t see each
other anymore and that was it, the end of our wedding,” he
said. “I might have been happier having stayed an Egyptian
film star.”
Yousra, Egypt’s biggest actress for much of the past 30
years and a close friend of Sharif, compared Sharif to a “cleancut” diamond.
“He was a phenomena; a one of a kind. Everyone had a
dream to be like Omar Sharif. No one will be like him,” she
told the AP on Friday after his death was announced. “I don’t
think we are going to ever have someone like him.”
Sharif’s son Tarek revealed in May that his father had been
suffering Alzheimer’s. Zaki, the Egyptian Theatrical Arts
Guild president, told the AP Friday that Sharif had stopped eating and drinking in the last three days.
Sharif was romantically linked with a number of Hollywood
co-stars over the years. In 2004, he acknowledged that he
also had another son, who was born after a one-night stand
with an interviewer.
Away from the movies, Sharif was a world-class bridge
player who for many years wrote a newspaper column on
bridge. He quit the game in later years, however, when he gave
up gambling.
He had been a prodigious gambler, reportedly once winning
a million dollars at an Italian casino.

A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST

HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman

Worship Service
Sunday School

10:00 AM
11:00 AM

Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.

Call (650) 349-0100

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

22

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

EAT,
EXPLORE,
EXPERIENCE:
PUERTO VALLARTA’S PITILLAL
NEIGHBORHOOD SERVES UP LA
COMIDA DELICIOSA. Paul and Lindsay
Mayer met in Puerto Vallarta while they were
traveling through Mexico. They loved
Mexico, travel and food, so it was natural in
2011 for them to start Vallarta Food Tours to
share these passions with visitors to the
city that had become their home. Now, every
day (and some evenings) of the week,
Vallarta Food Tours helps travelers in this
popular resort sample its culinary delights.
And delicious discoveries can be found in
one of the town’s not so famous areas. Three
days a week, a small group (no more than 10
people) explores Pitillal (“pee-tee-yall”), a
charming neighborhood a few miles from
the historic center of Puerto Vallarta. In
about three and a half hours and a mile of flat
walking, the tour visits nine tasting locations that offer samples of, among other
things, local specialties such as carnitas
(slow-cooked pork), handmade tamales, birria (a slow-cooked meat stew marinated in
red chiles and served in tacos), and Mexicanstyle popsicles. The history of the authentic
dishes and their ingredients is provided
along with the delicious fare. Vallarta Food
Tours’ guides enjoy sharing the unique
aspects of the Pitillal neighborhood. Guide
Ricardo Lopez said, “I think the biggest
reaction that I get from our guests is surprise. Surprise not just with the taste but
also with the complexity and history of
Mexican food. Surprise that our vendors do
not take shortcuts. For example, they still
make tamales by hand all day without the aid
of kitchen appliances. Surprise of the pride
and happiness that they have in carrying on
with these traditions. I love my job because
not only do I see smiles and full bellies
every day at the end but I have made them
fans of Mexico, its food, people and culture!”

AND THERE’S MORE THAN FOOD
ALONG THE WAY. Woven into the food
walk are glimpses of the history, architecture and culture of Pitillal. One stop, across
from the main square where the group assembles, is San Miguel Archangel Catholic
Church, where a monumental (over 20 feet
tall) carved wood sculpture of Jesus seems to
float over the altar. Just a few blocks away is
La Regional talabarteria, which since 1957
has been making spectacular hand-carved
and embellished saddles. Tour participants
are welcomed to the upstairs workshop
where the labor-intensive fabrication is
underway. Leather belts and decorative quirts
make good souvenirs.
SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL
A HIDDEN CULTURAL GEM. The
Mayers said, “Our Taste of Pitillal Food Vallarta Food Tours owner Paul Mayer, left, and guide Ricardo Lopez, center, introduce visitors
Tasting Walking Tour is ideal for Puerto to Maria Elena Segura, owner of La Tia Anita’s in the Pitillal neighborhood of Puerto Vallarta,
Vallarta residents and travelers eager to dis- Mexico. Segura’s handmade tamales are the specialty of her restaurant.
cover the culinary secrets and authentic tra- candy. An evening taco adventure visits the Rock Cafes and McDonald’s? Or do we want
ditions of this extraordinary, off the beaten night street foods of Vallarta with tastings to eat without fear, tearing into the local
path neighborhood. Whether you’re vaca- of pozole, sopes, churros and marlin que- stew, the humble taqueria’s mystery meat,
tioning in Puerto Vallarta for the first time or sadilla. Full portion samples, enough for a the sincerely offered gift of a lightly grilled
a proud Vallarta resident, we guarantee that satisfying lunch or dinner, are included in fish head? I know what I want. I want it all. I
you’ll walk away with a greater understand- the ticket price. Private tours are available. want to try everything once.” — Anthony
ing of this hidden cultural gem.”
Suitable for all age groups, but participants Bourdain.
must be able to be on their feet for the majorVALLARTA FOOD TOURS PARTICU- ity of the three-plus hours. For more inforSusan Cohn is a member of the North
LARS: In addition to the Pitallal neighbor- mation, visit www.VallartaFoodTours.com American Trav el Journalists Association,
hood tour, Vallarta Food Tours offers a day or call 1-888-457-2210.
Bay Area Trav el Writers, and the
tour that explores Puerto Vallarta’s centro
International Food, Wine & Trav el Writers
and old town neighborhoods, with samAND REMEMBER: Do we really want to Association. She may be reached at
plings of mole enchiladas, traditional travel in hermetically sealed popemobiles susan@smdaily journal.com. More of her
ceviche tostadas, tacos from an authentic through the rural provinces of France, stories
may
be
found
at
taco stand, traditional drinks and regional Mexico and the Far East, eating only in Hard http://ifwtwa.org/author/susan-cohn.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

TAX
Continued from page 1

DATEBOOK
cable TV bills. In 2014, nearly 55.8 percent of those polled
said they’d support a 5 percent utility user tax and more than
60 percent supported a 2.5 percent tax. But this year, only
41.8 percent said they’d support a 2.9 percent tax, according to the poll.

we do polling, we’ll see more support and can take action to
finally start solving our problem.”
Belmont streets were ranked the worse in the county by
the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and officials
have estimated they need $38 million to conduct repairs.
Fixing and maintaining the city’s 28 miles of storm drain
lines as well as two pump stations was estimated to cost
more than $57 million in 2013. While sewer fees can help
pay for the expense, they’re primarily used to fund nearly
$45 million in sewer-related repairs, according to the city’s
website.
Longtime Belmont resident Tim Strinden said city officials have exaggerated the extent of what’s actually needed
and, with revenue projected to increase more than 30 percent in the coming years, further taxing citizens isn’t necessary.
Of the $190 million the city is claiming it needs, “when
you take out all the unnecessary and already funded items,
you come down to about $50 [million] or $60 million,”
Strinden said. “They just need to live within their means
instead of trying to raise taxes. They do have increasing
revenues and healthier financial situation. So just make the
most of that and don’t shoot for the moon on this wish list.
Just go for what’s more realistic based on our finances.”
Strinden said with support having gone down for the utility user tax, he’d prefer the City Council not spend more
money on polling or investigating ballot measures.
Respondents in last year’s poll were more amenable to a
utility user tax — a mechanism that could add a tax to residents’ electricity, gas, water, sewer, telephone, garbage or

Although there was a narrow margin of support for a general half-cent sales tax increase that would only need a
majority vote, the city is also confronted with the possibility of having to place a citizen-initiated referendum on
the November ballot.

