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Celerra ICON

Celerra Training for Engineering

IP Network

Clients

SAN

Celerra

Back-end
Storage

EMC Education Services
February, 2006

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Version 5.4

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ICDA® (Integrated Cached Disk Array). and distribution of any EMC software described in this publication requires an applicable software license. 2000. and EMC2® (the EMC logo). 2001. EMC. 2003.Copyright: Copyright © 1996. Use.” EMC CORPORATION MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WITH RESPECT TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PUBLICATION. 2005. are registered trademarks of EMC Corporation. 2006 EMC Corporation. THE INFORMATION IN THIS PUBLICATION IS PROVIDED “AS IS. copying. The information is subject to change without notice. 2004. AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. EMC™ and SRDF™ are trademarks of EMC Corporation. EMC believes the information in this publication is accurate as of its publication date. All other trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners. All Rights Reserved. and Symmetrix®. . 2002.

Solaris. FarPoint. NetWin.4 Page 5 of 9 . Compaq and the names of Compaq products referenced herein are either trademarks and/or service marks or registered trademarks and/or service marks of Compaq. EMC. Connectrix. Celerra. are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems. Sun. Inc. SAN Architect. in the United States and/or in other countries. SilkWorm Express. the McDATA logo. Version 5. PowerPath. NobleNet is a registered trademark of Rogue Wave Software. TimeFinder. CentraStar. OpenView. CLARevent. SnapSure. E-Lab. SilkWorm. StorageScope. Third Party Trademarks AIX is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. SnapView. SupportMate. SDMS. EMC ControlCenter.Celerra ICON Student Lab Guide Trademark Information: EMC Trademarks EMC2. All other trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners. Documentum. SAN Manager. InfoMover. Hewlett-Packard. in the United States and other countries. DatabaseXtender. HP. Java. EMC Snap. EMC OnCourse. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group. SafeLine. and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Direct Matrix Architecture. AutoSwap. All Rights Reserved. SANbox is a trademark of QLogic Corporation. Inc.. EDM. Automated Resource Manager. and VisualSRM are trademarks of EMC Corporation. Windows. the Java Coffee Cup Logo. Celerra Replicator. Symmetrix DMX. Universal Data Tone. CLARiiON. CopyCross. Powerlink. Direct Matrix. and all Java-based trademarks and logos. PowerVolume. EMC Developers Program. AutoAdvice. Enginuity. RepliCare. CopyPoint. ResourcePak. Brocade. SunOS and all Sun-based trademarks and logos. GeoSpan. or registered trademarks of HewlettPackard Company. Legato. Sun Microsystems. Access Logix. VisualSAN. McDATA. and the Brocade logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Brocade Communications Systems. Inc. SnapView/IP. Navisphere. HighRoad. OnAlert. Microsoft. CLARalert. SRDF. HP-UX. Dantz. and OmniBack are trademarks. AVALONidm. OpenScale. and ES-2500 are registered trademarks of McDATA Corporation. the Sun Logo. SymmAPI. EMC Proven. and NFS. and where information lives are registered trademarks and EMC Automated Networked Storage. Symmetrix. SymmEnabler. FLARE. MirrorView. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. C-Clip. SAN Copy. Centera.

4 Page 6 of 9 .Document Revision History: Rev # 1 File Name CelerraICON_Lab Guide .doc Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Date 2/20/06 Version 5. All Rights Reserved.

.......................................................Celerra ICON Student Lab Guide Table of Contents: Celerra ICON Student Lab Guide Copyright : .................................6 Lab 1: Celerra Gatway Installation Lab 2: Basic Configuration Lab 3: File System and NFS Exports Lab 4: CIFS Configuration Lab 5: SnapSure and Celerra Replicator Lab 6: iSCSI on Celerra Appendix: Hurracane Marine Case Study Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation..........................................................5 Document Revision History:.......................................4 Trademark Information: ............. All Rights Reserved......................................................................4 Page 7 of 9 ............................. Version 5..................

When using other Celerras. Some of the Celerra Manager screen shots will have different values than what you will be entering because the lab was created in a lab environment with different IP addresses and CLARiiON instead of Symmetrix storage. be sure to log in as nasadmin. Putty on your workstation 2. You can su to root from there if required. Version 5. be careful when logged in as root. The CLI commands can be executed from one of three places: 1. However. Tools in the tree hierarchy > SSH shell – This option gives you full access to all CLI commands. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. 3.4. including interactive commands and text editors.Format of Lab Guide This Lab Guide introduces Celerra Manager v5. All licensing has been enabled. When logging in to SSH from Celerra Manager. you will see a combination of Celerra Manager GUI and CLI commands. As always.4 Page 8 of 9 . CLI Command in the Celerra Manager tree hierarchy – CLI from the GUI supports most CLI commands. such as nas_quotas. It also does not support running vi or other text editors. it does not support interactive commands. Since not all functionality is available within the GUI. Be aware that Celerra Manager can be purchased as “Basic Edition” or “Advanced Edition”. This is the option we recommend throughout this lab. All Rights Reserved. The Celerras used in this lab are set up for “Advanced Edition” with an Enterprise License (NFS and CIFS). be aware that some of the features may not be available because of licensing choices.

.

All Rights Reserved. Lab 1 Page 1 . 2005 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Celerra ICON Celerra Training for Engineering Lab 1: Installing a Gateway System EMC Education Services Date: September.

doc 01_Lab1_Celerra Install.0 2. 2006 Table of Contents: Exercise 1: Planning and Data Collection Exercise 2: Verify Cable Connections Exercise 3: Configure the Boot Array Exercise 4: Install and Configure NAS Software Exercise 5: Verify Installation Appendix: Sample Zoning Script Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 1 Page 2 .Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Document Revision History: Rev # 2. All Rights Reserved.doc Date February.1 File Name 01_Lab1_Celerra Install. 2006 April.

Using appropriate documentation: • Verify correct cabling between the Data Movers and The control Station.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Lab 1: Installing a Gateway System Purpose: Objectives: References: In this lab you will verify the proper cabling of a Celerra Gateway system and perform a complete installation of LINUX and the NAS code on the Control Station and DART on the Data Movers. the Data Mover and the Control Station to the IP switch. and the back-end cabling to the storage system • Install LINUX and NAS code on the Control Station • Configure a CLARiiON back-end • Configure Switch Zoning • Complete the installation of DART on the Data Movers • Verify Successful Installation Celerra Network Server Celerra NS500G/NS600G/NS700G Gateway Configuration P/N 300-002-071 Rev A03 Version 5.4 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 1 Page 3 . All Rights Reserved.

All Rights Reserved. Lab 1 Page 4 .Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

All Rights Reserved. Gather Information about Fibre Channel Switch IP address: _______________________________________________________ Administrator User ID: ______________________________________________ Navisphere Administrator User Password: _______________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Gather Software: What version of NAS are you going to Install? ____________________________ Do you have the CD and boot Floppy? __________________________________ 2.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Lab 1 Exercise 1: Planning and Data Collection Step Action Reference Appendix G of Celerra Network Server Celerra NS500G/NS600G/NS700G Gateway Configuration 1. Gather Information about CLARiiON back-end Storage Is this a dedicated or shared back-end?__________________________________ SPA Management Port IP address: _____________________________________ SPA Management Port IP address: _____________________________________ Navisphere Administrator User ID: _____________________________________ Navisphere Administrator User Password: _______________________________ 3. Lab 1 Page 5 .

168. Netmask _____ . _____ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. _____ .255.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 4. _____ .0 Configure TCP/IP (if Static IP Address selected) IP Address _____ . _____ .0 Backup Internal (Private) Network Setup Hostname: emcnas_i1 IP Address _____ .255. Lab 1 Page 6 . _____ .1. _____ Configure Network Domain Name ___________________________________________ This is the domain name of the customer’s network to which the Control Station is attached. 100 (default 192. Host Name ______________________________________________ Secondary Nameserver (optional) _____ . _____ . _____ .100) Netmask: 255. _____ . _____ This is the IP addresses of port eth3 that is cabled to the customer’s public or maintenance LAN. Control Station Network Worksheet: Primary Internal (Private) Network Setup Hostname: emcnas_i0 IP Address_____ .100) Netmask: 255. _____ .255. _____ Default Gateway (IP) Address _____ . 100 (default 192. _____ . _____ . All Rights Reserved. _____ . _____ . _____ Primary Nameserver _____ .168.2. _____ .255. _____ .

Verify Fibre Channel cables from Switch to Storage Array. Verify Serial Cables from Control Station to the Data Movers. Lab 1 Page 7 . Verify External Network cables. Action Reference Chapters 3-10 of Celerra Network Server Celerra NS500G/NS600G/NS700G Gateway Configuration Reference the appropriate chapter depending on the specific model and configuration. 4. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. 2.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Lab 1 Exercise 2: Verify Cable Connections Step 1. 6. Verify the Fibre Channel cables from the Data Mover BE ports to the Fibre Channel switch(es). 3. Verify Private LAN cables. All Rights Reserved. 5.

Celerra ICON: Lab 1

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 1 Page 8

Celerra ICON: Lab 1

Lab 1 Exercise 3: Configure the Boot Array
Step
1.

2.
3.

4.

5.

Action
Reference Chapter 11 of Celerra Network Server
Celerra NS500G/NS600G/NS700G Gateway Configuration
Power On the Boot Array.
Verify CLARiiON Array Software Versions.
ƒ

Verify Release Levels

ƒ

Verify all software is committed

ƒ

Verify Access Logix is enabled

Verify CLARiiON Array Write Cache settings.
ƒ

Write cache is enable

ƒ

Memory is allocated to write cache

Verify Array Privileged User Account Settings.
ƒ

Empty

ƒ

Or, it must include root user from the Control Station

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 1 Page 9

Celerra ICON: Lab 1

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 1 Page 10

you would want to allow the auto-config scripts to all the configuration but for this exercise we want to manually perform the steps. 5. 6. 9. 8. Follow prompts to install LINUX on the control station. CLARiiON back-end. Select Gataway System configuration. Lab 1 Page 11 . Use information gathered in Exercise 1 of this lab. Insert the CD and the floppy and boot the Control Station. Select serialinstall when prompted. Select NO when prompted “ Do you want to use Celerra Auto-config?” In many cases. remove the boot media and press return to boot from the newly installed LINUX on the control station. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Lab 1 Exercise 4: Installation and Configure NAS Software Step 1. All Rights Reserved. 7. Connect Null Modem cable and configure Hyper Terminal Session. Specify the IP address of the CLARiiON Back-end. When prompted. and Fabric Connect. Enter the Network parameters when prompted. ƒ 19200 BPS ƒ 8 data bits ƒ No parity ƒ 1 stop pit ƒ No flow control 3. 4. Action Reference Chapter 12 of Celerra Network Server Celerra NS500G/NS600G/NS700G Gateway Configuration 2.

Using the information created previously create zones from each Data Mover port to each port on the SP. 13. Record this information below: Data Mover 2 HBA 0 : WWPN = _______________________________________ Data Mover 2 HBA 1 : WWPN = _______________________________________ Data Mover 3 HBA 0 : WWPN = _______________________________________ Data Mover 3 HBA 1 : WWPN = _______________________________________ Note: It might be best to cut and paste this information into a notpad document. Using either the NaviCLI or the Navisphere Manager GUI. Reference the last page of lab for example of the zoning commands. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 1 Page 12 . the Control station will query the data Movers and report the WWNs of the Fibre Channel HBAs. Collect the WWPNs of the CLARiiON SP ports. When you entered No at the previous prompt. All Rights Reserved. Create and activate the Zone configuration. Reference Appendix E of Celerra Network Server Celerra NS500G/NS600G/NS700G Gateway Configuration Reference Appendix E Zoning FC switches and Manually configuring Control LUNs. Create a Navisphere Storage Group for the Celerra Data Movers. Collect the WWPNs of the SP ports and record the information below: SPA Port 0 : WWPN = ______________________________________________ SPA Port 1 : WWPN = ______________________________________________ SPB Port 0 : WWPN = ______________________________________________ SPB Port 1 : WWPN = ______________________________________________ 12.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 10. It is critical that you capture this information exactly! 11. Zone the Fibre Channel Switch.

Initiator records are created for each connection from a Data Mover HBA to the CLARiiON Storage processor port. Each Initiator Record is configured with the specific operating parameters required for the Celerra when they are Registered. Note: It is critical that the Host LUN Numbers (hlu) be correct. Bind two LUNs of Size 11GB. Register the Initiator Records for each Data Mover ports.New Host IP Address of the Control Station 15. 19. 16. Complete the installation. 21. Registration can be performed record at a time or all at once by performing a Group Edit. Lab 1 Page 13 . Create a Raid Group with one disk in it and bind a LUN of type HS.Disabled Failover Mode .<Model Name> This HBA Belongs to .Celerra Model . Bind four additional LUNs of size 2 GB. Using either CLI or GUI create a RAID 5 RAID group that includes 5 disks. Return to the Control Station Hyper terminal session and enter “c” to continue with the installation.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 14. 17. Add the newly create LUNS to the Storage Group you previously created.0 Unit Serial Number . 18. Right click on the CLARiiON Array and select Connectivity Status from the drop down menu. The two 11GB volumes must be hlu 0 &1 The four 2 GB volumes must be hlu 2-5 20. Create RAID5 Raid Group. Configure a Hot Spare.Array Vendor .CLARiiON Open Array Comm Path . All Rights Reserved. Add the Initiator records that you registered in step 14 to the storage group. Use the following Parameters when configuring Initiator Records: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ Initiator Type . The installation will continue and will create the appropriate file systems and load Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

All Rights Reserved. Do not walk away as you will be prompted one more time to select enable UNICODE. This will take 30 minutes or longer. the Data Movers will reboot off the newly install software. Lab 1 Page 14 . Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 the DART software. Finally.

Lab 1 Page 15 . All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

2. $ server_version ALL What is the version number? __________________________________________ Verify that the Data Movers have access to the Control Volumes. $ nas_version What is the version number? __________________________________________ 3.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Lab 1 Exercise 5: Verify Installation Step 1. Action Using the Serial console connection or SSH. Verify the software version of the code running on the Control Station. $ nas_disk -list What are the IDs sand sizes of the disk volumes? ID: _________________ Size: __________________ ID: _________________ Size: __________________ ID: _________________ Size: __________________ ID: _________________ Size: __________________ ID: _________________ Size: __________________ ID: _________________ Size: __________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. connect to the Control Station. Lab 1 Page 16 . Verify the software version of the DART code running on the Data Movers. All Rights Reserved.

Verify connection between the Data Movers and the Control Station over the both internal networks using the ping command. All Rights Reserved. $ server_df ALL What file systems are mounted on each Data Mover? _______________________ __________________________________________________________________ 5. Lab 1 Page 17 . List the file systems that are mounted on each Data Mover.Celerra ICON: Lab 1 4. $ ping –c 1 server_2 $ ping –c 1 server_2b $ ping –c 1 server_3 $ ping –c 1 server_3b End of Exercise Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

50:06:01:60:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_2_BE_0_SPB_Port0"."50:06:01:61:30:60:2f:3b."50:06:01:69:30:60:2f:3b. DM_3_BE_1_SPA_Port1.50:06:01:61:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_3_BE_1_SPB_Port1".50:06:01:60:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_3_BE_0_SPB_Port0"."50:06:01:60:30:60:2e:d2."50:06:01:69:30:60:2f:3b. DM_5_BE_1_SPA_Port1.50:06:01:69:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_3_BE_0_SPA_Port0".50:06:01:61:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_2_BE_1_SPB_Port1".50:06:01:69:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_5_BE_0_SPA_Port0". DM_2_BE_0_SPB_Port0. "DM_2_BE_0_SPA_Port0."50:06:01:60:30:60:2e:d2.50:06:01:69:00:60:02:42" cfgcreate "Celerra_cfg". DM_3_BE_0_SPA_Port0."50:06:01:61:30:60:2e:d2. DM_3_BE_0_SPB_Port0.50:06:01:68:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_3_BE_1_SPA_Port1".50:06:01:61:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_5_BE_1_SPB_Port1".Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Sample Zoning Script for Brocade and NS704/CX700 zonecreate "DM_2_BE_0_SPA_Port0". DM_5_BE_1_SPB_Port1" cfgenable "Celerra_cfg" cfgsave Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. DM_5_BE_0_SPA_Port0. DM_4_BE_0_SPA_Port0."50:06:01:68:30:60:2e:d2.50:06:01:68:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_4_BE_1_SPA_Port1"."50:06:01:68:30:60:2e:d2. DM_3_BE_1_SPB_Port1."50:06:01:69:30:60:2e:d2."50:06:01:60:30:60:2f:3b.50:06:01:60:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_5_BE_0_SPB_Port0"."50:06:01:61:30:60:2f:3b. DM_2_BE_1_SPB_Port1. DM_4_BE_0_SPB_Port0. DM_5_BE_0_SPB_Port0. DM_2_BE_1_SPA_Port1.50:06:01:68:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_5_BE_1_SPA_Port1"."50:06:01:61:30:60:2e:d2. Lab 1 Page 18 .50:06:01:60:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_4_BE_0_SPB_Port0"."50:06:01:68:30:60:2f:3b.50:06:01:68:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_2_BE_1_SPA_Port1".50:06:01:69:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_4_BE_0_SPA_Port0"."50:06:01:69:30:60:2e:d2. DM_4_BE_1_SPB_Port1. All Rights Reserved. DM_4_BE_1_SPA_Port1."50:06:01:60:30:60:2f:3b.50:06:01:61:00:60:02:42" zonecreate "DM_4_BE_1_SPB_Port1"."50:06:01:68:30:60:2f:3b.

Lab 1 Page 19 .Celerra ICON: Lab 1 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

2006 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 2 Page 1 . All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Celerra ICON Celerra Training for Engineering Lab 2: Basic Configuration EMC Education Services Date: February.

