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WEEKLY GUIDE

MAT 131-1419: MATHEMATICS III
Leonardo Torres Pagan, Ph.D

UNIT

Functions and their representations

Lesso
n

Functions and relations

DAY
Theme

Date

August

Specific
objectives

Concepts
and skills
Assessment
Consistently academic focused,
frequent & high quality, specific,
timely, high quality & relates to
lesson objective/sub-objective;
prompts student thinking;
assesses progress;
individualized & varied

Academic
Strategy

to

22

201
4

Groups 11-1

MONDAY
Cartesian Plane

18

WEDNESDAY

20

Functions and relations

Standards
Depth of
Knowledge

, 18

FRIDAY

22

Functions characteristics
A.PR.11.2.1: Determines the domain and range of functions
based on its different representations.

 Recall &
Reproduction
 Skills & Concepts

 Strategic Thinking  Recall &
Reproduction
 Extended
 Skills & Concepts
Thinking

At the end of the learning experiences of this day, the students will:
 Locate a point in the rectangular plane
 Interpret a point in the real context

Rectangular plane (Locate points, quadrants, axis, origin)

 Strategic Thinking  Recall &
Reproduction
 Extended
 Skills & Concepts
Thinking

At the end of the learning experiences of this day, the students will
 Determine whether a relation it’s a function
 Identify the independent and the dependent variable
 Evaluate functions
 Use the f(x) notation
 Given a table of value, draw a graph in the Cartesian plane
Functions and relation. Multiple representations (Recognize
functions, use function notation, evaluate functions &

Curricular integration. Technology

 Extended
Thinking

At the end of the learning experiences of this day, the students will
 Find the domain and range of a function

Domain and range (Determine the domain and the range of a
functions in ALL representations)

Exit sheet
Dark / Soft Blue card
Summarize

Curricular integration. Technology

 Strategic Thinking

Curricular integration. Technology

Diferentiated Instruction

LLE1

Word wall: Require students to use words from the Word Wall in their writing and to refer to the
Word Wall to find correct spellings. Leveled questions. Student journals. Math glossary. English
worksheets. Read clearly and slowly. Use motions, gestures, and facial expressions to
communicate. Model appropriate nonverbal feedback for students. Work in a group or with a
partner asking and answering questions about a current event or book. Listen to English movies.
Replace an academic language word with a social language word to aid in understanding and
building new vocabulary. Allow student to choose topics and partners. Preferred seating.
Complete a monitoring and self-evaluation chart. Pre-teach vocabulary using visuals. Pair words
with pictures. Place math symbols on a sheet. Encourage the use of math symbols. Use math
cognates. Use color marker to highlight key words. Allow students to nonverbally act out words
to help them process vocabulary without having to speak. Promote structured and appropriate
discussion that requires students to utilize words from Word Wall in their verbal responses. Write
simple sentences to answer questions. Combine written language with corresponding visuals
whenever possible. Provide a text that is challenging but engaging, focusing not only on
vocabulary, but also on grammatical concepts. Student Response Boards: Allow students to work
in pairs if they need more support or accept pictures as correct answers instead of written
language.

EE2

Use topics that are of interest to the student. Praise student for asking and answering questions.
Give the student a choice of topics. Provide frequent and specific feedback to the student on
performance. Preferred seating. Complete a monitoring and self-evaluation chart. Pair words
with pictures. Provide age appropriate materials. Provide graphic organizers for theme,
summarizing, mind maps. Combine written language with corresponding visuals whenever
possible. Provide a text that is challenging but engaging, focusing not only on vocabulary, but
also on grammatical concepts. Provide students with key words from the text and have them put a
checkmark next to a word. Allow student to check with a partner before answering or
commenting. Use marking strategies. Provide powerpoint slides. Sort examples and nonexamples appropriately. Provide students with examples and non-examples