OFFICE

be accessible to building tenants at street level, and 31
standard spaces would be accessible at each level of the
underground lot.
Gardiner said there could be concerns about cars entering
and exiting the building as well, as drivers are proposed to
drive in from Highland Avenue and leave onto Hatch
Avenue.
Whether Hatch Avenue is suitable to accommodate the
demand of cars leaving the building will be up for consideration, he said.
Dewey Land Company was also responsible for redeveloping the building in Burlingame currently housing City
National Bank, 1450 Chapin Ave., which Gardiner said has
drawn admiration.
“That project was pretty well received,” he said.
The meeting Monday, July 13, will likely be the first in
a series, as the sizable office project starts to work its way
through the public planning process, said Gardiner.
“This is really kind of the beginning,” he said.
In other business at the meeting, commissioners will
consider a proposal to redevelop 305 Primrose Road, which
is currently vacant, into a Philz Coffee house.
The popular craft coffee roaster and brew house will continue its growth along the Peninsula, under approval of city
officials, expanding beyond current locations in San
Mateo, Redwood City, Menlo Park, Palo Alto and South
San Francisco.
The development is proposed to blend with its surroundings and maintain much of the character that defines the current, older building design, said Gardiner.
Gardiner said the anticipation in Burlingame for the new
coffee business is palpable.
“Everyone is all excited about that,” he said.
The Burlingame Planning Commission meets Monday,
July 13, in City Hall, 480 Primrose Road. The meeting
begins at 7 p.m.

Continued from page 1
Planning commissioners will begin the design and environmental impact review process during their meeting
Monday, July 13, for the development at the site which is
currently the home to Bay Area Window Pros, 213 Highland
Ave., and the former Fine Consign furniture store.
Kevin Gardiner, planning manager for the city of
Burlingame, noted the substantial size of the proposed
development.
“It’s a large project,” he said.
The building is proposed to be built 55 feet tall, with a
roof deck, sitting on top of three levels of underground
parking, which will provide a total of 124 spaces, according to the report.
Per city regulations, according to the size of the proposed project, the site would need 149 parking spaces, so
the developer is asking for an exception allowing fewer
spaces than would be normally required.
Gardiner said the developer has expressed belief the
amount of proposed parking will be sufficient to meet
demand.
“They have stated they feel the parking is adequate,” he
said. “But the city needs to decide it is in agreement with
that rationale.”
The site is within minutes of walking distance from the
downtown Burlingame Caltrain station.
According to the report, 22 of the parking spaces would
be dispersed through a puzzle parking stacking mechanism,
and six tandem spaces in the underground lot, to maximize
efficiency and provide as many parking spaces as possible.
The puzzle stacker, a mechanical parking option that utilizes a lift to arrange cars in an independent structure, would

County elections officials determined a group of residents
gathered enough signatures to have the City Council either
overturn its recent zoning amendments making home
remodels easier or put the matter on the ballot. The council
will discuss what to do in response to the referendum concerning its zoning and tree ordinances this Tuesday, said
City Manager Greg Scoles.
While the city has a plan for some of the $190 million in
identified projects, such as the nearly $45 million in
deferred sewer maintenance that will be paid for by sewer
rates, a significant outstanding need remains, Scoles said.
The city could use $3 million a year for fixing streets
alone and a half-cent sales tax is only estimated to raise
between $1 million and $2 million, Scoles said.
Mayor David Braunstein said the city should consider various options for funding vital repairs while finding something with which residents are amenable.
“We know that infrastructure is an important component
for the city, it’s something that many of us on the council
have been thinking about for a number of years, ”
Braunstein said. “The bottom line is just trying to find the
right mechanism or tool to use that the residents and our
constituents can support.”

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

23

Calendar
SATURDAY, JULY 11
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. Ravenswood
Open Space Preserve, 2070 Bay Road,
East Palo Alto. Free program of the San
Mateo County Medical Association’s
Community Service Foundation that
encourages physical activity. For more
information and to sign up visit
smcma.org/walkwithadoc or call 3121663.
Media and Fiction Book Sale. 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. San Bruno Library Downstairs
Community Room, 701 W. Angus Ave.,
San Bruno. For more information call
616-7078.
Used Book/CD/DVD Sale to Benefit
Palo Alto Libraries. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cubberley Community Center, 4000
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Credit
cards now accepted. For more information call 213-8755.
Sketching Class: One Stroke at a
Time. 10:30 a.m. New Leaf Community
Market, 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Learn to sketch and paint
watercolors of fruit and vegetables
with local artist Laura McHugh. Bring 23 sheets of regular bond or watercolor
paper, child’s set of watercolors, 1-2
small round tip paintbrushes and a
black fine-pointed felt pen (Pentel P500 or equivalent) or pencil. $10. To
Pre-register
email
lauramchugh@me.com. For more
information email patti@bondmarcom.com.
Meet Author Sonya Lee. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Ms. Lea will be discussing her memoir ‘Wondering Who
You Are.’ Free. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
Life and Times of Ty Cobb. 1 p.m. San
Mateo County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. The San
Mateo County History Museum will
present historical reenactor Norm
Coleman, who will portray the life and
times of baseball legend and Atherton
resident Ty Cobb. $6 for adults, $4 for
seniors and students. For more information call 299-0104.
Origami Time. 1 p.m. Reach and Teach,
144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Learn and
share origami folding techniques for all
ages and experience levels. All materials provided. Free. For more information email craig@reachandteach.com.
The Story of Jade by Cynthia Woo.
1:30 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library
Ave., Millbrae. Learn about jade, the
priceless treasure, and its role in the
history of China. This talk will be conducted in Mandarin Chinese. Free. For
more
information
email
paulchsieh@gmail.com.
Dragon Productions presents ‘Lo
Speziale.’ 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Comedic
opera by Haydn done as an homage to
‘Breaking Bad.’ For more information
and to purchase tickets go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
SUNDAY, JULY 12
Used Book/CD/DVD Sale to Benefit
Palo Alto Libraries. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cubberley Community Center, 4000
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Credit
cards now accepted. For more information call 213-8755.
Kidchella: Allison Faith Levy’s Big
Time Tot Rock. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free.
Soil Fertility for Growing Organic
Fruit Trees. Master Gardener Plant
Clinic is 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the Soil
Fertility for Growing Organic Fruit Trees
presented by Terrence Welch is from 1
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. San Mateo Arboretum
Society, Kohl Pumphouse, 101 Ninth
Ave. (located in Central Park), San
Mateo. For more information, call 5790536 or email info@sanmateoarboretum.org.
Pacifica: Milagra Ridge Walking
Tour. 1 p.m. Milagra Ridge, Pacifica.
Discover Milagra Ridge’s military history from World War II gun emplacements for coastal defense to the Nike
missile launch site (1955-1974). The
walk is led by Dave Bridgman, who was
stationed at Milagra Ridge in the early
1970s. Free. For more information call
299-0104.
Music in the Park. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Washington Park, Burlingame. The
Peelers will perform the Top 40. There
will be free entertainment, lawn seating and beer, wine and food for purchase. For more information call 5587300.
Concerts in the Park: ‘Highwater
Blues.’ 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Twin Pines
Meadow, Belmont. Free.
Dragon Productions presents ‘Lo
Speziale.’ 2 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Comedic
opera by Haydn done as an homage to
‘Breaking Bad.’ For more information
and to purchase tickets go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
Classical on the Square: Opera San
Jose. 6 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 780-7311.