Lab 2 Page 2 .Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Document Revision History: Rev # 1.0 File Name 02_Lab2_CelerraICON_Basic Config Date February. 2006 Table of Contents: Exercise 1: Configure Data Mover Failover Policy Exercise 2: Configure Network Interface Exercise 3: Configure Network High Availability Exercise 4: Testing Basic Data Mover Failover Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

4 April 2005 Configuring Standbys on Celerra P/N 300-002-034 Rev A01 Version 5. For example. you will test Data Mover failover. Lab 2 Page 3 . Next you will configure network interfaces and high availability networks using Ethernet trunking and FailSafe Networks. the Data Movers may already be configured with a standby.4 April 2005 Configuring and Managing Celerra Networking P/N 300-002-016 Rev A01 Version 5.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Lab 2: Basic Configuration Purpose: In this lab you will examine the components of your Data Mover to determine if they are compatible for Data Mover failover. an NS700 initial setup configures one Data Mover as a primary and one as a standby. All Rights Reserved. Depending on the back-end storage being used.4 April 2005 Configuring and Managing Celerra Network High Availability P/N 300-002-034 Rev A01 Version 5. Finally. Then you will configure server_2 to use server_3 as its standby Data Mover. Objectives: References: • • • • • Configure Data Mover failover Configure Celerra Data Movers’ Network Interface Cards Configure a Data Mover for EtherChannel Trunking Configure a Data Mover for Fail Safe Network and test Test Data Mover Failover Configuring Celerra Quick Start P/N 300-002-003 Rev A01 Version 5.4 April 2005 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

Celerra ICON: Lab 2

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 2 Page 4

Celerra ICON: Lab 2

Lab 2 Exercise 1: Configuring Data Mover Failover
Step

Action

1. Connect to your Celerra Control Station:
Using Putty or other SSH tools, connect to your Celerra Control Station and log in
as nasadmin.

2. View the current Data Mover configuration:
View the server table for your Celerra and record the following information for each
Data Mover:
$ nas_server -list
id
type
slot
name
_________________________________
_________________________________
_________________________________
_________________________________
_________________________________
What does DM Type 1 indicate? ______________________________
What does DM Type 4 indicate? _______________________________

3. Confirm that server_2 and server_3 have the same hardware components.
$ server_sysconfig server_2 –Platform
Record the following information from server_2:
Processor speed (MHz) _____________
Total main memory (MB) ___________
Mother board _____________________
Bus speed (MHz)__________________
$ server_sysconfig server_2 –pci |more
Make note of all of the PCI devices in your Data Mover. Now issue the same
commands for server_3 and compare the results.
Do your two Data Movers have the same hardware components? ______
Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 2 Page 5

Celerra ICON: Lab 2

4. Configure Data Mover failover standby relationships:
Use the server_standby command to configure server_2 to use server_3 as its
standby Data Mover; use the auto policy.
$ server_standby server_2 –c mover=server_3 –policy auto

5. Verify standby configuration for servers:

$ nas_server –info server_2
Does the output identify server_3 as the standby server? _______
$ nas_server –info server_3
Does the output indicate that server_3 is a standby for server_2? ______

6. Using Celerra Manager, confirm Data Mover failover standby relationships:
Log on to Celerra Manager as nasadmin by launching Internet Explorer and enter
the IP address of your Control Station.
Verify Celerra Manager Licenses:
7.
Click on the IP address of your Control Station > Licenses tab to verify that all
licenses have been enabled. If they have not, enable them.

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 2 Page 6

Confirm that server_2 is configured to use server_3 as its standby Data Mover and the Failover policy is auto: • Expand Data Movers in the tree hierarchy > select server_2 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. • View the Role field to determine server_3 is configured as a Standby.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 8. All Rights Reserved. select standby from the Role: dropdown and click apply (the data mover will reboot). • If not. Verify that server_3 is configured as type Standby: • Expand Data Movers in the tree hierarchy > select server_3. 9. Lab 2 Page 7 .

Lab 2 Page 8 . All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

______ . ______ ______ . ______ .127. ______ ______ . ______ . we are only going to configure a single interface so we only need one IP address per data mover.161 Hurricane Marine’s NIS domain name is: hmarine. ______ . This is a basic task that will likely be required for all Celerra configurations.com The DNS IP address is: 10.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Lab 2 Exercise 2: Configure Data Mover Network Interface Cards Step Action In this lab you will be configuring Celerra with networking settings.*.com The NIS IP address is 10. ______ .*. ______ . All Rights Reserved.127. ______ . ______ . ______ . ______ . you will want to confirm the following key information from Appendix E: Hurricane Marine’s DNS domain name is: hmarine. ______ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. ______ ______ . Gather required information: 1. server_2: IP address: Subnet mask: Broadcast address: Default gateway: ______ . ______ ______ . Note: while each Data Mover has multiple network devices. ______ .163 The IP address of your Control Station: ______ . ______ . ______ . ______ server_3: IP address: Subnet mask: Broadcast address: Default gateway: ______ . ______ . ______ . ______ . Lab 2 Page 9 . ______ ______ . ______ . ______ . ______ The IP address information for server_2 & server_3. Before you begin. ______ ______ .

$ server_ifconfig server_2 –c –D cge0 –n cge0_if0 –p IP < IP Address> < Netmask> < Broadcast Address > Hint: Reference the manual page (man server_ifconfig) Verify settings for interface: 6. Configure IP address for a network interface in server_2: Configure the IP address for the 10/100/1000 Ethernet Device (cge0) for server_2. cge2. Lab 2 Page 10 . cge3. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. it is a Best Practice to hard configure the speed and duplex of the network devices. server_ifconfig server_2 cge0_if0 Verify that the IP. and Gateway addresses matches what was identified in Step1. $ server_sysconfig server_2 –pci What kind of Network Devices are in server_2?_____________________________ 4. 5.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 2. Note: While auto negotiate is the default. All Rights Reserved. $ server_sysconfig server_2 –pci x –o speed=100.duplex=full (where x is the port name. Netmask. Verify hardware configuration for Network Interface Card (NIC): Determine the physical network hardware in server_2. for example cge0) Repeat step 4 for ports: cge1. connect to your Celerra Control Station and log in as nasadmin 3. Connect to your Celerra Control Station: Using Putty or other SSH tools. and full duplex mode. Configure speed and duplex for the network cards in server_2: Configure the Ethernet card in server_2 to use a transmission speed of 100Mbs.

com <IP_Addr> $ server_nis server_2 hmarine. Configure Data Mover to use DNS and NIS: Configure server_2 to use the names and addresses of the DNS and NIS servers that you recorded in step 1.com <IP_Addr> Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. $ server_ping server_2 <IP_Addr of Windows Workstation> 10. $ server_ping server_2 <IP address of Control Station> Note: You may also want to ping back from the Windows workstation to your Data Mover by connecting to your Windows workstation and issuing the ping command from a command prompt. 8. Test connectivity to Gateway: Test your configuration by pinging from your Data Mover to your Windows workstation. Configure the default gateway: Configure server_2 to use the default gateway recorded in step 1. Test the interface: Test the network interface by pinging the external IP address of your Control Station. Lab 2 Page 11 .Celerra ICON: Lab 2 7. $ server_route server_2 –a default <IP_Addr> 9. $ server_dns server_2 hmarine. All Rights Reserved.

Celerra ICON: Lab 2 11. All Rights Reserved. test the network interface by pinging the external IP address of your Control Station: • Select the Ping tab > select Data Mover: server_2 > select the Interface address you just configured > enter the IP address of your control station in Destination: • Click OK You should see the following: Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 2 Page 12 . confirm that the Fast Ethernet card in server_2 is configured to use a transmission speed of 100Mbs. and full duplex mode: • • • 12. Using Celerra Manager. Select Network in the tree hierarchy > click the Devices tab Select server_2 in Show Network Devices for: To set speed and duplex double click on ana0(cge0) to view its properties > select 100FD for Speed/Duplex: Using Celerra Manager.

Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Answer the following question(s) using the Celerra man pages as a resource.) ___________________________________________________________________ • How would you delete this configuration? (See man page for server_ifconfig.) ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.) ___________________________________________________________________ How would you configure the Celerra to use a specific network interfaces to get to the DNS and NIS servers? (See man page for server_route. Lab 2 Page 13 . • How would you shut down the network interface temporarily? (See man page for server_ifconfig.

Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Lab 2 Page 14 .

Confirm with your instructor that the appropriate ports are channeled together. All Rights Reserved. ƒ Referencing Appendix G. Lab 2 Page 15 . or switch failure. Action Planning and Verification of Ethernet switch Configuration: Prior to configuring EtherChannel Trunking on the Data Mover. Primary Data Mover DM port Switch port cge0 (ana0) cge1 (ana1) cge2 (ana2) cge3 (ana3) Standby Data Mover DM port Switch port cge0 (ana0) cge1 (ana1) cge2 (ana2) cge3 (ana3) Note: The Ethernet switch must be configured for EtherChannel. EtherChannel is configured either by itself or in conjunction with Failsave Networks (FSN)) that will be configured in the following exercise. switch port. note which physical ports on the Ethernet switch connect the Data Movers’ ports. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. it is critical that you verify the correct setup of the Ethernet switch.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Lab 2 Exercise 3: Configuring EtherChannel Ethernet Channel trunking provides network high availability in the event of an adapter. and cge2 and cge3 for the following exercise. Step 1. cable. Gather and record the following information: ƒ The ports on the Data Movers that will be setup as an EtherChannel are cge0 and cge1 for this exercise. It is a CISCO specific implementation and an alternative to the open standard LACP.

$ server_ifconfig server_2 –a Delete any existing interface configuration $ server_ifconfig server_2 –delete cge0 3. Confirm that all interfaces are set for 100Mb/Full Duplex: $ server_sysconfig server_2 -pci 4.cge1” Verify the trunk virtual device was created: $ server_sysconfig server_2 –v –info trk0 5. Lab 2 Page 16 . All Rights Reserved. $ server_ifconfig server_x –create –Device trk0 –name trk0_if0 –protocol IP <IP_Addr subnet_mask broadcast_address> Verify the configuration of the interface. Create a Trunk Virtual Device: Configure a virtual device on the Data Mover as an trunked Ethernet Channel using cge0 and cge1.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 2. $ server_ifconfig server_x trk0_if0 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Call the virtual device trk0 $ server_sysconfig server_2 –virtual –name trk0 –create trk -o “device=cge0. Delete existing network interface configurations: Confirm that the Data Mover ports you wish to configure as an EtherChannel trunk are not already being used. Assign an IP address to the Virtual Device you just configured: You do this in the same manner as you did in the previously for a physical device.

127.y > done (Where y is the IP address of the Data Mover’s default gateway. set up a continuous ping. Ask your instructor to re-enable the switch port which was disabled.y (Where y is the IP address of the Data Mover’s default gateway. and use server_netstat with a while true loop to identify and monitor which network interface is being used for the connection.*.*.) Generate network traffic over the Ethernet Channel Interface: 7. Examine the activity from step 10. You should see the activity has switched to the other Ethernet port. Simulate a switch port failure: Ask your instructor to disable the switch port to which your active Data Mover port is connected. 9. On the Control Station. $ while true > do > server_ping server_2 10.) You should see only one cge port with increasing packet counts.) 8. 10. Stop the “while true loops” using “ctl c”. Lab 2 Page 17 . All Rights Reserved. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. $ while true > do > server_netstat server_2 –i > sleep 1 > done (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. Test your IP configuration by pinging the Data Mover’s default gateway: $ server_ping server_x 10.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 6. log on to the Celerra’s Control Station. Monitor which of the two interfaces are being used: Do not close the window that is running the do-while loop above.127. In a separate terminal window.

Delete the interface on trk0. All Rights Reserved. Lab 2 Page 18 . 12. $ server_ifconfig server_2 –delete trk0_if0 Note: The trunk is still configured but there is no IP address configured on it.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 11. Verify that the interface was removed but the virtual device is still configured. The IP address is associated with the Interface that is configured for the device. Remove the IP configurations from the EtherChannel trunk. $ server_ifconfig server_2 -all $ server_sysconfig server_2 –v –info trk0 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

Note: This is not a truly highly available as a FSN should be configured with multiple Ethernet switches interconnected with an ISL trunk. Verify that it is still configured $ server_sysconfig server_2 –v 2. This time we want to do the same thing but using Celerra Manager. In the previouse exercise we created trk0. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Lab 2 Page 19 . Configure a second Ethernet Channel Trunk virtual device on the Data Mover: Previously you used the CLI to create trk0. Create a new EtherChannel Trunk virtual device called trk1 using cge2 and cge3 ƒ ƒ Open Celerra Manager and select Networks from the tree. In the Devices tab. In this exercise we will create a FailSafe Network (FSN) device using two Ethernet Channel trunks. click New > Enter the requested information trk1 X • X Click OK.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Lab 2 Exercise 4: Configuring an FailSafe network device comprised of 2 Etherchannel Trunks and test FSN functionality In this exercise you will configure a failsafe network that consists of two Ethernet channel trunks. Step Action Verify that trk0 is still configured: 1.

Then assign the IP address for your Data Mover to the FSN virtual device. Create an FSN virtual device from the two EtherChannel Trunk virtual devices.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 3. Lab 2 Page 20 . All Rights Reserved. • Select Network in the tree hierarchy > click Devices > New • Select your server > Type is Fail Safe Network > Device Name is fsn0 • Select trk0 and trk1 as the standby • Click OK To assign the IP address to the FSN device: • select the Interfaces tab > New • Select your Data Mover > Device Name is fsn0 • Enter the appropriate Address and Netmask • Click OK Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

*.127. All Rights Reserved. $ > > > > while true do server_netstat server_2 –i sleep 1 done Which network device is showing IO activity? ______________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 2 Page 21 . $ while true > do > server_ping server_2 10.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 4. log on to the Celerra’s Control Station.) 6. In a separate terminal window.y > done (Where is the IP address of the Data Mover’s default gateway. and use server_netstat with a while true loop to identify and monitor which network interface is being used for the connection. Log into the Control Station and set up a continuous ping. Monitor which of the two interfaces are being used: Do not close the window that is running the do-while loop above. Verify the FSN configuration using the CLI: $ server_sysconfig server_x –v –info fsn0 Which trunk (trk0 or trk1) is active? __________________________________ Generate network traffic over the FSN device: 5.

Does the traffic move to the second device in trk0? ______ Disable the new active port.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 7. Test FSN Failover: Ask your instructor to disable both Ethernet connections one at a time and notice which interface is carrying the network traffic. Lab 2 Page 22 . Verify the status of the FSN: Log on to your Control Station and verify the status of your virtual devices. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Does the traffic move to one of the devices in trk1? ______ Disable the port that is currently active. Does the traffic move to the last remaining port? ______ Is the do-while loop still running? _________________ 8. Disable the active port. All Rights Reserved. Re-enable all of your Ethernet ports for your Data Mover. $ server_sysconfig server_x –v –info fsn0 Which trunk (trk0 or trk1) is active? __________________________________ 9.

All Rights Reserved.*. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. $ while true > do > server_ping server_2 10. $ server_standby server_x –activate mover Observe the ping command as the failover test takes place. reference Lab 2 and configure the relationship appropriately.127. 2. Generate network traffic over the FSN device: On the Control Station and set up a continuous ping. Lab 2 Page 23 .Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Lab 2 Exercise 5: Testing Basic Data Mover Failover Step 1. activate Data Mover failover.y > done (Where y is the IP address of the Data Mover’s default gateway. Perform Data Mover Failover: From your Control Station. Server_3 should assume all configuration of server_2 including the FSN configuration.) 4. $ nas_server –info server_2 $ nas_server –info server_3 If server_2 is not type primary and server_3 is not type standby. Verify the status of the FSN: $ server_sysconfig server_x –v –info fsn0 Which trunk (trk0 or trk1) is active? __________________________________ 3. Action Verify that your data movers have been configured in a Primary/Standby relationship: View the server table for your Celerra and verify that server_2 is type primary and server_3 is type standby.

the default name assigned is the same as the IP address.server_3 the Data Mover that was the standby should now list as server_2. Confirm the name of the Interface: $ server_ifconfig server_2 –all Delete the interface: $ server_ifconfig server_x –delete <Interface Name> Delete the virtual devices: $ server_sysconfig server_x –v –d fsn0 $ server_sysconfig server_x –v –d trk1 $ server_sysconfig server_x –v –d trk0 End of Lab Exercise Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. $ nas_server –list You should see that server_2 is now listed as server_2. Clean up the network configuration: From your Celerra Control Station. Restore server_2. Note: When configuring an interface using Celerra Manager. Confirm the failover test: Verify that the failover took place. including the configuration of the FSN. 6. delete the interface on FSN0 interface and remove all virtual network devices (FSN and TRK).faulted. All Rights Reserved. $ server_sysconfig server_x –v 7. Verify the status of the FSN: Server_3 (now called server_2) should have the identical configuration as prior to the failover.server_3 to primary status.faulted. $ server_standby server_2 –restore mover 8.Celerra ICON: Lab 2 5. Lab 2 Page 24 .

Celerra ICON: Lab 2 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Lab 2 Page 25 .

Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Celerra ICON Celerra Training for Engineering Lab 3: Creating & Testing File Systems for NFS Client Access EMC Education Services Date: February. All Rights Reserved. Lab 3 Page 1 . 2006 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

2006 Table of Contents: Exercise 1: Creating Volumes and File Systems Exercise 2: Mounting and Exporting File Systems for NFS Access Exercise 3: Integrating a Celerra File Server with NIS Exercise 4: Exporting File Systems with Root Privileges Exercise 5: Exporting a File System for Read Mostly Permissions Exercise 6: Extending File Systems Exercise 7: Testing Data Mover Failover with NFS Clients Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.0 File Name 03_Lab3_CelerraICON_File Systems Date February. All Rights Reserved. Lab 3 Page 2 .Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Document Revision History: Rev # 1.

Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3: Creating and Exporting File Systems Purpose: Objectives: In this lab you will manually create slices.4 April 2005 Managing NFS Access to the Celerra Network Server P/N 300-002-036 Rev A01 Version 5. and meta volumes and then use them to add a file system. Next you will mount the file system and export it for NFS client access various options. stripes. AVM and Celerra Manager Mount and Export file systems for NFS Client Access Export file systems: Assigning root to another host Export file systems: “Read mostly” Integrating into a NIS Domain Test Data Mover failover and understand impact to client systems Managing Celerra Volumes P/N 300-01-977 Rev A01 Version 5.4 April 2005 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Finally. • • • • • • References: Create Volumes and File systems using CLI. Lab 3 Page 3 . On a UNIX workstation. you well test Data Mover failover and effect on NFS clients. you will NFS mount the file system and test access.4 April 2005 Configuring and Using Secure NFS with Celerra P/N 300-002-082 Rev A01 Version 5. All Rights Reserved.

Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 3 Page 4 . All Rights Reserved.

CLI In this exercise you will be configuring a Celerra file system and the underlying volume structure. d8. First . Lab 3 Page 5 . & d6 for Symmetrix) are on different physical drive. d5. $ nas_disk –l Note: The disk numbers will be different depending on whether you’re configured with a Symmetrix or CLARiiON Back-end. 2 Determine what disks are available: Before configuring file systems. In following exercises. d9.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3 Exercise 1: Configure File Systems for Celerra . $ nas_disk –info disk_volume_name What are the LUN numbers (stor_dev) associated with the following disk volumes? d7 (d3): ______________________ d8 (d4): ___________________________ d9 (d5): ______________________ d10(d6): ___________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. & d10 (d3. map the Celerra disk name to the Logical Volume IDs on the back-end. All Rights Reserved. ƒ With Symmetrix back-end. first verify what disks are available to your Data Movers. it is a Best Practice to make sure that the disk volumes used are on separate physical drives on the back-end. available disk volumes begin at d7 How many standard (STD/CLSTD) disk volumes are available (not in use)? __________________________________________________________________ 3 Verify disk configuration: When creating stripe volumes. it will be exported for client access. available disk volumes will begin at d3 ƒ With CLARiiON back-end. d4. 1 Connect to the Control Station: Open a SSH session to your Control Station. Use the following command to get lists of the disk volumes that are seen by your Data Movers. Confirm that disks d7.

For each RAID Group you will see a list of LUNs associate with that RAID group. Name the stripe volume “str1”. $ nas_volume –create –n str1 –S 8192 sl1. Name these slices “sl1” through “sl4”. All Rights Reserved. sl3. $ nas_storage –list Determine the RAID groups associated with the LUNs above $ nas_storage –info <serial number of array> |more The output will be verbose. sl2. $ nas_slice –n slx –c dy 250 (Where x is the number of the slice you are creating. Make the “size”.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Determine the serial number of the attached storage array.sl4 Best Practice: A stripe depth of 32768 (32K) is recommended for both CLARiiON and for Symmetrix.sl3. and y is the number of the disk volume. Lab 3 Page 6 .) Verify that the slices were created: $ nas_slice -list 5 Create a stripe volume from the four slices you just created: Create a stripe volume from sl1. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.sl2. and sl4. or “depth” of the stripe 32768 bytes for Symmetrix back-end and 8192 for CLARiiON back-ends. Other Best Practices: ƒ Stripe using LUNS across (not within) RAID Groups ƒ RAID Groups should be of the same protection type and architecture ƒ Generally. random workloads perform best with four volume stripes Refer to “Celerra Network Server Best Practices for Performance” 4 Create four 250MB slices on separate “disks”: Create (4) 250 mb slice on each of “disks” d7-d10 (d3 – d6 for Symmetrix).

Name this meta volume “mtv1”. Name this file system fs1. All Rights Reserved. $ nas_volume –l (Reference second column for “in use” status. 9. $ nas_fs –n fs1 -c mtv1 Verify the file system was created.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 6 Verify Volumes: Confirm that your slices now show as being in use. $ nas_fs -list Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.) 7. Create a meta volume out of the stripe volume that you created above. Create a file system from the meta volume that you have just created: Create a file system on the meta volume that you created above. $ nas_volume –n mtv1 –c –M str1 8. Create a meta volume from the stripe volume that you have just created: File systems reside on meta volumes. Lab 3 Page 7 .

Reference IP address information you gathered in Lab2. for example cge0) Configure the IP address for the 10/100 FastEthernet NIC (port cge0) for server_2. All Rights Reserved. Step 1. Exercise 2. Verify the interface you just configured can be used to connect to the outside network. Configure IP interface: Configure the Fast Ethernet card in server_2 to use a transmission speed of 100Mbs. and Broadcast addresses match what was identified in Lab2. $ server_sysconfig server_2 –pci x –o speed=100.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3 Exercise 2: Mount and Export File System In this exercise you will Mount the file system you just created on a Data Mover and export it for access on the network by NFS clients. $ server_ping server_2 <IP address of Control Station> 3. Netmask. $ nas_fs -list Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Exercise 2. Lab 3 Page 8 . and full duplex mode. 1. $ server_ifconfig server_2 cge0 2. Step 1. Confirm that the file system previously created exists. $ server_ifconfig server_2 –c –D cge0 –n cge0 –p IP < IP_Address Netmask Broadcast_Address > Verify that the IP.duplex=full (where x is the port name.

$ server_mountpoint server_ x –c /mp1 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover.) Note: Giving anonymous users root access is NOT a Best Practice! Why? ____________________________________________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. and mount your file system to it: Create a mountpoint on your Data Mover. All Rights Reserved. $ server_export server_x –o anon=0 /mp1 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover.) 6.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 4. Create a mountpoint on the Data Mover. assigning anonymous users root access. UID 0 (zero). $ server_mount server_ x fs1 /mp1 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. Mount your file system to this mountpoint: Mount your file system to this mountpoint using the default mounting mount options. Export this file system for the NFS client access: Export this file system for the NFS protocol.) Verify the mountpoint was created $ server_mountpoint server_ x –list (Where x is the number of your Data Mover.) 5. Lab 3 Page 9 .

$ server_export server_x -list 8. All Rights Reserved. mountpoints are simply empty directories.) 11.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.zzz. Verify that the /studentx directory is empty: # ls studentx (Where x is your Celerra number. Lab 3 Page 10 . # mount zzz. # cd / # pwd 9.zzz. # mkdir studentx (Where x is your Celerra number. Create a local mountpoint: In UNIX.zzz is the IP address of the FastEthernet port of your Data Mover. Perform a NFS Mount on the client system: NFS mount this directory to the exported file system on your Data Mover.zzz:/mp1 /studentx (Where zzz. Create a directory called studentx. and x is your Celerra number. In the following steps you will be perform a NFS mount of the file system you previously exported on the Data Mover.zzz. Change directories to the root directory and confirm. Log on to your UNIX workstation as the root user.zzz.) 10.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 7. Confirm file system is exported: Verify that your exported file system is listed in the export table for your Data Mover.

# cd / # umount /studentx (Where x is your Celerra number. a new file system contains a lost+found directory. Unmount the NFS file system: When unmounting a file system you specify the name of the mountpoint. Lab 3 Page 11 . All Rights Reserved. # ls studentx (Where x is your Celerra number.) Were you able to create a new file? ____________ 14. When you created your /studentx directory it should have been empty. you now have full access to the contents of the file system. # cd /studentx # touch filex (Where x is your Celerra number.) What is in this directory now?__________________________________________ By default a new directory is empty. After NFS mounting your new file system to the /studentx directory. 13.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 12.) 15. Connect back into the Celerra Control Station: Log into the Celerra Control Station as nasadmin Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. In comparison. Verify the contents of the mounted NFS file system: Check the contents of your /studentx directory. Verify write access to the NFS file system: Change directory to /studentx and create a new file.

the umount is temporary. Lab 3 Page 12 . $ server_umount server_x –p /mp1 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Specifying the –p parameter makes the unmount permanent.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 16. Permanently unexport your file system: By default. Unless you specify the –p parameter. Permanently unmount your file system: The same is true with Data Mover umounts. it is temporary and on the next reboot of the Data Mover. when you unmount a file system. $ server_export server_x –u –p /mp1 17. it will automatically be re-exported.

In later exercises you will test the ability of users to access to his or her own directories on the Data Mover’s file system. The Data Mover will authenticate the users through the NIS services.com 10.163 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. $ server_nis server_x If not configure the Data Mover to use NIS.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3 Exercise 3: Integrating Celerra File Server with NIS Client users must present user credentials when connecting to a Celerra File Server.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.*. 1. In the lab configuration. Configure your Data Mover to use NIS: Log on to your Celerra’s Control Station as nasadmin Verify that your Data Mover to integrate with Hurricane Marine’s NIS server.127. NIS Services are already setup. One way that the Celerra can authenticate users is using Network Information Systems (NIS). $ server_nis server_x hmarine. All Rights Reserved. Lab 3 Page 13 . In this exercise you will configure your Data Mover to access these services.

All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 3 Page 14 .

______. To determine the size of the file system. $ nas_fs –list The file system you created previously should exist but not be in use. Lab 3 Page 15 . 1. $ nas_fs –size fs1 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.127. Preparation: In this exercise you will be using your assigned UNIX workstation and one other workstation. use the –size parameter. ______. In this exercise you will make the export more secure by exporting the file system for root access to only a specific host.127. Before you begin this exercise you will want to record the following information: The IP address of your UNIX workstation: 10. ______ The IP address of another UNIX workstation (See below): 10. ______ Use the following table to learn what other UNIX station to record If you are at: 2.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3 Exercise 4: Exporting File Systems with root Privileges In the prior exercise you exported a file system for NFS access. However. Use: sun1 sun2 sun2 sun1 sun3 sun4 sun4 sun3 sun5 sun6 sun6 sun5 Confirm that the file system you created in a previous exercise still exists: List the status of all configured file systems. there was minimal security to the file system. A production system requires a higher level of security for file systems that are available to the network.

Lab 3 Page 16 . $ server_mount server_ x fs1 /mp2 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. All Rights Reserved. Only one Data Mover at a time can have a file system mounted for Read/Write. Export the file system.yyy. Mount the file system on the Data Mover: Mount your file system to this mountpoint using the default mounting mount options.yyy.yyy /mp2 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. # cd / # ls If it is missing make a directory for your NFS mount.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Create a mountpoint on the Data Mover: Create a new mountpoint for your Data Mover named /mp2. and yyy.) 5.yyy.yyy is the IP address of your UNIX workstation.) 4.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 3. $ server_export server_x –o root=yyy.) 6. # mkdir /studentx (Where x is the number of your Celerra. a file system is mounted for Read/Write access.yyy. Note: by default. $ server_mountpoint server_x –c /mp2 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. Log on to your UNIX workstation as root: Change directories to the root directory and verify that the local mountpoint directory /studentx is still exists. assigning root permission to your UNIX workstation: Use the server_export command to assign root permission to only your UNIX workstation.

Lab 3 Page 17 .zzz. and x is your Celerra number.zzz. name the directory “/remotestudentx”. # telnet 10. On the UNIX workstation NFS mount the file system: NFS mount the exported file system on your Data Mover to this directory. (Where x is the number of your Celerra. Test write access to the file system: Change to the /studentx directory and create a new directory and a new file in that directory.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 7.zzz:/mp2 /studentx (Where zzz.zzz.) Were you able to create a new directory and file? ____________ 9.zzz.) # cd / # mkdir /remotestudentx NFS mount the exported file system to the above directory.x (Where x is the address of another UNIX workstation that you recorded in step 1.*.) Create a directory off of the root file system. All Rights Reserved. # mount zzz. # mount <IP_Addr_of_data_mover>:/mp2 /remotestudentx (Where x is your Celerra. # cd /studentx # mkdir dirx # cd dirx # echo “THIS IS A TEST” >filex (Where x is the number of your Celerra. Connect to another UNIX workstation and NFS mount the file system: Telnet to another UNIX workstation as root.127.zzz is the IP address of the FastEthernet port of your Data Mover.) 8.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

# cd /studentx Assign all users full access to dirx. Exit your telnet session to your other UNIX workstation: # exit 13. Test write permissions to the File System: Try to create a new file. # who am i # hostname Change directories to the NFS mounted file system. # touch filex (Where x is the number of your Celerra) Do you have write permissions? _____________ Why/Why not?_____________________ 12.) Are you able to read the file? ___________________ 11. Lab 3 Page 18 . All Rights Reserved. # chmod 777 dirx Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Test read access to the File System: Verify that you can you navigate to and read the file that you created on your UNIX workstation. As the root user administer the permissions of the file system from your UNIX workstation: Verify that you are logged on to your UNIX workstation as root.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 10. # cd /remotestudentx/dirx # cat filex (Where x is the number of your Celerra.

Telnet back to the other UNIX workstation.*. #su switt Test Permissions from the other UNIX workstation: 15.x (Where x is the address of another UNIX workstation that you recorded in step 1. suny% mkdir epallisx (Where x is the number of your Celerra) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.) Change user to Selma Witt. # telnet 10. Lab 3 Page 19 .127. Navigate (change directory) to /remotestudentx/dirx. % cd /remotestudentx/dirx (Where x is the number of your Celerra) Can you create a subdirectory in dirx? _____________ % mkdir swittx (Where x is the number of your Celerra) 16. All Rights Reserved. Verify that only the “Owner” can write to the directory that was created: Change user to Earl Pallis % su epallis password: epallis Can you get into swittx. and create another subdirectory? ______ % cd swittx % mkdir epallisx (Where x is the number of your Celerra) Can Earl Pallis create a subdirectory inside dirx? _______ % cd .Celerra ICON: Lab 3 (Where x is the number of your Celerra..) Connect back into the other UNIX workstation: 14.

Unmount /studentx at your UNIX workstation: # cd / # umount /studentx (Where x is the number of your Celerra. % exit % Exit from user switt.) Exit from telnet session to your other UNIX workstation. % exit # 18. Lab 3 Page 20 . Change user back to root: Exit from user epallis. Unmount /remotedstudentx at the remote workstation: # cd / # umount /remotestudentx (Where x is the number of your Celerra. Permanently unexport your file system: Log on to your Celerra’s Control Station as nasadmin: $ server_export server_x –u –p /mp2 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.) 20. # exit 19. All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Answer the following questions: What were the effective permissions in /remotestudentx/dirx when you exported the file system? (Who had write access?) _________________________________________________________________ What were the effective permissions after you changed the permissions to 777 on dirx? _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ 17.

# cd /studentx # mkdir unixz (Where x is the number of your Celerra.127. server_export server_x -list 3. 4. and z is the number of your UNIX workstation. while allowing Read-only to others.127. 1.1z. /mp2 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. and z is the number of your UNIX workstation.root=10. In the Celerra documentation this is referred to as “Read mostly”. If you can’t remember the command syntax.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3 Exercise 5: Exporting File System with “Read mostly” Permission In this exercise you will test the ability to provide Read-Write permission to some users. All Rights Reserved. Give your UNIX workstation read-write permission. refer to the prior exercise. 2.1z. while giving Readonly access to everyone else: Export your file system as “Read mostly”. Log on to your Celerra’s Control Station as nasadmin: Provide Read-Write permission to your UNIX workstation. Lab 3 Page 21 .*. Log on to your UNIX workstation as root: Test Read-Write permission from your workstation: Mount the exported file system to the /studentx directory. and everyone else read-only permission. $ server_export server_x –o ro.*. Verify that you have read-write permission by creating a directory named “unixz”.) Verify that the file system was exported as specified.rw=10.

Verify that all other host have Read-only access: Log onto your other UNIX workstation as root.) # cd /remotestudentx # mkdir remoteunixz (Where x is the number of your Celerra.) Answer the following questions: How could you have provided read-write access to all hosts in your subnet? (Hint: man server_export) _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ 6. Verify that you have read-only permission by trying to create a directory named “remoteunixz”. and z is the number of your other UNIX workstation. # exit Umount /studentx. (Where z is the number of the remote UNIX workstation. Mount the exported file system to the your /remotestudentx directory. # cd / Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 3 Page 22 . # cd / # umount /remotestudentx End your telnet session to your other UNIX workstation.) Were you able to create the directory? ________________________ Can you read the directory created in step 4? ______________ # cd unixz # ls –al (Where unixz is the directory that was created in step 4. All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Were you able to create the directory? ________________________ 5. Unmount the exported file system on both UNIX clients: Umount /remotestudentx.

Lab 3 Page 23 . $ server_export server_x –u –p –a Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 # umount /studentx 7. Permanently remove all exports from your Data Mover: Log on to your Control Station as nasadmin. All Rights Reserved.

$ nas_fs –info fs1 Which disks are being used for the file systems?__________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. $ nas_volume –list Display detailed information on the slice. and meta volumes that you created in the prior exercise. View file systems information: Obtain a list of all Celerra file systems. All Rights Reserved. Lab 3 Page 24 . you will extend the file system you previously created to check their status. and extend existing file systems. 1. Determine what volumes are available: Log on to your Celerra Control Station and obtain a list of all Celerra volumes.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3 Exercise 6: Extending a File Systems In this lab. stripe. $ nas_fs –list Display detailed information on “fs1”. $ nas_volume –info volume_name What client (clnt) volume and file systems are associated with your “str1” and “mtv1” volumes? _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ What percentage of your “mtv1” Meta volume is available? $ nas_volume –size mtv1 _______________________________________________ 2.

