Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 

 

1

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 

Visit us online
www.NorthStarCommunity.com

® 
   

Join us

Sundays at 10:45 a.m. Bon Air Elementary School
8701 Polk Street, Richmond, Virginia 23235

Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. Bon Air Baptist Church
2531 Buford Road, Richmond, Virginia 23235

Contact us
2531 Buford Road, Richmond, VA 23235 Information@NorthStarCommunity.com 800-908-2377

a televised service on CBS Channel 6, Richmond, Virginia 

Watch us Sundays at 11:30 a.m.

MECHANICSVILLE LOCATION

Sundays 10:30 a.m. Walnut Grove in Mechanicsville 7046 Cold Harbor Road, Mechanicsville, Virginia 804-746-5081     

 

2

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
STEP 1  We admitted that we were powerless over  our dependencies—that our lives had become  unmanageable.    January 1    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 1, 2, and 3      I have great plans for the New Year. I want to be  the “new” me! I plan on eating well, exercising,  doing my daily devotionals without fail, being kind to  others, and even keeping a tidy house in my spare  time. I can’t wait to see how I’m going to turn out in  the new year with all these resolutions for “right  living.”  But there’s one little problem ‐ on day one I  blew it! My husband, Pete, and I were heading home  from a quick, 24‐hour beach trip with dear friends.  So far, I had been practically perfect—healthy  breakfast and lunch, a leisurely quiet time, a brisk  walk—my year was turning out as planned. But  around 4:00 in the afternoon, when we were  heading home in the car, my beloved spouse opened  a gigantic bag of M&M’s. And like Eve and her nasty  fruit‐tasting incident, I succumbed to temptation and  ate from that bag of tempting chocolate. Now my  year is ruined. On the first day, I failed to be perfect.  How am I going to get to be the “new” me if I keep  living like the “old” me? My best‐laid plans stretched  out before me—all my potential and promise thrown  away—from a handful (or 2 or 3 or 4) of M&M’s!    How long will it take you to join me in the pursuit  of powerless living? I admit it – I am powerless in the  face of my potential for perfection. No amount of  positive thinking, practicing healthy habits, and  prayer seems to be enough to keep me from falling  prey to living in ways that leave me disappointed in  myself.     It’s true. I do not have the power to live life to my  exacting standards (note the emphasis on MY). Even  on the first day of a fresh new year, my life is not  working for me. As a believer, I admit that I do not  have the power to live life as God intends. Surely you  know these feelings have nothing to do with a few  M&M’s. You get that, right? Despite numerous  strategies and renewed efforts, most of us reach a  moment in time when we realize that our attempts  at perfection, control, and sustainable life  satisfaction have failed. The M&M’s are a  symptom—not the cause. (Take a moment to reflect:    What are some of your symptoms that show you  that you, like me, are not able to be like God— perfect and blameless?  Please also realize that  there’s nothing inherently evil about a handful of  tasty treats – that’s perfectionistic thinking).    Thought for today:  Adam and Eve had a fresh‐start  experience that failed too.  They were created by  God himself (they had no parental units to blame for  their major lapse in judgment). They had only one  instruction for what not to do (“do not eat from the  tree of the knowledge of good and evil”), and yet  they failed. They were powerless over their desire to  be like God (which is distinctly different from  desiring to imitate God by following His voice and  stepping as He speaks), and their lives became an  unmanageable mess. One of their kids became a  murderer, and another son was a victim at his  brother’s hand. God meted out consequences, one  of which resulted in them losing their home. Does  this sound familiar? Do you know anyone who is also  suffering like this today?  Think about it ‐ a man and  woman, fresh from the very hands of Creator God.  Two people who strolled with God himself in the  evening and were given the ultimate position of  power on earth. They had a marriage literally made  in heaven, and they blew it. They had it all, and it  wasn’t enough. Why, then, do we expect a different  experience? So for today, let’s acknowledge our  powerlessness and our unmanageable lives. Tune in  tomorrow to see why this is such great news!    Thought for tomorrow:  There’s nobody living right,  not even one, nobody who knows the score, nobody  alert for God. They’ve all taken the wrong turn;  they’ve all wandered down blind alleys. No one’s  living right; I can’t find a single one. Their throats are  gaping graves, their tongues slick as mud slides.  Every word they speak is tinged with poison. They  open their mouths and pollute the air. They race for  the honor of sinner‐of‐the‐year, litter the land with  heartbreak and ruin, don’t know the first thing about  living with others. They never give God the time of  day. This makes it clear, doesn’t it, that whatever is  written in these Scriptures is not what God says  about others but to us to whom these Scriptures  were addressed in the first place! And it’s clear  enough, isn’t it, that we’re sinners, every one of us,  in the same sinking boat with everybody else? Our 
3

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
involvement with God’s revelation doesn’t put us  right with God. What it does is force us to face our  complicity in everyone else’s sin. But in our time  something new has been added. What Moses and  the prophets witnessed to all those years has  happened. The God‐setting‐things‐right that we read  about has become Jesus‐setting‐things‐right for us.  And not only for us, but for everyone who believes in  him. For there is no difference between us and them  in this. Since we’ve compiled this long and sorry  record as sinners (both us and them) and proved  that we are utterly incapable of living the glorious  lives God wills for us, God did it for us. Out of sheer  generosity he put us in right standing with himself. A  pure gift. He got us out of the mess we’re in and  restored us to where he always wanted us to be.  And he did it by means of Jesus Christ. What we’ve  learned is this: God does not respond to what we do;  we respond to what God does. We’ve finally figured  it out. Our lives get in step with God and all others  by letting him set the pace, not by proudly or  anxiously trying to run the parade.  Romans 3,  selected verses from The Message     January 2    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 16 ‐ 21      Yesterday we looked at the kind of powerlessness  that grips us from the inside out. It’s the place in our  heart where our desire to be healthy and fit collides  with our inner couch potato and junk‐food junkie.  Why is it that the potato and junkie always seem to  win? That’s one kind of powerlessness. But there’s  another.    This is the kind of powerlessness that comes when  our life circumstances appear to place us in a  position of limited choices. We wish we had other  options, but it seems as if circumstances beyond our  control dictate our lives. I know a lady who feels like  she has no choice but to continue to give money to  her drug‐addicted son. Her support group tells her  this is codependent, enabling behavior. But she has  grandchildren that need shoes! Those babies need to  eat! She hears what her friends and family suggest.  She wishes she could follow their sound advice.  What about those babies?    When we have an abusive spouse but feel  compelled to stay for the children’s sake, or for    religious reasons, or simply because we can’t figure  out how to leave, we feel pretty powerless. I know  folks who feel absolutely powerless as they watch a  dreaded disease overtake a loved one. That’s a  pretty powerless situation too. There are many  different ways to experience powerlessness.    But it’s not all bad news.    Thought for today: Hagar is a great example for all  kinds of powerless living. As a servant with very few  choices, she is enlisted to act as a surrogate for  Abraham’s lineage. Abraham’s wife, Sarah, grew  impatient waiting for God’s promise of a son, and  she cast Hagar into the role of baby‐maker with  Abraham. When Hagar became pregnant, she  suffered under the illusion that now she had some  power. Boy, was she wrong. Read the whole story to  get a grip on all the sordid details. The bottom line is  that Hagar was indeed powerless. In fact, her  pregnancy increased her lack of power and level of  unmanageability. But here’s the hope: Once Hagar  acknowledged her powerless state, an angel of the  Lord came to her. He gave her words of  encouragement. Hagar, a servant, one of the lowliest  of the low in her society, had an intimate encounter  with God. Hagar understood what many of us miss:  God hears us when we cry out to Him. And he  responds. He gave Hagar wise counsel, and she  followed his advice. Abraham didn’t exactly rush to  Hagar and Ishmael’s aid when Sarah began to resent  them. Sarah never seemed to grasp that all this  chaos was the result of her own attempts to exert  power in a situation that God already had a hand in.  Life stayed messy for this “blended” family. But the  thing to remember is this: God heard the cries of  those who knew they were without power. I hope  this comforts you today. I hope this helps you  muster up the courage to admit all the powerless  and unmanageable parts of your life to the One who  hears.    Thought for tomorrow:  My people are broken –  shattered! – and they put on band‐aids, saying, “It’s  not so bad. You’ll be just fine.”  But things are not  “just fine”! Jeremiah 6:14 The Message     This is God’s word on the subject: …“I’ll show up and  take care of you as I promised and bring you back  home. I know what I’m doing. I have it all planned 
4

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
out – plans to take care of you, not abandon you,  plans to give you the future you hope for. When you  call on me, when you come and pray to me, I’ll  listen.”  Jeremiah 29:10‐12 The Message     January 3    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 22 – 25      Have you experienced any post‐holiday blues,  specifically the “jeans” blues? We’ve had the  Thanksgiving‐through‐Christmas binging, and now  our favorite jeans are snug. Don’t you hate that?  There’s another kind of blues too—the “genes”  blues. We’re living during such an interesting time in  history. Crime‐solving television shows like CSI have  taught us that we can learn a lot just by studying the  DNA unwittingly left at crime scenes. Cloning and  genetic testing give us windows into information  that no one could have dreamed of possessing a few  years ago.     My brother’s kids were out playing in their  driveway and someone got hurt. Blood was shed. My  nephew, Robby, a little tyke at the time, came  running in the house shouting, “Dad, dad, come  quick. There’s DNA all over our driveway!”  That’s a  far different perspective from when we were kids  and would get injured. We’d yell things like, “Mom,  Tim threw a dart and hit Gary between the eyes!  Blood is everywhere! I bet Tim’s in big trouble!”     With or without genetic testing, our genes have  been supplying us with the potential for  powerlessness for a long, long time. Recall the story  of Hagar and her son Ishmael. Ishmael was the son  conceived when Sarah gave Hagar (her servant) to  Abraham (Sarah’s husband) so that a child might be  conceived. Not surprisingly, barren Sarah gets pretty  tensed up when Hagar gets pregnant. Hagar starts  getting cocky with Sarah. Abraham is now stuck with  an angry wife and a servant carrying his son. God  steps in to provide for Hagar, Ishmael, Sarah, and  Abraham. But the seeds of anger and resentment  have been sown, and they show up in the genes.    Genesis 25:12‐18 gives us a glimpse into the DNA  of Ishmael and his descendents, “And they lived in  hostility toward all their brothers.”      Thought for today: Like Ishmael, we have some  genetic predispositions too. These inclinations leave    us powerless; our lives become unmanageable.  Research is revealing that even our personalities are  shaped by our DNA. We’re learning that our  environment and family systems may even alter our  chromosomes! How weird is that? Does that leave  you breathless? Do you look back into your family  tree and tremble with dread? No need for all this  fear! If we can acknowledge our powerlessness  potential, it puts us in a perfect position to accept  God’s generous response and saving grace. We’ll  look at more about that good news tomorrow.    Thought for tomorrow:  Through your faithful  prayers and the generous response of the Spirit of  Jesus Christ, everything he wants to do in and  through me will be done.  Philippians 1:19 The  Message    January 4    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 26 – 29    Through your faithful prayers and the generous  response of the Spirit of Jesus Christ, everything he  wants to do in and through me will be done.   Philippians 1:19 The Message      Philippians was written by Paul. I’d recommend  that you take a moment and read the first chapter in  this little book of the New Testament. You’ll recall  that Paul, a devout Jew and Roman citizen (a lot of  interesting implications packaged in those two  truths) once lived for the purpose of persecuting  Christians. He thought this was, as we say at  NorthStar Community, “a God thing.”  Then he had  an amazing conversion experience (you can read  about that in the book of Acts) and became a  missionary and itinerant pastor.     The man suffered for the cause. When he wrote  Philippians, he was facing trial in Rome. Depending  on the outcome, execution was a distinct possibility.  Paul, who experienced a wide range of plenty and  poverty, health and hardship, knew about  unmanageability and powerlessness firsthand. It is  from this kind of man that we can learn how to  hope.    The Greek word that Paul uses in this passage has  been translated “generous response.”  In other  translations, “supply” and “help given” are among 
5

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
the words chosen. It’s an interesting word.  According to Rick Renner’s book Sparkling Gems  from the Greek, (see January 2), the ancient word  literally means, “on behalf of the choir.”  Huh? It  helps to have Renner’s historical perspective.  According to his research, this word (used only twice  in scripture) came from a story of a miraculous  supply. It seems that thousands of years ago, a huge  choral and dramatic group worked endlessly to  create a huge production in ancient Greece.  Unfortunately, right before they were scheduled to  put the show on the road, they ran out of money.  Fortunately, a wealthy benefactor came forward and  “supplied/gave help/responded generously”—so  much so that the contribution was considered  overwhelming. The show went on.     He makes two points in this study: 1.  The actors  had given their all and were completely powerless,  without a single, solitary resource of any kind. 2. The  response of the benefactor was way over the top— excessively large—illogically generous.     So when our monsters within raise their ugly  heads and we feel powerless over our compulsions,  when our circumstances seem beyond enduring and  we believe we are without any healthy choices, and  even when our genetic history is questionable, we  can know this: the Spirit that Jesus Christ is donating  for our present cause is greater than all these  limitations. So, as the sign over my desk reads, “Put  your big girl (or boy) panties on and just deal with  it.”    No more excuses. No more power plays. Let’s just  admit our powerless state, join that ancient choir in  realizing our helplessness, and ask God to do what  He does best: provide generously for the helpless,  the hopeless, and the oppressed.     Thought for today: One of the things that strikes me  every year when I read through Genesis is the  repetition of family sin. The sins of the fathers tend  to show up in their children. The notable exceptions  seem too few and far between for me to be too  comfortable with my own baggage. It seems that the  only thing I have to offer as an antidote to multi‐ generational sin patterns is willingness—willingness  to tell the truth about my own predispositions,  willingness to be made willing, willingness to always  say earnestly, “I could be wrong.”  Join me, won’t  you?      Thought for tomorrow:  I know that nothing good  lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the  desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out.  For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the  evil I do not want to do – this I keep on doing. Now if  I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do  it, but it is sin living in me that does it.  Romans 7:18‐ 20 NIV    …everything he (Jesus) wants to do in and through  me will be done. Philippians 1:19(b) The Message    January 5    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 30 ‐ 31       “To me Step One is not just a step ‘to take’ and  then leave it behind and go on. Step One is a  growing awareness of one’s condition, and it should  be thought about, and the realization deepened  every day.” 1      Abraham eventually had a son by Sarah, and they  named him Isaac. Isaac had twin boys, Jacob and  Esau. Jacob in particular carried on one of the multi‐ generational patterns of sin: deception. Jacob was a  tricky trickster, and he used his clever ways to usurp  Esau (the official firstborn) of his birthright. It’s a  long story, with lots of good family systems stuff,  and I really want to retell it—but I won’t—so go read  it!    Anyway, after all the trickery, Jacob high‐tailed it  out of town and ended up working for a man named  Laban. Jacob fell madly in love with one of his  daughters, Rachel. In a twist of irony, Laban tricked  Jacob into working for him for seven years with the  promise that Rachel would be his bride, but instead  gave him his older daughter, Leah. Then Jacob had to  work an additional seven years to finally marry  Rachel. (This story is soap‐opera material!)    Finally, Jacob comes to a “step one” moment in his  life. He becomes aware of his condition. Jacob  responds to this growing awareness by becoming                                                              
 The Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, Some Personal Comments by Father Martin, Father Joseph C. Martin, Kelly Productions, Inc. 530 S. Philadelphia Blvd., Aberdeen, MD 210013498  6
1

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
more cagey in his dealings with Laban. Eventually, all  this manipulation results in Jacob gaining enough  wealth that he feels free to take both wives and flee  Laban’s control. Confrontation is inevitable. Read  Jacob’s response to Laban’s attempt to re‐exert  domination:    “What is my crime? What sin have I committed that  you hunt me down? I have been with you for twenty  years now. Your sheep and goats have not  miscarried, nor have I eaten rams from your flocks. I  did not bring you animals torn by wild beats; I bore  the loss myself. And you demanded payment from  me for whatever was stolen by day or night. This was  my situation: The heat consumed me in the daytime  and the cold at night, and sleep fled from my eyes. It  was like this for the twenty years I was in your  household. I worked for you fourteen years for your  two daughters and six years for your flocks, and you  changed my wages ten times.”  Genesis 31:36‐41      Jacob was seriously in touch with his situation.  How about you? Are you fully in touch with the  areas in your life that render you powerless and  leave your life an unmanageable mess?     Thought for today: As you continue reading, and if  you give this passage a lot of thought, you’ll  probably notice that Jacob wasn’t exactly coming  clean. He didn’t mention that his own efforts at  manipulation cleverly increased his personal wealth.  So even Jacob had some more work to do on step  one. This is good news for us. We don’t have to have  it all together to successfully take our first step. Let’s  just begin where we are able, and see how God will  lead!     Thought for tomorrow: One really cool part of this  story is Jacob’s awareness of God’s place in the  story. He believes that without God’s intervention,  Laban’s manipulations would have worked.    “If the God of my father, the God of Abraham and  the Fear of Isaac, had not stuck with me, you would  have sent me off penniless. But God saw the fix I was  in and how hard I had worked and last night  rendered his verdict.”  Genesis 31:42 The Message      I love knowing that God’s provisions for me are not  dependent on my perfect behavior.    January 6    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 32 ‐ 36      Have you participated in a family feud? That can  be nasty stuff. The incident with Jacob and Esau  makes the rest of us family feuders look like  amateurs. In the scripture reading today, you’ll have  an opportunity to study their reconciliation. Notice  Jacob. He continues to cleverly manipulate those  around him. He sends his servants, wives, and  children ahead of him. Were they his human shields?  What was he thinking? Did he decide that if Esau  came out swinging, the terrified cries of his family  would give him ample warning and he could flee?     What else did Jacob think about on his long and  dusty ride home? Certainly he worried about Esau’s  response. But did he also remember his mom’s  home cooking? When he couldn’t sleep at night, did  he toss and turn in his tent, remembering the days  of childhood? Did flashes of fun times with Esau pass  through his memory? As he traveled with his own  children, did he remember the times when Isaac first  taught him how to ride a camel, or find water in the  desert?     Our memories are quite selective. In the midst of  feuding, loved ones become the enemy. We stew  and stew, remembering their offenses against us.  The pressure builds. Our resentments increase. Our  plans for revenge take shape. Forgotten are all the  memories of better times. People who once  enriched our lives become caricatures, stick figures,  one‐dimensional beings—shadows of their true  selves. We pick out the things that we can attack,  and off we go. We rally our defenses and mount our  high horses. Yes, our memories are quite selective.    It has been my experience that most people who  seriously need a step one experience have a history  of broken relationships. I’m not talking about the  normal tiffs and arguments that are inevitable; they  flare up and quickly die out, never to be  remembered again. I’m talking about painful,  unresolved, abundant‐life‐threatening, family‐ dividing, feuds. I’m talking about the chronic  brokenness that results in people sitting at home,  driving down the road, watching TV, working out—
7

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
and constantly remembering the offenses of others  perpetrated against them. How many years did  Jacob and Esau think of each other in this way before  the embers of their rage grew cold? How long has it  been for you, that you’ve stewed in the anger of a  busted relationship?    Step one may be the first step in healing the pain  of betrayal. It is acknowledging our powerless state  in our damaged relationships. It’s taking a good,  hard look at the consequences and unmanageability  that have resulted in our inability to play well with  others.    It’s an opportunity to begin to remember more  than just the pain.    Thought for today:   For this reason, I [Paul] remind  you [Timothy], to fan into flame the gift of God which  is in you.  2 Timothy 1:6 NIV      “Remind you” literally means to re‐gather, to  recollect memories, to be reminded of something  repetitively. It’s normal to obsess over wrongdoing.  Everyone does it. But if we want the abundant life  that Jesus says he came to provide for us, it’s not  good enough to just do what everyone else does. If  we want to live God’s big dreams for us, we’ve got to  be willing to learn how to see life through His eyes.  Creator God, the one who knows us best (after all,  He made us), encourages us to remember more than  just today’s hardships and petty grievances. He tells  us that he wants us to remember the gift of God  which is in you. The gift of God is in you. God has  planted something in you that he wants to fan into  flames. Not flames of hot anger and burning  resentment, but a flame that lights our world—a  flame that makes a difference. This kind of flame  serves a purpose, and it is a good one. No—it’s a  great one. It is a purpose that is custom made by  God himself and hand delivered, planted in your  heart. It is my prayer that each of us will begin to  change what we’re remembering.     Thought for tomorrow:  Our deepest fear is not that  we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are  powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our  darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves,  “Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented and  fabulous?”  Actually, who are you not to be? You are  a child of God. Your playing small doesn’t serve the    world. There’s nothing enlightened about shrinking  so that other people won’t feel insecure around you.  We were born to manifest the glory of God that is  within us…And as we let our own light shine, we  unconsciously give other people permission to do the  same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our  presence automatically liberates others. (Nelson  Mandela)    January 7    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 37 – 38    This is the account of Jacob and his family. When  Joseph was seventeen years old, he often tended his  father’s flocks. He worked for his half brothers, the  sons of his father’s wives Bilhah and Zilpah. But  Joseph reported to his father some of the bad things  his brothers were doing. Jacob loved Joseph more  than any of his other children because Joseph had  been born to him in his old age. So one day Jacob  had a special gift made for Joseph – a beautiful robe.  But his brothers hated Joseph because their father  loved him more than the rest of them. They couldn’t  say a kind word to him.   Genesis 37:2‐4 New Living  Translation      If a family wants to experience unmanageability,  Jacob sets before us an excellent model. Favoritism  in families is terrible. As you continue to read  through Genesis, you will discover that Joseph’s  brothers did a terrible thing to him. They caused a  lot of grief to fall upon their family. But in all the  excitement surrounding sibling violence, let’s not  overlook this point: Jacob screwed up. There is no  excuse for favoritism. Never.     I wonder if your family might be suffering some  damaging consequences from favoritism. I wonder if  you have ever shown favoritism. (Think about this— what we see modeled, we usually repeat.)      One of the reasons I love reading scripture is  because it is so real. Since scripture is God‐breathed  and inspired by Him, I realize that this was a choice  on God’s part. How many books have you ever read  like this? God tells it like it is, but with love. In  communicating the stories of a litany of men and  women who loved Him, he didn’t edit out the messy  parts. He named them. David was a man after God’s  own heart, but he was also an adulterer and 
8

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
murderer. Jacob was a tricky trickster who showed  favoritism to his son, to the detriment of his family.  God used all this pain and ultimately brought about  reconciliation and even provision for this hurting  family. I love how He does that.     He can do that for your family too. He can. But you  must be willing to ask. You must be willing to  acknowledge the pain. You must be willing to tell the  truth about how powerless you and your family have  been over the multi‐generational patterns of sin that  continue to course through your veins. I pray that  today you will ask the Lord, “Is there anything in my  life that causes You grief?”  And when He answers,  agree with Him.    Thought for today:  And do not bring sorrow to  God’s Holy Spirit by the way you live.  Ephesians 4:30  New Living Translation      The Greek word used for sorrow in this passage is  “lupete” – meaning, the pain or grief that can only  be experienced by two people who deeply love each  other. I suspect that this is the kind of grief Jacob’s  family experienced during the years we will read  about in scripture over the next few days. Because  we don’t know these family members personally, it’s  easy to find fault with all of them, and judge them  rather harshly. (What was the baby of the family  thinking, squealing on the older siblings? If my kid  brother had done that we would have tried to  smother him with a mattress!)   So let’s not get lost  in the detachment. Let’s remember that these guys  were a real family, and they suffered—just like many  of our families have—because we have all failed at  some point to love each other well.  We don’t like to  think about that, do we? Then we read this verse in  Ephesians, and we may decide that the way not to  grieve the Holy Spirit is to stop messing up. So we  berate ourselves and promise to do better in the  future. Of course, that would be great! But I don’t  think that’s really what this passage is asking of us.  As a parent, I read this verse differently. I am not  sorrowed when my children make mistakes—that’s  how children learn. What sorrows me is when they  refuse to acknowledge their wrongdoing. Why does  that grieve me so? Simply because I love them, and I  know that when they fail to learn from their  mistakes, the pain of the error is in vain—it’s  wasted—and they will likely make the same mistakes    again. A mother wants her children to learn from  their mistakes. Learning from a mistake begins with  admitting that we made one. Hear this: God knows  we are going to mess up. I have come to believe that  He is less desirous of perfection than He is humility.  May today be a day when you rejoice as you freely  admit your powerlessness in some area of your life.  Trust me. You will be amazed at how taking the first  step now may ultimately lead to a future where you  actually are transformed and make fewer errors of  judgment.     Thought for tomorrow: My dishonesty made me  miserable and filled my days with frustration. My  strength evaporated like water on a sunny day until I  finally admitted all my sins to you and stopped trying  to hide them.  Psalm 32:3‐5 The Living Bible    January 8    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 39‐41      If history ever produced a powerless figure, it was  Joseph. When you decide your life is unmanageable,  make a note to yourself: reread the stories about the  life of Joseph. A favored son with a beautiful coat to  prove it, his brothers throw him in a well and even  sell him into slavery. Sounds terrible, but: “The Lord  was with Joseph, so he succeeded in everything he  did as he served in the home of his Egyptian master.  Potiphar noticed this and realized that the Lord was  with Joseph, giving him success in everything he did.”  (Genesis 39:2‐3 NLT) For a guy sold into slavery,  Joseph was doing very well ‐until Potiphar’s wife got  the hots for him. Virtuous Joseph rebuffs her  advances but the revenge‐filled Mrs. Potiphar still  manages to get Joseph locked up in prison.     Seriously, this is soap opera material. Read it. But  for our purposes today, I want us to look at two key  points.   • Joseph was powerless and his life was  unmanageable at every turn. Joseph just kept doing  the next right thing. We can make the same choice.  As we name our powerlessness and acknowledge  the parts of our life that are unmanageable, we do  not need to become victims of our own personal  dramas. We can choose to just keep doing the next  right thing.  
9