Gifted &
Talente
d

Continuous Progress Curriculum (Flexible Pacing)—the content and pacing of curriculum and
instruction are matched to the student's abilities and needs. Advanced Placement (AP)—
students have the opportunity to complete college level coursework and earn college credit
through examination while still in high school. Ability Grouping—the flexible regrouping of
students based on individual instructional needs. Curriculum Compacting—allows highly able
students to "compact" or eliminate material already mastered from the curriculum, thus allowing
them to complete subject material in a shorter time span. Subject Acceleration—taking a course
earlier than is typical. Differentiation—the modification of instruction based on a student's
academic needs. Tiered Assignments—assignments within the same lesson plan which are
structured at varied levels of complexity, depth and abstractness to meet the need of students
with diverse abilities. Learning Contracts—give students freedom to plan their time and yet
provide guidelines for completing work responsibly. Problem-Based Learning—type of problem
solving in which students are presented with an "ill-structured" problem that resembles a real-life
situation. Students are responsible for identifying additional data and resources that they need
and for deciding how to present their findings and demonstrate their learning. Enrichment—
provides students with experiences in regular classrooms that are additional or supplemental to
the established curriculum. Mentorships—an enrichment program that pairs an individual
student with someone who has advanced skills and experiences in a particular discipline. This
mentor can serve as an advisor, counselor, and role model to the student.
***Actually there is no gifted or talented student identified in this classroom.

504

Actually there is no student identified for 504 accommodation or modification in this
classroom.

Word wall: Require students to use words from the Word Wall in their writing and to refer to
the Word Wall to find correct spellings. Leveled questions. Student journals. Math
glossary. English worksheets. Read clearly and slowly. Use motions, gestures, and facial
expressions to communicate. Model appropriate nonverbal feedback for students. Work in
a group or with a partner asking and answering questions about a current event or book.
Listen to English movies. Replace an academic language word with a social language
word to aid in understanding and building new vocabulary. Allow student to choose topics
and partners. Preferred seating. Complete a monitoring and self-evaluation chart. Preteach vocabulary using visuals. Pair words with pictures. Place math symbols on a sheet.
Encourage the use of math symbols. Use math cognates. Use color marker to highlight
key words. Allow students to nonverbally act out words to help them process vocabulary
without having to speak. Promote structured and appropriate discussion that requires
students to utilize words from Word Wall in their verbal responses. Write simple sentences
to answer questions. Combine written language with corresponding visuals whenever
possible. Provide a text that is challenging but engaging, focusing not only on vocabulary,
but also on grammatical concepts. Student Response Boards: Allow students to work in
pairs if they need more support or accept pictures as correct answers instead of written
language.
Use topics that are of interest to the student. Praise student for asking and answering
questions. Give the student a choice of topics. Provide frequent and specific feedback to
the student on performance. Preferred seating. Complete a monitoring and self-evaluation
chart. Pair words with pictures. Provide age appropriate materials. Provide graphic
organizers for theme, summarizing, mind maps. Combine written language with
corresponding visuals whenever possible. Provide a text that is challenging but engaging,
focusing not only on vocabulary, but also on grammatical concepts. Provide students with
key words from the text and have them put a checkmark next to a word. Allow student to
check with a partner before answering or commenting. Use marking strategies. Provide
powerpoint slides. Sort examples and non-examples appropriately. Provide students with
examples and non-examples
Continuous Progress Curriculum (Flexible Pacing)—the content and pacing of
curriculum and instruction are matched to the student's abilities and needs. Advanced
Placement (AP)—students have the opportunity to complete college level coursework and
earn college credit through examination while still in high school. Ability Grouping—the
flexible regrouping of students based on individual instructional needs. Curriculum
Compacting—allows highly able students to "compact" or eliminate material already
mastered from the curriculum, thus allowing them to complete subject material in a shorter
time span. Subject Acceleration—taking a course earlier than is typical. Differentiation
—the modification of instruction based on a student's academic needs. Tiered
Assignments—assignments within the same lesson plan which are structured at varied
levels of complexity, depth and abstractness to meet the need of students with diverse
abilities. Learning Contracts—give students freedom to plan their time and yet provide
guidelines for completing work responsibly. Problem-Based Learning—type of problem
solving in which students are presented with an "ill-structured" problem that resembles a
real-life situation. Students are responsible for identifying additional data and resources that
they need and for deciding how to present their findings and demonstrate their learning.
Enrichment—provides students with experiences in regular classrooms that are additional
or supplemental to the established curriculum. Mentorships—an enrichment program that
pairs an individual student with someone who has advanced skills and experiences in a
particular discipline. This mentor can serve as an advisor, counselor, and role model to the
student.
***Actually there is no gifted or talented student identified in this classroom.