Lab 3 Page 25 . spindle size). $ nas_fs –size fs1 What percentage of “fs1” has been utilized?______________________________ 4. $ nas_fs –size fs1 What is the new size of the volume?_____________________________________ Could this operation be performed while the file system was mounted and exported?____________________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. d8. $ nas_volume –list Extend your file system to include your new stripe volume. All Rights Reserved. ƒ Do not extend a file system using the same spindles on the back-end. Best Practices for extending a file system: 5. $ nas_fs –x fs1 str2 Check the detailed information on your meta volume. $ nas_volume –info mtv1 What volume sets make up your meta volume now?________________________ Verify the new size of the file system: 6. Extend the capacity of the file system: Verify the strip2 volume was created. you used the CLI to create the components of a meta Volume. (Use the entire capacity of “disks” d11. This time try to do it using the Celerra Manager. and d10 for Symmetrix). d9. d12. d14 (d7. FC vs. and d13. Previously. Name the stripe volume “str2”. ATA. ƒ Extend a volume using the same drive type (parity.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Determine file system size and utilization: 3. ƒ Use only stripe volumes containing an equal (or greater) number of component spindles. Create a new volume that will be used to extend the file system: Create a new stripe volume.

2. Mount your file system to this mountpoint using the default mounting options. $ nas_fs –list Verify that the mountpoint /mp2 still exists.yyy. reference Lab 2 and configure the relationship appropriately.yyy.yyy is the IP address of your UNIX workstation.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Lab 3 Exercise 7: Testing Data Mover Failover with NFS Clients Step 1.yyy.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.yyy /mp2 (Where yyy. $ server_mount server_ x fs1 /mp2 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover. verify that the file system you previously created still exists. $ nas_server –info server_2 $ nas_server –info server_3 Alternatively: $ nas_server –list If server_2 is not type primary and server_3 is not type standby.) Use the server_export command to export the file system for client access an assign root permission to only your UNIX workstation.yyy. $ server_export server_x –o root=yyy. Mount and export the file system for client access: On the Control Station. All Rights Reserved. $ server_mountpoint server_x -list If not recreate it. Action Verify that your data movers have been configured in a Primary/Standby relationship: View the server table for your Celerra and verify that server_2 is type primary and server_3 is type standby. Lab 3 Page 26 .

zzz. and x is your Celerra number. Log on to your UNIX workstation and mount the NFS file system: Log in to the UNIX workstation as the root user and NFS mount the exported file system to the directory /studentx.zzz. Change to the /studentx directory. Lab 3 Page 27 .zzz is the IP address of the FastEthernet port of your Data Mover. and run a do-while loop in the directory to generate file system access from the UNIX host to the Data Mover./mysbin done Do not close the window that is running the do-while loop.zzz. All Rights Reserved.zzz:/mp2 /studentx (Where zzz. # mount zzz. log on to the Celerra’s Control Station./mysbin while true do ls –al . # # # > > > cd /studentx cp –R /sbin . copy /sbin as /mysbin. 5. and use server_netstat with a while true loop to monitor the network connectivity $ while true > do > server_netstat server_x –i > sleep 1 > done (Where x is the number of your Data Mover.zzz. Simulate IO activity to the file system: For this test.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 3.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Test Network connectivity to the Data Mover: In a separate terminal window.) 4. we want to simulate continual client access so we need to run a small script.

The standby Data Mover should take over the IP address of the Primary. 9. From your Control Station.faulted. 8. Verify that the do-while loop is still running from your UNIX workstation. $ server_standby server_2 –restore mover Watch the while-true loop on your UNIX workstation to monitor connectivity throughout the process. Unmount the NFS file system.faulted.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 Perform Data Mover failover: 6. activate Data Mover failover. # cd / # umount /studentx (Where x is your Celerra number. Failback to the original Primary: Restore server_2. $ server_standby server_x –activate mover Observe the activity on your UNIX workstation as the failover test takes place.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.server_3 to primary status. End test and clean up: Stop the continuing while-true loops (by pressing CTRL-c) on the Control Station and the UNIX workstation. mount the file system and re-export it. Lab 3 Page 28 . Roughly how long did it take for the failover to complete and the File system was again available? 7. All Rights Reserved.server_3 the Data Mover that was the standby should now list as server_2. Confirm that the Failover was successful: $ nas_server –list You should see that server_2 is now listed as server_2.

$ server_export server_x –u –p /mp2 Permanently unmount your file system. Clean up the file system on the Data Mover: Log onto the Celerra Control Station as nasadmin Permanently unexport your file system.Celerra ICON: Lab 3 10. delete all of the following from the Data Mover: ƒ file systems ƒ meta volumes ƒ stripe volumes ƒ slice volumes ƒ mountpoints End of Lab Exercise Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. $ server_umount server_x –p /mp2 Using the Celerra man pages if needed. All Rights Reserved. Lab 3 Page 29 .

All Rights Reserved. 2006 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 4 Page 1 .Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Celerra ICON Celerra Training for Engineering Lab 4: Configuring and Testing a Windows CIFS Environment EMC Education Services Date: February.

Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Document Revision History: Rev # 1.0 File Name 04_Lab4_CIFS. All Rights Reserved. Lab 4 Page 2 .doc Date February. 2006 Table of Contents: Exercise 1: Configuring Usermapper Exercise 2: Configuring CIFS Servers and verifying client access Exercise 3: Configure Local Groups and test permissions Exercise 4: Removing CIFS configuration Exercise 5: Configure Mixed Windows and UNIX file system access Exercise 6: Configuring Home Directory support Exercise 7: Configuring DFS Root file system Exercise 8: Virtual Data Movers Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

All Rights Reserved. Lab 4 Page 3 . It also explores some of the optional features of CIFS such as Home Directory Support and DFS. • • • • • • • • References: Verify the Usermapper configuration Configure CIFS servers Join the CIFS Server to a Windows domain Start and stop CIFS services Configure Home Directory support Configure DFS Root file systems on a Data Mover Configure VDM Relocate a VDM to another Data Mover Configuring CIFS on Celerra P/N 300-001-974 Rev A01 Version 5.4 April 2005 Configuring Virtual Data Movers for Celerra P/N 300-001-978 Rev A01 Version 5. In addition it includes an exercise where CIFS Servers are configured inside of a Virtual Data Mover (VDM) and then relocates the VDM to a second Data Mover.4 April 2005 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4: Configuring and Testing a CIFS Environment Purpose: Objectives: The purpose of this exercise is to configure and test the CIFS services on the Data Mover.

Lab 4 Page 4 .Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

the Usermapper database should be empty. server_usermapper server_2 –Export –user mymapfile View the contents of the Usermapper database. Internal Usermapper is a Celerra service that automatically maps each Windows users and group to a UNIX-style user ID (UID) and group ID (GID). On the Control Station. Because no windows users have accessed the Data Mover since the Celerra was installed.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4 Exercise 1: Configure Internal Usermapper Because the Celerra Network Server uses UIDs and GIDs to identify users. export the Usermapper database. This is referred to as the primary and runs on the Data Mover in Slot 2 (server_2) Verify the status of the of the Usermapper service. Verify the status of the of the Usermapper service: Internal Usermapper is automatically installed and configured as part of the DART installation on the Data Mover. Windows clients must be assigned UIDs and GIDs so that the Celerra Network Server can determine access to system objects. more mymapfile Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Step Action 1. such as files and directories. Later on in the lab we will be looking at this again. Lab 4 Page 5 . $ server_usermapper ALL Is the service enabled and is server_2 the Primary? ____________________ 2. All Rights Reserved. There should only be one instance of usermapper in a single Celerra environment. Verify why That the Usermapper database is empty.

Lab 4 Page 6 .Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Configure NTP Services: Set your Data Mover to synchronize with the Kerberos using the a time server.127.162 Verify that you were able to get updates from the time service.com The computer name for your CIFS Server on the Data Mover:_________________ (See Appendix E.hmarine.127. ______ . Lab 4 Page 7 . Action Gather required information: Before you begin. Log on to the Control Station as nasadmin. 3.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4 Exercise 2: Configure CIFS Servers Step 1. Hurricane Marine. 161 The Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) of the Windows 2000 domain that will hold the CIFS Server’s computer account: corp. you need to record the following key information: The IP address of the DNS server: 10. $ server_date server_2 timesvc update $ server_date server_2 timesvc stats Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.*. IP Addresses and Schema) 2. $ server_date server_2 timesvc start ntp 10.

127. Confirm that DNS has been configured to allow Dynamic Updates: Confirm with the DNS administrator. • • • Click the + sign to the left of HM-1 to expand the domain.x.com.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 4. Instructor to demonstrate the following: To verify that “Allow dynamic updates” is set to yes perform the following while logged on to the DC for hmarine. where z is the number of your Celerra) zones have “Allow dynamic updates” set to “yes”.hmarine.msc This should open the Windows 2000 DNS Management Console. Lab 4 Page 8 . your instructor. All Rights Reserved.com”) and reverse (“10. • Click on Start > Run Type dnsmgmt. that the forward (“corp.161 subnet”. You should see the forward and reverse lookup zones. in this case. Click the + sign to the left of Forward Lookup Zones Click the + sign to the left of Reverse Lookup Zones Your display should look similar to the following Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

The “Allow dynamic updates” option is in the center of the window. ALL Subnet Reverse Lookup Zones • Click on a zone (for example 10.127. $ server_dns server_2 –delete <domain name> Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.x Subnet) to highlight it. Remove any previous DNS configuration: Determine if DNS is configured. $ server_dns server_2 Delete the current DNS configuration if configured:. You should see the following window. • Right-click on the same zone and select Properties. It should be set to “Yes” 5.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 To verify that “Allow dynamic updates” is set to yes. Lab 4 Page 9 .50.com Forward Lookup Zone. confirm the following zones: hmarine.

161 $ server_dns server_2 –o stop $ server_dns server_2 –o start 7. Lab 4 Page 10 .interface=cge0 (Where y is the number of your Celerra.hmarine. All Rights Reserved.) When prompted.com domain. $ server_dns server_2 corp. Configure the CIFS Server on the Data Mover to join the Windows 2000 domain. Configure DNS on the Data Mover: Configure the Data Mover for DNS and to be in the corp.admin=administrator (Where x is the number of your Data Mover and y is the number of your Celerra. $ server_cifs server_2 –Join compname=celydmx.*.hmarine. Configure CIFS Server: Setup you’re the CIFS Server on the Data Mover for the Windows 2000 domain corp.hmarine. Then stop and start DNS.com.127.domain=corp.com. Start the CIFS service on your Data Mover: $ server_setup server_2 –P cifs –o start 8.hmarine.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 6.com. domain=corp.com 10. enter the domain administrators password server_x: Enter Password Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.hmarine. $ server_cifs server_2 –a compname=celydm2.) Join the CIFS Sever to the domain: 9.

Celerra ICON: Lab 4 10. All Rights Reserved. Verify the actual size of the file system: $ nas_fs –size fs4 12. name the mountpoint /win2k. $ server_export server_2 –P cifs –n w2kdata /win2k Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Verify that the CIFS Server successfully joined the domain: $ server_cifs server_2 Ask your instructor to show the following results to you: ƒ The container that was created “EMC Celerra” ƒ The computer account in that container 11. $ server_mountpoint server_2 –c /win2k $ server_mount server_2 fs4 /win2k 13. $ nas_fs –n fs4 –c size=5G pool=<pool name> This command may take a few minutes to complete. Mount the file system: Mount the file system to a mountpoint on your Data Mover. Lab 4 Page 11 . Determine what storage pools are have available space: $ nas_pool –size -all Make the file system at least 5 GB in size using an available storage pool. In this example you will create a file system named “fs4” using Automatic Volume Manager. Create a File System to be used by your Windows clients: In prior exercises we manually created volumes and file systems. Export the file system: Export /win2k for CIFS using the share name w2kdata.

etc directories. connect to share: Logon to your Windows 2000 workstation as administrator of corp.com.microsoft. What contents are displayed in the w2kdata share? _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ You should see the lost&found and . Connect to your Data Mover using the UNC path: Start > Run > Type \\celydmx\w2kdata (Where y is the number of your Celerra and x is the number of your Data Mover. All Rights Reserved. From Windows Client. then at least one Microsoft Windows computer must reside in the same network segment.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. (See articles Q117633.com (CORP).hmarine. Q120151.) You should be able to connect to the share and view the contents of your exported file system. Lab 4 Page 12 . What could you have done differently in order to hide these two directories from the CIFS share? ___________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ NOTE: The Data Movers do not display in Network Neighborhood because there are no Microsoft Windows computers in that network segment.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 14. For more information on Network Neighborhood and the browse list see the Microsoft Knowledge Base at http://support. etc. If it is desired that the Data Mover appear in the browse list.

The creation of the “CIFS Full” and “CIFS Read-only” Local Groups. create a Local Group on the Data Mover. select the computer name of your CIFS Server and click OK. Lab 4 Page 13 . Log on to your Windows 2000 workstation as the Administrator of the CORP domain. 2. Result: The Computer Management console should now say “Computer Management (CELxDMy.HMARINE. is simply to illustrate basic User / Group / Permissions management concepts. as well as managing permission with these groups.CORP.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4 Exercise 3: Configure Local Groups and Test Permissions Step NOTE: What follows is an example. Create a Local Group on the Data Mover: In the Tree window pane: a) Expand System Tools b) Expand Local Users and Groups c) Click on the Groups.msc and click OK. Connect to Computer Management Console on the CIFS Server: Using the Windows 2000 Computer Management console. 3. Action 1. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.COM)” at the top of the Tree window pane. careful planning is required to architect an appropriate scheme. Verify that “Computer Management (Local)” at the top of the Tree window pane is highlighted. From the menu choose Action > Connect to another computer… In the Select Computer dialog box. All Rights Reserved. In production environments. Start > Run > type compmgmt.

click the Close button to close the New Group dialog box. choose “corp. In the Select Users or Groups dialog box. and the two engineering Global Groups from Hurricane Marine’s CORP domain to this local group. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.com” from the Look in: drop-down menu. The New Group dialog box will remain open for creation of additional groups. Managers. You should now see the two groups that you created in the right window pane of the Computer Management console. All Rights Reserved. Add the Domain Admins. With the Groups folder highlighted choose Action from the main menu and choose New Group… b. In the New Group dialog box you should now see these four groups in the list. 4. After clicking the Create button in part d. Lab 4 Page 14 . c. In the New Group dialog box enter the Group name “CIFS_Full” and a description of “Permissions Test”. Click the Create button to complete creation of this Local Group on the Data Mover.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Create a local group for full access on the CIFS Server.hmarine. • Domain Admins • Engineering Propulsion • Engineering Structural • Managers d. a. Doubleclick on the following groups to add them to the group then click OK to return to the New Group dialog box. Click on the Add button. Create another Local Group: Repeat the previous step (omitting part a) to create a Local Group named “CIFS Read Only” and add the Sales East and Sales West groups (from the CORP domain) to the CIFS Read Only group.

HMARINE. 8. In the data Properties dialog box choose the Share Permissions tab. one at a time. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. expand the Shared Folders object in the Tree window pane. Then click OK to return to the Share Permissions tab. Computers or Groups dialog box. Complete setting Permissions: Click on the OK button to close the data Properties dialog box. All Rights Reserved.CORP. Click on the Add button to add users and/or groups to the permissions list. In the Select Users or Groups dialog box. 6. Click on the Shares folder to open the list of shares on the Data Mover’s CIFS server. Remove a Group from the Share Permissions: Select the Everyone group and click on the Remove button to remove this group from the list. Add the Local Groups you just created to the Share Permissions: With the Computer Management console still connected to your Data Mover. Right-click on your “w2kdata” share and choose Properties. CIFS_FULL: Full: Selected (checked) Change: Selected (checked) Read: Selected (checked) CIFS Read Only: Full: Not selected (unchecked) Change: Not selected (unchecked) Read: Selected (checked) 7.COM” from the Look in: drop-down menu. NOTE: There are many methods to manage permissions.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 5. The method you have just performed is only an example and is not better or worse than other methods. In the Select Users. select each of the groups. double-click on the CIFS_Full and CIFS Read Only groups to add them to the list. choose “CELxDMy. and assign the following permissions. Lab 4 Page 15 . Set Share permissions for the Local Groups: In the Share Permissions tab. You have now completed setting permissions on your Data Mover’s share.

txt. Connect to Windows workstation as user Liza Minacci: Log on to the Windows 2000 workstation as Liza Minacci (username lminacci) of the Managers group.) 10. Where you able to create the file? ______ Can you read any existing files? ______ Sage should not be able to create a file. Test write access to the share by member of the Propulsion Engineering Group: Repeat the three preceding steps logging on as Eddie Pope of the Propulsion Engineering group. Test write access to the share by member of the Sales Group: Repeat the same steps logging on as Sage Early of the Eastcoast Sales group. Connect to the w2kdata share: Connect to your CIFS Server using the UNC path. 13. Where you able to create the file? ______ Eddie should also be able to create a file. but he should be able to read the existing files. All Rights Reserved. and using a file name of sales. Lab 4 Page 16 . Log off of your Windows workstation.txt.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 9. 12. Test write access to the share by member of the Managers Group: Open the w2kdata folder and try to create a new text document named manager1. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Start > Run > \\comp_name A window should open displaying your w2kdata share. shown as a folder icon.txt. (See Windows 2000 Users and Group Memberships in the appendix for a list of usernames. Were you able to create the file? ______ Since Liza is in the Managers group. and create a file named propulsion. 11. she should be able to create the file.

$ server_cifs server_2 –Unjoin compname=celxdmy.domain=corp.hmarine. however still holds the specific configuration information for that particular CIFS server (celydmx). All Rights Reserved.msc and click OK From the menu choose Action > Connect to another computer In the Select Computer dialog box. The Data Mover.admin=administrator server_x: Enter password: The Unjoin gracefully removes the Data Movers computer account from Active Directory and from Dynamic DNS. Unjoin the Data Mover from the Windows domain. Unjoin the CIFS Server from the domain: Logon to the Control Station as nasadmin. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4: Exercise 4: Removing CIFS Configuration Step 1. select the computer name of your Data Mover and click OK In the Tree window pane: • Expand System Tools • Expand Local Users and Groups • Click on the Groups Right-Click on CIFS_FULL and click on Delete Right-Click on CIFS Read Only and click on Delete 2.com. Action Delete Local Groups: Using the Windows 2000 Computer Management console. Lab 4 Page 17 . delete the CIFS_full and CIFS Read only on the Local Groups • Start > Run > type compmgmt.