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
• In spite of all the dire circumstances surrounding 

Joseph, God was with him. We too have this same  promise. Scripture teaches us that God will never  leave us nor forsake us. Practicing the principles of  recovery require us to come to accept this truth,  even when we can’t see evidence of it in our daily  lives. “But the Lord was with Joseph in the prison and  showed him his faithful love.” (Genesis 39:21NLT) No  matter what your situation, the Lord is with you too.  I want to encourage you to put on your God‐vision  goggles and strain to see the unseen. Ask the Holy  Spirit to reveal God’s presence in your life today.  Then look through the seen world into the unseen  and enjoy the practicing the presence of God.     Thought for today: I know your life may be a mess. I  suspect that even if you think your life is just  peachey, there are some messy parts hidden away in  the closets of your heart. Perhaps today is truly your  happy day – filled with good things and not one iota  of heartburn on the horizon. In all these things, God  is with you. So it is possible today to celebrate His  presence in either the messiness or the blessing of  his good gifts.     Thought for tomorrow: Many are the plans in a  man’s heart, but it is the Lord’s purpose that prevails.   Proverbs 19:21 NIV     January 9    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 42‐45      Only desperate people are willing to do desperate  things. People are simply reluctant to change their  established patterns of behaving. Consider the story  in Genesis you are about to read. Joseph, by the  grace of God, now rules all of Egypt. Famine has  struck his homeland, and Jacob sends all his sons  (with the exception of Benjamin, the youngest—see  Gen. 35:24) to Egypt to buy grain.    As ruler, Joseph is the dispenser of the grain.  Through a series of events orchestrated by Joseph to  test the hearts of his brothers, Joseph finagles a way  to require them to return to Egypt with the youngest  brother. They promise to comply. But they break  their promise, because Jacob refuses to cooperate.    A continued famine and starvation force them to  re‐evaluate and ultimately to return to Egypt. That’s   

the kind of desperation I’m talking about. If the heat  isn’t really hot, people are simply not going to  change their ways.    Unless and until you admit that you are powerless  and that control in this life is an illusion, your life will  stay pretty much the same. I once had a recovering  addict tell me that being told that his addiction  would kill him had no effect on him. (He welcomed  death.)  But what compelled him to seek a new way  was this statement: “Man, you could live like this for  the next 50 years.”    So may I reiterate the wise words of this  anonymous man? “You could live like this for the  next 50 years!”  Is that what you want?    Thought for today: Despite what some might say,  God is still in the miracle business. Your miracle may  be just a few short minutes away. Consider allowing  today to be the first day of your new powerless  life—a life where you are willing to tell the truth  about who you are and what your life is like—and  trust God to make a beautiful garden out of what  may now look like a pile of manure.    Thought for tomorrow: There is no wisdom, no  insight, no plan that can succeed against the Lord.  Proverbs 21:30 NIV    …a man is a slave to whatever has mastered him.  2  Peter 2:19 NIV    January 10    Scripture reading for today: Genesis 46‐50      As we finish up our reading in Genesis today, I  can’t wait for you to read one of my favorite verses  in scripture:    “You intended to harm me, but God intended it all for  good. He brought me to this position so I could save  the lives of many people.”   Genesis 50:19 NLT      [Joseph speaks to his fearful brothers after his  father’s death. His brothers, assuming that Joseph  has waited to avenge their cruelty until after the  death of their dad, have lived in a constant state of  dis‐ease—waiting for the other shoe to drop.] 
10

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  I just love this verse! I love it because Joseph  provides us with a model that embraces both  honesty and kindness. I’ve often stopped after  reading this verse and thought about how a less  healthy person might have handled this whole  situation.   • Joseph could have bought into the lie that he was  a victim of life’s cruel tricks. Thrown into a well, sold  into slavery, falsely accused and imprisoned for a sex  crime he did not commit, he could have used all  those unfortunate circumstances to decide he was a  cursed man. That decided, he could have become  rage‐filled, depressed, suicidal, self‐destructive, or  other‐destructive.  • Joseph, eager to keep the family reputation intact  and desperate for familial relationship, could have  decided to believe that all that his being thrown into  the well and sold into slavery was just an adolescent  prank gone bad. He could have minimized the  intentions of his siblings. Living in denial, how  effective would his choices been in the future?  Burying all that unnamed resentment could have led  him to self‐medicate. Mrs. Potiphar was certainly  willing to ease his pain.   • Joseph could have been honest with himself about  his brothers’ intentions and developed a desperate  need to prove them wrong. As a young boy, Joseph  had been given the vision of leadership. He could  have worked hard and achieved his same status in  Egypt—driven by insecurity rather than blessing.  From that frame of mind, he would have used his  power to subdue his brothers in their time of need.  He could have used trickery and deceit in a way that  resulted in the ruination of his family.    But Joseph did none of those things. Joseph chose  to firmly clamp on his God‐vision goggles and  recognize the hand of God in every situation. I can  imagine how he sat in his jail cell and remembered.  Joseph remembered well. He remembered his  calling; he remembered God’s favor, blessing,  presence, and plan; he remembered the hurt  suffered at the hand of his family. Yes, he  remembered all of that. Because of the way Joseph  remembered, he was able to suffer heartache and  disappointment without self‐destructing. That, my  friends, is why I love this verse!    Thought for today: Joseph reminds us that accepting  the messy truths of our lives, when combined with a    spiritual framework for interpreting life’s ups and  downs, can help us live our big dream AND deal with  our big disappointments in a way that does not  derail God’s plans for us. I pray that today, you will  find a new, more truthful, more blessed way to  understand your past, so that you can live a more  abundant present!    Thought for tomorrow:  We were under great  pressure, far beyond our ability to endure, so that we  despaired even of life. Indeed, in our hearts we felt  the sentence of death. But this happened that we  might not rely on ourselves but on God, who raises  the dead.  2 Corinthians 1:8‐9 NIV    January 11    Scripture reading for today: Malachi      If you’ve joined me in reading through the book of  Genesis, I wonder if you notice the cycle of shame.  The book starts out promising.  Creator God pauses  as He creates and crys out ‐ “It is good!” – (as He  makes man in his own image). Adam waxes poetic  about his beautiful, newly minted bride. “CEO of the  garden” must have been an awesome career path.     Then comes the nasty fruit‐tasting incident, and  the cycle begins. Pain comes to Adam and Eve in  various forms. They respond with fear (Who  wouldn’t? God gave them one negative instruction,  and they couldn’t even manage NOT to do that one  little thing…) Shame has entered the picture, and  suddenly Adam is afraid to be seen naked in front of  God. Blaming comes next; Adam blames Eve. They  get kicked out of the garden and the next thing you  know, they’re having trouble with their kids. Sound  familiar?     We have our cycles of pain too. Perhaps you can  take some time to reflect this week and pay  attention to your own cycles of pain. For addicted  people it goes like this: pain, reaching for pain relief,  short‐term pain reduction, negative consequences,  shame and guilt, renewed efforts to behave, buildup  of pressure, more pain, and then more acting out.  If  you want more information on this cycling, you may  want to check out the January 13‐14, 2007 message.   Look for it at www.northstarcommunity.com.   
11

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today: I will leave you today with one  thought. Lots and lots of people have been caught in  the trap of the cycle of shame. Some have learned a  new way of living. They found it by busting out of  their denial and fear of the pain of change. There is  help within the community of people who’ve learned  how to find their freedom. It’s my prayer that you  find that resource and embrace it if indeed you need  it!    Thought for tomorrow:  You will never succeed at  life if you try to hide your sins. Confess them and give  them up, then God will show mercy to you. Proverbs  28:13 Good News Bible    January 12    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 1 ‐ 3      Yesterday’s devotional addressed a cycle of  shame.          There are three reasons why we reject the  opportunity to jump off the “ride”. Dale Ryan, co‐ author of a wonderful devotional book called Rooted  in God’s Love: Meditations on Biblical Texts for  People in Recovery says this:     “There are three common but unhelpful ways of  dealing with our failures and sins.     • First, there is denial. We tell ourselves that  everybody has problems, so it doesn't really matter.  Nothing of any value comes from this effort to cover  up.   • A second unhelpful strategy is to blame others for  what has happened. This can range from different  versions of 'the‐devil‐made‐me‐do‐it' to 'I'm just a  product of my environment'. Nothing of any value  comes from this effort to cover‐up.   • Thirdly, instead of turning the emotional energy  outwards in blame we can turn it against ourselves  as self‐loathing. We see ourselves as monsters and  what we have done as unforgivable. Nothing of  value comes from this effort to atone for our own  sins.    God invites us to another path. God invites us to  be transformed. God invites us to stop denying,  blaming and catastrophisizing about our lives. In  order to change and grow we need to face the  reality of our actions and attitudes. We need to  understand that our sins are like scarlet, like  crimson. They are life‐draining. Destructive. But we  are forgivable. We are invited to receive forgiveness.  And we are invited to change. The life‐draining  behaviors that we have pursued can be changed.  Changed from bright red to snow white. We do not  have to let denial, blame and shame lock us into  destructive, hurtful patterns. We can be clean and  sober. White as snow. Forgiven.”     [You can sign up to receive emails related to this  book by visiting www.Nacronline.com. Also, I added  the bullets and the color – the rest is a quote from  NACR January 11th's email meditation and found in  the book, Rooted in God’s Love.]     Thought for today: I pray that today you will have  the opportunity to meditate on Dr. Ryan’s three  “unhelpfuls”: 1) Denying; 2)  Blaming and 3)  Catastrophisizing –  asking the Holy Spirit to renew 
12

 

 

    If you’ve ever been on this particular merry‐go‐ round, you know its dizzying, disorienting effects.  The faster you run through the cycle, the sicker you  feel. Can you relate? Whether you admit it to  yourself or not, the truth is: all of us can relate to the  need for a deliverer from our circle of shame.    

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
your mind and to help you see yourself just a bit  differently…a bit more truthfully, a lot more gently…     Thought for tomorrow:  Come now, let us reason  together, says the Lord. Though your sins are like  scarlet , they shall be as white as snow; though they  are red as crimson, they shall be like wool.  Isaiah  1:18 NLT    January 13    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 4; Psalm 84  and 85        A Brief Look at the Gospels      If you are following along with our devotional  reading, you know that yesterday we began reading  the gospel of Matthew. This is the first of the four  gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John), which are  found in the New Testament portion of the  scriptures. The first three gospels are pretty similar,  while John has some noticeable differences in  material. This used to freak me out.    When I first began reading scripture, I didn’t like  any incongruence in the telling of the story of the life  of Jesus. The problem, I have come to discover, was  with some basic misunderstandings on my part. I  was reading these books as if they were four  different news accounts by four different  eyewitnesses. I expected a bit of variation, but I was  focused on the timeline of events, not the content.    God did not share my perspective as His Spirit  guided these early recorders. Time was not His  emphasis; He was trying to make a point, a different  point, in each of these accounts. In the book of  Matthew, the apostle Matthew (who was a tax  collector) was the human author. Scholars love to  argue about this kind of thing, but most people  agree on this point.    Which gospel came first in the time line? Again,  there is lots of debate, but most scholars would say  that Matthew was written after Mark.     What is the purpose for this book? Matthew is  driven to prove to his Jewish readers that Jesus is  their Messiah. He accomplishes this through  comparing the life of Jesus with the prophetic words  about the Messiah written in the Old Testament. He    draws heavily on the history of God’s people—a high  value for the Jewish culture.    Matthew knew what we experience: all of us are in  need of a deliverer. Jesus represents hope. Matthew  tells a story of hope. But what I particularly love  about scripture is true in this gospel: God keeps it  real. Tomorrow we’ll examine one very real portion  of this gospel.    Thought for today: I wonder what particular  strategies you have used to save yourself from the  inevitable burdens associated with living on planet  earth. Have you self‐medicated, self‐improved, self‐ helped? Taking personal responsibility for our lives is  a good thing. Believing the illusion that we are in  control and responsible for the outcome of our  efforts is denial and is usually discouraging.     Common strategies: workaholism, addiction of  various forms, hypochondria, body image  obsessions, perfectionism, isolation, addiction to the  approval of others    Thought for tomorrow:  When he [Jesus] saw the  crowds, he had compassion on them because they  were confused and helpless, like sheep without a  shepherd.   Matthew 9:37 NLT    January 14    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 5; Psalm 86 ‐  88    When he [Jesus] saw the crowds, he had compassion  on them because they were confused and helpless,  like sheep without a shepherd.  Matthew 9:37 NLT      When I was a kid, my three younger brothers and I  used to get kind of wild. Every night after dinner, our  parents would drink coffee and eat dessert and we’d  run upstairs to our rooms to play. It usually got loud  and rough and resulted in injury. So a tradition  began. As the noise escalated and the chandelier  shook, my dad would begin speaking, then hollering,  “Don’t make me come up there!”  Finally, the chaos  would result in my dad coming up and intervening.     That’s what shepherds do; they intervene. Why do  shepherds get up from a good cup of coffee,  pleasant conversation, and a yummy dessert?  Because they have compassion on their confused 
13

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
and helpless sheep. Kids don’t know what is best for  them. Sometimes we can get to be 45 years old and  realize that in some ways we’re still like a small  child—confused and helpless, like sheep without a  shepherd.    Notice that the shepherd is motivated by  compassion, not control. He doesn’t condemn the  sheep because they’re acting like sheep. He  intervenes because he loves those silly sheep. The  shepherd also distinguishes between judging and  using good judgment—an important point. Judging  the sheep would lead to blaming, shaming, and  condemnation. Using good judgment requires the  shepherd to pause to prepare and decide the best  course of action for the sheep.    I think all of us just expect Jesus to be  compassionate. After all, he’s the Son of God! But he  was also the son of a woman, and he was born into a  family system. I believe that we cannot presume on  the compassion of Christ. It’s hard work to maintain  patience with a bunch of sheep running wild and  acting up. So I’d like to suggest that you set aside  your assumption that Jesus is a good guy, and  consider how his family might have taught him  something about being the kind of guy who looks  past the warts and sees others as God intended for  them to be.    The first chapter of Matthew is a genealogy of  Jesus. Matthew finds this important, because he’s  trying to prove to his Jewish friends that Jesus is who  the prophets predicted he would be: a Messiah from  the line of David and Abraham. Most genealogies do  not include women, but this one does. Women  didn’t get much respect back in the days of Jesus. I  find it curious that God inspired Matthew to include  some women. And not just any women; there were  some “bad girls” from the Bible.    Tamar, the mother of Zerah (verse 3) pretended to  be a prostitute, slept with her father‐in‐law, and  then blackmailed him to get what she wanted.  Rahab (verse 5) was a prostitute who helped some  of God’s people escape the bad guys; but she was  indeed a prostitute, and she came from a group of  people that were considered quite unsavory.  Solomon’s mom was Uriah’s wife (verse 6), who  committed adultery with King David. These people  had messy, messy lives. Despite this messy family  tree, though, God chose this family to provide Jesus  with his earthly DNA.      I don’t know where you come from or what DNA  may have contributed to your powerless and  unmanageable life. But I know this: Jesus, our  deliverer, will deliver us from evil without shame,  blame, or condemnation.     Thought for today: Because of the motivation of  Jesus’ heart, and in light of the awesome resources  at his disposal, he is trustworthy and well qualified  to meet us at our point of greatest need. I pray that  today will be a day when you draw nearer to him.    Thought for tomorrow:  For we do not have a high  priest who is unable to sympathize with our  weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted  in every way, just as we are—yet was without sin. Let  us then approach the throne of grace with  confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find  grace to help us in our time of need.  Hebrews 4:15‐ 16 NIV    January 15    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 6 – 7; Psalm  89      Yesterday’s devotional reading was Matthew 5. If  you haven’t read it yet, take a moment and do so.    You have just read what modern‐day scholars have  called, “The Sermon on the Mount.” This is the first  of five extended teachings by Jesus found in  Matthew. Scholars differ in their opinions regarding  whether this was one long, marathon sermon or a  compilation of the teachings of Jesus.     It’s an interesting body of work. It begins with a cry  for brokenness and humility, because according to  Jesus, it is in these times when we are blessed. Then  Jesus sets before us a clarion call to live by a moral  and ethical standard that is so high that many have  questioned whether it could ever be met. But that,  of course, is the point; it cannot be obtained by  mere mortals.     This isn’t supposed to be a quick read—easily  understood and applied without too much hassle.  Jesus is a master teacher, knowing that sometimes it  is best to leave his audience confused and slightly off  balance. One truth is clear and indisputable in the  messages of Christ: Apart from him, we can do  nothing. So why should it surprise us that his 
14

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
messages are challenging, confusing, and  uncomfortable? I think it is because:   • We are a people more inclined to want to be God,  than we are willing to become imitators of God  (remember the story of Adam and Eve?).    • Jesus wasn’t trying to gain a market share or get  his face on the cover of People magazine (“I do not  accept praise from men.”  John 5:41 NIV). He was  trying to present the plans and purposes of God,  and He was inviting us to join God in his pre‐ designed epic adventure. This plan was not, and is  not, up for discussion and debate. It is God’s plan.  Our choice is not about approving His plan; it is  about whether or not we are going to participate  in His plan.  • It’s a good thing Jesus wasn’t going for the popular  vote, because his plan involved a decidedly  unpopular concept: Deny yourself.    So no wonder Matthew 5 is confusing. We  naturally seek the softer, gentler way. We prefer  microwaves to crock pots; speed dating to  relationship building; instant gratification to delayed  gratification. We are wired in this way. But it is not  healthy, nor is it in keeping with God’s plans for us.    It’s time for each of us to own up to the fact that  though we may say we love God with all our heart,  mind, soul and strength, our Day Timers may prove  otherwise. That duality of thinking results in  powerless and unmanageable living.    You should also know this Timothy, that in the last  days there will be very difficult times. For people will  love only themselves and their money. They will be  boastful and proud, scoffing at God, disobedient to  their parents, and ungrateful. They will consider  nothing sacred. They will be unloving and  unforgiving; they will slander others and have no  self‐control; they will be cruel and have no interest in  what is good. They will betray their friends, be  reckless, be puffed up with pride, and love pleasure  rather than God. They will act as if they are religious,  but they will reject the power that could make them  godly. 2 Timothy 3:1‐5 NLT     Thought for today:  “From this time many of his  disciples turned back and no longer followed him.”  John 6:66 NIV        Why? Because the message was too hard. Finding  our way back to God is not the same thing as landing  on  easy  street.  Tom  Hanks  had  a  great  line  in  the  movie, “A League of Their Own,” an awesome movie  about women’s baseball leagues during the war. One  of  the  girls  is  crying  after  he  yells  at  her,  and  he  shouts in frustration, “There’s no crying in baseball!”  He  was  delivering  a  hard  message,  and  some  could  handle  it  while  many  could  not.  Well,  welcome  to  the real world. If we think the message of the gospel  is soft and gentle, we’re wrong. I think the message  is much better than just the promise of an easy life.    Thought for tomorrow:  For God has not given us a  spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love and self‐ discipline.  2 Timothy 1:9 NLT      So consider being one of the few who are willing  to accept their chosen status. Begin by  acknowledging your personal powerlessness.     January 16    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 8‐9; Psalm 90      Then Jesus got into the boat and started across the  lake with his disciples. Suddenly, a fierce storm struck  the lake, with waves breaking into the boat. But  Jesus was sleeping. The disciples went and woke him  up, shouting, “Lord, save us! We’re going to drown!”    Jesus responded, “Why are you afraid? You have so  little faith!”  Then he got up and rebuked the wind  and waves, and suddenly there was a great calm.    The disciples were amazed, “Who is this man?”   they asked, “Even the winds and waves obey him!”   Matthew 8:23‐27 NLT      We have been looking at the principles of  powerlessness and unmanageability for two weeks  in this devotional series.     Powerless: It’s a tough concept, but there’s no  need to proceed until admission is made – I do not  have the power to live life well; my life is not  working for me. For those who come into this study  as believers, take this one step further – I do not  have the power to live life as God intends. (Don’t get  hung up here if you’re not a believer; all of us are in  different places in our journey of faith. But this is a  spiritual program, and for those who do believe, it’s 
15

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
time to get real and acknowledge that our lives truly  are not congruent with God’s will for us.)  At the  heart of powerlessness is the acknowledgement that  we cannot stop doing whatever we’re doing that is  leading to unmanageability; nor can we consistently  maintain a commitment to choices that are positive,  healing and healthy – in keeping with the deepest  desires of our heart. When all our strategies to  control ourselves and others stop working, we’re  ready to admit that We are powerless. 2    I woke up this morning with a longer list of things  to do than time to do them. I found myself  squirming and agitated before I even had the sunrise  to keep me company. My shoulder is a little sore  from an overly exuberant workout last week, and my  heels needed an extra stretch this morning before  they’d agree to accompany my feet downstairs.  Aging isn’t for sissies. That said, one of the benefits  of aging is the ability to laugh at oneself; and before  too long, I was chuckling.    I knew I was trudging downstairs to hot coffee and  morning devotions—focusing on powerlessness!   My, how God had worked during the night to  prepare my mind to receive His message of hope. I  was feeling powerless before I was fully awake. This,  I thought to myself, is going to be an awesome day.    So I turned to my readings in Matthew and was  soon immersed in the story of Jesus and his disciples.  While crossing the lake, a sudden storm threatens  the safety of the disciples, who believe they are on  the verge of capsizing. If you’ve ever been in a boat  during a storm, you get the picture. It is a helpless  feeling to be in the middle of a lot of water, knowing  there is nothing you can do but hold on for the ride.    This is exactly the perspective we need to grasp  and experience in our daily living. We have some  choices and many opportunities to make responsible  decisions, but we are powerless over many, many  aspects of our lives. We’ve spent a long time trying  to figure out how to build boats that won’t sink, to  outfit ourselves with life preservers that won’t fail,  to make pets out of sharks and other scary sea  creatures, and in general—to figure out how to  avoid pain. But the bottom line is this: we cannot  control our own destinies. We are powerless over  many factors that can change our lives in an instant.                                                              
 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide – Step 1, a NorthStar Community publication, copyright pending 2005, p.9. 
2

  Thought for today: But there is one who does have  the power; his name is Jesus. He hears our voice and  responds to our cries for help. I love the New Living  Translation, which states that “Jesus responded” to  the cries of his friends; “He rebuked” the wind and  waves. Sometimes I fear that God will rebuke me  instead of the storms in my life. If I may be brutally  honest, sometimes I forget the true character of God  and falsely believe that God himself is responsible  for my fear‐inducing circumstances. Thankfully, we  have God’s word to remind us that “God has not  given us a spirit of fear…” (2 Timothy 1:9 NLT).  Today, I pray that you will focus on God’s power and  His character. May you see His hand, and recognize  His response when you cry out to Him.    Thought for tomorrow:  He who trusts in himself is a  fool, but he who walks in wisdom is kept safe.  Proverbs 28:26 NIV    January 17    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 10‐1l; Psalm  91      Sometimes people like to argue the point of  “powerlessness.”  If I listen long enough, I usually  hear someone speak of the fear of where the  powerless principle might take them. Specifically, my  friends who like to talk about these things want to  make certain that I can distinguish between  concepts like: powerless versus irresponsible,  powerless versus helpless and hopeless, and  powerless versus passive. These are excellent  distinctions. I do not believe that powerless is equal  to: irresponsible, helpless, hopeless or passive living.    After Jesus left the girl’s home, two blind men  followed along behind him, shouting, “Son of David,  have mercy on us!”   They went right into the house  where he was staying, and Jesus asked them, “Do  you believe I can make you see?”  Matthew 9:27‐28  NLT    Reread the scripture and note the following: these  were blind guys. Jesus had just performed a miracle,  the news of which had “swept through the entire  countryside” (Matthew 9:26 NLT). Can you imagine  how the crowds swarmed Jesus? Would it have been  easy to follow behind him? Sighted individuals 
16

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
probably had difficulty jostling for positions. How  well do we think two blind men would fare? When  Jesus got to his destination, the scripture says, “they  went right into the house where he was staying.”  These guys were persistent. Perhaps the more polite  thing to do would have been to pause at the door  and wait for Jesus to leave the house. But these guys  weren’t interested in polite social norms; they  wanted a miracle. They were powerless over their  disease, but they were not irresponsible in looking  for a solution. Nor were they helpless, hopeless, or  passive in their pursuit of freedom from their  disease. I believe that acknowledging powerlessness  is, at its core, all about honesty.     "So then, let us not be like others, who are asleep,  but let us be alert and self‐controlled."  1  Thessalonians 5:6      “The first step toward honesty is to pay attention.  In the words of this text, the choices we face are  either to sleep or to be alert and self‐controlled.  There are days when we would rather 'sleep'. There  are days when the emotional numbness of denial  seems less painful than the alertness required by  recovery. Couldn't we just 'let it ride' for a day?  Couldn't we just 'sleep' for a while? Sometimes  people encourage us to 'sleep'. "Why are you still  paying attention to that? It was a long time ago!" Or  "Why are you still 'holding on' to that? Just forgive  and get it behind you." Wouldn't it be great to get  this over with quickly and not have to pay attention  to it anymore? There is a rest, a serenity, that comes  from God. But it comes from 'alertness' not from  'sleep'. God's peace is not like the 'sleep' in this text.  This sleep is denial, it is avoidance, it is distraction, it  is pretending, it is death. Being alert means that we  allow ourselves to see and hear, to use our senses  and mind and heart. It means that we pay attention  to what is happening inside of us and around us. The  text urges us to be alert, to pay attention. Pay  attention, it urges, even if life is painful, even if it is  not what we want it to be.” 3                                                              
 Copyright 1991 Dale and Juanita Ryan. ROOTED IN GOD'S LOVE (the book from which these meditations are taken, is back in print! You can purchase it at our book table at NorthStar Community or to order call at 714-529-6227 or order online at http://www.nacronline.com. Meditations by Dale Ryan from
3