MONDAY, JULY 13
Financial
Literacy
and
Entrepreneurship Summer Camp
for ninth- and 10th-graders. Runs
through July 17. St. Matthews Catholic
School, San Mateo. Students learn
budgeting, taxes, capital market, cash
management and are taught how to
apply their skills and interests to help
them navigate toward a potential
career or education path. The second
part of the program focuses on starting and running their own business.
For more information call 401-4662.
Sons in Retirement Branch 91
Monthly Luncheon. 11 a.m. South San
Francisco Elks Lodge, 920 Southgate
Drive, South San Francisco. SIR members enjoy a variety of activities including golf, bocce ball, bowling, travel,
computers, investments, etc. They
meet the second Monday of each
month. Lunch is $16-$20. For more
information call Lee Severe at 5951973.
Makerspace Friday. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
South San Francisco Main Library, 840
W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. All
ages welcome. For more information
call 829-3860.
Ventriloquist Steve Chaney and
Corney Crow. 2 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, 205 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo. Free. Enjoy a puppet show and
learn about ventriloquism with Steve
Chaney and Corney Crow. For more
information call 522-7880.
Paws for Tales. 4 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Children (ages 5 and up) can
improve their reading skills and make a
new four-legged friend by reading
aloud to a therapy dog. The dogs and
handlers are from the Peninsula
Humane Society and the SPCA’s Pet
Assisted Therapy program. For more
information and to sign up call 5227838.
Garage Band on iPad. 6 p.m. South
San Francisco Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Demo of GarageBand, a music creation
studio and sound editor. For more
information call 829-3860.
TUESDAY JULY 14
Kiwanis Weekly Meeting. Noon to
1:15 p.m. Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. Guest Speaker: Jeff
Wachtel serves as Secretary of the
board of Trustees at Stanford
University. He will talk about the
accomplishments and challenges facing Stanford University. For more information email info@suziworleyphotography.com.
Bonnie Lockhart: International
songs and music games. First showing at 5 p.m., second showing at 7 p.m.
Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Tickets
required. For more information email
John Piche at piche@plsinfo.org.
African Drumming. 6:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Come with Onye
Onyemaechi to hear the voice of the
African village, the drum. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
Documentary Club. 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. ‘Paris is Burning’ will be
viewed. Free. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 15
Music in the Park. Stafford Park,
Redwood City. Musician Andre Thierry.
For more information go to www.redwoodcity.org/events/musicinthepark.html.
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. Windy Hill
Open Space Preserve, Portola Road,
Portola Valley. Free program of the San
Mateo County Medical Association’s
Community Service Foundation that
encourages physical activity. For more
information and to sign up visit
smcma.org/walkwithadoc or call 3121663.
Computer Class: Internet Security.
10:30 a.m. to noon. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Learn how to stay safe online and protect your computer and accounts by
avoiding viruses and scams. Free. For
more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Kingfish Restaurant, 201 S. B St.,
San Mateo. Free admission for business
professionals. For more information
call 430-6500 or visit sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Sizzling Science: Physics in Action. 2
p.m. Burlingame Public Library, Lane
Room, 480 Primrose Road, Burlingame.
For fifth and sixth graders only.
Registration is required. For more information email John Piche at
piche@plsinfo.org.
Teen Summer Candy Sushi. 3 p.m.
Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. You make
it, you eat it! For more information,
email John Piche at piche@plsinfo.org.

24

COMICS/GAMES

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL
CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Garish
5 Snag a dogie
9 Bonfire remains
12 Long for
13 Europe-Asia range
14 Fair grade
15 Thick carpeting
16 Mystify
18 Like some pay rates
20 Fixes a shirttail
21 Helm position
22 Electric fish
23 Majestic wader
26 Moos
30 Biddy
33 Ow!
34 Cut hair
35 Yeah, right! (2 wds.)
37 Mets’ former home
39 Dirty place
40 Brazen boldness
41 London flashlight
43 Tummy muscles
45 Intersect

GET FUZZY®

48
51
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Car-wash step
Suspected
Quack medicine (2 wds.)
Buddhist monk
DVD predecessor
Firecracker part
Athletics channel
Snow boot
Mex. miss
Smell awful

DOWN
1 Eye protector
2 Golfer Lorena —
3 Self-move firm (hyph.)
4 Longitude unit
5 July stone
6 Mother lode
7 Bear’s foot
8 Privileged few
9 Australian rockers
10 Hunt for
11 That girl’s
17 Quiet times
19 Toy-block brand

22
24
25
27
28
29
30
31
32
36
38
42
44
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
54
55

Knockout gas
Corrodes
Canyon reply
Switch positions
Life of the party
Dangerous job
Old crone
Vega rocket org.
Zero
Lab glassware
Crowning point
Physician
Complaints
Delete a file
Phoenix suburb
Host’s plea
Andes empire
DEA operative
— circus
Clammy
Not just mine
Is, to Fritz

7-11-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, JULY 11, 2015
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Take a stand for
something you believe in. Your honest approach will
help recruit others to a worthwhile cause. Idle time
will lead to boredom. Do something engaging.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You will be upset about
changes going on around you. Take care of your
responsibilities and don’t be overly opinionated. Wait
for an opportune moment to make a suggestion.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Your quick wit and
sense of humor will elicit attention. If you are single,
this can be the day you meet that special someone; if
not, enjoy the one you are with.

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Don’t share your
financial status with anyone other than a trained
adviser. Well-meaning friends or relatives will
not give you good advice. Play it safe and get an
expert opinion.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Get out and do
something that displays your talent. Your creativity
will astound your friends, and your popularity will
grow. An elderly relative will need your assistance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Strive for rest
and reflection. Do some soul-searching to determine
if you are heading in a direction that is good for you.
An evening of romance should be on your agenda.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Important new
connections can be made through networking at

7-11-15
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

industry functions. Meeting people with similar
backgrounds or interests will lead to opportunities
and long-term benefi ts.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Your financial status
will be compromised if you loan money to a friend.
Regardless of the guilt or obligation you feel, you are
best off giving advice, not your hard-earned cash.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Business talks or
seminars will be valuable aids to your progress.
Brainstorm with people who have successful tips that
you can use to ensure the success of your projects.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Contentious relatives
or family members will try your patience. Resist the
urge to voice your opinion. Keep the peace and make
the day go by smoother for everyone.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — You can drum up
some impressive support if you let others know what
you are trying to achieve. You will be amazed at the
results that are possible once others are on board.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Uncertainty at home
or work will be confusing. You will end up in a better
emotional position if you get the facts straight and
avoid the current rumors.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment

ACTIVITIES
COORDINATOR -

Memory Care Community in Burlingame searching for energetic & creative team member. Contact Ana
650.771.1127

CAREGIVER -

Looking for compassionate team
member for Assisted Living in Burlingame. Call Ana 650.771.1127

CAREGIVER
WANTED

Senior Living Facility
San Carlos
(650)596-3489
Ask for Violet
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

RESTAURANT -

Dishwasher Required, San Carlos Restaurant, 1696 laurel Street. Contact Chef
(541) 848-0038

25

110 Employment

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
• Customer Service
• Presser

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?