Celerra ICON: Lab 4

3.

Stop the CIFS Service and delete the server:
Stop and delete the CIFS server from the Data Mover’s configuration.
$ server_setup server_2 –Protocol cifs –o stop
$ server_cifs server_2 –delete compname=celxdmy
This step removes the CIFS server configuration information (for celydmx),
however global CIFS configurations remain. This is very useful if a Data Mover has
multiple CIFS servers residing on it. Using –delete you can remove one CIFS
server while leaving the others intact.
On the other hand, if you desire to remove all CIFS servers and configurations you
simply perform the next step and all CIFS configurations is removed from the DM.

4.

Remove all CIFS configurations from the Data Mover:
$ server_setup server_2 –P cifs –o delete

5.

Permanently unexport all file systems:
$ server_export server_2 –u –p -a

6.

Permanently unmount all file systems:
$ server_umount server_2 –p –a

7.

Remove the mountpoints:
$ server_mountpoint server_2 –d /win2k
Delete file systems and it’s underlying volumes:

8.
$ nas_fs –d fs4 –o volume

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 4 Page 18

Celerra ICON: Lab 4

Lab 4 Exercise 5: Configure a Celerra File System for UNIX and
Windows Access
In this exercise you will configure a file system for access by both UNIX and
Windows clients. In it, you will set the access policy so that both CIFS and NFS
client must satisfy UNIX permissions. Each user will have full control over his or her
own data, and have read-only access to other users’ data. Additionally, you will
configure the export so that neither NFS or CIFS users will have access to the
lost&found or the /.etc directories that are at the root of the Celerra file system.
Step Action
Log on to the Celerra Control Station as nasadmin.
1.
2.

Verify that there are no file systems on any Celerra “disks”.
$ nas_disk –l
Create a new file system using AVM:

3.
Determine the storage pools with available space.
$ nas_pool –size –all
Create a file system named “fs5” using Automatic Volume Manager. Make the file
system at least 7 GB in size.
$ nas_fs –n fs5 –c size=7G pool=clar_r5_performance
Depending on your environment, the pool may be different.

4.

Create a mountpoint on your Data Mover:
Name the mountpoint “/mp5”.
$ server_mountpoint server_2 –c /mp5

5.

Mount the file system:
Mount the file system fs5 to /mp5 so that both NFS and CIFS clients must satisfy
UNIX security.
$ server_mount server_2 –o accesspolicy=UNIX fs5 /mp5

6.

Export the file system for UNIX clients:
Export fs5 so that root privilege is assigned to only one UNIX workstation. (Use the

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 4 Page 19

Celerra ICON: Lab 4

IP address of your assigned UNIX workstation.)
$ server_export server_ 2 –o root=IP_Address /mp5

7.

TELNET to your UNIX workstation and log on as root.
NFS mount the file system:

8.
Verify that nothing is mounted to the /studentx directory
# mount
If it is still mounted, unmount it.
# umount /studentx
Mount the file system to /studentx.
# mount zzz.zzz.zzz.zzz:/mp5 /studentx
(Where x is the number of your Celerra, and z is the IP address of your Data
Mover.)
9.

Create a directory on the file system for export with CIFS:
We want to “hide” the lost=found and .etc directories so we will create a directory
inside /studentx for export to all users. Name the directory “data”. Give all users full
access to this directory. Then unmount /studentx.
# cd /studentx
# mkdir data
# chmod 777 data
# cd /
# umount /studentx
(Where x is your student number.)

What will be the effective permissions for each user inside the data directory?
_______________________________________________
Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 4 Page 20

enter the domain administrators password server_2: Enter Password Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.) Join the CIFS Sever to the domain: 13. Lab 4 Page 21 . Start the CIFS service on your Data Mover: $ server_setup server_2 –P cifs –o start 12. 10.) When prompted.com. $ server_cifs server_2 –Join compname=celydmx.com. $ server_cifs server_x –a compname=celydmx. 11.admin=administrator (Where x is the number of your Data Mover and y is the number of your Celerra. Configure CIFS Server: Setup you’re the CIFS Server on the Data Mover for the Windows 2000 domain corp. All Rights Reserved. they will only have read access to objects created by other users.hmarine.hmarine.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 In the data directory. each user will have permission to create their own objects and have full access to what they create. Configure the CIFS Server on the Data Mover to join the Windows 2000 domain.domain=corp. Log on to the Celerra Control Station as nasadmin. domain=corp.hmarine.com.interface=cge0 (Where x is the number of your Data Mover and y is the number of your Celerra. However.

All Rights Reserved.255. This will “hide” the lost+found and . we exported the root of the file system. Lab 4 Page 22 . $ server_export server_2 –o access=10. Export the data directory for NFS and CIFS: When the file system was first exported.224 /mp5/data Export the file system for CIFS clients using the share name “celdata”.etc directories from the users.0/255. Now we will unmount the file system and re-export it from the subdirectory “data”. Log on to you UNIX workstation as root and mount /studentx to /mp5/data. First unexport /mp5. $ server_export server_2 –u –p /mp5 Re-export to NFS clients on your subnet from the /mp5/data directory. # mount Data_Mover_IP:/mp5/data /studentx Do you now see the lost+found directory? _____________________________ # cd /studentx # ls Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.127.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 14. $ server_export server_2 –P cifs –n celdata /mp5/data Log back into the UNIX workstation and mount the file system: 15.255.*.

Lab 4 Page 23 .) Was Etta able to create the directory? _________ Create a file named “etta. password: swassi). Verify users can write to their own files but not to those belonging to others: Switch user to Etta Place and change to the /studentx/data directory and try to create a directory named “eplace”. # su swassi % cd /studentx/eplace % cat etta.txt Can Seve read the file? Enter the following command to try to create a file.txt % cd / % exit Change user to Seve Wassi (user:swassi.txt” inside the eplace directory. % echo TEST FILE >seve.txt.txt Can Seve write inside Etta’s directory? _______ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. % cd eplace % echo GO TEST >etta. # su eplace % cd /studentx % mkdir eplace (Where x is your student number. and try to read etta. Then exit from user eplace. All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 16.

Then exit from user swassi. Connect to the share celdata: Using the UNC path. (Start > Run > \\celydmx) Open the celdata share. Why can’t Seve modify his own files? _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Try to modify the file and save the changes. (username:swassi.txt inside the swassi directory.txt % cd / % exit Seve Wassi should be able to write in his own directory.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Create a directory in /studentx named “swassi”. 19. and create a file there. connect to your Data Mover. no password) 18. Log on to your Windows workstation as Seve Wassi from the CORP domain. % cd /studentx % mkdir swassi % cd swassi % echo TEST FILE >seve. 17. You should see the directories that you created from the UNIX workstation. All Rights Reserved. Should a user be able to access their own files from both Windows and NFS? Open seve. Lab 4 Page 24 .

server_usermapper server_2 –Export –user mymapfile View the contents of the Usermapper database. ls –ln /studentx What is the UID for swassi? _____________________________________________ Why are they different? _________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ What could we have done differently to ensure that the users have the same UID when accessing files from either UNIX or Windows? _______________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. determine the UID assigned to Seve Wassi. Verify why Seve Wassi was not able to modify his files created in Windows from his UNIX account. more mymapfile What is the User ID (UID) for swassi? ____________________________________ On the UNIX workstation.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 20. export the Usermapper database. All Rights Reserved. On the Control Station. Lab 4 Page 25 .

# cd / # umount /studentx (Where x is your Celerra number. $ server_umount server_2 –p /mp5 Remove the mountpoints: $ server_mountpoint server_2 –d /mp5 Delete file systems and it’s underlying volumes: $ nas_fs –d fs5 –o volume Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Log on to the UNIX workstation as root and unmount the NFS mountpoint. All Rights Reserved. users have read-only access to other users’ data. $ server_export server_2 –u –p /mp5/data Permanently unmount your file system. Clean up. • Each user should have full ownership of their own objects regardless of which system through which they login. • Permissions set from UNIX are effective on both NFS and CIFS users.) Logon to the Control Station as nasadmin. Lab 4 Page 26 . o UNIX and Windows UIDs must be the same. this exercise has established the following: • Access to lost&found or the /. Permanently unexport your file system.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 In review. o Would require a single user name space ƒ Ntmigrate ƒ LDAP • By default. 21.etc directories can be hidden by exporting a sub-directory of the file system. However.

Lab 4 Page 27 . Using AVM and the following guidelines. There are several restrictions that must be kept in mind as you do this: ƒ The home directory feature is not supported on CIFS servers configured with SHARE or UNIX-level security • Home Directory support requires a share named HOME. it must first be removed Step Action 1. You may use the CLI as outlined below or if you prefer. create a file system: • File system size: > 10G • File system name: userdata • Mountpoint /userdata Determine the type of back-end in your lab environment: $ nas_storage –i –a| more Determine the storage pools with available space: $ nas_pool –l Create a file system named userdata from an AVM pool. $ nas_fs –n userdata –c size=10G pool=<pool_name> For SYMM use: <symm_std>. If you’ve previously configured a share with this name. Log in to the Control Station as nasadmin. All Rights Reserved. Create and mount a file system for user home directories. CLARiiON use: <clar_r5_performance> Create a mountpoint and mount the file system: $ server_mountpoint server_2 –c /userdata $ server_mount server_2 userdata /userdata Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. 2. use Celerra Manager. Specify a size of 10GB.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4 Exercise 6: Configure Celerra for Windows Home Directories In this exercise you will be configuring Windows home directory support.

uses a text editor (vi) create a map file homedir that contain a mapping of each domain user to the home directory location on Data Mover. :wq and enter) 4. but it can be accessed directly from the command line by those who know its name. $ vi homedir The format of the entries should be as follows: corp:<assigned user>:/userdata Save and exit from homedir (Esc.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 3. Export the share for creating home directories: The share should be exported as an administrative share. the home directory feature is not enabled and the homedir map file does not exist. By appending the share name with $ make it an administrative share and it will not be visible in Windows Explorer. Create a homedir map file: On the Control Station. Put the homedir file in to the Data Mover : Put the homedir file in to the Data Mover /. Lab 4 Page 28 . By default. Enable Home Directories feature on Data Mover: $ server_cifs server_2 –option homedir Verify that Home directory support is now enabled: $ server_cifs server_2 6. All Rights Reserved. ask your instructor to provide you with a user account for this lab.etc directory using the server_file command. Note: Because we do not want everybody to use the same user accounts. $ server_export server_2 –P cifs –n user1$ /userdata Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. $ server_file server_2 –put homedir homedir 5.

Celerra ICON: Lab 4

7.

Log onto Windows as the Domain administrator:
Log onto Windows as the Domain administrator and connect to the administrative
share using the UNC path.
Start > Run > type \\celxdm2\user1$
Where x = is the name of the CIFS server.

8.

Create a directory for the user provided by your instructor.
The name of the user’s directory must match exactly the user’s username in the
Windows domain.

9.

Right-click in the share folder > New > Folder
Change the name to match the name provided by the instructor.

Add the home directory path to the user’s profile:
As the administrator, add the home directory path to the user’s profile
Start > Run > type:
net user <User Account> /domain /homedir:\\celxdmy\HOME

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 4 Page 29

Celerra ICON: Lab 4

Test Celerra Home Directories feature.
10.
Log onto the Window workstation as the user name provided
From the Windows client as the user provided, Open My computer.
Is the Home directory mapped for the User? _______________________
Log off and log back on as any other user and Open My computer.
Do you see the mapped network drive created in the previous step? ________
How would you manually map the network drive to the path created in the previous
steps?
11.

Clean up.
Logon to the Control Station as nasadmin .
Permanently unexport your file system.
$ server_export server_2 –u –p -all
Permanently unmount your file system.
$ server_umount server_2 –p /userdata
Remove the mountpoints:
$ server_mountpoint server_2 –d /userdata
Delete file systems and it’s underlying volumes:
$ nas_fs –d userdata –o volume

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 4 Page 30

Celerra ICON: Lab 4

Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 4 Page 31

Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4 Exercise 7: Configure and Implement a DFS Root file system DFS is a distributed file system that is built from one or more network shares. $ server_export server_2 –P cifs –n DFS_Root_x -option netbios=celxdmy /userdata Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Otherwise. From the root there can be one or more links to other shares. create a local share and name it DFS_Root_x. Lab 4 Page 32 . Step 1. Windows 2000 only supports a single root. multiple DFS roots are supported however. Action Create and mount a file system for user home directories. Celerra supports the hosting of the root file system. the share will be accessible only via the specified CIFS servers and therefore considered a local share. Currently Celerra supports only Standalone Root DFS. the share will be accessible from all defined CIFS servers and thus global. Since we are currently on Windows 2000 in our lab. All Rights Reserved. create a file system: • File system size: 100MB • File system name: userdata $ nas_fs –n userdata –c size=100MB pool=<pool_name> For CLARiiON use: <clar_r5_performance> Create a mountpoint and mount the file system: $ server_mountpoint server_2 –c /userdata $ server_mount server_2 userdata /userdata Note: When the CIFS service is started. use Celerra Manager. Note: With Windows 2003. Where x refers to your assigned student lab team number. Using AVM and the following guidelines. Export a share as the root of the DFS: With Windows 2003 DFS supports Global shares however Windows 2000 supports only Local Shares. For Windows 2000 you must specify the netbios name when exporting the CIFS share to make it a local share. If you do not select any specific CIFS servers. There is one server that hosts the ”root”. DFS support is enabled automatically. You may use the CLI as outlined below or if you prefer. 2.

Then share it out on the network giving everyone full access. All Rights Reserved. Launch Distributed File System Wizard: From your Windows workstation. start the New Root Wizard tool. Lab 4 Page 33 .Celerra ICON: Lab 4 3. create a folder name it studentx. 4. Select Start > Programs >Administrative Tools > Distributed File Systems The application dialog box below should appear. Create a Share on your Windows workstation: From your Windows workstation server. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. You will need these later on during this lab exercise. Note: There are a couple of network shares already created and located at \\hm1\studentx and \\hm-dc2\studentx Where studentx refers to your assigned Windows server.

Lab 4 Page 34 .Celerra ICON: Lab 4 New DFS Root: 5. From the Distributed File System dialog box. Select Action > New DFS root 6. All Rights Reserved. Sect Dfs Root Type: Click on next > Select Create a standalone Dfs root > Click next Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

The fully qualified domain name should appear in the Server name box. Lab 4 Page 35 . All Rights Reserved. Click next 8. Select “Use an existing Share” and from the drop down box.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 7. Specify Host for DFS Root: From the Host Server dialog box. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Specify the host server for the DFS root: Browse to your CIFS server’s name (celxdm2) and double click it. Specify the Dfs Root Share. select DFS Root x and click next.

and Root name and click Finish. Share name.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 9. The Root Distributed File system should now be available Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Lab 4 Page 36 . Complete New Dfs Root setup: Click next: Confirm the Host server.

\\hm-dc1\studentx Leaf3 . Lab 4 Page 37 . labeled leaf 1.\\hm-dc2\studentx Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. and click OK. You will create three of these the links.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 10. See the list below for the corresponding UNC names for each leaf share: Leaf1 . type the name leaf -> In the send user to shared folder box. leaf 2. Add Links to the DFS Root: Right Click on the DFS root share -> select New DFS Link -> In the link name box. type the UNC name for the leaf share.\\w2kx\studentx Leaf2 . and leaf 3. All Rights Reserved.

The DFS should now include the root on the Data Mover CIFS Server and three other links labeled leaf1 leaf2 and leaf3 that reside on other systems. Delete the DFS File System Unjoin the CIFS Server from the domain Stop the CIFS Service and delete the server Remove all CIFS configurations from the Data Mover Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Please cleaning up in the following order: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ On the Data Mover. remove the DFS links Within the MS Distributed File System menu. Logically this appears as a single file system hierarchy. Un-export the CIFS share Within the MS Distributed File System menu.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 11. Lab 4 Page 38 . Verify the Distributed File System. remove the DFS Root On the Data Mover. The advantage of DFS is it enables an administrator to consolidate network shares into one single namespace. Clean up: 12. The actual location of these shares is transparent to the users and gives the administrator centralized control. All Rights Reserved.

Lab 4 Page 39 . All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

both Data Movers must be of type Primary. All Rights Reserved. $ nas_server –list If necessary. delete the relationship between the primary and standby: $ server_standby server_2 –d mover Convert server_3 to primary. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. not standby Data Movers).Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Lab 4 Exercise 8: Configuring and Testing Virtual Data Movers (VDM) VDMS are most often implemented with replication technologies to build a disaster recovery solution. Reference Appendix E for the IP addresses for your assigned Data Movers. $ server_setup server_3 –type nas Verify that the internal Usermapper is enabled on server_2. Gather required information: For this exercise you will need two IP addresses. Log onto your Celerra Control Station as nasadmin and verify that server_2 and server_3 are type “1” servers (i. In a prior exercise you configured server_2 as primary and server_3 as standby.e. Configure both data Movers as Type 1. One for Data Mover 2 and one for Data Mover 3. The following step will change the Data Mover type and cause it to reboot. 2. For this exercise. Step Action 1.This interface will use the cge0 physical port on Data Mover 2. Lab 4 Page 40 . • cge0-1 . ___________________________________________________________ • cge0-1 – This interface will use the cge0 physical port on Data Mover 3. ___________________________________________________________ Note: Successful configuration of VDM require the interfaces to have the same name on both Data Mover 2 and Data Mover 3. In this exercise you will be creating a VDM and test it by moving it to another Data Mover within the same Celerra system.