  Thought for today: Have you worried that admitting  your powerless condition is a sign of weakness?  Those two blind men got this result from their  honest confession of powerlessness:    “Then he touched their eyes and said, “Because of  your faith, it will happen.”  Then their eyes were  opened, and they could see!  Matthew 9:29‐30 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  "So then, let us not be like  others, who are asleep, but let us be alert and self‐ controlled…"  1 Thessalonians 5:6    January 18    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 12‐13; Psalm  92      The Kingdom of Heaven is like…a farmer who  planted a good seed in his field…a mustard seed…the  yeast a woman used in making bread…a treasure a  man discovered hidden...a merchant on the lookout  for choice pearls...a fishing net thrown into the  water that catches fish of all kinds…Every disciple in  the Kingdom of Heaven is like a homeowner who  brings from his storeroom new gems of truth as well  as old.—the  words of Jesus    Jesus used parables to talk about the Kingdom of  Heaven, so often it was very hard for the listener to  understand the meanings behind these simple‐but‐ mysterious stories. (So how much harder it is for  us—living in a different century—without most of  the context clues that those original hearers brought  to these storytelling experiences?!)    As you read through these stories, go slowly. Don’t  skim over the parts that are hard to understand.  Stop. Pause. Discover the part of the story that  seems weird to you. Acknowledge that this “God  stuff” may have a certain simple beauty, but it is also  deep, profound, and mysterious.    It’s OK to not have all the answers. It’s OK to be  confused. It’s OK to ask for help. It’s OK to say, “I  don’t know.”  Jesus was perfectly OK with leaving  the crowds, whom he had great compassion for,  without clear‐cut answers to all their questions.                                                                                                     
previous days can be viewed at: http://two.pairlist.net/pipermail/nacrmed/ 

 

17

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for today: Sometimes early in recovery, we  think that someday we’re going to “arrive” and our  lives are going to be practically perfect. Maybe that  is how recovery will be for you. For me, it hasn’t  happened. I am excited to report that I have gotten a  lot more comfortable with accepting the fact that  this whole recovery process is more like a journey  than a quick trip to a destination vacation. It’s more  a lifestyle than a crash diet. It’s more like a series of  decisions made moment by moment than it is one  big, grandiose decision that magically works itself  out into a neat and tidy life. May today be a day that  you draw nearer to God, even if it turns out to be a  messy, confusing day. The really great news is that  the Kingdom of Heaven is real, it is with us even  now, and it is very, very cool.    Thought for tomorrow:  For if you listen to the word  and don’t obey, it is like glancing at your face in a  mirror. You see yourself, walk away, and forget what  you look like.   James 1:23‐24 NLT    When I was a child, I spoke and thought and  reasoned as a child. But when I grew up, I put away  childish things. Now we see things imperfectly as in a  cloudy mirror, but then we will see everything with  perfect clarity. All that I know now is partial and  incomplete, but then I will know everything  completely, just as God now knows me completely. 1  Corinthians 13:11‐12 NLT    Step one isn’t about putting childish things aside;  it’s one little step. It’s the step we take when we say:  Sometimes I don’t even understand why I do what I  do. Two writers in scripture describe this experience  to us – without shame or condemnation. It’s OK to  know we’re in need of growing up. It’s awesome to  think that someday our minds will be less cloudy.  Step one is where the process begins.    January 19    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 14 – 15; Psalm  93      Bad days happen. Consider the day Jesus had in  the chapters we’re reading from today in Matthew.  • His cousin and most loyal advocate, John the  Baptist, is cruelly and unjustly beheaded simply  because of a run‐in with a “mean girl.”      “As soon as Jesus heard the news, he left in a boat  to a remote area to be alone. But the crowds heard  where he was headed and followed on foot from  many towns.”  Matthew 14:13 NLT  • The crowds gathered in this remote place filled  with needs. A grief‐stricken Jesus, desiring to be  alone, is bombarded instead with the relentless  requests of others. Jesus asks his disciples to feed  the hungry crowd, and they couldn’t figure out how  to do so.    “…he had compassion on them and healed their  sick… About 5,000 men were fed that day, in addition  to all the women and children!”  Matthew 14:14,21  NLT   • Jesus again tries to grab some quiet time alone.  Meanwhile, the disciples get caught in a storm on  the lake. Jesus calms their fears and the storm.  While Jesus is busy healing and feeding and rescuing,  he says to Peter: “You have so little faith, why did  you doubt me?”  1. Jesus has both the power and perspective to  respond appropriately to the needs around Him,  even when the circumstances seem overwhelming.  Jesus responds by doing what he always does:  meeting those needs with a spirit of compassion.  2. Jesus does not wait to provide for the needs of his  people as a reward for their good behaviors. His  friend was beheaded by the political powers of the  day, his hometown people (see 13:57) refused to  believe in him, crowds of strangers followed him  relentlessly, and his own disciples didn’t “get it.”   Jesus is filled with compassion even though the  people are a messy lot, prone to fickle loyalties  and self‐interest. (Take a moment and let this sink  in. This was hard for Jesus. He was the Son of God.  Do we therefore assume that his super powers  numbed him to the relentless messiness of the  people he came to save? Do we think that he was  somehow immune to their offensiveness and  insensitivities?)     I hope that you have a working knowledge of your  own powerless dependencies and the  unmanageability that has resulted from them. Sit for  a moment and think of your most heart‐wrenching  concerns.     If you had been among the crowds on Jesus’ very  bad day, would your pain have compelled you to  pursue him? In the rush of the day, would you have  forgotten to pack a lunch for yourself and your 
18

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
family? Would you have elbowed your way through  the crowds, pushed past your weaker or more timid  neighbors in an effort to have a word with Jesus? As  you pushed and shoved, what would have happened  if, miraculously, the crowd parted and you found  yourself face to face with Him? Knowing time was  short, what would you ask of Him?    Thought for today: Bad days are sometimes directly  related to our poor choices. If everyone had just  packed a lunch before they started out to spend the  day with Jesus, it wouldn’t have been necessary for  Jesus not only to heal but to feed too. Sometimes  things go bad because we’ve stood firm and done  right, like John the Baptist! Sometimes we do right,  and nothing goes particularly wrong, but we’re still  really, really tired. And then the next right thing  comes along for us to do before our batteries get  recharged. If you woke up to a bad day, then maybe  today is a good day to practice the principle Jesus  modeled for us on his bad day: He went off and had  some alone time. True, he was interrupted. His  compassion and calling guided him as he gracefully  managed the interruptions to his quiet time. But  eventually, he got back to the thing he knew he  needed: solitary time with God. I hope you will find  that today. I pray that you will push through the list  of things “to do” and insist on a clear path to time  with God. I trust that the Holy Spirit will guide your  conversation. I am excited to see how God will have  compassion on you as He does that thing He does— heal, feed, and rescue the helpless, the hopeless, the  oppressed.    Thought for tomorrow:  I am worn out from  groaning; all night long I flood my bed with weeping  and drench my couch with tears. My eyes grow weak  with sorrow; they fail because of all my foes.  Psalm  6:6‐7 NIV    January 20    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 17 – 18; Psalm  94      Yesterday I was watching television while trotting  along on my treadmill. The news show featured a  woman with a severe eating disorder. She looked    skeletal and ghoulish—hardly human. She also  looked crazy.    “When I look in the mirror, all I see is this fat roll,”  she lamented. All the audience could see was her  bone structure. A fat roll would have been a  beautiful upgrade from the stick figure in front of us.  I’ve seen meth addicts with more going for them.    I don’t mean to judge her; I’ve been there and  done that myself. Eating disorders are lamentable.  It’s a terrible thing to have an obsession in the mind  constantly chattering away a litany of condemning  thoughts and outright lies. This young woman is  struggling with an ugly dependency. Her obsession  with thinness is her way of seeking a satisfying life. I  know that sounds like madness, but think about  yourself: who or what are you depending on to  provide you a satisfying life?    Dependencies: These are the people, places,  and/or things that if we are brutally honest, we do  not think we could live without. They are the things  we cling to, even when clear evidence indicates they  are not good for us and depending on this is not  working. 4    Instead of scrunching up our noses in disgust at  this woman’s plight, what if we decided to ask God  these questions: How am I living like her? What are  my dependencies? What condemning thoughts and  blatant lies am I believing?    Thought for today: Believing that any person, place,  or thing can satisfy our every desire is insanity; it is  also quite common. Step one is an invitation for us  to set aside our expectations for self‐satisfaction and  to begin to get real about the source of eternal  satisfaction.     Thought for tomorrow:  Have mercy on me, Lord, for  I am in distress. Tears blur my eyes. My body and  soul are withering away. I am dying from grief; my  years are shortened by sadness. Sin has drained my  strength; I am wasting away from within.  Psalm  31:9‐10 NLT                                                                      
The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 1, A NorthStar Community Publication, p. 10. 
4

19

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
January 21    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 19 – 20; Psalm  95      Dependencies: These are the people, places,  and/or things that if we are brutally honest, we do  not think we could live without. They are the things  we cling to, even when clear evidence indicates they  are not good for us and depending on this is not  working. 5    I slid into a seat in a hurry. Running late, I barely  made it through the door before the recovery  meeting commenced. The room was crowded, and I  glanced apologetically at the woman I squeezed next  to in our circle of pain. Uh oh, a newcomer, I  thought. I knew the look. The meeting progressed,  and this gal got increasingly hostile.    “This is so stupid. These people are pathetic. I  don’t even know why I’m here. This is just what I  expected; all these people do is complain.”  On and  on she muttered. Her arms were crossed, and her  face was furrowed with lines of frustration.     After the meeting ended, I wanted to run from  her. She reminded me too much of…someone. We  walked out together, and she continued to talk.     “I can’t believe this. I have been to these meetings  before. I hate the word ‘codependency.’ I hate it!”  she hissed.    “Why did you come today?”  I asked.    “Because I’ve just found out my new husband is a  pervert. I can’t believe I’m in this position. Again.”    “Again?”      “My last husband was an alcoholic. I’ve got a son  in jail because of his drug problems. So I know all  about this addiction stuff.”  She paused for a long  time, studying her shoes. “I can’t believe I am here.”    We went for coffee, and I listened to the rest of  the story. As a young girl, she made one solemn vow  to herself: If she could get away from her alcoholic  parents, she would never ever live with an addict  again. It’s the only dream she ever had for herself;  she wanted a life free from addicts. No wonder she  was so mad. She had one small goal, which she  never achieved, and she had no clue as to how she  ended up in this mess again. The addiction issue had                                                              
The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 1, A NorthStar Community Publication, p. 10. 
5

morphed—alcohol, drugs, sexual addiction. The  relationships affected had varied—father, husband,  son, new husband. But the result was the same: this  woman had a life filled with addicted people that  she loved.     How does this happen? Today you’re going to read  about a mother who has one simple dream; she  wants her boys to succeed in life. She goes to Jesus  with her request. Perspective allows us to read this  story and interpret Jesus’ words with the clarity only  hindsight provides. She wants her boys to have  power and prestige, but Jesus is predicting a far  different life.     “…just as the Son of Man did not come to be  served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom  for many.”  Matthew 20:28 NIV    Thought for today: As you are considering the  people, places, and things that you believe you  cannot live without, beware. It is entirely possible  that you, like the rest of us, lack clarity. You may  desire things, that if you receive them, will cost you  dearly. The angry lady from the meeting didn’t try to  pick two husbands with addictions; she certainly  didn’t wake up every morning with dream for her  son to end up with a substance‐abuse issue. She still  doesn’t know how all this happened. Dependencies  on people, places, and things leave us vulnerable  and powerless. They make life unmanageable.    Thought for tomorrow:   The thief comes only to  steal and kill and destroy. I have come that they may  have life, and have it to the full.  John 10:10 NIV    Life to the full—a rich and satisfying life—will never  be found as long as we are living in denial, walking  around staring at our feet and muttering, “How did  this happen?”    January 22      Scripture reading for today: Matthew 21 – 22; Psalm  96      For where your treasure is, there your heart will be  also.  Matthew 6:21 NIV    Maybe you aren’t quite ready to tell this to anyone  else, but take a moment and tell yourself the truth:  Who or what do you treasure?  
20

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  “After twenty years of listening to the yearnings of  people’s hearts, I am convinced that all human  beings have an inborn desire for God. Whether we  are consciously religious or not, this desire is our  deepest longing and our most precious treasure. It  gives us meaning. Some of us have repressed this  desire, burying it beneath so many other interests  that we are completely unaware of it. Or we may  experience it in different ways—as a longing for  wholeness, completion, or fulfillment. Regardless of  how we describe it, it is a longing for love. This  yearning is the essence of the human spirit; it is the  origin of our highest hopes and most noble dreams.  Modern theology describes this desire as God given.  But something gets in the way. Not only are we  unable to fulfill the commandments; we often even  ignore our desire to do so. The longing at the center  of our hearts repeatedly disappears from our  awareness, and its energy is usurped by forces that  are not at all loving. Our desires are captured, and  we give ourselves over to things that, in our deepest  honesty, we really do not want.” 6  (See Matthew  22:37‐40)    Have you ignored your desire to love God and  others?     Thought for today: Denial is a terrible thing. It blinds  us to the truth; sometimes “our desires are  captured, and we give ourselves over to things that,  in our deepest honesty, we really do not want.”  I  want you to know this very hard truth: There are  some things that we say we do because we are  motivated by “love,” when the truth is that we are  acting in ways that reject love—love for others, love  for God, love for self…    Thought for tomorrow: Lord, help us to see  ourselves as you see us, and give us the grace and  mercy we so desperately need.    There is a way that seems right to a man, but in the  end it leads to death.  Proverbs 14:12 NIV    All a man’s ways seem innocent to him, but motives  are weighed by the Lord. Proverbs 16:2 NIV                                                              
6

Addiction and Grace Love and Spirituality in the Healing of Addictions, by Gerald G. May,, M.D., Harper Collins, 1991, p.1. 

January 23    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 23 – 25; Psalm  96    • A bright, articulate, funny, and smart kid (who  always used to say, “I’m going to grow up and be a  doctor; I want to make sick kids well.”) dropped out  of high school and is currently serving out a felony  conviction for drug trafficking.  • A homeless person, huddled inside an office  doorway trying to keep warm, startles me as I round  the corner and head into a nearby building on my  way to a meeting. I know this person. He is a  beautiful, talented, bright musician. This kid doesn’t  make music anymore.  • I know a grandpa who loves his kids and grandkids  more than life itself, but not more than his addiction  loves him. His wife wants someone to visit him in  prison and maybe write him sometimes. She can’t  stand to look at him, yet she loves him. His addiction  has forced his kids to sever all ties with the family. A  drunken incident has landed him in jail.    What extreme stories, you may say. But they are  not so extreme, though I wish they were. I have  hundreds of stories like this hidden in my heart.  These just happen to be three families who gave me  permission to share their stories today. They are  common stories. Families across every economic and  racial spectrum are living these stories. Many live in  self‐imposed isolation—ashamed to find themselves  in these kinds of situations. Patrick Carnes, in Out of  the Shadows, makes the point that the fatal  progression of addiction begins years and years  before anyone considers the addiction more than  just a habit.     Consider the words of Gerald May (Addiction and  Grace, p.13): “Addiction uses up desire. It is like a  psychic malignancy, sucking our life energy into  specific obsessions and compulsions, leaving less and  less energy available for other people and other  pursuits. Spiritually, addiction is a deep‐seated form  of idolatry. The objects of our addictions become our  false gods. These are what we worship, what we  attend to, where we give our time and energy,  instead of love. Addiction, then, displaces and  supplants God’s love as the source and object of our  deepest true desire. It is, as one modern spiritual  writer has called it, a “counterfeit of religious 
21

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
presence.”  I bring this up because each of us has an  idol or two hidden in our closet of secrets. Now  would be a great time to acknowledge how truly  powerless we are over these tiny idols that have  become our false gods.    Thought for today: As you read this devotion, did  you wonder why I included those stories about  addiction? I did it with prayer and hope. My prayer is  that you will hear these stories, and it will move your  heart to listen to what’s really going on inside you. I  pray that instead of your life becoming a story, you  will find your place in God’s story and live your  grand, epic adventure. We never discover grand,  epic adventures when we chase after false gods. My  hope is that brutal honesty with self today could  ward off those “counterfeit religious presences” that  come to steal, kill, and destroy. I’m hoping for you a  satisfying, abundant life.    Thought for tomorrow: It is the nature of desire not  to be satisfied, and most human beings live only for  the gratification of it.—Aristotle    January 24    Scripture reading for today: Matthew 26 – 28; Psalm  97      “Addiction is about wanting to be hungry, about  the need to be unsatisfied. This, it turned out, was  the truth that, for the longest time, I sought to  deny.”  William Leith – author of The Hungry Years:  Confessions of a Food Addict (Gotham)    Denial: Denial is so much more than a river in  Egypt! It’s that stubborn propensity to see things  with a skewed perspective. Denial is a range of  maneuvers designed to reduce awareness of the fact  that we have problems; we have mislabeled our  problems; our problems are beyond our capacity to  solve (independently of God).    I so hope the guy I talked to yesterday follows  through with his good intentions. After a prolonged  and almost fatal relapse, he showed up at our  celebration service at NorthStar Community, loaded  up with promises and plans for reform. I truly hope  that this time he succeeds. I do. But I’m getting older  and although I can’t claim to be wiser, I do have  more experience.      Experience has taught me that a lot of verbal  expressions of “turning over a new leaf”, new plans,  new promises and surefire solutions usually slide  glibly off the lips of those who are in the process of  moving one day closer to their next relapse. I also  believe that this man was completely sincere. He  wants to be right and to find that new leaf, execute  the plan, fulfill the promises, and find a solution to  his plaguing hurts.    Today you’re going to read in Matthew 26 how  Peter and Jesus approached their personal times of  testing. In Matthew 26:31‐35, Jesus warns Peter. He  tells him, “Tonight all of you will desert me.”  Peter  replies with a confidence and bravado that leave me  queasy, “NO!” Peter insisted. “Even if I have to die  with you, I will never deny you!”  A short while later,  Peter denies Jesus—not once, not twice, but three  times.    In Matthew 26:36‐46, Jesus confronts his own  demons. Three times he went in prayer to his father  and said (this is my paraphrase), “I don’t want to do  this! Get me out of here! There’s got to be another  way. I feel terrible! I want a way out! But I also want  to please you, dad, and I want to do what you want  me to more than anything else.”  Then Jesus goes off  and saves the world. But don’t miss the point; he  was reluctant, he was in pain, and he was honest. (If  you’re unfamiliar with the particulars of all that  Jesus did in the days that followed to save us, you  might want to read our Insight Journal entitled  “Finding Our Way Back to God Part 3.”  You can get a  copy at www.NorthStarCommunity.com).)    We can ignore the principles found in step one,  and act like Peter, or we can choose to follow the  model of Christ. As you decide, think about the  outcome for each man. Peter, shame‐filled and  appalled; Christ, strengthened and empowered to  live God’s big dream for him.     Thought for today: Here’s one more important  thought. Notice that even though Peter acted like a  big old goof, Jesus restored him in spite of his  goofiness. Peter goes on to lead the church, preach  great sermons, heal people, and yes, even suffer for  the cause. That says so much more about God’s  character than it does Peter’s ability to perform  under pressure. So I leave you today with great  hope. Whether we effectively master step one or  not, God continues to love and care for us. Our 
22

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
freedom is not contingent upon our good behaving  but upon God’s mercy and grace.    Thought for tomorrow:  Jesus replied, “I tell you the  truth, everyone who sins is a slave to sin. Now a  slave has no permanent place in the family, but a son  belongs to it forever. So if the son sets you free, you  will be free indeed.”  John 8:34‐36 NIV    January 25    Scripture reading for today: Haggai and Psalm 98      I’m currently reading a book that challenges  everything I believe. My son is reading a book  written by a famous agnostic philosopher, and the  author is also sharing a perspective wildly different  from what we usually read around our house. (My  fifteen year old is reading this book because of a lyric  in a song; go figure.)  No doubt you’re tempted to  suggest that my son and I stop reading books written  by heathens. But the book I’m reading was written  by a world renowned theologian! We’re going to  have to come up with a different strategy if we want  to go through life without our preciously held beliefs  being challenged.  Books are not the only way our  beliefs get challenged. When we decide to get  serious about recovery, honesty has to become a  treasured value. So let’s get honest. Sometimes we  question our belief in God.     Where were you God? Where were you  when I needed you? Didn't you see the violence?  The abuse? The injustice? Didn't you care? There  are times in recovery when we are full of  questions about God. The pain of past trauma can  be intensified when we begin to struggle with  these hard questions about God. It is important to  acknowledge that these questions about God are  not academic questions. No theoretical  explanation of the problem of pain will soothe our  raging, confused hearts. These are urgent,  personal questions about God and about God's  involvement in our lives. We want to know that  God sees and cares and intervenes in our lives. We  need God. We need God's love. We need God's  help. It is an important source of encouragement  to know that we are not the first to ask these hard  questions. There is clear biblical precedent for  asking difficult questions about God. People of    faith have always struggled with questions like  these. We can take comfort and courage from  knowing that the prophets also asked urgent  questions similar to our own. 7    Thought for today: Step one is the perfect place to  admit that we don’t have all the answers. It’s the  perfect time to tell ourselves the truth; we may not  like all the answers that time reveals. That’s pretty  powerless, isn’t it? How does that make you feel?  But find comfort in this word of encouragement:  God is much bigger than our feelings about Him.     Thought for tomorrow:  How long, O Lord, must I  call for help but you do not listen? Or cry out to you,  "Violence!" but you do not save? Why do you make  me look at injustice? Why do you tolerate wrong?  Destruction and violence are before me; there is  strife, and conflict abounds.  Habakkuk 1:1‐3 NIV    January 26    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 1 – 3      In yesterday’s devotion, I mentioned that my  youngest child was reading a book in which the very  premise is the antithesis of everything our family  professes to believe. At first, he was scared to tell  me that he had checked it out of the library. He was  worried I would disapprove.    I did disapprove. I did not like it that my son  hesitated for a moment about telling me that he was  reading a book, even a book that challenged our  beliefs! I explained to my boy that if reading a book  could shake his faith, then all that proved is that his  faith was pretty unsettled before he picked up that  book. I assured him that if this is what we  discovered, it was a good thing to learn at fifteen  rather than at 40. I asked him to come to me if he  had any questions or concerns about what he read.  In the end, he ended up telling me example upon  example about how this author had really missed  the boat. It has been a really cool experience. But  what if he had found things in the book that he had  wanted to incorporate into his belief system? Would                                                              
Devotional for January 23, 2007 found on line at nacronline.com. Written by Dale and Juanita Ryan, copyright 1991, taken from their book Rooted In God’s Love. 
7

23

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
I have thought that was cool? I hope I would have  had the maturity and trust in God to let my son have  his own journey. Honestly, I’m glad I didn’t have to  find out how mature I am.    In the book of Exodus, we’re going to read about  the trials and tribulations of a big family system  (You’re going to love it!). Families are messy things.  Children raised in staunchly Republican families turn  into Democrats. Hippies end up birthing Wall Street  tycoons. This kind of wild family stuff started with  Adam and Eve and is still happening in our families  today. Lots of problems pop up in all families.  Here’s something else that happens in families. In  healthy families, parents know that problems are  normal and they work toward solving the problems.  They acknowledge the discomfort they feel when  their kid tells them they’re reading a book that  claims that God is for the weak and not for real. In  healthy families, parents have learned to deal with  their own emotions and can therefore be available  when their children are emotional. Healthy families  adapt to the developmental needs of their children.  (Fifteen is an appropriate age to explore one’s  beliefs; I probably wouldn’t offer my seven‐year‐old  a book on hedonism.) Healthy families seek the  truth.    Dysfunctional families see the world a little  differently. Instead of being solution‐centered,  they’re into appearance management. Instead of  nurturing their babies, parents want their children to  meet their needs by performing well and not  blowing the family’s cover. Guidance is missing in  unhealthy families. Parents either overreact or  under‐respond—in a wildly chaotic fashion.  Dysfunctional families teach shame.    Thought for today: What kind of family were you  born into? No problem is ever solved by pretending  it doesn’t exist. If you were raised in a toxic family,  step one is a great place to acknowledge your  powerlessness over your family of origin.    Thought for tomorrow: As God’s messenger I give  each of you this warning: Be honest in your estimate  of yourselves…Romans 12:3 NLB            January 27     Scripture reading for today: Exodus 4 – 6      Most of us know all about Moses. Epic movies  have been made about this guy who is famous for  setting the Israelites free. Oppressed, helpless, and  hopeless, enslaved in Egypt—the Israelites were in a  big mess. Along came Moses (also famous because  of his adoption by an Egyptian princess) and saves  his people in very dramatic fashion.    His story is great for children’s Bible studies. It’s  dramatic, and the ending is a killer. When my  children were little, I struggled with how much to tell  them about Moses. His adoption and his amazing  leadership of his people—those were no‐brainers— great inspiring stories for my children to hear.    But do I leave out the part about Moses murdering  someone? What about Exodus 4, when Moses tries  to get out of God’s big dream for him? Does a  mother really want her children to know that there  have been people, like Moses, who have dared to  argue with God?    In the end, I decided that honesty was the best  policy, and my children got the unedited version of  the life of Moses. Parts of it are still points of  discussion at our house.     Truthfully, some of the messy parts of Moses’  story have become my favorites. For example, God  “became angry with Moses” when Moses whined  and complained and tried to duck out of his  responsibility to lead his people. I love that story. I  love that Moses was honest, God got mad but didn’t  get mean, and that God and Moses had a  conversation (not just a “God said it, so I better do  it” kind of compliance). What I really really love is  this: Even though Moses was a real pain, God still  used Him in a grand way, and even provided special  assistance to Moses to allay Moses’ fears. It’s true,  Moses was a very insecure leader. But lead he did.  Moses was able to lead not because he was perfect,  but because God had the power to make it happen.    Maybe you’re trying to be perfect at something.  Maybe the something you’re trying to accomplish is  big and grand and even a “God thing.”  Perhaps your  anxiety is rising as reality sets in; you’ve got a big  task and a small ability to make it happen. That’s a  good thing. That’s honest and even realistic. All of  God’s big dreams for us are completely unattainable 
24