Call
(650)777-9000

Do you have….Good communication skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?

WOODSIDE STORE-SITE MANAGER
needed Saturdays from 12-4pm at the
Woodside Store Historic Site. Located at
3300 Tripp Rd, Woodside. Share History
of the site with visitors, make gift shop
sales and do light cleaning. $18-$20 per
hour. Send Resume to
jobs@historysmc.org.

Please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978

GARDENER WANTED Maintenance
(650)345-2135

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

NOW HIRING
FULL TIME
PART TIME, ALL SHIFTS

The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

CNA’s and Caregivers Needed
Will train – Excellent salary
Must have good communication skills

DISHWASHER
Full Time

SERVER

Part Time
APPLY IN PERSON AT:
PALO ALTO COMMONS 4075 El Camino Real, CA 94306

FREE

CAREGIVER
TRAINING

Employment Opportunity for
Successful Candidates
Call for Appointment for
Next Infomation Session

650-458-2200
www.homebridgeca.org

DRIVERS
WANTED
San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Routes

Early mornings, six days per week,
Monday through Saturday
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.
and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.
Pay dependent on route size.
Apply in person 800 S. Claremont
Street #210 in San Mateo

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015
Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

JOB FAIR
COMPANY
LOCATION
POSITION TYPE
JOB FAIR ON

LSG Sky Chefs
BURLINGAME, CA
FULL TIME
THURSDAY July 16, 2015
10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

110 Employment

110 Employment

127 Elderly Care

HAIRSTYLIST/BARBER WANTED for
chair rental in downtown San Mateo. Eko
Salon. (650)207-8476

OFFICE Brisbane pest control company needs FT
office worker M-F, 8am-5pm. Salary.
Call Jose 415-467-2500

FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

203 Public Notices

868 Cowan Road - Burlingame, CA

NOW HIRING!
DRIVERS CLASS A and B
DRIVER HELPER
COOK Halal & Arabic Foods and Western
FOOD PREPARER
ASSEMBLY Beverage & Equipment

UTILITY Worker/porter
QUALITY CLERK
WAREHOUSE CLERK
MEAL ORDER CLERK
FOOD COST ANALYST

RETENTION BONUS AVAILABLE!
Contact Info: Phone: 650-259-3100 Fax: 650-692-2318
Email: stephane.ako@lsgskychefs.com

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

124 Caregivers

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.

We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

CASE# CIV 534605
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Michael Nelson Haas and Lisa Ellen
Porter
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Michael Nelson Haas and Lisa Ellen Porter filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Cameron Angelina Haas
Proposed Name: Cameron Angelina Porter Haas
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 19,
2015 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 07/09/2015
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/09/15
(Published 07/11/2015, 07/18/2015,
07/25/2015, 08/01/2015)

Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

Now Accepting Applications

Assistant Candy
Maker Trainees

Seasonal
Quality Assurance Inspector

Qualifications for Assistant
Candy Maker Trainees
include, but are not limited to:
follow formulas, be able to
work day and night shifts,
read, speak and write English
and regularly lift up to 50 lbs.
Entry level rate of pay is
$14.00/hour.

Qualifications for the Seasonal
Quality Assurance Inspector include,
but are not limited to: check the
weight, appearance and overall
quality of our product at various
steps of manufacturing; read, speak
and write English. Must pass a
written math test. Entry level rate of
pay is $13.00/hour.

Applicants must be available for day or night shift and overtime, as required.

Both are Union positions. If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at
(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

27

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

298 Collectibles

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265728
The following person is doing business
as: Pinnacle Imaging Systems, 288 Harbor Blvd, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered Owners: Pinnacle Imaging Corporation, DE. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on11/25/2014
/s/ Alfred Zee/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/15, 06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-265690
The following person is doing business
as: Boho Family Wellness, 155 Birch
Street Suite 1, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062. Registered owner: Mia Blomquist,
339 Oxford St., SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94134. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Mia Blomquist/
This statement was filed by the assessor-county clerk on 06/15/2015. (published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
6/27/15, 7/04/15, 7/11/15, 7/18/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265726
The following person is doing business
as: Young Anatomy, 311 Cedar St, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner: Estephania Morales Maupome,
same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s//Estephania Morales Maupome/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265904
The following person is doing business
as: Ancient Infusions, 3403 CSM Drive,
Apt 102, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. Registered Owner: Cynthia Kay James,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Cynthia K. James/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/01/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/11/15, 07/18/15, 07/25/15, 08/01/15)

LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265738
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Dental Implant Center,
1201 Saint Francis Way, SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070. Registered Owner: Shirani
Gupta, DDS, CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s// Shivani Gupta/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265599
The following person is doing business
as: Varza Games, 24 Devonshire Blvd,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered
Owner: Alexander Nicholai Sorensen,
same address. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s//Alexander Sorensen/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/05/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265
The following person is doing business
as: ABC Language Center, 458 San Mateo Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owner: Vinh Thai, 464 Linden
Ave, #6, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. The
business is conducted by an individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s// Vinh Thai/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/23/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265831
The following person is doing business
as: Bella Salon, 7 North Kingston St,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Nhung Le, 3806 Evangelho Cir,
SAN JOSE, CA 95148. The business is
conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s//Nhung Le/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/26/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/15, 07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15)

THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday, July
21, 2015 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and take action on the following
items. All interested persons are invited to attend.
1580 Greenwood Drive. Request for a Use Permit to construct a 260 square foot addition which together with the previously approved addition, will increase the gross floor area of
the existing home by greater than 50% (109%), per SBMC
Section 12.200.030.B.1. Recommended Environmental Determination: Categorical Exemption
428 Elm Avenue. Request for a Use Permit to allow the construction of an addition which increases the gross floor area of
the existing home by greater than 50% (60%), per SBMC Section 12.200.030.B.1. Recommended Environmental Determination: Categorical Exemption
1520 Greenwood Way. Request for a Use Permit to allow the
construction of an addition which increases the gross floor area
of the existing home by greater than 50% (75%), per SBMC
Section 12.200.030.B.1. Recommended Environmental Determination: Categorical Exemption
680 Acacia Avenue. Request for a Use Permit to allow the
construction of an addition which increases the gross floor area
of the existing home by greater than 50% (59%), per SBMC
Section 12.200.030.B.1. Recommended Environmental Determination: Categorical Exemption
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 11, 2015.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265921
The following person is doing business
as: Executive SUV Service, 210 S. Ellsworth Ave, 392, SAN MATEO, CA
94401. Registered Owner: Nnambi R.
Moghalu, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Nnambi R. Moghalu/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/02/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15, 07/25/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265683
The following person is doing business
as: Wise Financial Services, 140 School
St., DALY CITY, CA 94014. Registered
Owner: Hilda Orbegozo, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Hilda Orbegozo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/04/15, 07/11/15, 07/18/15, 07/25/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266004
The following person is doing business
as: Tough Guy Music Productions, 375
Convention Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063. Registered Owners: 1)Gerald
Pellizzer, 200 D Street, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94063. 2) Richard Collora, 818
MIller Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s//Gerald Pellizzer
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/09/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/11/15, 07/18/15, 07/25/15, 08/01/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-265999
The following person is doing business
as: My Legal Document, 800 N. Delaware St., #406, SAN MATEO, CA
94401. Registered Owner: Winston Arver, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Winston Arver/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/08/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/11/15, 07/18/15, 07/25/15, 08/01/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-266023
The following person is doing business
as: big101store, 1670 S. Amphlett Blvd,
#214, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: Jerzy Sabik, 205 De Anza
Blvd, #299, SAN MATEO, CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Jerzy Sabik/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/10/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/11/15, 07/18/15, 07/25/15, 08/01/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265932
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Top Oil Products Company, 100 N.
El Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA
94402. 2) Top 1 Oil Products Company,
same address. Registered Owner: Atlas
Asia-Pacific, CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBNs on 1) 10/02/1985, 2)
12/01/2008
/s/Bridget H. Ryan/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/03/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/11/15, 07/18/15, 07/25/15, 08/01/15)
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT M-258283
Name of the person abandoning the use
of the Fictitious Business Name: Martin
Rojo. Name of Business: Agilimpex. Date
of original filing: 10/24/13. Address of
Principal Place of Business: 2319 Alamedia de las Pulgas, San Mateo, CA 94403.
The business was conducted by an Individual.
/s/ Martin Rojo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 6/23/15. (Published in the San
Mateo
Daily
Journal,
6/27/2015,
7/04/2015, 7/11/2015, 7/18/2015).