127.hmarine.161 $ server_dns server_3 corp. $ server_usermapper server_2 -enable 3.com 10. $ server_route server_3 –add default <Address_from_above> Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.127. $ server_ifconfig server_3 –c –D cge0 –n cge0-1 –p IP < IP address> < netmask> <broadcast address> $ server_ifconfig server_2 –c –D cge0 –n cge0-1 –p IP < IP address> < netmask> <broadcast address> Configure both server_2 and server_3 to use DNS $ server_dns server_2 corp. $ server_route server_2 –list What is the default gateway: ___________________________ Configure server_3 to use the same gateway.com 10. Lab 4 Page 41 .Celerra ICON: Lab 4 $ server_usermapper server_2 If it is not enabled.*.hmarine. All Rights Reserved.161 List the route table for server_2.*. $ server_ifconfig server_2 –delete cge0 Create a network interface on device cge0 of server_2 and server_3. Use the IP addresses and names that you noted above. Configure IP Interfaces on Data Mover 2 and Data Mover 3: First delete the current network interface on device cge0 on server_2. enable it.

$ server_cifs ALL Note: Starting with v5. Set the date and time on Data Mover 3 and configure it for NTP: Using the server_date command list the time and date of server_2.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 4.162> 5.3. Verify UNICODE is enabled: Use the server_cifs command to verify that both Data Movers are set to use UNICODE. then set the time and date of server_3 to match that time. UNICODE can be enabled at installation time. All Rights Reserved. $ server_date server_3 timesvc start ntp <10. $ server_date server_2 $ server_date server_3 YYMMDDHHMM Display the NTP settings for server_2. Lab 4 Page 42 .*. 6. Verify that only root file systems exist on the data mover: $ nas_disk –list Disks d7 and d8 should show “n” under the “inuse” column. $ server_date server_2 timesvc Set server_3 to use the same NTP server.127. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

Celerra ICON: Lab 4 7. Start the CIFS service on both of the physical Data Movers: $ server_setup ALL –P cifs –o start Verify that cifs was started. Determine what disk was used to create the root file system for the VDM: $ nas_fs –list What is the name of the file system that as created for the VDM? ________________________________________ 9. $ server_mount server_2 10. $ server_cifs vdm1 –a compname=vdm-x. $ server_cifs ALL 7 Create a CIFS server on your VDM.com domain using interface cge0-1. Create a Virtual Data Mover: Create a Virtual Data Mover on server_2 and name it “vdm1”. Use the compname “vdm-x” (where x is the number of your Celerra).com.hmarine. Confirm that the root file system of the new VDM is mounted to server_2: List the mounted file systems for server_2. Lab 4 Page 43 . domain=corp.interface=cge0-1 (Where x is the number of your Celerra) 8 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.hmarine. $ nas_server -name vdm1 –type vdm -create server_2 What is the name of the VDM’s root file system? __________________________ What is the i18N mode of the VDM? ____________________________________ What is the status of the VDM? ________________________________________ 8. and join it to the corp.

$ server_export vdm1 –P cifs –n vshare /userdata/dir 15. Mount userdata to your VDM using a mountpoint of /userdata. $ server_mountpoint vdm1 –c /userdata/dir 14. domain=corp. Lab 4 Page 44 .admin=administrator password: 11.hmarine.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 Join the VDM to the domain. Start > Run > \\vdm-x\vshare (Where x is the number of your Celerra. $ nas_fs –n userdata –c size=1G pool=<pool name> –o slice=y 12. Create a File System to be used on your VDM.etc and lost&found. create a directory named “dir” in /userdata. Hide the /. Use AVM to create a 1 GB file system named userdata. $ server_cifs vdm1 –J compname=vdm-x.etc and lost& found directories: In order to hide /. Verify access to the share: Log on to your Windows workstation as Sadie Epari (username separi) and verify that you can access your CIFS server on your VDM as well as the CIFS share without seeing /.etc and lost&found from CIFS users.) Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.com. Export the File system: Export /userdata/dir by the share name vshare and assign the share to your new CIFS server. $ server_mount vdm1 userdata /userdata 13.

Verify the configuration of the VDM root file system: Again. $ /nas/sbin/rootnas_fs –info root_fs_vdm_vdm1 What is the value for the “rw server”? _______________________ 18. Move vdm1 to server_3: $ nas_server –v vdm1 –move server_3 19.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 16. $ server_cifs vdm1 $ server_cifs server_2 17. Verify the configuration of the VDM root file system: Examine the information on your VDM’s root file system. Start > Run > \\ip address\vshare Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Verify access to the share from the CIFS server that is running on VDM that now resides on Server_3: Log on to your Windows workstation as Sadie Epari (username separi) and verify that you can access your CIFS server on your VDM now that it has been moved. examine the information on your VDM’s root file system. $ /nas/sbin/rootnas_fs –info root_fs_vdm_vdm1 What is the value for the “rw server”? _______________________ You should see the “rw server” changed from server_2 to server_3. 20. All Rights Reserved. Compare the configuration of the physical Data Mover and the VDM: From your Celerra Control Station. Verify that the CIFS service is started on server_3. Lab 4 Page 45 . examine the CIFS configuration information of your VDM. $ server_cifs server_3 21.

$ nas_fs –d userdata Unjoin the CIFS Server from the domain: $ server_cifs vdm1 –Unjoin compname=vdm-x. domain=corp. $ nas_server –d vdm1 Configure server_3 back to a standby role. type nbtstat –R ƒ Also.Celerra ICON: Lab 4 If the share is not visible: ƒ You may have to flush the dns. you may have to resolve the hostname to IP ping –a <ip address> Clean up and remove VDM configuration: 22. $ server_export vdm1 –u –p –n vshare Unmount the userdata file system. $ nas_server –l End of Lab Exercise Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved. $ server_umount vdm1 –p /userdata Delete file system userdata.admin=administrator server_x: Enter password: Delete the Virtual Data Mover.hmarine. This can be done via cmd prompt on Windows client work station. Lab 4 Page 46 . $ server_standby server_2 –c mover=server_3 –policy auto Verify server_3 is now standby for server_2. Unexport the userdata file system.com. At the c prompt type: ipconfig /flushdns ƒ In addition reload remote cache name table.

2006 .Celerra ICON Celerra Training for Engineering Lab 5: SnapSure and Celerra Replicator EMC Education Services Date: February.

doc Date February.0 File Name 05_Lab5_replication. 2006 Table of Contents: Exercise 1: Configuring and Test SnapSure Exercise 2: Configuring and Test Celerra Replicator Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Lab 5 Page 2 .Celerra ICON: Lab 5 Document Revision History: Rev # 1.

4 April 2005 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. • • • • Configuring SnapSure Test SnapSure Configuring Celerra Replicator Test local replication using Celerra Replicator Using SnapSure on Celerra P/N 300-002-030 Rev A01 Version 5. Then you will perform a similar actions using Celerra Replicator. First you will configure SnapSure and perform various SnapSure management functions such as recovering files and restoring file systems. Lab 5 Page 3 .4 April 2005 Using Celerra Replicator P/N 300-002-035 Rev A01 v5.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 Lab 5: SnapSure and Celerra Replicator Purpose: Objectives: References: In this exercise you will be configuring and testing two Celerra Replication technologies. All Rights Reserved.

If not. Log in to the UNIX workstation as the Root user. All Rights Reserved. 6.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 Lab 5 Exercise 1: Configuring SnapSure Step 1. use the CLI and AVM to create a 1GB file system named “pfs12”. Create a 1GB file system that will be the Production File System (PFS) for this exercise: From the Control Station. $ server_mount server_2 4. You will not be able to perform this exercise without this directory. $ nas_pool –list $ nas_fs –n pfs12 –c size=1G pool=<AVM_pool> –o slice=y 3. $ server_export server_2 –o root=IP_address /mp12 5. Assign root access to the IP address of your UNIX workstation. Mount the PFS file system: Mount pfs12 to Data Mover 2 using a mountpoint name of “/mp12”. Mount the /studentx directory to /mp12 on your Data Mover. pfs12 /mp12 Export the PFS: Export pfs12 for NFS access. 2. Lab 5 Page 4 . Action Verify Prerequisites: To complete this lab you will need to confirm that: • Confirm that you are using Celerra Manager – Advanced Edition • Your Data Mover has IP connectivity to your UNIX workstation Confirm that your UNIX workstation has a /CA-labs directory. # mount DM_IP_address:/mp12 /studentx Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. notify your instructor so that this directory can be copied to your workstation.

then SavVol = 10 GB. then SavVol = 64 MB (minimum SavVol size).perm. By default. # cp –R /CA-labs /studentx (This may take several minutes) 8. copy /CA-labs/dir into /studentx. b.perm. $ nas_fs –size monday $ nas_fs –size pfs12 Is monday the same size as pfs12?_____________________________________ 10.rw monday on /monday ckpt. Specify “monday" as the name of the checkpoint. pfs12 on /mp12 uxfs. c. Compare the size of the SavVol with the size of the PFS using the commands.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 7. If PFS < 64 MB. All Rights Reserved.ro Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. If PFS > 10 GB. Determine the size of the SaveVol. Lab 5 Page 5 . $ fs_ckpt pfs12 -n monday -C 9. Verify that the checkpoint file system was automatically mounted to the Data Mover: $ server_mount server_2 The output of this command should include the following information pertaining to this exercise. then SavVol = PFS size. On the Control Station create a checkpoint of the Production file system: Use the fs_ckpt command to create a checkpoint file system pfs12. Copy test data into the filesystem: At your UNIX workstation. If (PFS < 10 GB) and (PFS > 64 MB). SnapSure bases the initial size of the SavVol on the following: a.

90m 13. # ls /studentx/CA-labs/dir Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.ckpt/*/CA-labs/dir # ls /student/dir 12.ckpt/*/CA-labs/dir/file1.ckpt # ls Is the checkpoint file system present and named according to the timestamp of the checkpoint? ______ Record the name of the checkpoint directory: _____________________________ Verify that the contents of the dir directory is consistent between the PFS and the checkpoint. # rm /studentx/CA-labs/dir/file1. Lab 5 Page 6 . From your UNIX workstation. From your UNIX workstation. # cp /studentx/. All Rights Reserved. change to the /studentx/.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 11. Verify that the client can see the data in the checkpoint. Recover file1.90m from /studentx/dir.90m is still present. Verify that the file is still available in the checkpoint: List the contents of the checkpoint view file system and confirm that file1.90m has been recovered.ckpt directory and examine the contents. # ls /studentx/.90m labs/dir /studentx/CA- List the contents of the PFS and confirm that file1. remove file1.ckpt/*/CA-labs/dir 14. # cd /studentx/.90m by copying it from the checkpoint to the PFS. # ls /studentx/. Recover the accidentally deleted file. Simulate an accidental loss of file by deleting it.

Lab 5 Page 7 . From your UNIX workstation. From your Celerra Control Station. # echo Tuesday data>>/studentx/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file 19. # echo Monday data>/studentx/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file 16. Verify that Checkpoint has the correct data. From your Celerra Control Station. $ fs_ckpt pfs12 -n tuesday -C 20. # cat /studentx/. create a file in /studentx/dir named ckpt_file that contains a text string of: “Monday data”. All Rights Reserved. refresh the “monday" checkpoint. Modify the data in the test file on the Production file system. confirm that the “monday" checkpoint shows the text you just entered. Rename the checkpoint file systems. from your Celerra Control Station rename the Checkpoint Virtual File System (CVFS). Refresh the Checkpoint.ckpt/*/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file 18. $ fs_ckpt monday –refresh 17.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 15. create another checkpoint of pfs12 and name it “tuesday". Create a new checkpoint of the Production file system. Create a test file. From your UNIX workstation. To make it easier to locate the Monday and Tuesday data. Modify the contents of “ckpt_file”. $ server_mount server_x –o cvfsname=Monday monday /monday $ server_mount server_x –o cvfsname=Tuesday tuesday /tuesday Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

restore the tuesday view of pfs12. Delete the entire contents of the production file system. restore the entire file system. delete all of the contents of the /studentx directory.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 21. remove the “ckpt_file” file. Using the checkpoint. then view the data from the two checkpoints.ckpt/Monday/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file Record your results here: ________________________________________ # cat /studentx/. Lab 5 Page 8 . as root. From the Celerra Control Station. From your UNIX workstation.ckpt/Tuesday/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file Record your results here:_________________________________________ In performing the above steps you have seen that SnapSure’s has the ability to preserve multiple point-in-time views of a file system. # rm /studentx/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file # cat /studentx/. From your UNIX workstation. 22. $ su Password: nasadmin # /nas/sbin/rootfs_ckpt tuesday -R Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. # ls /studentx 23. # cd /studentx # rm –Rf /studentx/* Confirm the deletion. All Rights Reserved. Remove the test file from the production file system and verify the data in the checkpoints.

confirm that Tuesday’s view of the PFS has been restored. # cat /studentx/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file Do the contents of “ckpt_file” show the Tuesday data? ______ 25. and tuesday. From the Celerra Control Station. What are the names of these checkpoints? ____________________________ ____________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Using the Checkpoint.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 24. These additional checkpoints serve as protection against an accidental restore overwriting needed data. Verify that the restore was successful. Verify that additional checkpoints were created prior to the restore. monday. Lab 5 Page 9 . restore the entire file system to the monday point in time. as root. All Rights Reserved. # nas_fs –list In addition to pfs12. list the existing file systems. restore the monday view of pfs12. From your UNIX workstation. From the Celerra Control Station. confirm that Monday’s view of the PFS has been restored. # cat /studentx/CA-labs/dir/ckpt_file Do the contents of “ckpt_file” show the Monday data? ____________________ 27. SnapSure automatically creates checkpoint prior to performing a restore to facilitate roll-back. Verify that the restore was successful. you should see additional checkpoints created for each time a restore was performed. $ su Password: nasadmin # /nas/sbin/rootfs_ckpt monday -Restore 26. From your UNIX workstation.

All Rights Reserved.ckpt # ls Are these additional checkpoints present? ______ 29. Delete the production file system and all the checkpoints. View that the checkpoints are also visible from the UNIX host. Clean up the UNIX workstation Start by unmounting the /studentx NFS mount from the UNIX workstation. Delete all checkpoints and then pfs12. Lab 5 Page 10 . $ nas_fs –d pfs12_ckpt2 –o volume $ nas_fs –d pfs12_ckpt1 –o volume $ nas_fs –d tuesday –o volume $ nas_fs –d monday –o volume $ nas_fs –d pfs12 –o volume Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 28. From your UNIX workstation. From the Celerra. # cd /studentx/. view these same checkpoints. Unexport and unmount the Production file system. unexport and unmount all the file systems from your Data Mover # server_export server_x –u –p –a # server_umount server_x –p –a 31. # cd / # umount /studentx 30.

$ nas_server -list Both server_2 and server_3 should be type1 (primary). All Rights Reserved. Step 1. In this test we will be creating a primary file system on server_2 and replicating it to a secondary file system on server_3. this is referred to as Local Replication. 3. Action Verify that there are no non-root file systems or volume configured. $ server_ifconfig ALL –all What is the IP address of the Data Mover server_2? ________________________ What is the IP address of the Data Mover server_3? ________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. If either one is set as standby. reset it to primary. Verify that both server_2 and server_3 have network interfaces configured. $ nas_fs –l $ nas_volume –list There should only be root volumes are listed. Before conducting this lab verify that there are no non-root file systems or volumes on your Celerra.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 Lab 5 Exercise 2: Configuring Celerra Replicator The purpose of this lab is to setup Celerra Replicator and examine file system and disk usage as the feature is setup. Because both Data Movers are in the same Celerra. 2. Lab 5 Page 11 . Verify that both server_2 and server_3 are of type Primary.

Lab 5 Page 12 . All Rights Reserved. Create the Primary file systems to test local replication: Create a primary file system and mount it to server_2 using the following parameters: ƒ Name for the primary file system: local_src ƒ Size: 5G $ nas_fs -name local_src -create size=5G pool=clar_r5_performance –option slice=y Mountpoint: the file system local_src. Copy the /CA-labs directory into /studentx. # cp –R /CA-labs /studentx Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Copy test data to the Primary file system.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 4. # mount <Data Mover ip>:local_src /studentx 6. $ server_export server_2 -option root=<UNIX Workstation> /local_src 5. $ server_mount server_2 local_src /local_src Export for NFS assigning root access to your UNIX workstation’s IP address. Mount your pfs file system from your UNIX workstation using the /studentx directory. Note: The mountpoint will be create automatically when issuing the server_mount command. Log in to the UNIX workstation and mount the test file system.

For the initial copy to the destination. All Rights Reserved. $ 8. Use nas_fs –list to view the existing file systems. Use the file system name: local_dst $ nas_fs -name local_dst -type rawfs -create samesize=local_src pool=<AVM pool name> –o slice=y Create a mountpoint called /local_dst $ server_mountpoint server_3 -create /local_dst Mount the file system as read-only. we will use a checkpoint rather than the actual source file system. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. server_mount server_3 -o ro local_dst /local_dst Verify local_src and local_dst file systems were created. Run nas_volume –list again. Create a Secondary file system on server_3. Create a secondary file system as type rawfs and mount it to server_3. $ fs_ckpt local_src –C 10. File systems local_src and local_dst should be the only file systems at this point. You should see three addition volumes create below the volume that you previously listed as the last volume. Lab 5 Page 13 . How many volumes have been created? _________________________________ What is the volume number of the last volume? ____________________________ 9. Create a checkpoint of the primary file system. Verify the creation of volumes used by the checkpoint. $ nas_fs –list Run nas_volume –list.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 7.