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
if they are independent of God himself. So if today is  one of those whining, fearful days when you are  pretty sure you cannot and will not, then welcome  to step one!    Thought for today:  I love knowing that I can do  anything God gives me to do as long as I am clear on  my part in the story. I know that apart from Him, I  can do nothing. But with Him, all things are possible.     Thought for tomorrow:  I can do everything through  him (Christ) who gives me strength. Philippians 4:13  NIV    Apart from me, you can do nothing.  {Jesus} John  15:5 NIV    January 28    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 7 – 11      Today’s reading seems like a lot of chapters, but  you will zip right through it. Sometimes I can’t help  but think, Why was Pharaoh such a hard‐head?  Pharaoh was presented a solution: let God’s people  go, and life will go on as normal. Fail to comply, and  trouble will abound.    “Pharaoh’s heart, however, remained hard; He still  refused to listen, just as the Lord had predicted.”   Exodus 7:13 NLT    And so—plagues of blood, frogs, gnats, flies,  livestock, boils, hail, locusts, darkness, and finally,  the death of Egypt’s firstborn—rained down on  Pharaoh. Once Pharaoh relented, “Pharaoh and his  officials changed their minds” (14:5), which  inevitably led to death at the Red Sea.    How easy it is to mock Pharaoh. What an oaf! How  could he be so stupid? Doesn’t he know that God’s  purpose always prevails? Who would be so foolish as  to go up against Creator God himself?     Thought for today:  Take a few minutes and dare to  compare your life to that of Pharaoh. What forms  have your personal plagues taken?      Thought for tomorrow:  Remember the former  things, those of long ago; I am God, and there is no  other; I am God, and there is none like me. I make  known the end from the beginning, from ancient    times, what is still to come. I say: My purpose will  stand, and I will do all that I please.  Isaiah 46:9‐10  NIV    January 29    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 12 – 13      Today’s reading is about right remembering.  Because God is our Creator, He knows exactly how  our brains work. The smallest neuron does not  escape the attention of God.    He knows we are a people who are prone to  forget. In an effort to help His people with the hard  task of right remembering, He provides some  instructions that should help this community  remember what has happened to them. What is it  exactly that God wants them to take away from this  experience?     Does He ask them to remember that He is a God  that can turn a stick into a serpent? No.    Does He ask them to remember that He is a God  that can turn a river into a stinky river of blood that  kills the wildlife residing in the Nile? No.    Does He ask them to remember that He can cause  frogs to swarm an entire land? No.    Does He ask them to remember that He can pester  them with gnats? No.    Does He ask them to remember that He can  plague them with flies? No.    How about the livestock incident? Does He want  them to remember that He can kill the country’s  livestock in a flash? No.    Fresh boils break out on people and animals; is  that what God wants them to remember He can  create? No.    Does God want them to remember the hail storm  that was more devastating than any in all the history  of Egypt? No.    What about the locusts? No.    The darkness? No.    The death of Egypt’s firstborn? No, not even that.    "And in the future, your children will ask you,  'What does all this mean?' Then you will tell them,  'With mighty power the LORD brought us out of  Egypt from our slavery. …It is a visible reminder that  it was the LORD who brought you out of Egypt with  great power."  Exodus 13:14, 16 NLT   
25

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today:  Make today a day when you  remember rightly. The plagues are so easy to  identify, and they make for great storytelling. But  God has asked that we remember well and true.  Look today for His hand. Look for His mighty hand.  Look for the ways He has extended His hand in an  effort to bring you out of your personal bondage.    Thought for tomorrow:  So Christ has really set us  free. Now make sure that you stay free, and don’t  get tied up again in slavery to the law.”  Galatians  5:1 NLT    I don’t know where you are on your journey of faith,  but God’s word teaches us that when the son of God  sets us free, we are free indeed. This may make  absolutely no sense to you today. But know this: the  moment you admit who you are—powerless—and  acknowledge who God is—power‐filled—you move  closer to your freedom potential. Sometimes we  have the capacity for freedom before we grasp how  to actually live it out.    January 30    Scripture reading for today:  Exodus 14 – 15 and  Zephaniah      When my husband and I were first married, we  had one car. It was a Plymouth Valiant, and it had a  few…issues. It wasn’t air conditioned, and the heat  worked sporadically at best (usually only when the  engine overheated). When you hit the brakes, you  had to remember to jerk the wheel to the right or  you’d end up in oncoming traffic. There was a nifty  hole in the floorboard, which made for a nice view of  the road beneath your feet. What a wreck! But it got  us from point A to B, and we were grateful.    Times have changed, and with almost 30 years of  marriage behind us, our cars have improved with  age. In fact, when I have to drive the car that doesn’t  have the heated‐seat feature, I feel slightly annoyed.  No one likes to ride in the car that has the CD  changer under the front seat. We prefer the vehicle  that has the dashboard model.     Our brains adapt to the situation around us, and  that becomes our “normal.”  If you asked me to go  back to the days of driving a Valiant, I’d hate it…for    awhile. Then I’d get used to it. It’s the transition that  would be difficult.    That’s how it was for the Israelites. Suffering in  Egypt, anything seemed like a blessing. But it wasn’t  long before “…the people complained and turned  against Moses.” (15:24)    I wonder if the transition stage from trying to be  God (in control) to becoming imitators of God  (willing to dance with Him and do his will) is what’s  tripping us up with the first step.    Transitions are tough. Your brain is in the business  of asking you to keep things “normal”—whatever  that means for you today. How good is your “good  enough”? Take some time today to reflect on the  things in your life that you accept as normal. Ask  yourself: Is this the abundant life?     Thought for today: We were created for an  abundant life. We were destined to be reasonably  happy in this life and supremely happy with God in  the next life. That’s our destiny. But if we choose to  create our own little world of “normal” without  regard to God’s intentions for us, we may miss out  on the abundant life He has for us.    Thought for tomorrow:  God, grant me the serenity  To accept the things I cannot change,  the courage to change the things I can,  and the wisdom to know the difference.  Living one day at a time,  enjoying one moment at a time;  accepting hardship as a pathway to peace;  taking, as Jesus did, this sinful world as it is;  not as I would have it;  trusting that you will make all things right  if I surrender to your will;  so that I may be reasonably happy in this life  and supremely happy with You forever in the next.  Amen  Reinhold Niebuhr    January 31    Scripture reading for today:  Psalm 119      We’ve had a month together, thinking and reading  and praying about our powerless, unmanageable  lives.  Some days we’ve felt discouraged; I pray that 
26

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
there have also been days when a ray of hopeful  light peaked through the clouds of despair. I know  you’re under pressure.  I suspect those charge cards  are coming in from Christmas – rebuking us of our  over‐indulgences.  Funny how that works – the same  little voice in our head that said, “Go ahead!  Get it!   You deserve it!” is the same voice that condemns,  “How could you have been so irresponsible,  gluttonous, and foolish?”    All of us are under pressure of some kind.  True  foolishness is believing that while living on planet  earth we will ever find perfect peace.    Let’s leave this month with a reminder of what we  might expect, if we choose to continue to walk this  path – using the Christ‐centered twelve steps as a  guide:  you may not find perfect anything, but you  will discover how to be grateful for good enough,  you may not find fame and fortune, but you will find  freedom and fulfillment, you may not experience  relationship bliss, but you will develop the skill sets  to be reasonably happy in all your relationships.   Hey, we’re not in heaven – yet.  But while we’re  here, we can figure out WHY we are here, and join  God in his grand epic adventure.  That’s pretty cool.    Thought for today:  We were under great pressure,  far beyond our ability to endure, so that we  despaired even of life.  Indeed, in our hearts we felt  the sentence of death.  But this happened that we  might not rely on ourselves but on God, who raises  the dead.  2 Corinthians 1:8‐9    Thought for tomorrow:  I double dog dare you.  Take  the plunge.  Go to the next step….If God can raise  Lazarus from the dead, he can revive your life too!                                STEP 2  We came to believe that a power greater  than ourselves could restore us to sanity.    February 1    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 16 ‐ 18      Have you ever wished that God would make  himself perfectly clear to you? In today’s reading,  that is exactly what He does for the Israelites. He  makes himself perfectly clear. Why did He do this?  Was it a reward for perfect behaving? No!     “In the morning you will see the glory of the Lord,  because he has heard your complaints, which are  against him…”  Exodus 16:7 NLT    As you keep reading, you will see clearly that even  God’s perfect revelation of Himself didn’t net him a  people who perfectly believed.     Thought for today:  Most people know that a Higher  Power exists—only a few believe. “Coming to  believe” is a process. We move from giving lip  service to God’s existence to a belief that I call  “knowing that you know that you know.”  Pay  attention; this is very important. You were created  to believe. People were not created to live in a  vacuum of unbelief. As the writer of Ecclesiastes  points out in chapter 3, verses 10 and 1, this belief is  a messy, complex thing. That’s why coming to  believe is such a process! Unless we grapple with the  existence of the unseen world, it is my firmly held  conviction that we cannot live well in the seen  world. Most of us have been cheated out of our  belief and the abundant life (see John 10:10) that  accompanies radical believing. Our past has left  many of us hurt and damaged. We’re in bondage to  a lot of lies: misuse of religion, cultic experiences,  and traditions of man that run counter to God’s  truths. These harmful exposures leave us scarred.  Now is the time to do three things:     1. Figure out what you truly believe.     2. See if your belief is false or true.     3. Decide to believe that which is true.     This is not an easy process, but you were created  for this. Don’t allow the junk in your trunk to hold  you back from your true God‐created self! At this  stage, coming to believe is fairly simple. Simply get 

27

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
honest. Get to know what you believe about God.  Practice believing. 8      Thought for tomorrow:  Jesus answered, “The work  God wants you to do is this: Believe the One he sent.”    John 6:29 New Century Version    Jesus did many other miraculous signs in the  presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in  this book. But these are written that you may  believe that Jesus is the Christ the Son of God, and  that by believing you may have life in His name.  John 20:30‐31 NIV, emphasis mine    February 2    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 19 – 20; Psalm  99      I get it. I don’t get it all, but I get this: We’re a  people who confuse “coming to believe” with  learning how to behave. Why? Consider Exodus.  Moses gets amazing quality time with God and  comes down from that mountaintop experience with  a tablet of ten do’s and don’ts. This sounds like  behaving to me!    I have spent a huge chunk of my adult life teaching  adolescents. Lessons about behaving are the easy  ones. Do this; don’t do that. Date only believers,  don’t have premarital sex, don’t throw candy in  class, don’t drink, don’t drug, and for Pete’s sake— always be nice to your mother. These are the easy  lessons. These are the lessons that you can drag out  from Exodus 20 and point to with a shaky finger of  certainty. Add a tiny bit of over‐confidence to the  mix, and you can begin interpreting how this  behavior is supposed to look in the lives of those you  teach. You can tell them that good Christians wear a  certain kind of clothes, have a well‐groomed  appearance (defined by parents), and indicate in  both stated and non‐verbal communications that the  really good kids are the ones who show up on  Sundays, raise their hands, and answer the questions  asked—without double entendres, without sarcasm,  without “attitude.”  That’s the easy way. I have  “come to believe” that it is not God’s way.                                                                 
The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide: Step 2, A NorthStar Community Publication, copyright 2005, p. 9. 
8

Thought for today: It’s time to wake up and smell  the coffee! Read the ENTIRE book of Exodus.  Remember the first three chapters of Genesis. Do  we really think that our all‐knowing, all‐powerful, all‐ loving, Creator God thought He could hand us a  tablet with ten do’s and don’ts and expect us to  behave? Even a middle‐aged Bible study teacher of  tenth graders knows better than that. There’s more  going on here than behaving. God is asking us to  believe!    Thought for tomorrow:  “For my Father’s will is that  everyone who looks to the Son and believes in Him  shall have eternal life.”   John 6:40 NIV        More on that eternal life stuff tomorrow.    February 3    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 21 – 23      My husband gets nervous when I make statements  that seem to minimize our responsibility to behave.  He’s right. Although I stand by my statement from  yesterday’s devotion, I do think God is more  concerned with our “coming to believe” than He is  with our perfectionistic behaving. God does care  about how we live. How we behave is a great  indicator of what we believe. Did you get that? God  cares about how we behave. Exodus provides plenty  of instruction on how the Israelites were expected to  behave.     God also provides them with some incentive for  good behaving. He tells the Israelites that if they  behave according to his decrees, “I will bless you  with food and water, and I will protect you from  illness. There will be no miscarriages or infertility in  your land, and I will give you long, full lives.”  (Exodus  23:26)    Last summer a friend of mine died of a very painful  disease. I appreciated the times we spent together in  those last days. One of her greatest fears was that  her disease was the consequence for her bad  behaving. Raised in a religious home, she had been  taught that her behaving would either bring blessing  or curse. At death’s door, she had trouble focusing  on anything but her bad behaving and the fear of  condemnation that those thoughts stirred. 
28

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Again, I understand when we’re reading through  Exodus why someone might come to that  conclusion. And frankly, it’s a neat, easy, satisfying  perspective. All we have to do for a full life is to  behave according to God’s decrees.    However, that is not the full story. It does not take  into account thousands of years of historical data.  The data I am suggesting we study is the behavior of  God. God has consistently revealed through his  behaving what he believes about us.    It seems He knows that we’re goofs; we are prone  to grow forgetful of him, and our intentions are  sometimes pure evil. He gives us one little “do not”  in the Garden of Eden, and look what we “do.”  It is a  given that we are a people with a history of bad  behaving. But here’s the thing about God: His  response to us has been to love us.     Once I convinced my friend that our work was to  believe, we spent her last days thinking more about  the God she was about to see than about her  behaving. We read stories about the many, many  times he responded to our faithlessness with loving  compassion. We didn’t skip the stories of goofy, bad  behaving on the part of God’s people, nor did we  spend too much time discussing why people act like  this. We just accepted the truth of it, and read on to  the part in the story where we saw how God loved  them. I hope as you read through scripture this year  that you will remind yourself to be at least as  concerned about your believing as you are about  your behaving.    Thought for today: One last thought. Perhaps today  you are overwhelmed with your life. It’s a mess and  it seems like there’s no good way to untangle all  those webs of deceit. I want to ask you to calm down  and take a deep breath. Instead of rushing to fix a  problem that you’re completely powerless over, take  time today to begin considering who God is. Relax  about what that means for your behavior. For this  month, while we’re on step two, just focus on the  character of this God that you’re coming to believe  in.    Thought for tomorrow:  I have come that they may  have life, and have it to the full.  John 10:10 NIV    February 4       Scripture reading for today: Exodus 24 – 31. This  may seem like a lot, but it’s not that bad; just do it!     I hope you’ve read all those chapters in Exodus,  because I want you to notice something about them.  All that attention to the rituals of worship did not  guarantee that God’s people would worship God.  Our rituals have never protected us from ourselves.  (For more details than this small devotion can  provide, check out “The Circle of Shame” message  on www.northstarcommunity.com)     We all have rituals, and some of them are very  dangerous. Let me give you some examples:   • What about when we overindulge in pizza,  pastries, and pop, and then hit the gym for three  hours of compulsive over‐exercising? Instead of  getting serious about being healthy, we’re trying to  find a ritual to ameliorate the effects of our bad  behaving.   • What about when we are getting ready for the  neighborhood Super Bowl Party and we swear to our  spouse that this year we’re not going to stand by the  beer keg and overindulge, only to find ourselves  three hours later standing next to the keg and saying  things that we’re really going to regret tomorrow?  Instead of acknowledging our powerlessness over  our drinking and our propensity to hurt others with  our unhinged tongues, we’re trying to find a plan  that will enable us to do what we want without any  negative consequences.   • What about when we’re standing over our  sleeping, angelic child and promising ourselves that  we’re never ever going to call them “stupid” again?  Promising to “never do it again” never leads us to  answers about why we did it in the first place, nor  does it lead us to solutions and new ways to handle  our parenting responsibilities.     These are three examples of rituals that we hope  will save us:   1. Try to take a “bad” and trump it with a “good”  (fitness for fat).   2. Recognize a negative consequence and  negotiate a plan for “controlling” the damage  (drink with rules).   3. Remorse without repentance (“I’m sorry” versus  “I’m wrong”).     These rituals aren’t working for us. The Israelites  were not made more holy with their ritualized 
29

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
offerings, their fancy ark of the covenant, the plans  for a decorated interior, the amazing courtyard, the  priests’ special clothes, the washbasins, the oils, the  money, the incense or even the craftsmen.     Thought for today: Sometimes our rituals are  religious in nature, and we use them in hopes of  atonement. But here’s the deal. “Coming to believe”  is not about rituals; it’s about relationship. Our  rituals are sometimes comforting in the moment,  but they offer no guarantee that we’re going to be  saved from our compulsions.  What kind of rituals  have you counted on for comfort? For cure? Is it  possible that you’ve confused ritual with belief? Are  you religious without relationship? “Coming to  believe” is just that—a process. It’s okay to admit to  ourselves that our believing has been more ritualized  than real. It’s a good place to start.     Thought for tomorrow: “If you hold to my teachings,  you are really my disciples. Then you will know the  truth, and the truth will set you free.”  John 8:31‐32  NIV     God knows these things about us and is not shocked.  The truth for me is this: I imperfectly hold to the  teachings of Jesus. That’s the truth. But what does  that mean? Does it mean I’m not a disciple? “Coming  to believe” is a process that allows us to ask these  tough questions. An effective step two does not  require us to have the answers, it is giving us an  opportunity to be honest about our current state of  belief.     February 5    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 32; Psalm 100  and 101       Think back to chapter 24, when the people  responded to the Lord’s covenant with, “We will do  everything the Lord commanded.” (Exodus 24:3 NLT)  and “We will do everything the Lord has  commanded. We will obey.” (Exodus 24:7 NLT)      Fast forward to chapter 32. “When the people saw  how long it was taking Moses to come back down  the mountain, they gathered around Aaron. “Come  on,” they said, “make us some gods who can lead us.  We don’t know what happened to this fellow Moses,    who brought us here from the land of Egypt.”  (Exodus 32:1 NLT)    How could they? In just seven chapters‐‐‐how  quickly they forgot! Consider this one for a moment.  I hope you’re feeling empathy, because just last  night I was asking myself, “How could I?”  I just know  that if you’re honest, you can relate to the Israelites  and to me.     Our intentions are sincerely good. Our follow  through is, well, pathetic. Sometimes I get confused  and think being forgetful means I don’t believe. I’m  glad I have friends who remind me that forgetfulness  of God and inadequate follow‐through does not  equal unbelief. It makes us human.     Thought for today: Sometimes our shame becomes  an excuse for quitting. My friend, Mike Thompson, is  always encouraging me not to give up five minutes  before my miracle. He’s got it right. “Coming to  believe” can help us understand that there is a God,  and we are not Him. So let’s set our shame aside and  just acknowledge the truth; we’re human. But that’s  not the key truth. The key truth is that God is God.  Let’s spend this month focusing on that!    Thought for tomorrow: . . . for it is God who works in  you to will and to act according to his good purpose.   Philippians 2:13 NIV    We can get off our high horses and acknowledge this  true belief: God will do the work in us and God will  enable us to act according to his good purpose. If we  will but believe, we can do all things through Christ  who gives us strength. Not because we are able, but  because He is!    February 6    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 33; Psalm 102  and 103       “…But I will not travel among you, for you are a  stubborn and rebellious people. If I did, I would surely  destroy you along the way.”  When the people heard  these stern words, they went into mourning and  stopped wearing their jewelry and fine clothes. For  the Lord had told Moses to tell them, “You are a  stubborn and rebellious people…” Exodus 33:3‐5 NLT 
30

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
   Wrapped in those few verses is an awesome,  succinct explanation of why step one precedes step  two. Unless and until we realize that something with  us is “not quite right” and “not quite working,” we  simply will not give God our full attention. I like to  begin my mornings by reviewing step one before I  rush on to step two and following. It’s a funny thing,  though; step one always seems to find meaningful  application every single day.    The Israelites had a step‐one experience, but  obviously, more stepping was needed. Of all the  people traveling on this desert journey, Moses had  the closest contact with God. Continue reading in  Exodus 33, and notice how Moses struggled with  “coming to believe.”    You keep telling me…but you haven’t told me…”    The Lord replies and assures Moses.    Moses doubts the Lord. “If you don’t…how will…”    The Lord replies with more reassurance.    Moses demands proof. “Then show me...”    The Lord does as Moses asks.    Folks, this is not perfect believing; this is the messy  reality of “coming to believe.”  This is the true, up‐ close‐and‐personal view of “coming to believe”—not  some fairy‐tale story of perfect believing, flawless  behaving, and unrestrained blessing (without any  bad stuff happening) that we sometimes fantasize  about.     “Coming to believe” may be something you  struggle with—not because you’re failing at it—but  simply because you don’t recognize it when it  happens!     Thought for today: Would you be willing to set aside  your preconceived notions about what it means to  believe long enough to simply enter the process?  (For a closer look at the wild and mysterious ways of  “coming to believe,” check out the article at  www.northstarcommunity.com about a young artist  in a family of atheists who became a believer.)    Thought for tomorrow:  For God is working in you,  giving you the desire and the power to do what  pleases him.   Philippians 2:13 NLT    God’s work does not hinge upon your belief. God is  and God will—because He’s God—not because you  believe “rightly.”        February 7    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 34; Psalm 104  and 105        Therefore, since we have such a hope, we are very  bold. We are not like Moses, who would put a veil  over his face to keep the Israelites from gazing at it  while the radiance was fading away.  2 Corinthians  3:12‐13 NIV    What a strange story! At first, Moses doesn’t  realize that time with God has actually given him a  radiance that is so glorious it is frightening. After he  gets it, he begins this strange ritual of taking on and  tearing off the veil. I’m not sure what to think of this  story as I read through Exodus 34. Does he do this  because he doesn’t want to startle his people? Is he  humbled by the experience, and afraid that  someone will confuse bestowed glory (a gift from  God) with intrinsic glory (something Moses can take  credit for)? What’s up with Moses?    The writer of 2 Corinthians says that it’s all about  pride. Drawing near to God and being given the gift  of glory is contingent upon continual, close contact  with God Himself. Evidently, Moses’ glow is like a  facial or BOTOX®‐‐you look great for a while, but  eventually the real, wrinkly you always reappears.    Moses liked the glow and intended to keep its  appearance up for as long as possible. This is a  danger of the “coming to believe” process. “Coming  to believe” is a glorious experience, and we often  find ourselves—quite surprisingly at first—with a  real, glorious glow after a close encounter with Holy  God.    But let’s not get confused. “Coming to believe”  isn’t a once‐and done‐experience. It’s a process. It’s  a choice. It’s a decision.     Thought for today: I think Moses’ desire to hide the  fading of the glow is something we can all relate to.  Our moments of clarity and our jolts of joy are all  great experiences that we love to share. I’m trying to  remember Moses. The glow wore off, and the  wrinkles were revealed; so what? Moses was still  Moses; He was still treasured by God. I’m thankful  that I have an opportunity to learn from Moses.  “Coming to believe” isn’t about continual BOTOX®‐‐ it’s also about being honest about who we are and  learning to trust God with the outcome. 
31