Word wall: Require students to use words from the Word Wall in their writing and to refer to
the Word Wall to find correct spellings. Leveled questions. Student journals. Math
glossary. English worksheets. Read clearly and slowly. Use motions, gestures, and facial
expressions to communicate. Model appropriate nonverbal feedback for students. Work in
a group or with a partner asking and answering questions about a current event or book.
Listen to English movies. Replace an academic language word with a social language
word to aid in understanding and building new vocabulary. Allow student to choose topics
and partners. Preferred seating. Complete a monitoring and self-evaluation chart. Preteach vocabulary using visuals. Pair words with pictures. Place math symbols on a sheet.
Encourage the use of math symbols. Use math cognates. Use color marker to highlight
key words. Allow students to nonverbally act out words to help them process vocabulary
without having to speak. Promote structured and appropriate discussion that requires
students to utilize words from Word Wall in their verbal responses. Write simple sentences
to answer questions. Combine written language with corresponding visuals whenever
possible. Provide a text that is challenging but engaging, focusing not only on vocabulary,
but also on grammatical concepts. Student Response Boards: Allow students to work in
pairs if they need more support or accept pictures as correct answers instead of written
language.
Use topics that are of interest to the student. Praise student for asking and answering
questions. Give the student a choice of topics. Provide frequent and specific feedback to
the student on performance. Preferred seating. Complete a monitoring and self-evaluation
chart. Pair words with pictures. Provide age appropriate materials. Provide graphic
organizers for theme, summarizing, mind maps. Combine written language with
corresponding visuals whenever possible. Provide a text that is challenging but engaging,
focusing not only on vocabulary, but also on grammatical concepts. Provide students with
key words from the text and have them put a checkmark next to a word. Allow student to
check with a partner before answering or commenting. Use marking strategies. Provide
powerpoint slides. Sort examples and non-examples appropriately. Provide students with
examples and non-examples
Continuous Progress Curriculum (Flexible Pacing)—the content and pacing of
curriculum and instruction are matched to the student's abilities and needs. Advanced
Placement (AP)—students have the opportunity to complete college level coursework and
earn college credit through examination while still in high school. Ability Grouping—the
flexible regrouping of students based on individual instructional needs. Curriculum
Compacting—allows highly able students to "compact" or eliminate material already
mastered from the curriculum, thus allowing them to complete subject material in a shorter
time span. Subject Acceleration—taking a course earlier than is typical. Differentiation
—the modification of instruction based on a student's academic needs. Tiered
Assignments—assignments within the same lesson plan which are structured at varied
levels of complexity, depth and abstractness to meet the need of students with diverse
abilities. Learning Contracts—give students freedom to plan their time and yet provide
guidelines for completing work responsibly. Problem-Based Learning—type of problem
solving in which students are presented with an "ill-structured" problem that resembles a
real-life situation. Students are responsible for identifying additional data and resources that
they need and for deciding how to present their findings and demonstrate their learning.
Enrichment—provides students with experiences in regular classrooms that are additional
or supplemental to the established curriculum. Mentorships—an enrichment program that
pairs an individual student with someone who has advanced skills and experiences in a
particular discipline. This mentor can serve as an advisor, counselor, and role model to the
student.
***Actually there is no gifted or talented student identified in this classroom.

Actually there is no student identified for 504 accommodation or modification in
this classroom.

Actually there is no student identified for 504 accommodation or modification in
this classroom.