You will be converting the rawfs to uxfs later.hwm=50 $ fs_replicate –refresh local_src –o to=100.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 11. See your Student Guide for information on these values. The checkpoint rather than the actual file system will be the source for the copy. Create another checkpoint. Lab 5 Page 14 . $ fs_replicate –start local_src local_dst –o to=600. $ fs_replicate –refresh local_dst –o to=500. 12. Start Replication: Start the replication service between the primary and secondary file systems. $ fs_copy –start local_src_ckpt1 local_dst –option convert=no Note: It is important to use the convert=no option. Perform the initial copy of the contents of the primary file system to the secondary file: Using the fs_copy command from the Celerra Control Station. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Create another checkpoint of the primary file system. Use the nas_fs –list command to get the actual name of the checkpoint.hwm=600 13. All Rights Reserved. Specify a timeout option of 600 seconds and highwater mark of 600 MB. This will be used to incrementally update the destination file system since the initial copy. Remember. copy the contents of the primary file system to the secondary file system. if the “to” value is too small then the secondary file system would remain unavailable. $ fs_ckpt local_src –C 14. Change the parameters for Celerra Replicator and finish setup: Set the running parameters for the timeout and high water mark values for both the local_dst and local_src file systems.hwm=80 NOTE: The numbers are for lab purposes only.

list the contents of /studentx and /studentrep. Copy incremental changes that exist between the two checkpoints to the destination file system. Lab 5 Page 15 . Check the status of the replication. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. The contents of these directories should be the same.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 15. the file system will be converted from rawfs to uxfs. Export the local_dst file system from server_3 and mount it on the UNIX workstation: Export the local_dst file system from server_3 assigning root access to your UNIX workstation. $ fs_copy -start local_src_ckpt2 local_dst –fromfs local_src_ckpt1 16. $ server_export server_3 -option root=<UNIX Workstation> /local_dst Create a directory on your UNIX workstation named /studentrep and NFS mount this to /local_dst on server_3. Test Celerra Replicator: From your UNIX workstation. This step will incrementally update the destination file system with any changes since the initial copy. Note: you are not using the convert=no option so that after this step completes. All Rights Reserved. $ fs_replicate -list 17. # mkdir /studentxrep # mount <Data Mover ip>:/local_dst /studentrep 18.

# rm /studentrep/file3 You should be unable to delete since /local_dst is mounted as read-only by server_3. $ fs_replicate –info local_src –verbose 10 21. unmount /studentx and /studentrep. Change data on the Primary file system. All Rights Reserved. # cd /studentx # touch file1 file2 file3 20. These 3 files should be replicated to the secondary file system. You should see that the historical delta set that includes a number of blocks and when they were created and/or played back. Verify that the source is a full read-write file system. Clean up UNIX workstation: From your UNIX workstation. 24. Verify replication occured. Wait approximately 5 minute and list the contents of /studentrep. # cd / # umount /studentx # umount /studentrep Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Try to delete /studentrep/file3.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 19. Check the status of the replication. 22. then check to verify that it is removed from /studentrep. 23. Verify that the Secondary is read-only. Lab 5 Page 16 . Change to the /studentx directory and create three new files. Now remove /studentx/file3.

Permanently unexport all file systems for server_2 and server_3. $ fs_replicate –abort local_src Run nas_fs –list again. Delete all file systems and associated volumes. Delete all file systems and associated volumes so that all disk volumes are shown as not in use by nas_disk –list. Abort replication for the local_src file system. All Rights Reserved. Abort replication for the local_dst file system. $ fs_replicate –abort local_dst Run nas_fs –list again. What changes took place? ____________________________________________________ 28. Unmount all file systems. What changes took place? _____________________ 27. Lab 5 Page 17 . # server_umount server_2 –p –a # server_umount server_3 –p –a 29.Celerra ICON: Lab 5 25. End of Exercise Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. # server_export server_2 –u –p –a # server_export server_3 –u –p –a 26.

2006 .Celerra ICON Celerra Training for Engineering Lab 6: Celerra iSCSI EMC Education Services Date: February.

2006 Table of Contents: Exercise 1: Configuring iSCSI Targets on Celerra Exercise 2: Configuring Windows iSCSI Initiator and Testing access Exercise 3: Removing iSCSI configuration Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 6 Page 2 . All Rights Reserved.0 File Name 06_Lab6_iSCSI.doc Date February.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Document Revision History: Rev # 1.

4 April. 2005 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. and test access to the LUNs.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Lab 11: iSCSI on Celerra Purpose: Objectives: In this exercise you will configure a Windows workstation to access iSCSI LUNs on the Celerra. You will configure both the Celerra iSCSI target. • • • References: Configure iSCSI Target on the Celerra Configure iSCSI Initiator on your Windows workstation Removing iSCSI configuration Configuring iSCSI Targets on Celerra P/N 300-001-992 Rev A01 Version 5. and the Windows iSCSI initiator. Lab 6 Page 3 . All Rights Reserved.

Step 1. Create and mount a file system called iSCSI: Create a 10GB file system called iscsi using AVM and mount it. $ nas_fs –n iscsi –c size=10G pool=<pool_name> $ server_mount server_x iscsi /iscsi 3. $ server_ifconfig server_x -all 2. Action Validate network interface: Validate that a network interface is configured on your Data Mover.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Lab 11 Exercise 1: Configure iSCSI Target on the Celerra iSCSI on the Celerra allows the support of applications that require block-level data access. All Rights Reserved. Windows Exchange is a typical application that could take advantage of this technology. Create the Celerra iSCSI target: Create the iSCSI target. $ server_iscsi server_x –target –alias target_1 –create 1000:np=<IP address of your Data Mover> To list the iSCSI target just created. Lab 6 Page 4 . $ server_iscsi server_x –target –list Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.

8. $ server_iscsi server_x –lun –info –all –target target_1 6. Log on to your Windows workstation. Lab 6 Page 5 . Create 3 iSCSI LUNs: Create three. Note: Size is specified in MB. No other host will be able to “see” them. $ server_iscsi server_x –lun –number 1 –create target_1 –size 1000 –fs iscsi $ server_iscsi server_x –lun –number 2 –create target_1 –size l000 –fs iscsi $ server_iscsi server_x –lun –number 3 –create target_1 –size 1000 –fs iscsi To list the LUNs just created: $ server_iscsi server_x –lun –list 5. Configure LUN mask: Configure the LUN mask for the iSCSI initiator on the target. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 4. you will configure the Windows iSCSI Initiator and access the disks. 1GB iSCSI LUNs on target_1 using file system iscsi. All Rights Reserved. To find the fully qualified name of the iscsi initiator. & 3 to only the Initiator specified. 2. Display information about all the iSCSI LUNs that have been configured: To list information for all LUNs on target. In the next Exercise. 7. Start the iSCSI service: Start the iSCSI service: $ server_iscsi server_x –service –start The iSCSI target is now configured on the Celerra. launch Microsoft iSCSI Initiator > Initiator Settings tab > The full name is listed on the bottom of the screen. $ server_iscsi server_x –mask –set target_1 –initiator <fully qualified name of the iSCSI initiator> -grant 1-3 This command grants access to LUNs 1.

All Rights Reserved.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 6 Page 6 .

otherwise. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Validate initiator registration: The initiator’s Qualified Name (IQN) must be written to the Windows Registry.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Lab 6 Exercise 2: Configure the Windows iSCSI Initiator In Exercise 1. the Celerra iSCSI target were configured. 2. This is done in the Initiator Settings tab and has already been completed for you. All Rights Reserved. 3. In this exercise. Step Action 1. Launch the Windows iSCSI Initiator: Launch the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator from the desktop. you will configure the Windows iSCSI Initiator and verify that the hosts can access the Celerra iSCSI LUNs as it would any other disk device. Lab 6 Page 7 . the browse dialog boxes in the Celerra iSCSI host applications may not be able to find the initiator’s IQN. Log on to your Windows workstation as administrator.

There are two methods of discovery which can be used. ƒ SendTargets discovery where you manually configure the initiator with a target’s network portal and then the initiator uses the portal to discover all the targets accessible from that portal.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 4. All Rights Reserved. Lab 6 Page 8 . Click the Target Portals tab: Click Add and enter the IP address of the Celerra iSCSI target: Click OK. This is the method that will be used in this lab. Configure iSCSI discovery: Before an initiator can establish a session with a target. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. the initiator must first discover where targets are located and the names of the targets available to it. The initiator can then query the iSNS server for targets. The initiator obtains this information through the process of iSCSI discovery. ƒ Automatic discovery using an iSNS server where the initiators and targets all automatically register themselves with the iSNS server.

In order to access the target’s LUNs. On the iSCSI Initiator. select the Available Targets tab.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 5. All Rights Reserved. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 6 Page 9 . Select your target > click Log On Select Automatically restore this connection when the system boots > click OK. Log on to the iSCSI target: After you configure the initiator with the target’s network portal IP address. it will appear in the initiator’s Available Targets properties page. the initiator must log in to the target.

click Details. click the Active Sessions tab. 7. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. View session information: To view information about the new iSCSI session. Lab 6 Page 10 . View session detail: To view details about your session.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 6. All Rights Reserved.

start > programs > administrative tools > Computer Management > Disk Management. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Lab 6 Page 11 . you must configure the LUN as an accessible disk. the LUNS appear as unknown in Windows Disk Manager. All Rights Reserved. Before you can use the iSCSI LUNs. Disk 3) > select Write Signature Select all three disks and click OK. Begin by opening Disk Manager on your Windows workstation. Notice that the disk description changes from Unknown to Basic. Configure iSCSI drives: After the initiator logs in to a target. Right click the first Unknown disk (in this case.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 8.

When the LUNs have completed formatting. select the Initiator Settings tab.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 9. Lab 6 Page 12 . Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Create a new partition on the new disk: Right click on the unallocated space for the first disk > select Create Partition This will launch the Create Partition Wizard. test your configuration. close Disk Manager. Bind the LUNS so that they are automatically reconfigured at reboot. and Click Bind Volumes to have the initiator mark all volumes that have been created using iSCSI disks The Windows iSCSI Initiator configuration is now complete. Complete the prompts choosing Primary partition and perform “quick format” Complete the Create Partition Wizard for all three Celerra LUNs. Next. 10. In the iSCSI Initiator. All Rights Reserved.

This is required if you are using Terminal Services client or ICA client (MetaFrame) to access the Windows workstation. Log back on to your Windows workstation as administrator. refer to “Installing Celerra iSCSI Host Applications”. Lab 6 Page 13 . Do you see your new Celerra iSCSI devices listed? __________________________ 13. Click on Start > Shut Down > Log off Administrator and click OK Note: This is done for lab demonstration purposes only. the disks will not appear in “My Computer”. If you do not log off and back on. Test Read Write access to the iSCSI LUNs Create a file and save it to the new Celerra iSCSI device.Celerra ICON: Lab 6 11. Open My Computer on your Windows workstation. All Rights Reserved. 12. Were you successful? _______________________________________________ Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. For further information. Verify that you can “see” the iSCSI LUNS as formatted drives. EMC does not recommend the use of regular mode Terminal Services with the Celerra iSCSI host application. Test your iSCSI LUNs: Before you test your iSCSI configuration you must log off of the Windows workstation and then log back on.

Lab 6 Page 14 .Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

All Rights Reserved. • Click the Active Sessions tab > Log off. Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. Remove Targets: Select the Persistent Target tab > select the target and click Remove In Persistent Target. Remove the Target Portal: Select the Target Portal tab > select your available portal and click Remove. Step Action 1. remove all targets. Log on to your Windows workstation as administrator: 2. Lab 6 Page 15 .Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Lab 6 Exercise 3: Removing iSCSI Configuration As a final cleanup you will now remove the existing configuration. Log off of the iSCSI target on the Windows workstation: Launch the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator from the desktop. 3. 4.

$ 8. 6. 5. Lab 6 Page 16 .Celerra ICON: Lab 6 Logon to the Control Station as nasadmin. 7. $ server_iscsi server_2 -lun -delete 1 -target target $ server_iscsi server_2 -lun -delete 2 -target target $ server_iscsi server_2 -lun -delete 3 -target target $ server_iscsi server_2 -target -delete target Stop the iSCSI service: Stop the iSCSI service. All Rights Reserved. Delete all iSCSI LUNs and Celerra iSCSI target: Remove the iSCSI LUNs and the Celerra iSCSI target. $ $ server_umount server_2 –p /iscsi nas_fs -delete iscsi End of Lab Exercise Copyright © 2006 EMC Corporation. server_iscsi server_2 -service –stop Delete the iSCSI file system Delete the iSCSI file system.

IP Addresses. All rights reserved. LTD Hurricane Marine Windows Network Design Hurricane Marine Windows User and Group Memberships Hurricane Marine UNIX Users and Groups Hurricane Marine. Rev 5. Topic Hurricane Marine.Celerra ICON Celerra ICON Appendix Overview In this Appendix Appendix A: Appendix B: Appendix C: Appendix D: Appendix E: Appendix F: Appendix G: This Appendix contains the following topics. IP Addressing See Page 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation. and Schema Bibliography Switch Ports. Router Configuration.4 1 .

Now. LTD is a fictitious enterprise that has been created as a case study for Celerra training. LTD has utilized. Organization chart On the following page is the organization chart for Hurricane Marine. but there are also some potential needs that he may like to explore. Hurricane Marine. People Hurricane Marine. Their network runs exclusively on a TCP/IP network. LTD is a world leader in luxury and racing boats and yachts. Continued on next page Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation. Thus. LTD. Their success has been enhanced by EMC’s ability to make their information available to all of their staff at the same time. Techi has some needs that Celerra is required to fulfill. Techi in implementing EMC Celerra into his network. While their engineering staff does the bulk of their work in a UNIX environment. EMC and Hurricane Marine. LTD computer network consists of both a Microsoft network and UNIX. Appendixes have also been provided to assist you with the design of the IP network. You will find appendixes that outline the design of both the Microsoft and UNIX security structures. Hurricane Marine. Environment Hurricane Marine. EMC data storage has been the only EMC product Hurricane Marine. and is now looking to implement EMC Celerra as their key file server. You will be working closely with Mr. EMC has just installed EMC Connectrix ED-1032.4 2 . All rights reserved. LTD has implemented support for both systems.Celerra ICON Appendix A: Hurricane Marine. all employees have Microsoft Widows based applications as well. The head of his IS department is Ira Techi. they have opted to put an EMC Einfostructure in place. LTD Description Hurricane Marine. LTD Until recently. Mr. LTD’s president and founder is Perry Tesca. Rev 5. however.

LTD . Marketing Users Perry Tesca Liza Minacci Edgar South Earl Pallis Sarah Emm Seve Wari Ira Techi Perry Tesca Ellen Sele Eddie Pope Sadie Epari Scott West Iggy Tallis Liza Minacci Eric Simons Etta Place Sal Eammi Seda Weir Isabella Tei Edgar South Eva Song Egan Putter Sage Early Seiko Wong Ivan Teribl Earl Pallis Ed Sazi Eldon Pratt Sam Echo Sema Welles Ira Tech Evan Swailz Elliot Proh Santos Elton Selena Willet Sarah Emm Elvin Ping Saul Ettol Selma Witt Seve Wari Sash Extra Sergio Wall Sean Ewer Seve Wassi Seymore Wai Steve Woo Engineering Propulsion Earl Pallis Eddie Pope Etta Place Egan Putter Eldon Pratt Elliot Proh Elvin Ping Engineering Structural Edgar South Ellen Sele Eric Simons Eva Song Ed Sazi Evan Swailz Sales East Sarah Emm Sadie Epari Sal Eammi Sage Early Sam Echo Santos Elton Saul Ettol Sash Extra Sean Ewer Sales West Seve Wari Scott West Seda Weir Seiko Wong Sema Welles Selena Willet Selma Witt Sergio Wall Seve Wassi Seymore Wai Steve Woo Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation.Celerra ICON Appendix A: Hurricane Marine. LTD.4 Information Systems Ira Techi Iggy Tallis Isabella Tei Ivan Teribl Managers Perry Tesca Liza Minacci Earl Pallis Edgar South Sarah Emm Seve Wari Ira Tech 3 . Continued Hurricane Marine.Organization Chart Perry Tesca President Liza Minacci Dir. All rights reserved. Rev 5.

All rights reserved.com Computer Accounts: w2k1. asia. Root Domain: hmarine. is also being planned for future expansion.4 4 .corp. w2k3.127.com (future expansion) Though the root domain is present solely for administrative purposes at this time. w2k2.hmarine. w2k5. w2k6 All Data Movers All user accounts Domain Controller: hm-dc2. A third domain.hmarine.com Domain Controller: hm-1.com (a subdomain of the root) asia. Windows 2000 domains The Windows 2000 network in comprised of the following two domains: • • • hmarine.com domain (the root of the forest) corp.com Sub Domain: corp.com.com Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation.hmarine. corp.hmarine.*. all nodes have static IP addresses (See the IP Appendix). groups.hmarine. Rev 5.hmarine.com will hold containers for all users.Celerra ICON Appendix B: Hurricane Marine Microsoft Network Design Microsoft networking features DNS Server: 10.161 DHCP: Not in use. w2k4. and computer accounts.corp.hmarine.