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for tomorrow:  But whenever someone  turns to the Lord, the veil is taken away. For the Lord  is the Spirit, and wherever the spirit of the Lord is,  there is freedom. So all of us who have had that veil  removed can see and reflect the glory of the Lord.  And the Lord – who is the Spirit – makes us more and  more like him as we are changed into his glorious  image. 2 Corinthians 16‐18 NLT    Not that we are competent in ourselves to claim  anything for ourselves, but our competence comes  from God.   2 Corinthians 3:5 NIV    We are a people of extremes: we believe we can  do anything, or we doubt we can do a single thing.  The truth is, we can do only those things that God  has purposed to do in and through and with us. Our  part is to surrender to the truth of that and allow  Him to have His way with us.     February 8    Scripture reading for today: Exodus 35 ‐ 40        “Then the cloud covered the Tabernacle, and the  glory of the Lord filled the Tabernacle….Now  whenever the cloud lifted from the Tabernacle, the  people of Israel would set out on their journey,  following it. But if the cloud did not rise, they  remained where they were until it lifted. The cloud of  the Lord hovered over the Tabernacle during the day,  and at night fire glowed inside the cloud so the  whole family of Israel could see it. This continued  through out all their journeys.”  Exodus 40:34, 36‐38  NLT      Just give me the cloud! I’ll take the fire! How great  would it be if “all” we had to do was get up, get  dressed and follow the very visible, totally‐not‐ subtle presence of God himself?     Someone asked me recently if God “updated his  methods.”  I’m not sure I understand the question,  but what if He did? Instead of all those clouds and  fires hanging around our houses, wouldn’t it be  more efficient if God just text‐messaged us? What  about email; would that get our attention? Would  we follow diligently and trustingly after a God who  regularly paged us?     I’m not a big fan of fussing at people. But I feel the  need to lecture for just a moment. The cloud‐and‐   fire metaphor is dramatic for sure. But our God has  always promised us His presence, His mind, His  guidance, His love, His beneficent purposes, and His  plans for us. He’s told us quite plainly—as clear as  any cloud and as hot with passion as any fire—that if  we seek Him, we will find Him.    So are you seeking Him? Is this seeking  relationship driven or ritual focused? Are you seeking  Him because He’s God and worthy of our worship, or  so that you can get His blessing on your own  personal agenda? Do you count it a privilege to peer  intently into His word, or is it a chore? We’ve been  given some mighty, powerful promises. I just wonder  how seriously we take the privilege of His presence.    Thought for today:  Trust in the Lord with all your  heart; do not depend on your own understanding.  Seek his will in all you do, and he will show you which  path to take. Don’t be impressed with your own  wisdom. Instead, fear the Lord and turn away from  evil. Then you will have healing for your body and  strength for your bones.   Proverbs 3:5‐8 NLT    “Coming to believe” does not mean that we  understand how to trust God with a whole heart. I  am in the process of trying to figure out if I regularly  seek His will or merely ask Him to bless mine. That’s  the nature of “coming to believe;” it’s messy, and  questions outnumber answers. But take heart. God  does not expect us to know how to perfectly follow  Him. He does ask us to practice believing.    Thought for tomorrow:  O Lord, our Lord, how  majestic is your name in all the earth! You have set  your glory above the heavens. From the lips of  children and infants you have ordained praise  because of your enemies, to silence the foe and the  avenger. When I consider your heavens, the work of  your fingers, the moon and the stars, which you have  set in place, what is man that you are mindful of him,  the son of man that you care for him? …The Lord is a  refuge for the oppressed, a stronghold in times of  trouble. Those who know your name will trust in you,  for you, Lord, have never forsaken those who seek  you.   Psalm 8:1‐4, 9:9‐10 NIV    It’s natural to assume that the world rotates  around us. We are, after all, our own central point of  reference for all that we know and experience. Step  two allows us to consider a different perspective: we  are not the center of the universe. The world does 
32

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
not depend on us to fulfill its daily rotation. But  there is One for whom that is true – and He is the  kind of God that will never forsake you. So in a way,  we are very special. God knows our names and cares  about us. But that caring concern has more to do  with His nature than our deserving it. “Coming to  believe” changes everything we have assumed we  knew about ourselves, our world, and our place in  the story.    February 9    Scripture reading for today: Ruth 1 – 4      One of the things that helps me “come to believe”  is continuing to address the question: who is this  “power greater than ourselves?” (For further study,  consider obtaining our “Finding Our Way Back to  God” four‐part series. Look for “Insight”, our  quarterly journals on the web to access this series.)   For a few years I studied scripture through the  squinty eyes of barely believing. Predisposed to be a  person of small faith, I found myself with no  confidence in the theory that we had all managed to  crawl out of the goo of primordial soup and morph  into something better than the tadpoles we  supposedly sprang from. It took much less faith to  believe that a great, powerful, other‐worldly force  had chosen to create us and our world. Armed with  such small faith, I read scripture with a critical eye. I  was always looking for loopholes that would confirm  my suspicions that any God with that much power  certainly wouldn’t care to be known by me. Why  would he reveal himself to me? Oh sure, I believed  He existed; I simply didn’t believe He wanted to be  known by a messy mortal like me. What I discovered  was that I was….gulp….wrong.     Make this tabernacle and all its furnishings exactly  like the pattern I will show you.  Exodus 25:9 NIV    They serve at a sanctuary that is a copy and  shadow of what is in heaven. This is why Moses was  warned when he was about to build the tabernacle:  “See to it that you make everything according to the  pattern shown you on the mountain.”  Hebrews 8:5  NIV    Wow! Imagine that – a God who brings heaven to  earth. This is fantastic news! This is a God who  comes to us, not requiring massive efforts of self  help in a vain attempt to become “good enough” to    be called His kid. We’re not a people who have to  pine away on planet earth until the day we get  sucked up to heaven. That’s not how it works.     So this “power greater than ourselves” is  interested in relationship with us. One thing we can  know about God is this: He is interested in  relationship with us.     Thought for today: “Here I am! I stand at the door  and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the  door, I will come in and eat with him, and he with  me.”  Revelation 3:20 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I realize that many of us  have lost faith that there is a man or God who really  cares about us. Guess what? If we believe that, then  we are wrong. Step one prodded and poked at us,  suggesting that our way of looking at the world is…  “not quite right.”  No one wants to admit such a  thing, but if the shoe fits, wear it. If your way of  believing has led to anything less than an abundant  life (see John 10:10), then perhaps today is a good  day to re‐evaluate your way of believing.    February 10    Scripture reading for today: Acts 1 – 2; Psalm 106      Yesterday’s devotional focused on one truth about  God: He desires relationship with us. Once I realized  this about Him, I began to ask other questions. One  question that I still find myself exploring is: Who is  this God who desires to be known by me? This is a  big‐deal question. If there is a God, and He’s as  powerful as scripture says, then I want to know his  intentions towards me. All that power unleashed can  be scary, dangerous, and potentially painful.     He peeked out from under a shaggy mass of  unruly, curly hair. His arms were crossed, and his  short little legs swung back and forth in a wide arc  that dared the coach to take one step closer.    “I don’t want to.”    “But Justin, this is our big day. We’ve been  practicing and practicing for this, don’t you want to  join your team out on the court?”  My husband,  Coach McBean, was working hard to get this tiny tike  interested in taking his place on the court. He was a  good little player, and if the team was to have a 
33

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
chance at victory, McBean needed this kid’s  participation.    “No. I won’t do it.”    “Okay, son. Let me know if you feel ready to play.”      The game ended in a not‐so‐stunning, rather  predictable defeat for McBean and his team. But this  was not the focus of the coach’s concern. What  bothered him was Justin. Why wouldn’t he play?  This kid was a real fire plug in practice. Whether on  offense or defense, this guy had game. After the  coach’s pep talk, he walked over to Justin, patted  him on the shoulder and said, “See you at practice.”   Perhaps Justin missed it. As the coach’s wife, I did  not. That statement was loaded with questions. Why  didn’t Justin want to play? Had Coach done  something wrong? Was Justin not feeling well? What  was the problem that was in so obvious need of a  solution? The answer was quickly revealed.    Trudging out to the parking lot, head down,  Justin’s dad (whom we had never met nor seen at  practice) was giving Justin an earful. “I know why  that coach didn’t play you. I bet you’re lousy. I  always knew you were stupid. I didn’t know you  were lazy too. Didn’t I tell you to practice more? All  those kids on the court—not a one of them could  play—and you’re worse than them? It’s why I’m  always asking your mother: is Justin my kid, or did  they switch the babies at the hospital?”  Sometimes  it’s the parents that make coaching so difficult.     Dads have a tremendous amount of power. Some  dads abuse this power. So do moms. Frankly, the  first place we experience the use and abuse of  power is in our homes. Lots of what we believe  about God is “transfer.”  “Transfer” is a term they  use on crime shows (CSI in particular); it describes  how a perpetrator always leaves a piece of self at  the crime scene, and usually takes away some crime  scene on self. Justin is experiencing “transfer.”  Dad  is teaching Justin that power is abused and a host of  other painful untruths about power sources, Justin,  and the world. This dad is a perpetrator who is  abusing his power.     Maybe that’s why we want to know who this  “power” is and what his intentions are toward us.  God created families for the purpose of “transfer”  (see Deuteronomy 6). Parents are supposed to  “transfer” to their children the truth about who God  is and what his intentions are for his created beings.  Justin’s family is making a “transfer” that is going to    leave Justin confused, angry, broken, and lost. It’s  going to be tough for Justin to believe that there is a  “power” that has Justin’s best interests in mind.    Thought for today: What kind of transfer did your  family of origin make? What kind of transfer are you  making in the lives of your children?    Thought for tomorrow:  It’s in Christ that we find out  who we are and what we are living for. Long before  we first heard of Christ and got our hopes up, he had  his eye on us, had designs on us for glorious living,  part of the overall purpose he is working out in  everything and everyone.   Ephesians 1:11‐12 The  Message    I don’t know what kind of “transfer” was made in  your house. What I do know is that if we’ve taken  our first step, we can now take the second. We can  admit that not only are we powerless and our lives  are unmanageable, but we can explore who this  “Power” is that wants an abundant life for us. He  may be a far different God than our “transfer” has  led us to believe.    February 11    Scripture reading for today: Acts 3 – 4; Psalm 107      Yesterday we had an opportunity to begin reading  the book of Acts. Many theologians believe that Luke  wrote both the gospel of Luke and this book, which  is a writing that illustrates how the life of Jesus was  lived out in the life of his disciples. Looking back at  yesterday’s example, what we’re going to be reading  about today is “transfer.”    Acts shows us the “transfer” that took place in the  relationship Jesus had with his disciples. One of  those important “transfers” was power.    He (Jesus) replied, “The Father alone has the  authority to set those dates and times (the disciples  had been questioning Jesus about when a certain  event was going to occur), and they are not for you  to know. But you will receive power when the Holy  Spirit comes upon you. And you will be my witnesses,  telling people about me everywhere – in Jerusalem,  throughout Judea, in Samaria, and to the ends of the  earth.”  Acts 1:7‐8 NLT    As we “come to believe” in this “Power greater  than ourselves,” we realize that there are many 
34

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
questions that will go unanswered. This is a tough  truth. We want answers, don’t we?     We also receive instructions. There is something  we’re supposed to go and do. We are given the  power to accomplish the task set before us. Again, I  return to a question: Who is this power source that  has such big plans for me? “Coming to believe”  compels me to get to know this God who is  sometimes so beyond my limited, human  understanding.    Thought for today: I want to ask you to consider the  implications of what we read in scripture. I want us  to become a people who not only hear His word, but  study it. We think about it. We consider its  implications for ourselves and for others. We force  ourselves to be honest about the incongruence we  see in our lives versus God’s intended life for us.  Think. Think about the process of “transfer.”   Acknowledge the truth that some of us have had an  inadequate “transfer” (see Justin’s story in  yesterday’s devotional) and we need to rethink what  we believe.     Thought for tomorrow: …I have carried you since  you were born; I have taken care of you from your  birth. Even when you are old, I will be the same. Even  when your hair has turned gray, I will take care of  you. I made you and will take care of you.   Isaiah  46:3‐4 NCV    God is in the business of taking care of us; His  “transfer” is always good stuff. He knows what we  need because He made us (this may be far different  than what we want). Yucky transfer means that you  and I may have mixed up our needs and our wants.  We may be looking for love in all the wrong places.  “Coming to believe” requires us to be willing to  change what we believe if our “transfer” proves to  be unworthy of Him who made us. I pray that today  the Holy Spirit will speak to you in a way that  reaches beyond your limitations and that His  “transfer” will be received by a soft and tender  heart—ready to be expanded and grown in new  ways.    February 12    Scripture reading for today: Acts 5 – 6; Psalm 108        Speaking of “transfer” (see the previous two days’  devotional to understand this phrase), check out  Peter in chapter 3 of Acts. Remember that when last  we left Peter, he was being a big goof. Although  promising Jesus (and sincerely meaning it) that he  would never leave him nor forsake him, Peter denies  that he knows Jesus—not once, not twice, but three  times. After Jesus’ death and resurrection (but prior  to his ascension back into the heavens) Jesus and  Peter have a little meeting (see John 21.)  We’re left  with mixed emotions as we read how Jesus  questions Peter. The reader is left with the  impression that Jesus is trying to communicate more  truth to Peter than Peter can receive at that  moment. Maybe it’s just me, but I’m left with the  distinct sense that Peter is still a big goof.    But praise be to God! Even big goofs are provided  the opportunity to participate in God’s grand, epic  adventure. Part of Peter’s problem in the gospels is  the same one we have; we want God to be the god  (notice the lower‐case “g”) of our understanding and  we don’t want anyone clarifying our understanding!  We can only experience God as we understand Him.  If our understanding is “not quite right,” it will be  difficult for us to recognize a God moment when we  have one. This is a hard concept, but think about it.  We can only experience God as we understand Him,  so we pray that he will expand our understanding!    Evidently, he did this with Peter. In Acts 3, a lame  man comes to Peter and presents a perceived need;  he needs money. Peter, “transferring” what he has  learned from the Christ, provides him with  something far more valuable; he heals him. The only  experience the lame guy had was with people  helping him the only way they knew how—throwing  him a few coins so that he might buy food and  shelter. That’s all he could conceive: help came in  the form of money.    Peter understood that God meets our needs in  wildly unpredictable—and far grander—ways than  we can imagine. He learned this through experience,  and failure, and frustration. This wasn’t intellectual  head knowledge. This was a man who had some  time to reflect back on his relationship with Jesus  and perhaps had a few moments of clarity. Jesus  miraculously “transferred” key information to Peter:  God Is, and God Will. But He “will” in ways that are  mysterious to us. We think small, but God thinks 
35

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
deep. We think money to ease the pain. God thinks  ease the pain by healing the wound.    Thought for today: I wonder what small things  you’ve been asking for instead of the thing that God  wants to give you. I wonder if maybe, just maybe the  thing is right in front of you, and you’re missing it  because you’re looking for the only thing you can  understand. You want your pain eased; God wants  your wounds healed.     Thought for tomorrow:  So do not fear, for I am with  you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will  strengthen and help you; I will uphold you with my  righteous right hand.   Isaiah 41:10 NIV    “Coming to believe” eventually involves deciding  to trust that God is with us, that God is for us, that  God can and will strengthen and help us, that he will  uphold us with his righteous right hand. He does  these things not because he has to, not because we  earned them, but because he desires this for us.    February 13    Scripture reading for today: Acts 7; Joel 1‐3      Stephen, a man full of God’s grace and power,  performed amazing miracles and signs among the  people.  Acts 6:8 NLT      Today we find Stephen, filled with the Holy Spirit  and exhibiting God’s power and love (awesome  “transfer” – see the previous few days’ devotions to  get this), ultimately is run out of town and stoned  (no, not what you’re thinking—he was killed by  people throwing rocks at him).    “You stubborn people! You are heathen at heart  and deaf to the truth. Must you forever resist the  Holy Spirit?”  Acts 7:51 NLT    Perhaps that did him in; he spoke a hard truth, and  no one wanted to hear it. It’s stories like this that  cause us to wonder about what it truly means to  “come to believe.” If that story doesn’t scare you,  turn back to Acts 5 and review what happened to  Ananias and Sapphira. It wasn’t like they didn’t give  a penny to the church; they did give! They just lied  about how much. Look where that got them!    “Coming to believe” isn’t for sissies. Sometimes  bad things happen even when we’re “full of god’s    grace and power, performing amazing miracles and  signs among the people.”  Sometimes our “sins”  seem to go unnoticed. Other times it seems like the  boom gets lowered quite fiercely.     I don’t know what to make of all these stories. I  can read the commentaries and even come to some  conclusions. But the truth is, God is mysterious, His  ways are beyond our comprehension. He loves us,  but He also loves justice. He’s big on mercy and  grace, but sometimes the dispensing of that mercy  and grace is more confusing to us than comforting  because we don’t get the big picture. “Coming to  believe” requires us to let go and let God do His  thing without trying to wrestle away the reins of  control. (Hey, if this were easy, anybody could do it.)    Thought for today: I don’t know how “coming to  believe” is going to play itself out in my life, much  less yours! But I know that doing it my way has  consistently not worked for me. In the days ahead,  I’m going to show you how doing it our way can be,  well, deadly.    Thought for tomorrow:  I am your Creator. You were  in my care even before you were born.   Isaiah 44:2a  Contemporary English Version    February 14    Scripture reading for today: Acts 8 – 9; Psalm 109      I’ve got some big news coming with regard to the  deadliness of living life on “our” terms (that’s  insanity). But I just can’t let go of “Power greater  than ourselves” just yet. I’ve spent days combing  through all my notebooks reviewing my notes on the  character of God. (I’ve got a lot of notebooks!)  For  many years, I believed that I would never be capable  of understanding scripture. Pair that false belief with  an obsessive love for school supplies, and you end  up with a gal who filled up a lot of notebooks. I want  to include in this step‐two series every single verse  I’ve ever studied on the topic of God—a power  greater than ourselves who can restore us. But  February is too short for all that sharing.    This morning I’m reading the paper, and there’s an  article in The Richmond Times‐Dispatch on  snowflakes. One thought comes to my mind: this is a 
36

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
God thing. So let me tell you what I learned about  snowflakes.  o Everyone knows that each snowflake is different.  But did you know that all snowflakes (snow  crystals in the form of plates, stars, columns,  needles, barely visible prisms, triangular crystals,  capped columns and even large fern‐like  dendrites) are based on a symmetrical six‐sided  figure? Snowflakes are mathematical.  o Experts say that a snowflake is highly intricate  and has beautiful symmetry – even a teeny, tiny  snow crystal has perfect symmetry.    o Did you know that snowflakes start out as a dust  particle?  o Did you know a million droplets must evaporate  to provide the water vapor for a single large  snow crystal?  o Did you know that many factors determine how  a snowflake turns out? Things like the size of the  dust particle, humidity levels, wind in the cloud,  amount of water vapor the cloud holds,  temperature, speed the flake falls all affect the  snow crystal product.  o Did you know that our snow machines can only  produce bubbles of irregular round balls of ice  with none of the delicate beauty of a God‐made  snowflake? Man can’t make snow.    So I’m ready to move on to other things. This is  enough said about God for step two. He is mighty  and mysterious; creative and caring; powerful and  playful. He is the kind of God who takes time to  make a snowflake.    Thought for today:  My notebooks prove to be  helpful when I’m trying to remember a particular  scripture on a specific topic. But nothing compares  to the “coming to believe” in a God who makes a  snow crystal.    Thought for tomorrow:  In the beginning, God  created the heavens and the earth…God saw all that  he had made, and it was very good.   Genesis 1:1, 31 The Message    February 15    Scripture reading for today: Acts 10 – 11; Psalm 110        I had a friend in treatment who was very insulted  when her treatment team dared suggest that she  was insane. Today is a good day to get that truth out  on the table. Anytime we are not living within the  confines of our God‐created identity, we are crazy! Is  this an extreme perspective that needs to be toned  down? NO! Stop and think. God made each and  every one of us. It’s in Christ that we find out who  we are and what we’re made of (and for). See  Ephesians 1:11 if you doubt this view (I especially  love how The Message paraphrases that passage.)    If we carry this thought to its conclusion, the  implication becomes crystal clear. The absolute best  “me” I can become is the identity God custom‐ selected for me. Lest we forget, this is the same God  who custom designs snowflakes just for fun. So if  God is willing to create a world that births one‐of‐a‐ kind snow crystals, what effort must He exert when  he’s designing us? We would have to be nuts to try  to make up our own identity! Translation: We are in  a state of insanity when we live independently of our  true God‐created identity.    Today you’re going to read in Acts about Peter’s  dilemma. One of the twelve disciples and a Jew by  birth, Peter was pretty confident about how God  created him. And he was cool with that creation. He  wasn’t resisting the mantle of responsibility God  placed upon him. He was completely sold out to  God.    Then he had this vision. It was a vision he didn’t  understand because the message didn’t fit with  Peter’s preconceived notions about what it meant to  be a follower of Jesus. His friends were confused  too. But here’s the great thing about Peter. When  God spoke, he stepped. He was willing to be made  willing to take a different perspective. As we march  through the twelve steps, we can expect to be blown  away. We will discover that some of our  preconceived notions are completely wrong. (If  that’s not happening, something is way wrong.)  It  helps if we just get over huffing and puffing and  accept the truth; sometimes we are in need of a  sanity check.    Thought for today: One of the phrases I think we  should all practice saying every day (because it’s  true) is “I could be wrong.”  To properly say this  phrase, you can’t sound like this is a radical idea. You 
37

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
can’t roll your eyes. No snarling allowed. Just calmly  say, “I could be wrong.” And mean it.     Thought for tomorrow:  Long before he laid down  earth’s foundations, he had us in mind, had settled  on us as the focus of his love. Ephesians 1:4 The  Message    Can you imagine that? Long before God set the  first star in the sky, he was thinking about you.    It’s in Christ that we find out who we are and what  we are living for. Long before we first heard of Christ  and got our hopes up, he had his eye on us, had  designs on us for glorious living, part of the overall  purpose he is working out in everything and  everyone.   Ephesians 1:11‐12 The Message    February 16    Scripture reading for today: Acts 12; Psalm 111‐112       Can you believe what Acts 12 says? Amazing! As  much as I want to spend some time discussing the  issue of sanity (or the lack thereof), scripture  continues to overwhelm us with the power of God.     Many miraculous experiences happened in the  early church, AND the early Christians faced all sorts  of trials and tribulations. Does that remind anyone  else of the process of recovery? Recovery is messy –  some days are good, others are yukky.  We’re not  alone in this process – check out the book of Acts.    The early believers were doing a lot of things right  AND a lot of things wrong (don’t forget Ananias and  Sapphira). Peter got locked in the slammer and faced  certain death, but God set him free. Peter couldn’t  believe that he was really free, nor could his friends  (all of whom had been praying for this very  freedom). Is it bad that they didn’t believe God  would hear their prayers and answer with Peter’s  freedom? When Peter realized he was truly free, he  scurried off to his friends’ house. When Rhoda heard  Peter’s voice, she ran to the door overjoyed. But  instead of answering, she ran back inside and told  everyone of Peter’s arrival. They called her crazy,  insane, loco. They even found it easier to believe his  angel was at the door than Peter in the flesh.  Eventually, everyone gathered their wits and  rescued Peter from the front stoop. (Read it – you’ll  love it!)      As we keep reading we see that Herod, because of  his response to some delegates from other towns  (who were there to flatter and regain his favor), gets  consumed with worms and dies. (If you want to see  what Herod did that I personally think was worthy of  a good worm eating, you may want to read Part 3 of  Finding Our Way Back to God.)  This guy had done a  lot of really bad things. Why was this the thing that  was worm worthy?    So “coming to believe” is still mysterious to me.  Great miracles are mixed with enormous trials while  mere mortals sit around and try to make sense out  of the mighty workings of God. Maybe one of the  best things that could happen to any of us during  this month in step two would be to stop trying to  figure out what God is up to all the time, and instead  try to figure out what it means to live out our true,  God‐created selves every moment of every day.  Finding our way back to God is an experience not  unlike the early Christians lived—wild and  mysterious, miraculous and debilitating, delightful  and discouraging—all rolled up in a messy stew of  living large.     Thought for today: Part of the insanity in how we  live is the way we rush to make value judgments. Am  I having a Holy Spirit moment because it makes me  happy, or because I recognize the voice of God even  in the midst of discouragement and despair? Coming  to believe doesn’t promise us a pain‐free existence.  Our level of pain doesn’t always indicate the  “rightness” or the “wrongness” of how we’re living.  Sometimes pain is our friend, because we are trying  a new way that, while uncomfortable, is much more  “right” than our old way of living.     Thought for tomorrow:  The Lord is close to the  brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in  spirit. A righteous man may have many troubles, but  the Lord delivers him from them all; he protects all  his bones, not one of them will be broken. Evil will  slay the wicked; the foes of the righteous will be  condemned. The Lord redeems his servants; no one  will be condemned who takes refuge in him.    Psalm  34:18‐22 NIV         
38