210 Lost & Found
FOUND-LARGE SIZED Diamond Ring in
San Carlos Bank Parking Lot on 5/21.
(650)888-2662.
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301

RING FOUND, 6 years ago, large 14 carat gold, in San Carlos. Eaton Ave.
(650)445-8827

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858
MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260

$12.,

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

JOHN GRISHAM H.B. books 3 @ $3
each. Call 650-341-1861

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595
TAMI HOAG H.B. books. 6 @ $3 each.
650-341-1861

295 Art
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

299 Computers
DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260
HP DESKTOP computer upgrade vista
Intel processor perfect condition tower
only $99 (650) 520-7045

296 Appliances

300 Toys

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208

5 RARE purple card Star Wars figures
mint unopened. $75. Steve, 650-5186614.

JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.

COMPLETE 1999 UD1&2 set of 525
baseball cards - mint. $50. Steve, 650518-6614.

KENMORE MICROWAVE quick touch
medium in perfect condition and clean.
$35.[510]684-0187
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
SHARP MICROWAVE CAROUSEL II
oven small in perfect condition and clean
$ 35. [510] 684-0187
WHIRLPOOL REAR tub assembly for a
front
loading
washing
machine,
$200/obo. (650)591-2227

PLAY KITCHEN Step 2, accessories,
sink, shelves, oven, fridge, extendable,
perfect , $50. 650-878-9511
STAR WARS Battle Droid figures mint
unopened. 4 for $40. Steve, 650-5186614.
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012

WHIRLPOOL shock absorber for front
loading washing machine, $30/obo.
(650)591-2227

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

297 Bicycles

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

2 KIDS Bikes for $60. 310-889-4850.
Text Only. Will send pictures upon request.

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

AB CIRCLE machine. $55. 310-8894850. Text Only. Will send pictures upon
request.

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

BRIDGESTONE MOUNTAIN Bike. $95.
27" tires. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

303 Electronics

LANDRIDER
AUTO-SHIFT.
Never
Used. Paid $320. Asking $75.(650)4588280

27 INCH Sony TV (not flat screen) Excellent condition $75.00. 650-347-6875.

LOST DOG, 14 year old Bichon, white
and Fluffy. Reward $500 cash. Her name
is Pumpkin. Lost in Redwood City.
(650) 281-4331.

298 Collectibles

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

BASUKA BASS tube speakers/ amplifier 20" x 10" auto boat never used $100.
(650)992-4544

LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542

NOTICE OF ELECTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a General Municipal Election will be held in the City
of San Bruno on Tuesday, November 3, 2015, for the following Officers and Measures:
OFFICERS
For Mayor

(Full term of two years)

For 2 Members of the City Council

(Full term of four years)

If no one or only one person is nominated for an elective office, appointment to the
elective office may be made as prescribed by § 10229 of the Elections Code of the State of California.
MEASURES TO BE VOTED ON
Shall the position of City Clerk of the City of San Bruno be appointive?

YES
NO

and
Shall the position of City Treasurer of the City of San Bruno be appointive?

YES
NO

The polls will be open between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.
This legal notice is being published pursuant to sections 12101, 12102, 12111, 10225,
and 10229 of the Elections Code and section 6061 of the Government Code of the State of California.
You may call the City Clerk’s Office at 616-7058 if you need additional information.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
July 6, 2015
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 11, 2015.

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015
303 Electronics

304 Furniture

308 Tools

310 Misc. For Sale

312 Pets & Animals

COMPACT- DVD Video/CD music Player never used in Box $45. (650)9924544

OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461

AIR COMPRESSOR - All trade. 125psi.
25 gallon. $99. (650)591-8062

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

ADOPTION IS THE ONLY OPTION

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

FREE 36" COLOR TV (not a flat
screen). Great condition. Ph. 650 6302329.
KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/ equalizer, with CD deck music player 2 Spkrs+.
$50. (650)992-4544
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324
PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266
PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266
PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063
RECORD PLAYER - BIC Model #940.
Excellent Cond. $30. (650) 368-7537.
SONY CD/DVD PLAYER model dvpn5575p brand new silver in the box. $50.
[510]684-0187

PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
ROUND DINING table (wood) very nice;
about 40” wide $25. (650)580-6324
SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274

CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

311 Musical Instruments

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY duty 10 inch saw
1 hp, blades/accessories, $90 (650)3455224 before 8:00 p.m.

SOLID WOOD stackable tables, Set of 3
$25. (650)996-0026

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TALL BOOKCASE (71" x 31") w/ 5 adjust. shelves. Ikea birch color. $25.
650-861-0088.
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505
TV STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168

WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

OXYGEN AND acetylene welding tanks,
small size, $95.00. 650-341-0282.
POWER INVERTER - STATPOWER
PROWATT 2500. modified, Sine wave
phase corrected. $245.
650-591-8062
PULLEYS- FOUR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
SKILL SAW 7/1/4" CRAFTMAN profesional unused $ 45. (650)992-4544

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

304 Furniture

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184

CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DECORATIVE MIRRORS, set of 4, $40
(650)996-0026
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. 40” x
35.5” x 17.5” . $65. (207)329-2853.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151
EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151
FOR SALE: Bed Room Set, Entertainment Center, Maple Dining Hutch,
Houseware, Juicers, Coffeemakers, Total Gym and More (650) 283-6997
FULL SIZED mattress with metal type
frame $35. (650)580-6324
GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.