Managers SEpari Sadie Epari Eastcoast Sales SEttol Saul Ettol Eastcoast Sales SEwer Sean Ewer Eastcoast Sales SExtra Sash Extra Eastcoast Sales SWai Seymore Wai Westcoast Sales SWall Sergio Wall Westcoast Sales SWari Seve Wari Westcoast Sales. Managers SEammi Sal Eammi Eastcoast Sales SEarly Sage Early Eastcoast Sales SEcho Sam Echo Eastcoast Sales SElton Santos Elton Eastcoast Sales SEmm Sarah Emm Eastcoast Sales. DOMAIN ADMINS LMinacci Liza Minacci Director of Marketing. DOMAIN ADMINS ITeribl Ivan Teribl IS. Rev 5. Managers ESwailz Evan Swailz Structural Engineers ITallis Iggy Tallis IS. Managers EPing Elvin Ping Propulsion Engineers EPlace Etta Place Propulsion Engineers EPope Eddie Pope Propulsion Engineers EPratt Eldon Pratt Propulsion Engineers EProh Elliot Proh Propulsion Engineers Administrator EPallis Domain Admins EPutter Egan Putter Propulsion Engineers ESazi Ed Sazi Structural Engineers ESele Ellen Sele Structural Engineers ESimons Eric Simons Structural Engineers ESong Eva Song Structural Engineers ESouth Edgar South Structural Engineers. DOMAIN ADMINS ITechi Ira Techi IS. Managers ITei Isabella Tei IS.Celerra ICON Appendix C: Hurricane Windows 2000 User and Group Memberships Hurricane Marine Windows 2000 Users & Group Memberships CORP Domain Username Full Name NT Global Group Earl Pallis Propulsion Engineers. DOMAIN ADMINS. Managers SWassi Seve Wassi Westcoast Sales SWeir Seda Weir Westcoast Sales SWelles Sema Welles Westcoast Sales SWest Scott West Westcoast Sales SWillet Selena Willet Westcoast Sales SWitt Selma Witt Westcoast Sales SWong Seiko Wong Westcoast Sales SWoo Steve Woo Westcoast Sales Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation. Managers PTesca Perry Tesca President. All rights reserved.4 5 .

mngr saleseas saleseas saleseas saleseas saleswes saleswes saleswes. mngr engstruc infotech infotech. mngr infotech infotech mngr mngr saleseas saleseas saleseas saleseas saleseas.4 6 . Rev 5.com Username & Password Full Name Group epallis Earl Pallis engprop.Celerra ICON Appendix D: Hurricane Marine UNIX Users and Groups Hurricane Marine UNIX Users & Group Memberships NIS Domain hmarine. mngr saleswes saleswes saleswes saleswes saleswes saleswes saleswes saleswes eping Elvin Ping eplace Etta Place epope Eddie Pope epratt Eldon Pratt eproh Elliot Proh eputter Egan Putter esazi Ed Sazi esele Ellen Sele esimons Eric Simons esong Eva Song esouth Edgar South eswailz Evan Swailz itallis Iggy Tallis itechi Ira Techi itei Isabella Tei iteribi Ivan Teribi lminacci Liza Minacci ptesca Perry Tesca seammi Sal Eammi searly Sage Early secho Sam Echo selton Santos Elton semm Sarah Emm separi Sadie Epari settol Saul Ettol sewer Sean Ewer sextra Sash Extra swai Seymore Wai swall Sergio Wall swari Seve Wari epallis Seve Wassi sweir Seda Weir swelles Sema Welles swest Scott West swillet Selena Willet switt Selma Witt swong Seiko Wong swoo Steve Woo Note: Password is the same as username Continued on next page Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation. mngr engprop engprop engprop engprop engprop engprop engstruc engstruc engstruc engstruc engstruc. All rights reserved.

4 7 . All rights reserved.Celerra ICON Appendix D: Hurricane Marine UNIX Users and Groups.x Nobody:/: itallis:NP:1012:105:Iggy Tallis:/home/itallis:/bin/csh sextra:NP:1034:103:Sash Extra:/home/sextra:/bin/csh settol:NP:1032:103:Saul Ettol:/home/settol:/bin/csh selton:NP:1029:103:Santos Elton:/home/selton:/bin/csh searly:NP:1020:103:Sage Early:/home/searly:/bin/csh listen:*LK*:37:4:Network Admin:/usr/net/nls: itechi:NP:1007:105:Ira Techi:/home/itechi:/bin/csh switt:NP:1033:104:Selma Witt:/home/switt:/bin/csh swari:NP:1006:104:Seve Wari:/home/swari:/bin/csh swall:NP:1035:104:Sergio Wall:/home/swall:/bin/csh uucp:NP:5:5:uucp Admin:/usr/lib/uucp: swoo:NP:1039:104:Steve Woo:/home/swoo:/bin/csh semm:NP:1005:103:Sarah Emm:/home/semm:/bin/csh noaccess:NP:60002:60002:No Access User:/: swelles:NP:1026:104:Sema Welles:/home/swelles:/bin/csh eswailz:NP:1027:102:Evan Swailz:/home/swailz:/bin/csh esimons:NP:1013:102:Eric Simons:/home/esimons:/bin/csh eputter:NP:1019:101:Egan Putter:/home/eputter:/bin/csh seammi:NP:1015:103:Sal Eammi:/home/seammi:/bin/csh esele:NP:1008:102:Ellen Sele:/home/esele:/bin/csh esazi:NP:1023:102:Ed Sazi:/home/esazi:/bin/csh epope:NP:1009:101:Eddie Pope:/home/epope:/bin/csh sys:NP:3:3::/: bin:NP:2:2::/usr/bin: lp:NP:71:8:Line Printer Admin:/usr/spool/lp Continued on next page Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation. Continued NIS Passwd file swillet:NP:1030:104:Selena Willet:/home/swillet:/bin/csh epallis:NP:1004:101:Earl Pallis:/home/epallis:/bin/csh swassi:NP:1037:104:Seve Wassi:/home/swassi:/bin/csh separi:NP:1010:103:Sadi Epari:/home/separi:/bin/csh esouth:NP:1003:102:Edgar South:/home/esouth:/bin/csh daemon:NP:1:1::/: swong:NP:1021:104:Seiko Wong:/home/swong:/bin/csh sewer:NP:1036:103:Sean Ewer:/home/sewer:/bin/csh secho:NP:1025:103:Sam Echo:/home/secho:/bin/csh eping:NP:1031:101:Elvin Ping:/home/eping:/bin/csh swai:NP:1038:104:Seymour Wai:/home/swai:/bin/csh itei::1017:105:Isabella Tei:/home/itei:/bin/csh adm:NP:4:4:Admin:/var/adm: iteribl:NP:1022:105:Ivan Teribl:/home/iteribl:/bin/csh ptesca:NP:1001:106:Perry Tesca:/home/ptesca:/bin/csh nobody:NP:60001:60001:Nobody:/: epratt:NP:1024:101:Eldon Pratt:/home/epratt:/bin/csh eplace:NP:1014:101:Etta Place:/home/eplace:/bin/csh swest:NP:1011:104:Scott West:/home/swest:/bin/csh sweir:NP:1016:104:Seda Weir:/home/sweir:/bin/csh nuucp:NP:9:9:uucp Admin:/var/spool/uucppublic:/usr/lib/uucp/uucico esong:NP:1018:102:Eva Song:/home/esong:/bin/csh eproh:NP:1028:101:Elliot Proh:/home/eproh:/bin/csh root:oiOEvBA22p40s:0:1:Super-User:/:/sbin/sh lminacci:NP:1002:106:Liza Minacci:/home/lminacci:/bin/csh nobody4:NP:65534:65534:SunOS 4. Rev 5.

4 8 .sextra.swari. engstruc::102:esouth.epallis.swelles.esele.epope.swassi.seammi.tty.iteribl.swong.itallis.secho.eplace.eputter.epratt.searly.swillet.adm bin::2:root.semm.esimons.lp.itechi.itei.se wer noaccess::60002: infotech::105:itechi.eproh.daemon staff::10:other::1: nuucp::9:root.esazi. Continued NIS Group file sysadmin::14: saleswes::104:swari.ptesca mail::6:root tty::7:root.daemon adm::4:root.eswailz nogroup::65534: engprop::101:epallis.swoo saleseas::103:semm. All rights reserved.swest.Celerra ICON Appendix D: Hurricane Marine UNIX Users and Groups.adm.sys. Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation.selton.swall.daemon lp::8:root.esong.separi.bin.uucp root::0:root mngr::106:lminacci.settol.sw ai.eping nobody::60001: daemon::12:root.adm sys::3:root.bin. Rev 5.nuucp uucp::5:root.esouth.switt.

127.127.127.*.127.*.127.224 10.*.224 10.*.*.127 10.127.94 10.191 10.*.123 255.127.127.*.*.127.127.*.255.150 255.0 10.31 10.224 10.127.14 255.127.224 10. All rights reserved.*.30 10.*.127.127.127.*.127.224 10.224 10.224 10.127.*.0 2/45:10 UNIX 10.*.255.127.127.191 10.153 255.127 3/28:42 Celerra 5 10.113 255.127.255.255.158 10.*.255.224 10.122 255.*.15 255.*.*.127.224 10.127.127.255.255.255.*.*.158 10.127.*.*.112 255.0 2/48:10 UNIX 10.72 255.127.*.255.12 255.94 10.*.*.*.255.224 10.127.*.255.127.127.127.127.*.127.*.*.*.132 255.*.127.255.127.255.*.31 10.127 10.158 10.*.159 10.255.*.224 10.96 2/9-12:41 Celerra 2 10.255.127.127 10.255.255.*.255.159 10.11 255.255.127.127.127.163 255.31 10.95 10.0 Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation.127.*.224 10.*.127 3/1-4:42 Celerra 4 10.64 2/37:30 Win2000 10.*.*.*.Celerra ICON Appendix E: Hurricane Marine IP Address and Schema Host IP Configurations Host/comp.224 10.127 10.127.*.127.30 10.127.95 10.*.127 3/29:42 Celerra 3 10.127 10.127.*.224 10.*.*.255.255.64 2/38:30 Win2000 10.224 10.159 10.224 10.127.127.127.127 2/21-24:42 Celerra 3 10.255.*.127.74 255.*.96 3/30:41 Celerra 6 10.4 On hm-1 3/32:Trunk 9 .127.127.127.127.*.255.255.96 3/27:41 Celerra 2 10.224 10.*.*.*.158 10.95 10.*.127.254 255.161 255.224 10.127.127.127.126 10.110 255.0 2/46:10 UNIX 10.*.127.*.*.140 255.159 10.255.*.127.127.*.127.*.126 10.*.94 10.127.127.*.224 10.*.*.255.159 10.*.127.224 10.*.*.127.*.31 10.158 10.152 255.255.64 2/40:30 Win2000 10.127.255.126 10.127.*.224 10.96 2/13-16:41 Celerra 2 10.127.255.127.*.255.96 2/1-4:41 Celerra 1 10.*.255.127.159 10.126 10.*.127.127.*.255.255.126 10.*.*.*.255.126 10.158 10.103 255.*.96 3/17-20:41 Celerra 6 10.127.127.*.*.127.127.255.*.73 255.*.*.255.30 10.31 10.127.*.127.127.*.127.255.255.*.*.127.127.127.127.255.64 2/42:30 Win2000 10.0 2/47:10 UNIX 10.127.127.255.64 2/41:30 Win2000 10.*.127.127 10.127.127.160 2/27:43 Root W2k 10.*.127.*.*.158 10.255.127 10.*.224 10.127.127.*.127.96 2/5-8:41 Celerra 1 10.127.94 10.30 10.127.*.224 10.127 3/26:42 Celerra 4 10.*.255.224 10.127.127.255.127.*.224 10.255.*.255.127.127.127.158 10.*.127.159 10.126 10.255.224 10.*.127.158 10.255.*.190 10.255.255.133 255.*.30 10.255.94 10.127.30 10.*.191 10.127.255.127 3/9-12:42 Celerra 5 10.127.127 10.255.*.255.75 255.64 2/39:30 Win2000 10.127.127.255.127.*.0 2/44:10 UNIX 10.142 255.127.127.127 3/13-16:42 Celerra 5 10.127.76 255.126 10.*.126 10.127.127.0 2/43:10 UNIX 10.255.102 255.16 255.255.224 10.*.*.*.*.127.224 10.127.224 10.255.*.127 10.*.162 255.255.127 2/17-20:42 Celerra 3 10.*.127.127.255.159 10.96 3/21-24:41 Celerra 6 10.127.120 255.127.127.*.*.127.*.96 3/25:41 Celerra 1 10.*.224 10.*.127.*.255.255.*.255.127.127.255.95 10.224 10.224 10.127.*.130 255.160 2/28:43 Corp W2K 10. Rev 5.127.255.*.127.*.127.*.224 10.255.127.*.127.190 10.255.255.127.*.95 10.127.*.*.*.*.*.255.*.*.160 2/29:43 NIS 10.255.94 10.127.127.255.255.127.*.224 10.*.253 255.*.161 255. Switch IP address Subnet mask Broadcast Gateway Network Sw port : VLAN Info 10.159 10.*. name sun1 sun2 sun3 sun4 sun5 sun6 W2k1 W2k2 W2k3 W2k4 W2k5 W2k6 cel1cs0 cel1dm2 cel1dm3 cel2cs0 cel2dm2 cel2dm3 cel3cs0 cel3dm2 cel3dm3 cel4cs0 cel4dm2 cel4dm3 cel5cs0 cel5dm2 cel5dm3 cel6cs0 cel6dm2 cel6dm3 hm-1 hm-dc2 nis-master DNS server Router E.127.13 255.31 10.190 10.95 10.71 255.100 255.*.143 255.127 3/5-8:42 Celerra 4 10.127.255.

Rev A01. Rev A01. Rev A01.4 10 . Version 5. Version 5. Version 5. Version 5. Version 5. Rev 5. 2005 Configuring and Managing Celerra Network High Availability P/N 300-002-015. Version 5. April.4.4.4. 2005 Celerra File Extension Filtering P/N 300-001-972. April. Rev A01. April.4.4. Version 5. Rev A01.4. Rev A01. Rev A01. Rev A01. April.4. Version 5. April.4. 2005 Configuring Virtual Data Movers P/N 300-001-978. April. April. Version 5. April. 2005 Configuring External Usermapper for Celerra P/N 300-002-023. 2005 Implementing Automatic Volume Management with Celerra P/N 300-002-078. Rev A01. 2005 Using SnapSure on Celerra P/N 300-002-030.4. April. Rev A01. Rev A01. April.4. 2005 Using FTP on Celerra Network Server P/N 300-002-019. Version 5.4.4. Version 5. Rev A01. April. Rev A01. 2005 Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. Rev A01. 2005 Using Quotas on Celerra P/N 300-002-029. April. Version 5. 2005 Using Celerra Replicator P/N 300-002-035.4. Version 5.Celerra ICON Appendix F: Bibliography Installing Celerra iSCSI Host Components P/N 300-001-993. April. 2005 Managing NFS Access to the Celerra Network Server P/N 300-002-036. 2005 Using Celerra Antivirus Agent P/N 300-001-991.4. 2005 Using Windows Administrative Tools with Celerra P/N 300-001-985. 2005 Configuring and Managing Celerra Networking P/N 300-002-016607. April. Version 5.

72 10.100 10.163 Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation.VLAN 43 Network Gateway Broadcast hm-1 hm-dc2 nis-master 10.127.*.32 10. All rights reserved.*.12 10.*.96 10.*.74 10.150 10.127.127.127.127.*.30 10. IP Addressing Cisco Systems 2980g Port layout Module 2 VLAN 41 1 3 5 7 cel1dm2 cel1dm3 2 6 4 8 VLAN 42 9 11 cel2dm2 10 13 15 cel2dm3 17 19 cel3dm2 VLAN 43 21 23 25 cel3dm3 12 14 16 18 20 22 11 13 15 17 19 21 24 VLAN 20 27 29 W2K NIS 31 33 VLAN 30 35 37 28 25 27 30 VLAN 10 41 43 W2kW W2K 26 39 32 34 36 38 40 45 47 Sun 42 44 46 48 Module 3 VLAN 42 1 3 5 7 cel4dm2 cel4dm3 2 6 4 8 VLAN 41 9 cel5dm2 10 12 cel5dm3 14 16 cel6dm2 18 23 cel6dm3 20 22 24 V 42 29 31 c1cs0 c2cs0 c3cs0 c4cs0 c5cs0 c6cs0 26 28 VLAN 42 30 T 32 V 41 Router Configuration Interface VLAN IP Address Interface VLAN IP Address Interface VLAN IP Address Interface VLAN IP Address 0/1 0/0 n/a 1 assigned 10.*.127.102 10.127.*.94 10.190 10.VLAN 10 Network Gateway Broadcast sun1 sun2 sun3 sun4 sun5 sun6 10.*.75 10.127.VLAN 42 Network Gateway Broadcast cel3cs0 cel3dm2 cel4cs0 cel4dm2 cel5cs0 cel5dm2 10.15 10.*.127.127.*.190 IP Addressing Subnet A .127.127 10.95 10.127.30 10.*.158 10.*.*.*.127.127.127.64 10.63 Subnet C .42 0/0.162 10.127.*.*.122 Subnet E .127.*.127.*.127.*.127 10.71 10.62 10.4 11 .127.127.*.*.14 10.*.127.112 10.127.*.*.*.127.*.127.*.127.*.127.*.*.*.*.30 0/0.132 10.*.*.*.127.10 0/0.VLAN 20 Network Gateway Broadcast Not in use DNS: 10.191 10.NAS Management Appendix G Switch Ports.127.127.*.127.16 Subnet B .*.160 10.*.13 10.*.120 10.41 30 41 10.73 10.*.158 10.127.127.127.127.*.127.127.127.*.127.127.127.126 0/0.127.142 10.152 Subnet F .127.*.254 0/0.0 10.161 10.*.94 10.126 10.140 10.127.43 42 43 10.76 Subnet D .130 10.127.159 10.31 10.110 10.127.*.127.20 10 20 10.127.163 NIS: 10.161 10.127.62 0/0.*.*.11 10.127.*.*.127. Rev 5.*.*.*.VLAN 30 Network Gateway Broadcast w2k1 w2k2 w2k3 w2k4 w2k5 w2k6 10.VLAN 41 Network Gateway Broadcast cel6cs0 cel6dm2 cel1cs0 cel1dm2 cel2cs0 cel2dm2 10.127. Router Configuration.127.*.127.

Rev 5. Router Configuration. IP Addressing Copyright © 2005 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.NAS Management Appendix G Switch Ports.4 12 .