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
February 17    Scripture reading for today: Acts 13 – 15      Scott Peck says, “Mental health requires the  willingness and the capacity to suffer self‐ examination.”  I’m thrilled to know that a piece of  “coming to believe” means accepting truths like,  “For God is working in you, giving you the desire  (willing) and the power (able) to do what pleases  him.”  (Philippians 2:13 NLT)  I’m disturbed by Peck’s  use of the word “suffer.”      Anyone who has self‐examined must acknowledge  Peck’s description as accurate. Seeing ourselves for  who we really are hurts. Today I watched a  commercial that had a ring of authenticity that most  ads lack. A woman in a weight loss commercial  stated, “When I saw this picture (up flashes a terrible  picture of her in a bikini) I knew I had to do  something. So I joined blah blah blah, and now I’ve  lost 70 pounds!”  That gal found herself suffering  with painful self‐examination. What’s interesting to  me is that it took a picture to break through her  denial and cause her to see herself accurately.     She had been going to great lengths NOT to notice  her weight. When she had to buy clothes, did she  think that manufacturers were just skimping on the  sizing? Had she stopped asking her husband if she  looked fat in this outfit (or had he wised up and  refused to answer that question)? Pictures do  communicate a powerful message – and she got  hers.    Acknowledging our own personal limitations is  difficult. But when we choose dishonesty over  suffering self‐examination, we lose more than just  perspective. It makes us go a little crazy.    Thought for today:  As a father has compassion on  his children, so the Lord has compassion on those  who fear him; for he knows how we are formed, he  remembers that we are dust.  Psalm 103:13‐14 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: We are not very  understanding or tolerant of our limitations. We  forget how we are 'formed'. Instead of accepting our  creatureliness as a good gift from God, we often find  ourselves being harshly judgmental and unforgiving  of ourselves. This lack of compassion can lead to self‐ abusive and self‐neglectful behaviors. When we    forget how we are formed, we can forget to take  care of such creaturely basics as sleep, decent food  and relaxation. Fortunately, God does not forget  how we are formed. God remembers. God knows we  have limitations. God remembers that we are 'dust'.  Because we are so intolerant of our limits, it is  important to emphasize that the metaphor 'dust' in  this text does not imply worthless. It is not that God  remembers how worthless we are ‐ just dust to be  sweep up and thrown away. Quite to the contrary,  God remembers our weakness and limitations and  has compassion on us. Again, because we are so  intolerant of our limits, it is also probably important  to emphasize that 'compassion' is not 'pity'. God  does not pity us poor, pathetic, helpless mortals.  Quite to the contrary, God's compassion is the  tender, loving care of a good parent towards a child.  God knows and respects our limitations. They are  not a surprise to God. God is our Creator. God  remembers what we tend to forget. God remembers  that we are creatures. 9    February 18    Scripture reading for today: Acts 16 – 17; Psalm 113      Our need for restoration is profound. All sorts of  life events can lead us to conclude that maybe we’re  losing our minds. Have you ever waited up for a child  long past curfew? How does it feel to discover that  someone you love has betrayed you? When life is  moving along at a nice clip and your yearly physical  reveals a life‐threatening health condition, do you  feel like you fell into a big hole and landed in a  nightmare? Stressful times play havoc with our  minds and bodies (more on that in a few days.)      Sometimes it doesn’t take a stressful event to  make me look like a nut. The other night I was trying  to introduce a new visitor to an old regular at  church. I’m glad the old regular has a sense of  humor. I went through three names before I got his  right! I knew Butch’s name as well as my own. But at  my age, sometimes the wires don’t connect as  quickly or predictably as they once did. Sometimes                                                              
NACR daily meditation for Saturday, February 10th, 2007 by Dale and Juanita Ryan. To subscribe go to www.nacronline.com or pick up a copy of the Ryans’ book, Rooted In God’s Love, copyright 1991. 
9

39

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
fatigue, hormones, physical illness, over‐working,  and under‐relaxing can cause us to seriously need a  restorative touch.    The most interesting case of crazy that I  experience is being surprised by God. Take for  example the two prison stories we’ve recently read  in Acts. In story one, Peter is in prison and God sets  him free. In the story today, Paul is in prison, is  miraculously freed, and then is instructed to stay  put. The jailer almost commits suicide because he’s  expecting the prisoners to have vanished after a  God‐inspired earthquake opens the prison doors and  casts off the chains. Paul and the others reassure  him and the warden accepts Christ as his Savior that  very night.     That’s how God is; His ways aren’t ours. He has  plans and purposes, and even past history can’t  predict what He is going to choose to do in and  through and with us. It’s this part of the character of  God that I love so much. No matter how insane our  past life has been, and regardless of how predictable  our future is based on our past, for those who come  to believe—watch out! God’s going to send you on a  grand, epic adventure far beyond your genetics, your  history, or even your good intentions.    Thought for today:  What is impossible for people is  possible with God.”  Luke 18:27 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  When I was in elementary  school my family and I visited the University of  Virginia. I thought the campus looked pretty and I  told the tour guide that I thought this might be a  school I’d like to attend. “Little lady, no can do. This  college is just for men.”  Once I felt that with  absolute certainty the Spirit of God impress upon me  that I was to preach His message of hope to hurting  people—to the ends of the earth. “Impossible.  You’re a woman; you’re Baptist. No way did God give  you that message,” I was told by someone I deeply  respected. But here’s the thing, and there’s no  escaping it. God’s purposes prevail. And that’s that. I  figured if I was going to even have a shot at storming  “The Grounds” at “The University” I’d better work  hard in school, and I did (and was accepted in 1974  with other women—we were a distinct minority, but  we were present).  I recognized that I’d probably  never deliver a message of hope from a pulpit on  planet earth, but I decided that heaven might look    different. So I got myself prepared for heavenly  cathedrals. So there were some things that I chose  to do even in the face of impossible odds. Why did I  do that? Honestly, I don’t know. Except to say this:  it’s God who makes us both willing and able.  Sometimes in the face of impossible odds and lost  dreams, we have an opportunity to continue to  persevere. Then we wait upon the Lord. We ask him  to have His way with us. Sometimes our choices  seem insane, but I have found that trusting in God  and His purposes is ultimately the sanest place to  plant. (By the way, I admit fully my very unspiritual  satisfaction and delight when my daughter attended  the University of Virginia in a class where more  women than men were accepted and attended. It’s  petty, I know. I’ll work on that when I get to step  four!)    February 19    Scripture reading for today:  Acts 18 – 19; Psalm 114      “I have been through some terrible things in my  life, some of which actually happened.” (Mark  Twain)    Anxiety disorders afflict about 19 million  Americans. Anxiety is a prevailing emotion—unlike  fear, which is a spurt of emotion that disappears as  soon as the threat is neutralized. Anxiety is a feeling  that lingers: a sense of dis‐ease, unrest, “a‐ something‐is‐not‐quite‐right attitude.”     Anxiety has been associated with a variety of  physical ailments including: cardiovascular diseases,  hypertension, colitis, irritable bowel syndrome,  ulcers, headaches, skin disorders, and decreased  immune responses, to name a few.    Some anxiety disorders are more dangerous to the  body than others. The most harmful are those that  create a release of stress hormones that just keep  pumping into our bodies (there’s more on why this is  bad in another devotion).    The body cannot distinguish “real” from  “perceived” stress. For example, if a young child  witnesses a murder on a TV show, and it freaks them  out, his body reacts with the same stress response as  if he had seen a murder. (I read that in a book; I  don’t make this stuff up!) 

40

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Sometimes worry becomes a habit. This habit can  literally become addicting. Some people get addicted  to adrenalin. Calm feels weird to a crisis junky.    It’s not just a myth: you can be scared literally to  death. Consider the story of Ananias and Sapphira.  Desiring social prestige and recognition for their  giving at church, they pretended to give the total  sum of their possessions to the church. (This was a  common practice at this time because new believers  were being ostracized from the community at large;  pooling resources enabled them to survive.)      Both Ananias and Sapphira experienced sudden  death, probably due to an arrhythmia or heart attack  brought on by sheer panic. Can you relate? These  two felt totally exposed and probably expected  public humiliation. They were hoping for applause  but now fully expected rejection. Taking step two  begins the process of setting aside all those things  we fear, one little piece at the time. We do this  because we are “coming to believe” that God can do  the impossible. I pray that today you will begin to  move toward the peace of mind that trusting in God  can bring.    Thought for today:  Come to me, all you who are  weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take  my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle  and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your  souls.  For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.    Matthew 11:28‐30 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: If you really want something  to worry about – hear this: highly anxious people are  risking their physical health. Anxiety can kill you. But  know this too: Jesus says that with Him, you can  expect to find rest. You’re going to have to learn  from Him how to rest. “Coming to believe” from  Jesus’ perspective results in a lightening of burdens,  not piling them on!    February 20    Scripture reading for today: Acts 20 – 21; Psalm 114      “As Paul spoke on and on, a young man named  Eutychus, sitting on the windowsill, became very  drowsy. Finally, he fell sound asleep and dropped  three stories to his death below. Paul went down,  bent over him, and took him into his arms. “Don’t    worry,” he said, “he’s alive!”  Then they all went back  upstairs, shared in the Lord’s supper, and ate  together. Paul continued talking to them until dawn,  and then he left. Meanwhile, the young man was  taken home unhurt, and everyone was greatly  relived. Acts 20:9‐12 NLT      What a strange story! I don’t know quite what to  make of it, except to say that I’m glad no one has  ever responded like this when I was teaching! The  other observation is Paul’s one instruction: “Don’t  worry.”      I was at a meeting yesterday when a lady  introduced herself as “the worry wart in the group,”  and she sounded quite proud! Scripture is full of  exhortations to “not worry” and “fear not”…so is it  good to be a worrier? Many people believe that  worrying is a sign of loving concern. I’ve discovered  that for me, worrying is usually more an indicator of  unbelief.     Worry is bad for the body. According to Dr. Don  Colbert, M.D., in his book Deadly Emotions,  untreated anxiety leads to a host of physical  symptoms (which we tend to treat as if they are the  root problem) including: tension headaches,  digestive‐tract problems, skin eruptions,  sleeplessness, weight loss or gain, muscle aches  (especially back and leg), lethargy, feelings of  exhaustion, sluggish thinking, and lack of ambition.  Ignoring these symptoms results in disease—the  kinds that require surgery, chemotherapy,  medications and other serious treatment  protocols. 10    Perhaps you remember that the book of Galatians  reminds us that we “reap what we sow” (see  Galatians 6). I wonder if we’ve missed this point as it  applies to our health. If we fail to “come to believe”  and to allow a “Power greater than ourselves to  restore us to sanity,” we are reaping a body that will  get sick. (I am not suggesting that all sickness is the  result of sin.)  It seems to me that when we fail to  believe (and become chronic worriers), then we are  reaping what we’ve sown, and our bodies show the  wear and tear of this persistent unbelief. That’s kind  of crazy, isn’t it?                                                              
10

Paraphrased from Deadly Emotions, by Dr. Don Colbert, Thomas Nelson Press, 2003, p.7. 

41

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Worry has little to do with love. It has a lot to do  with confusion about who’s in control and what  intentions this “Power” has towards us. Sometimes  what we call noble is called unbelief in the kingdom  of heaven; what we call inconsequential and un‐ noteworthy, Jesus calls big believing. A small little  story, some guy falls out a window, with one  instruction: don’t worry. The point was not “look at  the cool miracle that the guy survived the fall,” it  was not “Paul healed the sleepy,” nor was it “limit all  sermons to ten minutes ;” it was simply, “don’t  worry.”    Thought for today:  While Jesus was in the Temple,  he watched the rich people dropping their gifts in the  collection box. Then a poor widow came by and  dropped in two small coins.    “I tell you the truth,” Jesus said, “this poor widow  has given more than all the rest of them. For they  have given a tiny part of their surplus, but she, poor  as she is, has given everything she has.”  Luke 21:1‐4  NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Who would fault the poor  widow for holding off on giving two coins? No one  expected her to give. No one even valued her  offering—the small token that it was—the church  treasurer was paying more attention to how much  the big givers were going to toss in the plate! But  Jesus took another view. She gave without fear  because she knew in whom she trusted, and she had  no apparent anxiety. Jesus commends this  perspective. In the heavenly realms, she’s royalty. I  pray that today you will have Jesus’ view of your life.  I pray that you will come to value the things that  seem small in this world—the things that Jesus calls  huge in the heavens. I pray that this “coming to  believe” kind of realization will fill you with peace  that passes all understanding. Don’t worry. Fear not.  March on.    February 21    Scripture reading for today: Acts 22 – 24; Psalm 115      …Anyone who comes to God must believe that He  exists and that He rewards those who earnestly seek  him.  Hebrews 11:6 NIV      How different would our daily lives be if we  believed this statement? I know you are protesting;  of course I believe this, you are thinking. Really? Or is  this a statement we acknowledge intellectually  without truly believing…    “I am the resurrection and the life. Anyone who  believes in me will live, even after dying. Everyone  who lives in me and believes in me will never ever  die. Do you believe this, Martha?” “Yes, Lord,” she  told him.  John 11:25‐27 NLT    Jesus has this conversation with Martha at a  moment of great trial. Martha’s brother, Lazarus,  has died, and the family believes that he could have  lived if Jesus had hastened to respond to their cries  for help. Martha continues in this passage to give  Jesus the theologically correct answer, saying that  she has ALWAYS believed that he is the Messiah, the  Son of God, the one who has come into the world  from God. All true.    But her anxiety reveals a deeper truth. “…Lord, he  has been dead for four days. The smell will be  terrible.”    Jesus responded, “Didn’t I tell you that you would  see God’s glory if you believe?”  John 11:39‐40 NLT    Worry and anxiety sometimes reveal more about  what we truly believe than our church attendance  records or our pontifications on theology.    Thought for today: Please don’t misunderstand. I’m  not suggesting we run around chanting and rid  ourselves of all anxiety. What I am asking from you is  this: tell the truth. Recognize and acknowledge your  true state of belief. It’s okay to say, “Lord, I believe— help me in my unbelief!”  That’s the truth.  Remember, it’s God who will take it from that point  and move you to the next step in the process. Calling  anxiety love and concern is deceitful; telling the  truth invites God to have His way with us.    Thought for tomorrow: … Anyone who comes to God  must believe that He exists and that He rewards  those who earnestly seek him. Hebrews 11:6 NIV    Oh Lord, we believe. Help us in our unbelief to  remember that you are in the business of blessing us  as we seek you. No matter how dead we feel or  appear, in you we find life and life abundant. Help  me live the truth of this today, even if I don’t feel it.    February 22 
42

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Scripture reading for today: Acts 25 – 26; Psalm 115      I met a high school senior recently for an  expensive cup of coffee. I smiled as my young friend  exclaimed, “I can’t wait to get to college! I am going  to have so much freedom! I am so tired of my  parents ordering me around all the time!”      I smile because I know her parents. They do take  their job as parental units very seriously. I do know  her mom likes to keep up with the laundry and  regularly prepares meals that include not only a  meat but veggies and homemade bread too. I also  realize she tootles around in a cute little VW bug  that is well maintained by a mechanically inclined  dad. I’ve also noticed how faithfully her mom gets  her to the orthodontist, the dentist, and the trendy  salon in the city. I remember how her parents  wanted her to go to the gifted school, but she  wanted to stay at her local school. (She’ll be  graduating from her local school.)  I’ll never forget  praying with her mom about a dangerous mission  trip experience that this child felt called to take. (She  took it and survived it; she also didn’t have to take  out a loan to pay for it.)  I even remember how  desperately her older siblings wanted her to follow  in their footsteps in the school band. (She thrived in  the arts department.)  I can’t say that I saw a lot of  “ordering around” going on in that family.    I can’t wait until next October. If this precious  thing is anything like my children, she’s going to  return home with a lot more appreciation for the life  she left behind. I’ll bet she’s going to love those  laundry baskets being magically filled with clean  clothes, her favorite dishes for dinner, and an  opportunity to just let her family take care of all the  messy details of daily living. She’s going to love it.    That’s what “coming to believe” is like. It’s coming  to realize that if we will allow our heavenly Father to  parent us, we will be able to relax about the details.     Consider what we’ve been reading about Paul.  Stuck in prison, pleading his case, God gives him a  vision for going to Rome. I suspect that Paul would  have loved to go first class on a mission trip. But  instead, he gets sent to Rome because he’s still in  prison and no one can decide quite what to do with  his case. Paul could have been fretting away, chafing    for his freedom. But instead, Paul was at peace,  knowing who was in control.     Thought for today: Peaceful and passive are two  different things. As peaceful as Paul was, he was  actively seeking to do God’s will even in prison. He  was part of the process, not feeling like a pawn in  God’s complex game of life. He knew he had a part,  and he relied on God to show him when and how to  step. This is a far easier way to live than making it up  as we go and foolishly thinking that’s freedom.    Thought for tomorrow: …for I have learned how to  be content with whatever I have. I know how to live  on almost nothing or with everything. I have learned  the secret of living in every situation…For I can do  everything through Christ, who gives me strength.   Philippians 4:11‐13 NLT    I think contentment is the by‐product of “coming  to believe” in a God who has our best interests at  heart, even though at any moment his provision is  mysterious and not easily recognizable in the seen  world.    February 23    Scripture reading for today: Acts 27 – 28; Psalm 116      Paul’s life reminds me of an Indiana Jones movie.  Beaten, imprisoned falsely, shipwrecked, snake‐ bitten—a lot of bad stuff happens to Paul. I wonder  if he ever felt frustrated about all this action and  adventure. Anxiety isn’t the only emotion that  reveals hidden pockets of unbelief. Resentment,  hostility, and anger also can be toxic emotions.    Dr. Don Colbert, M.D. and author of Deadly  Emotions, claims that hostility, rage and anger are at  the top of the list of toxic emotions that generate an  extreme stress reaction. (When you read this terrific  book, you’ll understand that Colbert believes that  unchecked stress is deadly.)    Before you refer this devotion to someone you  love that is hostile, keep reading. According to  studies on aggression, most people are angrier than  they realize. Twenty percent of the general  population — one in five — have measurable levels  of hostility high enough to dangerously affect their  health. Here’s what happens to an angry body. 
43

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
• Hostile people release more adrenaline and  norepinephrine into their blood than the non‐ hostile. Angry people have elevated blood  pressure, cortisol levels, salt retention,  triglycerides, cholesterol and sticker platelets—all  predisposing factors for heart disease.   • A study in Finland showed that hostility is a  major risk factor and predictor of coronary artery  disease. (Hostiles are three times more likely to die  from cardiovascular disease than the calm.)  • Hostility may be a better predictor of  coronary disease than cigarette smoking, high  blood pressure, and high cholesterol.    Why wasn’t Paul torqued up about all his  suffering? Because he knew his place in the story. He  believed that there was a God, and he (Paul) didn’t  get the job. He believed that God had good things  planned for him. Paul didn’t try to manipulate the  world to bring those good things into reality;  instead, he entrusted himself to God and God’s time  and interpretation of what “good” looked like.     Thought for today: If you read through all of the  writings of Paul, you realize that Paul did get plenty  angry at times in his ministry. The goal here is not to  eliminate anger from our diets. It’s simply that anger  shouldn’t be our main course. Like a very fattening,  decadent dessert, it should be partaken of rarely.     Thought for tomorrow:  As he thinks in his heart, so  is he.  Proverbs 23:7 NKJV    If you can do this without getting angry (ha), ask  three people who you believe know you well to  assess your “anger” quotient. On a scale of 1 – 10  (1=Ghandi, 10=a raging lunatic), how angry are you?  Remember, no matter what they answer, say this,  “Thank you for sharing.”  I hope some of you will  email me with your results. Just go to “Ask Teresa”  on the web site and tell me what your average score  was, and how surprised you were by the  results….thanks!    February 24    Scripture reading for today:  Obadiah, Nahum 1‐3      Today I want to ask you to consider taking “coming  to believe” very seriously. Redundant? Yes. We’ve    been discussing it all month. But I am convinced that  few of us have given our “believing” the serious  consideration it deserves.       I also have a theory as to why we are deficit in the  believing department. For many of us, our families of  origin have taught us to ignore the cries of our own  hearts.     • In unhealthy families, children are taught to  not trust their own thoughts or feelings.   • In unhealthy families, the thoughts and  feelings of each family member are not valued  equally. (The most dependent member often  demands attention and sucks the energy out of  the family—energy that should have been  dispersed among all the members.)  • In unhealthy families, distorted thoughts,  relationship styles, beliefs, and even mental health  issues are “passed on” to the next generation. This  is done both consciously and unconsciously. Some  things we teach; many things we model.   • In healthier families, there is both a  commitment and a skill set that allows members  to experience problems AND focus on the  solutions.  • In healthier families, the input of each  member is valued (which validates each person’s  worth). Remember that in unhealthy families, the  needs of the children are usually subjugated to the  desires of the parents.       Last night our youngest son was under the  mistaken impression that I drank out of his glass of  milk. I did not. But that did not stop him from getting  up, pouring it out and refilling it with fresh milk. His  father teased him about his compulsive cleanliness  when it comes to drinking glasses. (He takes  exception to glasses with gunk in them. The rest of  us feel that if there is a little gunk in the bottom of a  glass that has gone through the dishwasher then the  gunk is sterile. Perhaps this is unhealthy.)      I think what happened next was kind of cool. I  mentioned that although we liked to tease about the  gunk, I truly thought the new milk pouring was a bit  obsessive. His comment to me was, “You’re sick a  lot.”    I can’t tell you the last time that I was sick. But  instead of saying, “Are you nuts? I’m healthy as a 
44

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
horse. You’re wrong mister!”  I asked for  clarification, “Tell me more.”    After a brief discussion, he recalled my two  surgeries in 2005 (hernia repair and cataract  removal) and the time I got the flu (also in 2005 and  was sick for weeks). I was glad to have this  information. Sure, I remembered the incidents. But I  didn’t know that to him it felt like I was sick all the  time. That year took a toll on more than just my  insurance company’s bottom line.    I know this seems like a silly example to you. But  take a moment and dig deep. What began as a funny  incident at dinner led to an opportunity for Michael  to get some stuff off his chest that he didn’t even  know had been perched there. I think Michael’s  perspective probably got readjusted a bit. But for  sure, his parents learned something new.    We certainly have our unhealthy patterns in our  family, but in this instance, I think we had a healthy  moment. This would not happen in a family where a  kid has learned to never say what he’s thinking,  feeling, believing, or fearing. This wouldn’t happen in  a family where the kid is concerned about the  consequences if he says something that his folks  might not agree with.     If you live in a family that can’t have healthy  discussion, conflict without confrontation, open  sharing of feelings in an environment of mutual  respect—if those things aren’t happening, it’s going  to be pretty hard for you to “come to believe.”   More on this topic tomorrow.    Thought for today:  Then we will no longer be like  children, forever changing our minds about what we  believe because someone has told us something  different or because someone has cleverly lied to us  and made the lie sound like the truth.  Ephesians  4:14 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: There’s a verse in Isaiah that  says this: Woe to those who call evil good and good  evil, who put darkness for light and light for  darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for  bitter. Woe to those who are wise in their own eyes  and clever in their own sight. (5:20‐21 NIV). I want  you to invite the Holy Spirit to direct you in this  matter; ask him to show you, are there things you  are believing about yourself, your world, others, and  God that are not true? Are there beliefs that you’ve    learned from you family since before you had words  to name them that are not in keeping with what God  has taught us? Could there be some strongly held  beliefs that you cling to that are wrong? It’s crazy  thinking to be out of alignment with God’s  perspective. (But use caution: sometimes mere  mortals tell us things about God that are not right.)    February 25    Scripture reading for today: Habkkuk 1 – 3      Yesterday I suggested that perhaps our “coming to  believe” is stunted by our preconceived notions and  baggage from our past. Common preconceived  notions among children who have grown up in  unhealthy families include: my feelings don’t count,  my feelings are wrong, my thoughts are crazy and/or  wrong, and I don’t matter and have no value.       None of these things are true in the kingdom of  God. But in our families sometimes they are, and  that leaves us anxious and angry. This can kill us. We  know how it predisposes us to addictions and  unhealthy codependent relationships, but did you  know it can literally kill you?   • Hostility and anger are directly related to  pain (physical). The psalmist knew this when he  talked about his bones withering away and his  back hurting day and night. He was right—he was  in physical pain. (See Jeremiah 15:17‐18, Psalm 32,  129:2‐3)  • Tension impacts blood circulation to the  back muscles—causing vessels and nerves to  construct, reducing blood supply and oxygen to  tissues. Chronic ongoing constriction causes waste  to build up in muscle tissue. Muscles in the back,  neck, shoulders, buttocks, arms and legs are  effected.  For more information about Sarno’s  theories you may want to read The Mind‐Body  Prescription, Healing Back Pain, Mind over Back  Pain.  •  “When a person begins to pack powerful  and devastating emotions into the closet of his  soul, he is setting himself up for trouble. Emotions 

45

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
do not die. We bury them, but we are burying  something that is still living.” 11    One of the best skills a parent can teach a child is  how to identify and appropriately work through his  or her emotions. As we’ve said earlier, lots of really  angry people don’t even know that they are hostile.  Signs of stuffed emotions are: perfectionism, a  desire for control, self‐doubt and deprecation,  cynicism and criticism, promiscuity, exaggerated  responses to everyday occurrences, flashback  memories or nightmares, and strong emotional  reactions that are inexplicable.    Thought for today: Sometimes we’re so busy telling  the world that we are “fine” (and hoping that this is  true) that we fail to realize our deep and profound  need to believe. We miss cues that reveal to us our  insanity and our need to be taught, led, healed, and  nurtured. I pray that you will not be so stuck in your  need to defend that you can’t look up and see God’s  commitment to restore.    Thought for tomorrow:  Lead me; teach me; for you  are the God who gives me salvation. I have no hope  except in you.  Psalm 25:5 NIV    February 26    Scripture reading for today: Instead of reading  Leviticus, thumb through it and note the chapter  headings. If you have any charts, glance over them  (my NIV translation has some great summaries in  chart form), notice all the rules and regulations that  helped guide the Israelites in their pursuit of  holiness.      Do you remember the “rules” God handed to  Adam and Eve when he presented them with the key  to the Garden of Eden? One rule:  And the Lord God  commanded the man, “You are free to eat from any  tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the  tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you  eat of it you will surely die.”  Genesis 2:16‐17 NIV      The rule was delivered in chapter two of Genesis,  and it was broken in chapter three.                                                              
11

Deadly Emotions, by Dr. Don Colbert, M.D., Thomas Nelson, Inc., 2003, p. 54, 58. 