309 Office Equipment
STAND WITH shelves, 29" high. Can be
used for TV, computer, printer. $10. Pacifica (650)355-0266

306 Housewares

310 Misc. For Sale

BOXED RED & gold lg serving bowl
18inches - $65 (650) 741-9060 SB

10 VIDEOTAPES (3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

BASE BOARD 110v heaters (2). 6'
white, 1500 watts. New. $25 each.
(650)342-7933

FLATWARE - Stanley Roberts stainless
flatware service for 8, plus assorted
pieces. $65 obo (650)591-6842
SCALE. 25 lb. capacity counter top model. Very good condition. $15. San Bruno.
650-794-0839
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
WROUGHT IRON wine rack, 24 bottle,
black, pristine $29 650-595-3933

307 Jewelry & Clothing
NEW IN box, quarts wristwatch stainless
case/strap $19 650-595-3933

NEW STORE

COSTUME JEWELRY $2

Friditas

132 Hazelwood Dr, SSF
(415)828-2997
www.friditas.com

MIRROR, NOT framed41" x 34" $ 15.
(650)366-8168
MIRROR, OAK frame oval on top approx 39" high x 27" Wide. (650)996-0026
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.
PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167

1-1/2 GAL. Stainless Steel Spray Can,
all Brass Fittings. $5. (650)368-0748
12 FOOT Heavy Duty Jumper Cables
$20 (650)368-0748

4 WHEEL movers dolly cost $40 asking
$25 obo 650 591 6842

MIRROR RECTANGULAR with silver
frame approx 50" high x 20 " wide $25
(650)996-0026

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

308 Tools

ITALIAN TABLE 34 X 34 X 29Hm Beautiful Oak inlaid $90 OBO In RC (650)3630360

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709

14 FT Extension Ladder. Extends to 26
FT. $125. Good Cond. (650)368-7537

LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483

FAN. LASKO Cooling fan. 21” x 20” x 41/2”. Like new. $15. San Bruno. 650794-0839.

VAN GOGH “Vase of White Roses”
wood and glass frame. 24” x 30”. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please

HOME MADE Banquet/Picnic Table 3' X
8' $10. (650)368-0748

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

COOKING MAGAZINES. 48 issues
“Taste of Home” series. Hundreds of color recipes. $10. 650-794-0839.

HAND EDGER $3. (650)368-0748

TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393
TRIPOD : Oak and brass construction.
Used in 1930"s Hollywood In RC $90
OBO (650)363-0360
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

650-697-2685

317 Building Materials

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

400 Broadway - Millbrae

XXL HARLEY Davidson Racing Team
Shirt. $90. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

UPARIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

WE BUY

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

315 Wanted to Buy

LEXICON LAMDA desktop recording
studio used, open box $75. Call
(650)367-8146

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280

WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

"DAISY POWERLINE, model 881, pump
bb or pellet gun, excellent condition, $40,
650-591-9769 San Carlos

www.petsineed.org
Proudly saving lives for 50 years.

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

KIMBALL PIANO with bench. Artists
console. Walnut finish. Good condition.
$600 obo (650)712-9731

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, free.
call 573-7381.

650.367.1405

316 Clothes

TWIN SIZED mattress like new with
frame & headboard $45. (650)580-6324

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414

We offer adoptions 7 days a week
noon - 6 PM
871 5th Ave. Redwood City

HOHNER MELODICA Piano 27 w/soft
case $100. (650)367-8146

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

PETS IN NEED

317 Building Materials

20 STEEL construction building spikes
3/4" x 24" $40.00 for all. 650-347-6875
32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955

FRENCH BULLDOG puppies. Many
colors.
AKC Registration. Call
(415)596-0538.

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

FREE, 3 interior solid core paneled doors
with hardware. Reply
tmckay1@sbcglobal.net

318 Sports Equipment

BB GUN. $29 (650)678-5133
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$10.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
GOLF SET for $95. 310-889-4850. Text
Only. Will send pictures upon request.
HJC MOTORCYCLE helmet, black, DOT
certified, size L/XL, $29, 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893
USMC TACTICAL folding knife, stainless
steel, boxed $25 650-595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

321 Hunting/Fishing
HUNTING
CLUB
Membership
$2,600.Camanche Hills Hunting Preserve, Ione CA. Pheasants, Ducks, Chukar and sporting clay range. Excludes
annual dues and bird card. Call 209-3041975.

335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Band conductor?
11 Burlap source
15 Kindle owner,
often
16 Logical
introduction
17 Shipped out
18 Beaufort scale
word
19 Half of sei
20 Briefly, with “in”
21 Drying
convenience
23 Proposal figs.
25 Head makeup
27 Grand Prince of
Moscow, 13281340
28 Sphere
30 Harpo Marx or
Carrot Top
32 Soap, e.g.
34 Cen. parts
35 River through
Yakutsk
36 Eye-catching link
designed to
generate ad
revenue
39 Sith foe
42 Thanksgiving
follower: Abbr.
43 Rogues
47 “Beats me”
50 The same, in
Sauternes
51 “In the
Summertime”
rock group __
Jerry
52 Biol. branch
54 Company name
based on a
passage from
Hosea
55 Most suggestive
57 21st Greek letter
59 “Rugrats” infant
60 God in both Eddas
61 Doesn’t wait
one’s turn
64 __-Tremblant,
Quebec
65 Unauthorized
underground city
explorer
66 “And so ...”
67 Deli counter
customers, as a
rule

33 Pick up
45 Less
DOWN
1 Moving aids
37 Animal
pretentious
2 Supervise
38 It may be shaved 46 Bears, often
3 Subject of a 1983 39 CBS Sports
48 Nail holder
incident in which
Radio host
49 Washes against
a George Brett
40 Gran Colombia
53 Biblical
homer was
successor state
possessive
originally nullified 41 Like the queen in 56 Pond problem
4 L.A. summer
a 1977 #1 hit
58 Pachacuti, for
setting
44 __ Islands: former
one
5 Big times
name of an Indian 62 TV Guide abbr.
6 “Concentration”
Ocean republic
63 Small muscle?
feature
7 Throw in a pen
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
8 ‘’Yes’’
9 Take in again
10 Mother of the
Valkyries
11 Dynamic
12 Sushi bar
appetizer
13 Albino’s lack
14 Horace’s “Ars __”
22 Mannerism
24 Cutting, as a
thick steak
26 Lumber
processing
equipment
29 __ du pays:
homesickness
31 Free spots,
briefly
07/11/15
xwordeditor@aol.com

By Barry C. Silk
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

07/11/15

THE DAILY JOURNAL
335 Rugs
CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

335 Garden Equipment
GREAT STATES brand push lawn mower, 14" blade, good condition, $20, 650561-9769 San Carlos
LAWNMOWER, GAS powered with rear
bag. Almost new. $100 (650)766-4858

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CAMERA. MINOLTA 35 mm Maxxum
7000 with accessories and Tamrac Bag.
$75. 650-794-0839. San Bruno

345 Medical Equipment
AUDLT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.
BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149
HOSPITAL BED, Hill-Rom electric with
mattress. $75.00 (650) 359-0213
PATIENT LIFT - People Lift $400.00
(650)364-8960
WHEEL CHAIR $60. Plastic Restroom
Shower Chair $50. (650)364-8960

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015
Garage Sales

Garage Sales

MULTIPLE
FAMILY
ESTATE/
GARAGE
SALE

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES

July 11-12, 2015
9am - 4pm
CASH ONLY/
EARLY BIRDS
PAY TRIPLE!

We have furniture,
collectibles, antiques,
silver, jewelry, toys,
games, books,
clothing, and more.
We are at:

20 Hobart Ave
San Mateo
CA 94402

Across El Camino
Real from 12th Ave
We are 2 apartment
complexes, 20 & 24
Hobart, facing each
other with a shared
driveway. Please park
on the street.

Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

435 Rental Needed
WANTED: 1 BR apt, desire dining area,
willing to paint / carpet. Prefer N. Peninsla, DC, SSF, SB, Millbr. $1,300 or less.
(415)441-4331

440 Apartments
BELMONT - LARGE Renovated units,
quiet bldgs in prime areas. No smoking,
no pets, no housing assistance. 1 BR (650) 592-1271.

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

620 Automobiles
‘’10 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Limited,
black, very clean, 167K miles, $7,800.
Call (415)265-3322
1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929

Concrete

NORTHWEST
ASPHALT PAVING

CHETNER CONCRETE

Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimates
(650)213-2648
Lic #935122

Construction

Lic. #706952

Driveways - Walkways - Pool Decks Patios - Stairs - Exposed Aggregate Masonry - Retaining Walls - Drainage
Foundaton/ Slabs

Cabinetry

AIM CONSTUCTION

JOHN PETERSON
*Paving *Grading *Slurry Sealing
*Paving Stovnes *Concrete
*Patching
WE AIM TO PLEASE!

MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

(408) 422-7695
LIC.# 916680

(650)630-0664

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

670 Auto Parts
1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449
BORLA CAT-BACK exhaust system, ‘92
to ‘96 Corvette LT-1, $600/obo.
olivermp2@gmail.com, (650)333-4949
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING

DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING

for all your electrical needs

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

(650)278-0157

Maintenance • New Lawns
Clean Ups • Sprinklers
Fences • Tree Trim
Concrete & Brick Work
Driveway Pavers
Retaining Walls

(650)400-5604

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business
Lic#1211534

HOUSE CLEANING
SERVICES
Vacancy, Janitorial,
Post Construction Cleaning.
Commercial & Residential
Cleaning

Flooring

Flamingo’s Flooring

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

SPECIALS
AS LOW AS $2.50/sf.

Mention this ad for
Free Delivery
See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119

Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Free Estimates

(650)296-0568

Free Estimates

Lic.#834170

HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

650.918.0354

(650)740-8602

PENINSULA
CLEANING

HANDYMAN SERVICE

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

FREE ESTIMATES
(650)771-2432

www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

1-800-344-7771

PAYLESS

Kitchen & bath remodeling
Tile work, roofing and more!

SENIOR HANDYMAN

Gutters

SHOP
AT HOME

www.gowrightbrothers.com

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596a

FREE ESTIMATES!
10% OFF Labor 1st time customers

DUCATI ‘01 750 Monster, 15K miles,
very clean. $4,500. (650)342-6342

Handy Help

• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372

Kitchens, Baths, Remodel, Plumbing,
Electrical, Decks, Bricks, Pavers,
Roofs, Painting, Stucco, Drywall,
Windows, Patios, Tile, and more!

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484

Housecleaning

Lic. #913461

WRIGHT BROTHERS
We do it all!

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

Electricians

Free Estimates
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION

FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

J.B GARDENING

(650)271-3955

625 Classic Cars

HONDA ‘93 LX SD, 244K miles, all
power, complete, runs. $1,400 cash only,
(650)481-5296

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Dryrot & Termite Repair
Decks, Doors/Windows, Siding
Bath Remodels, Painting
General Home Improvements

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Construction

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

630 Trucks & SUV’s

CALL NOW FOR
SUMMER LAWN
MAINTENANCE

Cleaning

Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

CADILLAC ‘07 ESCALADE, black on
black, excellent condition. 1 owner, always garaged, have all service records.
122K miles. 4 new tires, and all the
amenities. Runs and drives great, clean
interior, good leather & carpets, amazing
sound system. $19,995. (650)619-0370

Gardening

LEMUS CONSTRUCTION

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.

650-322-9288

Free Estimates
(650) 271-1442 Mike

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

2010 CHEVY HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

Asphalt/Paving

620 Automobiles

29

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
Handy Help

AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE

Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed

(650) 453-3002
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

“Specializing in any size project”

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retrired Licensed Contractor

650-201-6854
The Village
Contractor

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

Call Joe

(650)701-6072
Lic# 979435

Hauling

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015
Hauling

Hauling

AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

Landscaping

Painting

Plumbing

NATE LANDSCAPING

JON LA MOTTE

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

* Tree Service * Paint
* Fence Deck * Pavers
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete * Ret. Wall
* Sprinkler System
* Yard Clean-Up, Haul
& Maintenance

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates

Free Estimate

650.353.6554

A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

Lic. #973081

SUMMER LAWN
MAINTENANCE

CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

LEMUS PAINTING
(650)271-3955

Interior & Exterior
Residential & Commercial
Carpentry & Sheetrock Repairs
Lead safe certified
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461

Tree Service

SOS PAINTING

Hillside Tree

Interior/Exterior
Wall Paper Installation/Removal

Service

Free Estimates • Senior discounts

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

(650)738-9295
(415)269-0446
www.sospainting.com

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000

Lic# 526818

• Trimming

CORDERO PAINTING
Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates
(650)348-7164, (650) 372-8361
corderoapainting94401@aol.com
Lic # 35740 Insured

• Large

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA Lic 982576
(415)828-9484

Pool Service

Plaster/Stucco

AZURE

MENA
PLASTERING

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR
LATH AND PLASTER/STUCCO
ALL KINDS OF TEXTURES
35+ YEARS EXPERIENCE

PA I N T I N G
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
The Garden Doctor
Landscaping & Demolition
Fences • Interlocking Pavers
Clean-Ups • Hauling
Retaining Walls
(650)771-2276
sarrellin14@yahoo.com
Lic# 36267

* Specializing in Ranch
Style Homes

* All Residentials
* Interior/Exterior
* 10 Years Experience
craigspainting.com

650.553.9653
Lic # 857741

$20 OFF

Clear Any
Clogged Drain
24 Hour Service

(408)679-9771
CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY CLOGGED
DRAINS! with proper access
Installation of: Water Heaters •
Faucets •Toilets • Sinks • Gas • Water
& Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

(650)461-0326 or
(650)226-3762
Lic.# 983312

(415)497-3309

Call Luis (650) 704-9635

Maintenance & Repair

Roofing

LIMEY

ROOFING

* Free estimates
* All work guaranteed
* Skylights and Gutters
* Installed SHAKES
* Expert dry rot
* Termite and leak
* Repairs SHINGLES

IAN HANLEY

650.369.9572
Lic. # 586490

REED
ROOFERS

portraits by HADI

$5 CHARLEY'S

Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

Attorneys

Dental Services

Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

(650)771-6564

Do you want a White,Brighter
Smile?
Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

Maui Whitening
650.508.8669

1217 Laurel St., San Carlos
(Between Greenwood & Howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

Notices

(650) 591-8291

NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

License #931457

Beautiful portraits by experienced sketch artist. Pen & ink on
the 18” X 24” sketch paper.
Singles, couples, families.
Makes a wonderful gift. Can create a sketch from any photo.
Starting at $199. (650) 283-6836

Window Washing

www.limeyroofing.com

Call for Free Estimate

Clothing

Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial

Art

Free
Estimates

POOL SERVICE

CA LIC #625577

Plumbing

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

415-420-6362

CRAIG’S

Pruning

• Shaping

SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Painting

Roofing

Dental Services

Food

Food

Furniture

I - SMILE

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Bedroom Express

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo

Where Dreams Begin

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881

1221 Chess Drive Foster City

www.sfpanchovillia.com

184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

FATTORIA E MARE
Locally Sourced
Fresh Italian Food.
Join us for
Happy Hour 4-6:30 M-F
1095 Rollins Road
Burlingame
(650) 342-4922