1 Departamento de Educación de Puerto Rico. (2014). Matemática 10-12: Estrategias de instrucción diferenciada: Estudiantes de limitaciones lingüísticas. Hato Rey, PR: Autor. intraedu.dde.pr/Materiales
%20Curriculares/Matem%C3%A1ticas%202014/Estrategias%20de%20educaci%C3%B3n%20diferenciada/Estudiantes_con_Limitaciones_Linguisticas_en_Espanol_Matematicas_grados_10_12.pdf

2 Departamento de Educación de Puerto Rico. (2014). Matemática 10-12: Estrategias de instrucción diferenciada: Estudiantes de limitaciones lingüísticas. Hato Rey, PR: Autor.
intraedu.dde.pr/Materiales%20Curriculares/Matem%C3%A1ticas%202014/Estrategias%20de%20educaci%C3%B3n
%20diferenciada/Estudiantes_del_programa_de_Educacion_Especial_Matematicas_grados_10_12.pdf

Connections

Transve
rsal
themes
Literatu
re
Other
disciplin
es
Powerpoint slides: Graph stories I
Materials &
Student worksheets Torres, L. (2014). Functions and
Resources
Incorporate multimedia&
resources beyond the
textbook; some activities
which are game like, involve
simulations, & demands self
directions and self
monitoring

models. Chapter 1: Investigation 1

Powerpoint slides: Graph stories II
Student worksheets Torres, L. (2014). Functions
and models. Chapter 1: Investigation 2

Powerpoint slides: Graph stories II
Student worksheets Torres, L. (2014). Functions
and models. Chapter 1: Investigation 2

LEARNING ACTIVITIES
The unfolding of the first few lessons reveals where the unit is headed. Students clearly know the unit/lesson goals, as well as the tasks, criteria, and standards by which their understanding will be determined. They are fully mindful of the priorities – what is most important and why. The unit has a powerful hook stimulated by thought- provoking experiences early on.
Students will likely pay more attention than usual and take a greater interest than usual in the complex ideas. They will more likely be so engaged or puzzled by the opening activities that they want to know more about the unit’s big ideas. The unit/lesson moves beyond facts to fully explore key ideas through illuminating experiences. Lessons and activities equip
students to effectively prepare for final performance tasks to demonstrate the targeted understanding. Lesson includes visuals, modeling, logical sequencing and segmenting (beginning, middle, ending); essential information; concise communication; grouping strategies; differentiated instructional strategies to provide intervention & extension; seamless routines; varied
instructional strategies; key concepts & ideas highlighted regularly. Clearly supports lesson objective(s); rigorous & relevant; time for reflection. Induce curiosity & suspense; provide choices & student-to-student interaction. Anticipate learning difficulties, regularly incorporate student interests & cultural heritage; differentiate instructional methods. The unit/lesson is
clearly interactive, requiring students to rethink key ideas as further learning and inquiry occur. The unit has built-in opportunity to revise work or performance in progress on the basis of feedback or unexpected results. The culminating products and performances reveal deeper understanding as a result of rethinking and revising. The unit/lesson culminates by
providing students with opportunities to consider the quality of their work, the value and meaning of the unit/lesson, and plans for logical next steps (e.g. pursue the issues raised in the unit/lesson or identify needed skill development). Students see the logic of the unit/lesson – how the lessons/activities are connected and flow together. They understand that the unit is
clearly focused on big ideas, overarching questions, and appropriate culminating performance tasks. Most students are directed toward important ideas or culminating performance tasks

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY
Explore and lift up

FRIDAY
From now on there will be ten short exercises at the beginning of the class. Some of these
problems are intended for review of skills from previous sections, chapters or levels. Others are
intended to test your general knowledge. Speed and precision is the key. Students will try to do
all ten problems in less than five minutes.

Development
Closure
Reflection/Wrap Up. Summarizing, reminding reflecting, restarting, connecting

QUIZ
Indicator

5

4

3

2

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR STUDENT IN INTERNET
HOMEWORK
Prepare

Practice

Elaborate

Prepare

Practice

Elaborate

RECOMMENDED TEST ITEMS
TEACHER REFLECTION

Prepare

Practice

Elaborate

1