  Leviticus has many more rules besides “don’t eat  that.” Most of the Levitical law was purportedly  given during the year that Israel camped at Mount  Sinai. Much has been written about these laws and  their implications for us in today’s world, but I want  you to focus on the theme of Leviticus: be holy. God  is holy; if He is our God, we are to do something  (consecrate ourselves) and be holy ourselves.  Because of who God is, our belief in him should  change how we live.    I wonder if you sometimes find that message as  discouraging and daunting as I do. Be holy. Wow.  Who can do that? I can’t even keep my calendar  straight or my kitchen vacuumed. Holiness seems so  far away.    Coming to believe requires me to wrestle with the  command. I can’t just pretend it isn’t in scripture. In  the gospels, there’s even a call to “be ye perfect,”  and just writing out those words fills me with fear. I  don’t think I’ll ever fully grasp all that this means for  me as a believer finding her way back to God. But I  do believe it centers me—reminding me of several  points relevant to step two:  • Who God is—holy—is amazing, frightening, and  mysterious.  • Who He has created me to “be”—my true God‐ created identity—can reflect part of that mysterious  glory.  • What this means for my daily living is a constantly  evolving, God‐inspired, Holy Spirit‐revealing process  far bigger than my pea brain can grasp unless God  chooses to teach me.  • Where do I go from here? That is a question I will  be asking minute by minute, every day, for the rest  of my life.    Thought for today: Step two isn’t about answering  all the questions. It’s about realizing that there are  questions worth asking, and a God capable of  revealing all that I need to know in order to be who I  need to be in this moment.    Thought for tomorrow:  I am the Lord your God;  consecrate yourselves and be holy, because I am  holy.  Leviticus 11:44 NIV         
46

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
February 27    Scripture reading for today: Jonah 1 ‐ 4      I wonder what you expect “coming to believe” to  mean in your life. How do you think “perfect”  believing would change your daily life experiences?     “Coming to believe” in step two is clearly a  process; more closely resembling a journey than an  arrival at an important destination. I wonder what  you imagine a faith journey would be like for you.    Thought for today: I hope you can set aside all those  thoughts, dreams, and expectations; just put them in  a box and tie a ribbon around them. I invite you to  consider allowing God to define how he wants your  journey to unfold. How different would your  perspective be if you were able to lay aside  everything and instead just walk the path?    Thought for tomorrow: “Remember the former  things, those of long ago; I am God and there is no  other; I am God and there is none like me. I make  known the end from the beginning, from ancient  times, what is still to come. I say: My purpose will  stand, and I will do all that I please…What I have  said, that will I bring about; what I have planned,  that will I do.” Isaiah 46:9‐11 NIV    February 28    Scripture reading for today:  Psalm 116, 117, 118      Today concludes our study of step two. I hope you  have a snazzy notebook with lots of cool points that  you’re pondering from this month’s study. If not,  take some time to scroll back through the previous  studies.    You may want to take a moment and remember  step one too. Think about why these steps are next  to each other in the process.     I’d love it if you would take some special time and  reflect on the scripture passages, the metaphors, the  principles—whatever struck your heart from this  month’s reading. Go to “Ask Teresa” at  www.northstarcommunity.com and share some of  what you feel that God has revealed to you during  this devotional series.       May the Lord himself grant you both the  willingness and the ability to come to believe. May  He grant you peace in the process. May you live  large in whatever land the Lord has planted you.                                                                                         
47

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
STEP 3  We made a decision to turn our life and will  over to the care of God.    March 1    Scripture reading for today: Ephesians 1; Micah 1  and 2      We made a decision. All of us can relate to making  a decision. Have you ever been frustrated with a  decision you’ve made? I am always making  decisions.  But sometimes my follow‐through makes  me question whether I really “decided” something  or just “considered” it. How many diet decisions  have you made and later recanted? You get the idea,  don’t you? There are decisions, and then there are  DECISIONS. Step three is a tricky kind of decision; it  involves process.    I don’t know a verb tense that appropriately  captures the ongoing nature of this decision. Once I  was baptizing a man who chose to reveal his  “decision” publicly through baptism. This was a  baptism by immersion—the way Jesus was baptized.  First, he leaned back into the water. Once  submerged, I helped lift him back out of the water  and up he arose! Pushing hair and water out of his  face and shaking off the water like a shaggy dog, he  peered at me and said, “Wow! I feel different. This  was a good decision. I just know that I’m never going  to relapse again.” I felt a little twinge of concern.  This is not magic; this is process. (He did relapse  again, but only once. It was his last relapse; I’m quite  sure he’ll not be relapsing in heaven.)    On July 15th, 1978, I married my husband. The  entire ceremony lasted no longer than a good  baptism. But the decision I made on that day is  remade daily. Daily I choose to humble myself to the  marriage. That ceremonial expression of our decision  is not what keeps my husband and me married.  We’re married because we make a decision daily to  be committed to each other. The initial decision is  vital, but it is also continual. (That’s process.) And it’s  tricky. And some days we live out our decision with  more vim, vigor, and vitality than other days. Some  days we question our decision. (Like the time I  wrecked the car we were planning to trade in that  night for a newer, cooler model. Or the time my  husband complained because our son, residing  actively in my womb, was annoying him by kicking    him in the back while he slept. Or the time I  accidentally pushed my husband down the stairs  while we were moving a couch. Then there was the  time HE managed to lodge our sleep sofa into our  hallway wall. And who could forget the time when I  was nine months pregnant and had to help get the  car unclogged from a snowy embankment?)    It’s times like these when a well‐made decision  comes in handy. The matter is decided. And  although it may be inconvenient, annoying,  mysterious, or even questionable as to whether it  was a good decision or a bad one, a decision made is  one that you commit to regardless of how you feel  about that decision at any given moment.    Thought for today:  Then we will no longer be  infants, tossed back and forth by the waves, and  blown here and there by every wind of teaching and  by the cunning and craftiness of men in their  deceitful scheming. Ephesians 4:14 NIV      Thought for tomorrow: But when he asks, he must  believe and not doubt; because he who doubts is like  a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind.  James 1:6 NIV   Alternative translation: But when you  ask him, be sure that your faith is in God alone. Do  not waver, for a person with divided loyalty is as  unsettled as a wave of the sea that is blown and  tossed by the wind. James 1:6 NLT    Don’t you want the tossing about to stop?  Sometimes the storm is most brutal right before the  decision is made. There are many choices I don’t  have to entertain every day simply because I decided  to be married to my beloved. A faith decision can be  like that too. Once you decide, a calm certainty can  overtake your fretting. Make a decision; accept  God’s help!     March 2    Scripture reading for today: Ephesians 2; Micah 3  and 4      She plopped down in my office with a decisive air  of despair; there was no “upbeat happy camper”  persona today. “I need to ask you a question,” she  began.    “Shoot.” 
48

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  “I want to know if you really think it is reasonable  to expect me to make a decision to turn my life over  to the care of God.”    “What do you think?” I respond.    “I think you’re nuts.”    “Ok.” I answer, with no particular passion. I’ve  been called worse.    “You see, Teresa, here’s the deal. I’ve never had a  single person in my life who has ever taken decent  care of me.” I nod in agreement. She’s right. Every  care provider she has ever had has been a huge  disappointment.     “So why should I trust anyone—even God?”  It’s a reasonable question. Most of us craft our  earliest views about God from the adults in our lives.  Children are defenseless, and the adults in their lives  are the first introduction they have to a God‐like  figure. It’s hard to make a decision to believe that  man or God cares for you when you’ve never had a  human love you well.    I don’t know how to answer my despairing friend.  But I do know that my deciding to believe came  about as a result of my commitment to discovery.  Long before I decided to trust, I decided to study.    Our readings in Ephesians can help us understand  the mind of Christ and his intentions toward us. It’s  up to us to make the decision whether we will  believe what He says about who He is, or if we will  fall for cheap, fake, and false imitations of Him based  on our limited experiences.    Thought for today:  Long before he laid down earth’s  foundations, he had us in mind, had settled on us as  the focus of his love, to be made whole and holy by  his love. Long, long ago he decided to adopt us into  his family through Jesus Christ. (What pleasure he  took in planning this!)  Ephesians 1:4‐5 The Message      Thought for tomorrow:  I don’t know what kind of  role models you have for God, but I do know that the  genuine God is all about making us whole and holy  by His love. Notice that this doesn’t say we get  whole and holy by His discipline or His wrath or His  judgment. No, it is His love that compels Him to  adopt us into His family through Jesus. And this  pleased Him. This was not a hard decision for Him.  He loves us; He’s made the decision; He’s settled on  you as the focus of His love. You can’t change that.    You just have to decide if you can accept all that  pleasure.    March 3    Scripture reading for today:  Ephesians 3; Micah 5,  6, 7      “Little children form images of what the world is  like, what they themselves are like, and what God is  like through the interactions they have with their  parents. Images are powerful mental pictures that  are deeply rooted in us. If parents are consistent,  compassionate, attentive and responsive to a child,  the child will probably picture God as consistent,  compassionate, attentive and responsive. If parents  are neglectful, inconsistent or abusive, the child’s  perception of God will almost certainly include those  traits. Many people recognize early in the recovery  process that they have acquired distorted images of  God and that these images have a profound effect  on their current relationship with God. But  recognition does not by itself make the distortions  disappear. It is a long and difficult struggle to replace  images of a harsh and punitive God with images of  God as trustworthy and loving. But it is possible. God  has, fortunately, revealed his character to us in clear  terms. God is a not distant, unknowable God. God  has come near to us, has been among us, has  learned personally what it feels like to live on a fallen  planet.” 12    Thought for today:  God saved you by his grace  when you believed. And you can’t take credit for this;  it is a gift from God. Salvation is not a reward for  good things we have done, so none of us can boast  about it. For we are God’s masterpiece. He has  created us anew in Christ Jesus, so we can do the  good things he planned for us long ago. Ephesians  2:8‐10 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  I know believing isn’t for  sissies, but I wonder: What do you have the most  trouble deciding to believe?   • That God is powerful enough to save you (even  from yourself)?                                                               
Rooted In God’s Love, by Dale and Juanita Ryan, Zondervan House Publishing, p.203.
12

49

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
• That this salvation is a free gift with no strings  attached?  • That the good things that you hope make you  worthy of His love have nothing to do with why God  was willing to save you?  • That you are a masterpiece?  • That deciding to believe guarantees you a re‐ created self who can do the good things God  planned for you to accomplish (long ago, way before  you messed your life up so royally)?    After reading Ephesians, I’m wondering what the  downside is to “big” believing…    March 4    Scripture reading for today: Ephesians 4; Amos 1, 2  and 3      If you’re following along with our reading plan, you  have already read half of the book of Ephesians. I  love this short book. Written by Paul, this six‐chapter  letter, intended for the church in Ephesus, packs a  big punch.    Paul has one simple message: if you will decide to  believe, then you can change. But change cannot  happen on anyone’s terms but God’s. The good  news according to Paul is that God has the power to  transform us; the potential barrier is our  unwillingness to turn our lives over to His care.     Paul’s message to his friends in Ephesus leaps  ahead of our 12 steps in 12 months study plan, but I  don’t want you to miss what he’s communicating.  First, in chapters one, two and three, Paul tells us  who (God through Jesus) has the power, how He  intends to use it (for good and not for evil, and for us  not against us), and why (so that we might fulfill His  plans for our lives—plans he concocted long, long  ago).     Beginning in today’s reading, we’ll read about the  “what.” What does all this transforming power mean  for our daily lives? Paul will finish off this epistle with  a lot of instructions about how we should get along  with each other. For our purposes, I hope we can  remember this one big idea: God cares about how  we live and love each other. How we behave  matters. What we decide to believe is really  important, but so is how we choose to behave as a  result of that believing. Making the decision to  believe inevitably means that our behaving is going    to experience some major renovation. But note this:  Paul didn’t start out with a discourse on proper  behaving; he began with an impassioned plea to  believe.    Thought for today:  It’s in Christ that we find out  who we are and what we are living for. Long before  we first heard of Christ and got our hopes up, he had  his eye on us, had designs on us for glorious living,  part of the overall purpose he is working out in  everything and everyone. Ephesians 1:11 The  Message    Thought for tomorrow:  My kid is at this very  moment trying out for his high school lacrosse team.  He loves the game of lacrosse, but I think he loves  his team more. He loves the camaraderie, the fight  for a great goal in the midst of fierce competition,  the cool uniforms, and the way it feels to walk off  the field with a well‐earned victory. He hates to lose  but loves the guys on his team regardless of the  outcome. He doesn’t mind his coach coaching; he  appreciates the value of training. He just loves it all.  So did Paul. He loved writing his buddies in Ephesus  and encouraging them to push on to victory. I think  he loved everything about being on Christ’s team.  Even the crushing defeats were minimized as a result  of his commitment to playing hard with people he  loved. Paul believed. I wonder if it would help you to  know that finding a community to worship with is a  lot like being on an awesome lacrosse team. It’s lots  of work, lots of laughs, and lots of frustrations. But  how sweet is the sound when our sticks are raised  high in triumph, and we know that we have not only  found our freedom but been assured the outcome:  victory in, through, and with God. Lacrosse is a  messy game where the kids do all sorts of things  mothers disapprove of; they run with sticks in their  hands, steal the ball from others, hit each other, and  push each other around. Deciding to believe is messy  too. It requires us to rethink all the rules we’ve lived  by. It requires us to like being coached, to appreciate  the value of training. It means that we must care  more about the team than the needs of an  individual. It’s hard, but it’s worth it. So get with the  program; decide to believe. And I’m not talking  about some wishy‐washy, hoping‐that‐it will‐work  kind of believing; I mean the kind of believing that is 
50

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
sometimes decided with a clenched fist and a sweaty  brow. You can do it! Get started today.    March 5    Scripture reading for today: Ephesians 5; Amos 4 &  5      I am concerned about you. I am afraid you will  rush past big believing, and move on to trying to  behave, without pausing to prepare. Frankly, that’s  easier than doing the work of believing, and humans  gravitate towards softer, gentler solutions. If a  microwave will accomplish the same purposes as a  conventional oven, we will pick the microwave,  right?    So let’s read chapter five in Ephesians, and I’ll  illustrate my concern. Imitate God, therefore, in  everything you do, because you are his dear children.  Live a life filled with love, following the example of  Christ. Ephesians 5:1‐2 NLT    Reframing:  • Believing will require me to know God well  enough to imitate Him in every single solitary  moment of my life.  • Believing is contingent upon me understanding  my relationship with God (I’m His kid; not his  indentured servant, not His pawn, not an object of  His wrath; I’m His baby.)  • Believing will always, always, always mean  loving, and loving is best exemplified by Christ.  • Believing will require me to know how Jesus  loved, and will necessitate me learning how to  apply how He loved to my daily life experience  (I’ve got work to do!).    Hang with me on this point:  it’s far easier to rush  to the second half Ephesians and study what it says  we should do than to camp in two little verses long  enough to grasp their astounding implications.     Thought for today:  Once a long time ago, Pete (my  husband) and I were teaching a “newlywed” Bible  study at church. Someone in charge of curriculum  got the idea that the summer months would be a  good time to bring out a series of biblical studies on  sexuality. I’ll never forget the experience for a  variety of reasons, some of which I can’t share! One  Sunday our topic was homosexuality, and these  newlyweds really got into it! Oh, they said, what a    sin! How terrible! Just look at how clearly the  scriptures speak about this subject—how dare  anyone commit this vile act against holy God! The  next week we talked about adultery. Specifically, we  discussed Jesus’ instructions to men when he says, If  you even look at another woman with lust in your  heart, you’ve committed adultery in your heart (see  Matthew 5:27‐28). The room was strangely silent. It  struck me as sad, really, how easy it was for us to  judge others so harshly for a sin (that presumably  wasn’t an issue for any of them) yet how reluctant  we were to engage in meaningful conversation  about an area of behaving that surely every person  in that room could relate to. So I’m concerned that  you’re going to follow the example of these young  believers who found it easier to discuss a sin that  they couldn’t relate to than it was to wrestle with  one that they no doubt had experienced. When we  rush through believing and straight to behaving, this  can happen to us. We can seek to avoid getting  honest about our own stuff and instead set up rules  to live by that we think we can manage on our  own—independently of God. I warn you: don’t do  this. None of us can behave our way into the good  graces of God, nor do we have to! God has a  different way to handle our “issues” that is far more  effective than us trying to muster up the self control  necessary to play by the rules.    Thought for tomorrow:  The work of God is this: to  believe in the one he has sent. John 6:29 NIV    We’ve all worked so very hard at behaving. I know  it makes sense to us that good behavior would  please God, and I’m sure it does! But what He has  asked of us is this: believe in the one he has sent. I  suspect he knows that if we’ll believe, then He can  lead us in how he wants us to behave.    March 6    Scripture reading for today: Ephesians 6; Amos 6 &  7      We have a video link on our Web site that I think  you’ll want to watch. It’s a monologue delivered by  late night talk show host Craig Ferguson. He’s  speaking about his own history with alcoholism, and  he’s got a lot of great things to say. (Check it out at  www.northstarcommunity.com and follow the links.) 
51

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Ferguson expresses an opinion in his message that  many of us share. He describes the difference  between a “good” and a “bad” treatment facility.  The good ones, according to Ferguson, say this to  the recovering addict leaving treatment: “You’ve  made a good start. But you have a chronic condition  that you will need to deal with for the rest of your  life.” (Bad paraphrase, but I think you get the point.)    What he describes in vivid (and comic) detail is the  chronic nature of addiction. He pleads with us to  know this and to respond to this information  responsibly. Ephesians six says the same thing about  the life of one who believes. Paul writes in chapter  six about the fierce, invisible warfare that is waged  against us on a daily basis.    As I’ve said many times, deciding to believe is  serious business. Believing isn’t a magic pill; it is a  battle. Believing requires us to suit up and show up  every day. There’s some good news in this passage  that I don’t want us to miss. Just as addicts all  around the world find help when they gather with  others who have similar problems, believers follow  this same model and see awesome results. There are  those who have gone before us that can offer us  their experience, strength, and hope. Paul doesn’t  want us to be surprised when things are difficult. He  doesn’t want you and me to think we’re doing “it”  wrong, or that “it” doesn’t work simply because it  feels like war. It is war! It is a fight! But we have  weapons in our arsenal that are guaranteed to  prevail. That’s really, really good news!    Thought for today:  …for everyone born of God  overcomes the world. This is the victory that has  overcome the world, even our faith. Who is it that  overcomes the world? Only he who believes that  Jesus is the Son of God. 1 John 5:4‐5 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: When we are struggling with  coming to believe, many of us doubt that God can  love us. Sure, we think, that may work for someone  else, but not for me. Some of our lifestyles have  scarred us, and left us feeling “less than” and  ashamed. What if those feelings of shame are being  used by Satan himself to trick you into doubting your  place in God’s grand epic adventure? Deciding to  believe will require us to accept some things  because God said them before we have the life  experience to assure us that they are true. If you    doubt that God can love you, talk to someone about  it. Email us, and we can have a conversation. Know  this: you were created to believe! May you become  the Prince or Princess Warrior that God had in mind  when he created you!    March 7    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 1, Proverbs 1,  Amos 8 and 9      If we “make a decision,” then we need to proceed  with the turning over of our lives. I don’t want you to  be uninformed about this kind of life‐transforming  choice. The Twelve Steps: A Spiritual Journey A  Working Guide For Healing (RPI Publishing, Inc.  1994) has a list (see p. 258) of common behaviors  associated with persons in need of recovery. Here  they are (check the ones that apply to you):  o We have feelings of low self‐esteem that cause  us to judge ourselves and others without mercy.  We cover up or compensate by trying to be  perfect, take responsibility for others, attempt  to control the outcome of unpredictable events,  get angry when things don’t go our way, or  gossip instead of confronting an issue.  o We tend to isolate ourselves and to feel uneasy  around other people, especially authority  figures.  o We are approval seekers and will do anything to  make people like us. We are extremely loyal  even in the face of evidence that suggests loyalty  is undeserved.  o We are intimidated by angry people and  personal criticism. This causes us to feel anxious  and overly sensitive.  o We habitually choose to have relationships with  emotionally unavailable people with addictive  personalities. We are usually less attracted to  healthy, caring people.  o We live life as victims and are attracted to other  victims in our love and friendship relationships.  We confuse love with pity and tend to “love”  people we can pity and rescue.  o We are either overly responsible or very  irresponsible. We try to solve others’ problems  or expect others to be responsible for us. This  enables us to avoid looking closely at our own  behavior. 
52

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
o We feel guilty when we stand up for ourselves or  act assertively. We give in to others instead of  taking care of ourselves.  We deny, minimize, or repress our feelings from  our traumatic childhoods. We have difficulty  expressing our feelings and are unaware of the  impact this has on our lives.  We are dependent personalities who are  terrified of rejection or abandonment. We tend  to stay in jobs or relationships that are harmful  to us. Our fears can either stop us from ending  hurtful relationships or prevent us from entering  healthy, rewarding ones.  Denial, isolation, control, and misplaced guilt are  symptoms of family dysfunction. Because of  these behaviors, we feel hopeless and helpless.  We have difficulty with intimate relationships.  We feel insecure and lack trust in others. We  don’t have clearly defined boundaries and  become enmeshed with our partner’s needs and  emotions.  We have difficulty following projects through  from beginning to end.  We have a strong need to be in control. We  overreact to change over which we have no  control.  We tend to be impulsive. We take action before  considering alternative behaviors or possible  consequences.  your body and strength for your bones. Proverbs 3:5‐ 8 NLT    March 8    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 5 & 6, Proverbs 2      After yesterday’s list that reminds us of how  “common” we are – today’s list is a lot more  inspirational. The Twelve Steps: A Spiritual Journey  A  Working Guide For Healing (RPI Publishing, Inc.  1994) has a list (see p. 255) of milestones in recovery  that are downright dreamy. Read these, setting aside  for just a minute your pile of problems, and instead,  think about what potential you’ll have if you will  choose to make a decision to turn your life over to  God.  o We feel comfortable with people, including  authority figures.  o We have a strong identity and generally approve  of ourselves.  o We accept and use personal criticism in a  positive way.  o As we face our own life situation, we find we are  attracted by strengths and understand the  weaknesses in our relationships with other people.  o We are recovering through loving and focusing  on ourselves; we accept responsibility for our own  thoughts and actions.  o We feel comfortable standing up for ourselves  when it is appropriate.  o We are enjoying peace and serenity, trusting  that God is guiding our recovery.  o We love people who love and take care of  themselves.  o We are free to feel and express our feelings even  when they cause us pain.  o WE have a healthy sense of self‐esteem.  o We are developing new skills that allow us to  initiate and complete ideas and projects.  o We take prudent action by considering  alternative behaviors and possible consequences.  o We rely more and more on Christ as our Higher  Power.    Thought for today:  My prayer is that for today, you  will allow yourself to dare to dream about your  potential. Pause to prepare. May today be the day  you come one step closer to living your big dreams. 
53

o

o

o

o

o o

o

  Thought for today:  If these characteristics remind  you of someone, then I have good news for you.  Turning your life over will transform some of these  nagging, painful patterns that have characterized  your life up to this point. But here’s the tough part: it  may get worse before it gets better. Turning over  our lives is challenging work. It means that we have  to consider and reconsider our ways. We’ll have to  ask ourselves: could I be wrong? Is my perception  skewed? Is there a new and different way to  respond? Think about it.     Thought for tomorrow:  Trust in the Lord with all  your heart; do not depend on your own  understanding. Seek his will in all you do, and he will  show you which path to take. Don’t be impressed  with your own wisdom. Instead, fear the Lord and  turn away from evil. Then you will have healing for   