Financial

Health & Medical

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

(650) 295-6123

Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

31

Greek lawmakers back bailout reform plan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATHENS, Greece — Greece’s parliament
backed the government’s reform plan containing austerity measures to win a third
bailout early Saturday, but with the government suffering significant losses from dissenting lawmakers.
The motion, which sought to authorize
the government to use the proposal as a
basis for negotiation with international
creditors during the weekend, passed with
251 votes in favor, 32 against and 8 voting
‘present’ — a form of abstention — in the
300-member parliament.
Those who voted ‘present’ or were absent,
as well as two of those who voted against,
were members of Prime Minister Alexis
Tsipras’ left-wing Syriza party — raising
questions about the stability of his government.
The dissenters included two ministers —
Panagiotis Lafazanis who holds the energy
portfolio and Dimitris Stratoulis who holds
the social security portfolio — and prominent party member and Parliament Speaker

REUTERS

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, left. is congratulated by a lawmaker after a voting session
at the Parliament in Athens, Greece. The Greek parliament voted overwhelmingly on
Saturday in favor of authorizing the left-wing government of Tsipras to negotiate with
international creditors on the basis of a reform program unveiled this week.

Zoe Konstantopoulou.
“I support the government but I don’t support an austerity program of neoliberal
deregulation and privatizations which ...
would prolong the vicious circle of recession, poverty and misery,” Lafazanis said in
a statement released to the press explaining
his “radical and categorical” objection to
the proposal.
Former finance minister Yanis Varoufakis,
who resigned this week, was absent for family reasons, saying on Twitter he was spending the weekend with his daughter who was
visiting from Australia. Although he sent a
letter saying he would have voted in favor
had he been present, it could not be counted
among the ‘yes’ votes under parliamentary
rules.
All opposition parties except the Naziinspired Golden Dawn and the Communist
Party voted in favor.
The proposed measures, including tax
hikes and cuts in pension spending, are certain to inflict more pain on a Greek public
who just days ago voted overwhelmingly
against a similar plan.

Evo Morales calls pope’s teachings ‘socialist’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CRUZ, Bolivia — Evo Morales says
he feels like he’s got a good friend and ally in
the highest of places in his battle for revolutionary social change and halting global warming: Pope Francis.
Bolivia’s president also said Friday he thinks
that what Pope Francis preaches amounts to
socialism.
“I feel like the pope is the first and best politician in the world,” Bolivia’s president said in an
interview with The Associated Press a few hours
before bidding Latin America’s first pope goodbye.
Francis made history on his two-day visit by
apologizing before Bolivia’s first indigenous
president for the Catholic Church’s “grave sins”
in the subjugation of the Americas’ native peoples in the name of God during the European
conquests that began in the 15th and 16th centuries.

He also condemned,
before a crowd of leftist
activists
invited by
Morales’ government for a
World Summit of Social
Movements, the “injustices” of a capitalist system that puts profits ahead
of people and denies peoEvo Morales ple basic rights of “land,
lodging and labor.”
Asked if the pope is a socialist, Morales said
his emphasis on creating a world in which no
one is excluded amounts to socialism.
“I don’t know whether it’s communism, but it
is socialism. He’s talking about community,
about living in harmony.”
Francis has said several times that concern for
the poor and marginalized is at the center of the
Gospel, but has denied he’s preaching communism or any other political ideology. He’s
called Marxism wrong.

Gregory Weeks, a Latin
America specialist at the
University
of North
Carolina at Charlotte, said
Francis is asking people to
recognize harms that have
come from capitalism, not
seeking its eradication.
“We shouldn’t confuse
Pope Francis criticism of capitalism
automatically with socialism,” Weeks said. “He’s not advocating for the
government to take over everything.”
State-run and allied Bolivian media have
highlighted the similarities in the messages of
Francis and Morales.
“I feel like now I have a pope. I didn’t feel that
before,” said Morales, complaining that the
church had not backed him before.
On Friday, as he awaited the departure of the
pope’s plane on the Santa Cruz airport tarmac,
Morales chatted amiably with bishops with

whom he has been at odds in the past.
One Morales-Francis exchange did set
Catholic social networks ablaze during the
visit: Shortly after the pope arrived on
Wednesday, Morales gave him a cross fashioned
from a hammer and sickle, a classic communist
symbol, patterned after one created by Luis
Espinal, a leftist Jesuit priest slain in 1980.
Morales told the said the pope had no prior
knowledge of the gift but “at no point got upset.
I admire that.”
Morales also settled the question of whether
the 78-year-old Francis, who only has one good
lung, chewed coca leaves during the visit to
cope with the altitude during his four-hour stop
in La Paz.
The leaf is the raw material for cocaine and
Morales has been trying to get it off the international list of controlled narcotics because it is
also widely chewed in the Andes as a mild stimulant. The leaf is sacred in Andean culture and
has been used for centuries in religious rituals.

Health & Medical

Legal Services

Marketing

Massage Therapy

Real Estate Loans

Travel

EYE EXAMINATIONS

LEGAL

GROW

GRAND
OPENING

We Fund Bank Turndowns!

REAL ESTATE LOANS

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

KAY'S HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381 El Camino Real
Millbrae

(650)697-6868

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $24.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
Loans

(650)389-2468

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1
San Mateo

(650)557-2286

Open 7 days 10am - 9pm
Free parking behind bldg

HEALING TOUCH

Best Asian Body Massage

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$35/hr

$48

(with this ad for first time visitors)
Foot Massage $19.99

Belbien Day Spa

(650)692-1989

Free Parking

1204 West Hillsdale Blvd.
SAN MATEO
(650)403-1400

1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame

HEALING MASSAGE

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

Insurance

NEW YORK LIFE

Relaxing & healing massage
$50 per hour
$5 off with this ad!

10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

L & R WELLNESS
CENTER

10 am to 9 pm

New Masseuses
every two weeks

2305-A Carlos St.
Alongside Highway 1

Moss Beach
(Cash Only)

Music

Bronstein Music

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
All Credit Accepted
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker
CA Bureau of Real Estate#746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com

San Mateo Office
1(844)687-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • July 11-12, 2015

July 18, 10am - 4pm
Washington Park
850 Burlingame Avenue, Burlingame
Free Entertainment all day !
9:45

Elements Boot Camp
Bring your friends and get ready to sweat.

10:30 Marionette Puppet Show by Puppets on Parade
11:00 Food demonstration by the Westin
11:30 Magic Show by Doug’s Happy Magic

12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30

Gold Medal Martial Arts demonstration
Marionette Puppet Show by Puppets on Parade
Magic Show
Juggling performance by Beneficial Juggling
Amazing and inspiring fun for the whole family.

2:00

Elements Boot Camp
Everyone is welcome to join in for this 30 –minute Boot Camp.

2:30
3:00
3:30

Magic Show by Doug’s Happy Magic
Accel Gymnastics demonstration
Juggling performance by Beneficial Juggling

ALL DAY
Exercise Stations
Inflatable obstacle course and bounce house

'PSJOGPSNBUJPODBMMUIF%BJMZ+PVSOBM  
t&WFOUTTVCKFDUUPDIBOHF
Family. Fitness. Fun! is in collaboration with BCE, supporting Burlingame schools.