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for tomorrow:  God reminds us, I heard  your call in the nick of time; the day you needed me, I  was there to help. Well, now is the right time to  listen, the day to be helped. 2 Corinthians 6:2 The  Message    March 9    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 7 & 8, Proverbs 3      Have you seen the movie, Little Miss Sunshine? It  has received a lot of critical acclaim. If you saw it, I  wonder how it made you feel …send me an email  and tell me, please! I’m taking a survey. I’m serious  about this; how did the movie make you feel?    Here’s the thing.  My boys thought it was funny,  and so did my husband. I found it traumatizing to  watch. I kept saying things like:    “Why for the love of Pete did they let Grandpa  move into their house when he got kicked out of  assisted living…for doing drugs???? There are young  children in this home. What were these parents  thinking?”    “What on earth is wrong with this family? Why are  they asking the teenage son to watch over the  suicidal uncle? Why does that kid have to beg his  uncle to ‘please don’t kill yourself tonight’?”    This kind of questioning during a movie really  annoyed my family. It was a good movie. Parts of it  were funny. The things that hurt me so much were  all the parts that were so, well, real. Watching that  movie with my family left me feeling a little isolated  and weird. (I’m pretty sure they thought I was acting  like a big goof!)    This week my family and I went on a road trip and  visited a seminary my son may attend. It was fun!  We had an opportunity to have lunch with one of  the professors, and we talked briefly about, of all  things, Little Miss Sunshine. He shared my reaction  to the movie. It felt good to connect to another  person at such a visceral level.    If you make a decision to turn your life over to the  care and control of God, your life is going to get very  interesting. Sometimes you’ll be left feeling like Alice  in Wonderland when she fell down that big hole into  a strange, new world.    But here’s the really cool thing that I can share  with you from personal experience: If you invite God    in, He will bring new experiences and new people  into your life that will allow you to connect with  people in new and wonderful ways.     I know that life experiences and our own twisted  “thought lives” often leave us feeling alone, isolated,  unique, and not quite right. Life has more to offer  than our past experiences or our messy minds. I just  want you to know that if you decide to really take  step three to heart, you’re freeing God to bless you.  Blessings come wrapped in strange gifts. Sometimes  they come in the form of a new friend saying to you,  “I felt the same way when that happened to me.”  That, my friends, is a message of hope. It means  we’re not alone, isolated, or a goof.    Thought for today:  You and I have expected people,  places, and things to make us happy. So how has  that worked out? Some of us have learned that  people aren’t very reliable, so we’ve come to love  things and use people. This is twisted. God created  us to love people and use things. One of the things I  love about God is His intentional transforming  power. When people decide to become His  desperately devoted followers, God transforms them  from the inside out. God is then able to utilize these  people as resources for other hurting people. I know  that self‐reliance may be a coat you pull over your  shoulders every morning. It is my prayer that today  you will be challenged—and comforted—to know  that there are people in this world who have been  given the gift of loving and loving well. Making the  decision to believe, and turning our lives over to  God’s care and control, is going to give us the  opportunity to learn how to love and be loved. This  is messy business. So it’s true what we’ve learned:  man—especially man living independently of God— is not trustworthy. But what is also true: man  indwelled with the Spirit of God is one who can both  know and do the will of Him who sent him. May God  place just such a person in your life today! Not  everyone can share your past hurts, habits, and  hang‐ups. That means that sometimes they can’t  relate when a movie (or other event) triggers strong  emotional responses in you. That’s okay. God will  find a way to meet you wherever you are. He may  even use a fellow human to accomplish this task.    Thought for tomorrow:  It is better to take refuge in  the Lord than to trust in man. It is better to take 
54

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
refuge in the Lord than to trust in princes. Psalm  118:8‐9 NIV    March 10    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 9, Proverbs 4,  Song of Solomon (some bibles call it Song of Songs) 1      If you keep up with the recommended scripture  reading, I wonder how you’ll respond to Proverbs 4.  I’ve had several conversations over the years with  people who got all hot and bothered by the writer’s  assumptions.     This is a chapter written by a guy who believes that  his dad gave him solid advice. He proposes a  principle for right living: listen to your dad and all  will go well with you. But what do you do with that  advice when you’ve come to believe that your father  gave you bad counsel, or abandoned you, or simply  neglected to share any wisdom at all?    Two thoughts for today.  1. Whether right or  wrong, good or bad, every single one of us is a  student of our family of origin. We can commentate  on the worth of this educational experience until the  cows come home. Our natural inclinations are  formed at the feet of our parental units; we are born  imitating the family we are born into. So watch  yourself. Judge all you want, but remember this:  apples don’t usually fall far from the tree. I don’t  know a family that has perfectly executed the task of  perfect parenting. Pete and I certainly haven’t. Each  of us makes parenting blunders—blunders our  children could easily imitate. I suggest that you  consider ceasing the critique of what your parents  did or did not do, and instead begin to take  responsibility to learn from God what the next right  step is for you.  2. This is great news for all of us. We  have the opportunity—the  privilege—to decide to  accept God’s offer of adoption. God invites us to  come to believe, and we need to seriously consider  His offer. At the moment we decide, we are  transported into a new family system.    Thought for today:  The Lord will fight for you; you  need only to be still. Exodus 14:14 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Consciously, willfully,  deliberately, intentionally—stop. Pause to prepare.  Adoption into a new family means a fresh beginning    and an obligation to learn a new way of living. This is  what it means to turn our life and will over to the  care of God—our new daddy.    March 11    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 10 and 11,  Proverbs 5      “O Lord, why do you stand so far away? Why do  you hide when I am in trouble?” Psalm 10:1 NLT      I’ve said it a million times, but I think it’s worth  saying again: healthy families are wildly different,  creative blends of people. Healthy families have  problems just like dysfunctional families do, but  healthy families are more focused on solutions.  Healthy families skip over the blaming, shaming, and  finger pointing and move right on to the next  question: where do we go from here?    Dysfunctional families are eerily similar in their  patterns of relating to each other and their world. In  dysfunctional families: problems fester and solutions  are rarely sought, children learn that they can’t trust  the adults to protect them, someone is usually to  blame, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness are  common.    It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that  unhealthy families are breeding grounds for raising  codependents‐in‐training. (If you don’t have a  working knowledge of the nature of codependency,  check out our Insight Journal on this topic.)    Codependents‐in‐training find it particularly  difficult to believe that God is near. Obviously the  psalmist joins the rest of us in struggling with this  false belief. Just because this isn’t true doesn’t mean  we don’t feel as if it is true. It’s okay to have these  feelings; it’s normal to have these thoughts. But…  (The truth always follows the “but.”)  But “coming to  believe” and “making a decision” require us to  rethink our firmly held and often erroneous views of  God, ourselves, and others.     Turning our lives over to God is going to require  each of us to learn how to “let go and let God”. It’s  not easy. If you’re struggling with relinquishing  control, perhaps this thought will help. Although it is  not easy to learn new ways of living, it is also really,  really hard and stressful to try to chart your own  course. Right? Aren’t you tired of being tired? It’s 
55

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
exhausting carrying on as if you’re the captain, co‐ captain, chief cook, and bottle washer all rolled into  one (very frazzled) person.     Thought for today:  I want to leave you with  something to ponder. While we were in California  this week, all my codependency issues raised their  ugly little heads. This happened while riding down  route 110 late at night, jet‐lagged, headed to a  strange city in an even stranger state. I just had the  urge to boss Pete (the driver) and Scott (the  navigator) around. I’m sure my guys will claim that I  do this all the time. But I’m serious; I really wanted  to hoot and holler and nag and control more than  usual. I’m an excellent backseat driver, really. But I  didn’t. I asked a question: “Do you guys need me for  anything?”    “NO!” They responded in unison.    So I did what any recovering person can do: I laid  my weary head back, closed my eyes, and fell asleep.  I’m not suggesting that we all start sleepwalking  through life. I am asking you to consider a radical,  new way of thinking: we don’t need to fix other  people’s problems, guide other people’s destinies, or  inventory other people’s choices (or even comment  on them). Take a load off. Be still. Rest. Stop  meddling. If you ask God, “Do you need me for  anything?”—what do you think He will say? There’s  a huge difference between needing and wanting.  God wants relationship with us; He does not need us  to make sure the world keeps rotating. Chill.    Thought for tomorrow:  Be still and know that I am  God; I will be exalted among the nations, I will be  exalted in the earth. Psalm 46:10 NIV      March 12    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 12 and 13; Song  of Solomon 2      I’ve been pretty consistently beating the drum  about re‐learning, re‐thinking, and renewed  believing. For me, this re‐education process has  been an essential part of my decision to “come to  believe,” and I suspect that this principle is true for  others too. Let me speak frankly (and I pray, gently)  to you about something that really bothers me.      It disturbs me that we seem to be so reluctant to  dive into the deep end of the pool when it comes to  finding our way back to God. Let me explain. If you  were going to be a physician, you’d expect to have  to study and work diligently to gain the skill sets to  be a decent doctor. The mechanics that regularly  interpret my complaints about my car have  certificates hanging on their walls demonstrating  their commitment to learning the language of ladies  who show up at their shops in need of car repair. If  we want to play golf, tennis, football, or lacrosse,  most of us receive some kind of instruction and  coaching.    First, we receive instruction. The doctors and  mechanics go to class, the athletes go to camps, and  every student reads books on the subject they are  seeking to understand.    Second, we practice what’s been preached. We  take tests, apprentice, stand at the base line and hit  balls, hang out at the driving range, practice our stick  work in lacrosse and our tackles on the football field.    Third, people give us feedback. Sometimes we  appreciate the input, but often we chaff under the  instruction. It’s only in hindsight that most of us  come to appreciate those that have pushed us to  achieve beyond what we currently believe we can  accomplish.     Thought for today:  All this is good stuff. But it’s just  “seen world” learning. How are we doing in the area  of heart transformation? Are we willing to go to any  lengths to figure out what it means to turn our lives  over to God’s care and control? I’m just asking. We’ll  look at more on this topic tomorrow.    Thought for tomorrow:  Teach me to do your will,  for you are my God; may your good Spirit lead me on  level ground. Psalm 143:10‐11 NIV    March 13    Scripture reading for today: Proverbs 6; Song of  Solomon 3 and 4      After about ten years of “doing church,” I almost  threw in the towel. I decided that either the way I  was going about practicing my faith was wrong  (which was hard for me to believe), OR there was no  God. So, I cut a deal with the God of my limited 
56

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
understanding. I told Him that for one year I was  going to give Him a chance to prove Himself to me  (how arrogant), or I was done with religion. Even I  realized this wasn’t the most respectful conversation  in the world, so I “sweetened the pot” in order to try  to win God’s approval of this plan. I promised Him  that each morning I’d wake up and ask only one  question, “Lord, if you exist and if I were completely  convinced, how would I live this day?” And I did it.  Here is some of what I learned.    First, I realized that if God existed, then it made  sense for me to learn more about Him. I had been in  church, heard the sermons, attended Bible studies,  conferences, and workshops; but I hadn’t really  become a student of scripture. I sort of audited all of  the classes. When I asked the daily question, I  decided that a convinced believer would stop  copping out and taking everything pass/fail. So when  my babies went down to bed and Pete was at work  or out of town, I studied. Remember that this is  exactly how interns become doctors, guys who love  cars become mechanics, and hacks become Tiger  Woods‐ish, etc.    Second, I quit all my church committees. This was  radical. But I couldn’t find anywhere in scripture  where it said I should be at church working all the  time instead of spending time developing my  intimate, personal relationship with God. (Don’t  misinterpret me; I did this for a season. There’s  plenty in scripture to guide us and instruct us about  our need for community and supporting the work of  our church community in particular. But I had gotten  all out of whack, and a serious re‐evaluation time  was essential.) I replaced all those committees with  practice. I considered this my apprenticeship. When I  read instructions for how to live in scripture, and I  asked the daily question, I proceeded as best as my  heart could discern. Although I ditched several  committees, I did find myself working in a prison  ministry. I found myself spending more time  teaching my children about God and less time  plopping them in front of Sesame Street. I made  meal plans and actually went to the grocery store  (Pete enjoyed this season). I spent a lot of time in  conversation with others about God stuff. Each day  was a different day. I was asking a question each  morning, and every day brought new challenges.  Again, this was the same kind of practicing that all of  us do when we’re pursuing a new skill set.      Third, I got some good counseling. I found out  something about myself during all this study and  practice time. I realized that I had some potentially  fatal flaws in my character and in my thought life.  My studying and practicing was frustrating. I needed  help. I decided to go to a spiritual mentor who could  guide me in unpacking some of my reactions to this  new way of living. I joined a small group. I  intentionally sought relationships with a few people  who I knew could assist me in this grand experiment.  I truly don’t think parts one and two would have  been sustainable without this key component to this  decision‐making process. This is the same kind of  feedback a young intern would receive. I got some  good coaching. Why am I telling you all this?  Because I want you to really think about whether  you’ve ever decided to turn your life and will over to  God. I had been a faithful, committed, active  member of my church for ten years when I began  this experiment. I believed. I was baptized. I simply  had never decided to turn my life and will over to  God. Can you relate?    Thought for today:  Commit to the Lord whatever  you do and your plans will succeed. Proverbs 16:3  NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  The year passed without me  noticing. I still wake up every morning and ask the  same question. I am still living by steps one, two and  three with varying degrees of “success”. In fact, let  me close with this thought. If you had asked me in  the beginning how I would have described a  successful outcome for that first year, I would have  said this: “Well, I think I’ll become a sweeter, kinder,  gentler person. I’m pretty sure I’ll become an  introvert. I probably will acquire a dainty laugh and  no longer struggle with an addiction to peanut  butter. I’m sure my husband and children will adore  me. I’ll probably learn how to become a frugal  shopper. I’m pretty sure I’ll be unrecognizable; the  new me truly will be new. Off with the old.”    It hasn’t happened. Hindsight is always 20/20, and  with the clarity I have at the moment, I’ll say this: I  think God is doing something in, with, and through  me. I’m not at all sure how to measure it, nor do I  care to. I just know that this is a cool way to live. It’s  a good life. It’s not perfect. It is perfectly messy.  Some days I slip, and forget to ask the question. 
57

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Many days of slipping have taught me that those are  never my best days. I know I’m going to grow  forgetful, but I’ve learned to trust in God’s nearness,  even when I wander. You should try it. Maybe you  don’t want to try it for a year, but you could try it for  today…    March 14    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 14 and 15,  Proverbs 7      During my year of decision, I came across this:  Obey my commands and live! Guard my instructions  as you guard your own eyes.” Proverbs 7:2 NLT   And  I thought ‐ I don’t have a clue how to do this. Some  days, my eyes would droop with boredom as I read  scripture. (Sorry, but it’s true.)  I didn’t get a lot of  what it meant. I had very little historical background.  I was kind of wandering around in my own  wilderness experience. So I decided to change up my  routine. I had always been a voracious reader. But  during this year, I decided that reading about  scripture might be cheating. So I decided to limit my  studies simply to scripture. (I don’t necessarily  recommend this. But I needed to do this for me,  because I’m a big cheater and I might disengage my  brain and just decide some expert knows best.) This  proved to be not very simple. But I did it. On any  given day, I might have come across this Psalm.    O Lord, how long will you forget me? Forever?  How long will you look the other way?  How long must I struggle with anguish in my soul,  with sorrow in my heart every day?  How long will my enemy have the upper hand?  Turn and answer me, O Lord my God!  Restore the sparkle in my eyes, or I will die.  Don’t let my enemies gloat, saying, “We have  defeated him!” Don’t let them rejoice at my  downfall. But I trust in your unfailing love.  I will rejoice because you have rescued me.  I will sing to the Lord because he is good to me.  Psalm 13      Then I’d whip out my school supplies and take  notes. I’d ask myself, What can even a dummy like  you deduce from this text? So here’s what I might  have written about Psalm 13.      • 13:1  I’m not alone in this feeling of  isolation I have. Even a guy who got his writings in  the Bible asked this kind of question. I wonder if  this means that God doesn’t mind it if we’re  honest with Him. Hmmmm…it has to mean that, or  else God clearly could have edited this out.  Teresa’s take away: I need to start getting more  honest with God.  • 13:2  My notes say this is from David. I  remember him. He was the giant killer. Goodness!  I look him up in my concordance, read all about  him and find out that scripture says he’s a man  after God’s own heart; God loved David. He was  also a murderer, adulterer, and apparently a very  poor parent. This totally blows my mind. I don’t  get this. How can such a messy dude be so loved  by God? This is more than I can process. I’m going  to ask someone about this…  • 13:3  David thinks God can restore sparkle. I  thought that was the job of a good anti‐ depressant!  • 13:4  What a human guy! Even this king  worried about what others thought. He had  enemies. He didn’t want to be put in a position of  shame. I get that. I’m still wondering though, how  God could love him.  • 13:5  I’m noticing a pattern. I saw this in  Lamentations too. These guys pour out their guts,  but they seem to always circle their wagons back  to this point: I trust in your unfailing love. I wonder  if this is more of a decision than a firmly held  belief. It seems like to me that these guys really  wrestle with fear, anxiety, and a sense of God  being far away, but they keep coming back to a  decision to believe that God is who He says He is. I  don’t know why this makes me feel better about  myself, but it does.    Then off I would go. There was laundry to do. A  difficult relationship to navigate. Babies to feed. My  coach to call.     Thought for today:  I will remove from them their  heart  of stone and give them a heart of flesh.   Ezekiel 11:19   

58

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for tomorrow:  I’m begging you to dig.  Think. Ask. Ponder. Practice. Get coaching. You can  do it.    March 15    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 16, Proverbs 8;  Song of Solomon 3      There are some promises God gives to those who  decide to turn both life and will over to His care…    I will remove from them their heart of stone and give  them a heart of flesh. Ezekiel 11:19     God promises us a heart transplant. God promises  to change us. Our stone hearts will be removed and  in their places will be put hearts of flesh. A heart of  stone is a dead heart. It is closed to honest, intimate  relationships. A heart of stone is unmerciful with  itself and with others. But we do become attached  to our hearts of stone. And we find ourselves fearing  God's promised transplant. Our stone hearts have  one thing in their favor: they allow us to feel strong  and to appear strong to others. A stone heart is a  protected heart. It seems invulnerable. You cannot  wound a heart of stone. God's offer of a heart  transplant is a promise of life. A heart of flesh is  alive. Only a flesh heart can feel joy. Only a flesh  heart can celebrate. Only a heart of flesh can give  and receive love. But the vulnerability of a heart of  flesh scares us. A flesh heart does not seem as well  protected as a heart of stone. It can feel joy, but it  can also feel pain. You can wound a heart of flesh.  God promises to change us. God will remove our  hearts of stone and give us hearts of flesh. 13    What’s the state of your heart?    Thought for today:  For those who find me find life  and receive favor from the Lord. But those who fail  to find me harm themselves; all who hate me love  death. Proverbs 8:35‐36 (Today’s NIV)    Thought for tomorrow: Okay, boys and girls. Here’s  your test. Are you lost or found? Do you take care of  yourself or harm yourself? Plan to succeed or  deliberately sabotage? How you answer these                                                              
 Dale and Juanita Ryan, on line devotional from Rooted in God’s th Love, March 14 .
13

questions will help you understand whether you’ve  made a step three decision—or not.    March 16    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 17, Proverbs 9;  Song of Solomon 4      This is a great devotional written by Dr. Dale Ryan.  Before you proceed, let me point out one itsy‐bitsy  detail. He’s talking about believers—those who have  decided. Remember: coming to believe gives us the  capacity to find our freedom. The process of  developing the skill sets to access all of God’s big  promises to us is just that—a process. Before we  come to believe in a deciding‐kind of way, none of us  has this capacity. The capacity to find our freedom,  to know and do God’s will, to have the mind of  Christ, etc.—that comes after the decision…    I love Dr. Ryan’s honesty. This is hard stuff, even  for those who decide.      Christians do not believe about life that 'what  you see is what you get'.    Quite to the contrary, Christians believe that  many things we cannot now see are still part of  God's plans for us. Some days we cannot see (or  maybe even imagine) what it would be like to be  completely recovered. But we know that this is  God's plan for us. God is committed to our full  recovery. As this text puts it, God will not be done  with us until we are 'like him'. That is as 'recovered'  as you can get. The clarity of God's plan for us can  give us hope. It may be a difficult journey, but you  can get somewhere from here. We can make it  because God is involved in the process of our  transformation. This hope can give us a kind of  purity of purpose and vision. Because God is  committed to our full recovery, we are not alone  with our hopes and dreams. Because God is  committed to our full recovery, we have a power  greater than our own to help with the struggle.  Because God is committed to our full recovery, we  can find rest and courage in the purity of God's  vision for us. Because God is committed to our full  recovery, we can let go of our pathetic little idol  gods and turn to the true and living God. When we  worshipped a god‐of‐impossible‐expectations, we  became driven and compulsive. When we 
59

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
worshipped a god‐who‐abused, we became fearful  and frozen. When we worshipped a god‐who‐ keeps‐his‐distance, we fought despair. As we begin  to see God as loving, we come to believe that we  are lovable. As we begin to see that God wants us  to let go of our self‐destructive behaviors in order  to live more fully, we come to believe that we are  precious and valuable. 14    Thought for today:  Dear friends, now we are  children of God, and what we will be has not yet  been made known. But we know that when he  appears, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as  he is. Everyone who has this hope in him purifies  himself, just as he is pure. 1 John 3:2‐3    Thought for tomorrow: Take some time today to  journal. Put on your thinking cap. Think about all the  things you’ve learned. Think about the limitations of  the human spirit, and write out a list of things that  might naturally make it difficult to hope based on  unseen things. Tell God this, and thank Him for his  supernatural provision.     March 17    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 18, Proverbs 10;  Song of Solomon 5      You know about Moses, right? He was an Old  Testament hero. If Moses were around today, he’d  have made it into the final round of God’s version of  “American Idol.” In fact, perhaps he did make it  there:    By faith Moses, when he had grown up, refused to  be known as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. He  chose to be mistreated along with the people of God  rather than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a short  time. He regarded disgrace for the sake of Christ as  of greater value than the treasures of Egypt, because  he was looking ahead to his reward. By faith he…By  faith he…By faith…Hebrews 11:24‐29 NIV    Chapter 11 in the book of Hebrews is scripture’s  version of the American Idol All‐Star finals. It’s the  place where the author of Hebrews sort of gathered                                                              
 Dale and Juanita Ryan, on line devotional from Rooted in God’s th Love, March 13 . 
14

up all of God’s top performers and paraded both  them and their accomplishments before us.     Moses, a hero of the faithful, spoke honestly with  God about his doubts. You’d expect a bona fide hero  to say, “Sir, yes Sir. Thank you Sir.” He did not. Once  you make a decision to turn your life over to God’s  care and control, you don’t become a robot. You’re  still you. A decision like this is one more step in the  process of coming to believe. It is not a magic pill, a  lobotomy, or an easy way to rid yourself of all those  hurts, habits, and hang‐ups that are trailing around  behind you like a well‐worn and smelly security  blanket.    Thought for today: The Lord replied, “My presence  will go with you and I will give you rest.”     Then Moses said to him, “If your presence does not  go with us, do not send us up from here.” Exodus  33:14‐15 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I recommend that you take  Hebrews 11, go to the back of your Bible (most have  a concordance in the back listing key words/names  in scripture and where you can find them), and look  up each hero mentioned. Turn to all the places their  names are referenced in the Bible and make notes  about what you find. I suggest two columns: 1. Hero  for sure, and 2. Why I’m surprised God chose this  one. I want you to notice that these men and  women didn’t make it into the heroes’ chapter by  being good, behaving best, or even simply by not  messing up. By faith is why they are there. They  believed.    March 18    Scripture reading for today: Psalms 19 and 20,  Proverbs 11      In a recovery ministry, I get to watch families deal  with events that any sane person would  acknowledge as very shame inducing. It’s  embarrassing to acknowledge that your child has  been stealing from the family business to keep up  with gambling debts. It’s extremely embarrassing to  see dad’s face on the front page of the local  newspaper because he got arrested in a prostitution  drag net. It’s mortifying to have mom show up for a  parent/teacher conference drunk as a skunk.  
60

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  “God is very disappointed in you, and so am I.”  These are the best words a father could come up  with after he bailed his adult child out of jail. And  hey, I’m not slamming dear old dad. All of us have  the inclination to take God and lower Him to our  level. Disappointment is a natural, normal human  emotion when one runs face to face with the  shattering of all illusions.    But natural and normal isn’t God’s way.    Thought for today:  Do not be afraid; you will not  suffer shame. Do not fear disgrace; you will not be  humiliated. Isaiah 54:4 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Sometimes giving human  attributes to heavenly God makes us afraid to cast  our lives into His hands. Fear not. He will not shame  us, humiliate us, or disgrace us. He will, however,  heal us, restore us, renew us, and fulfill His promises  to us.     March 19    Scripture reading for today:  Psalm 21, Proverbs 12;  Song of Solomon 6      An honest witness tells the truth, but a false  witness tells lies.  The words of the reckless pierce  like swords, but the tongue of the wise brings  healing.  Proverbs 12:17‐18 NIV    I’ve spent a lot of years listening to lots of people  share their opinions about who God is and what He  is up to in this world.  Here’s a sampling of some  opinions I’ve heard in recent weeks:  • I think God has abandoned me.  • God is punishing me unfairly.  • When God was handing out the good stuff, he  skipped me.  • God is so far away.  • God doesn’t care about my problems.  • When I pray, it feels like there’s a glass ceiling  between my prayers and God – I feel very far  away from Him.  • God could have stopped these bad things from  happening to me and he did not.  • What God?  God is for the weak. (A sentiment  I happen to agree with.  Unlike mankind, who  seems to despise weakness, God does not.   God is FOR the weak.  But I digress.)    God is disappointed with ____ (me, my child,  my spouse, etc.)    Step three is our opportunity to make a decision  about who we think God is – it’s important to know  the character of the one in whom we’re being asked  to cast our lot with.  I believe that many of us take  the attributes of the people who have been most  influential in our lives (for good or evil) and heap  them onto our image of God.  Pause to prepare.  If  that is true for you, how close do you think your  opinions of God align with what is true of God?    Thought for today:  I will not leave you as orphans; I  will come to you. John 14:18 Scripture is a great  place to seek out a sense of who God is.  I found  great comfort in John 14:18 when I discovered it for  the first time.  God won’t leave us as orphans – God  comes to us.  He doesn’t make us search for him in a  game of heavenly hide and seek.  He comes to us.   He desires relationship with us.  That’s a God I want  to get to know.    Thought for tomorrow:  Why not take some time  this year to explore who God is, recognizing that we  all have opinions about God that may be, well,  wrong.    March 20    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 22, Proverbs 13;  Song of Solomon 7 and 8      Misery loves company. At least that’s true for me.  In Psalm 22, David crafts a psalm that is right up my  alley. He starts out fussing at God for being so  distant, praises God for his saving power, moves on  to a self‐pitying tirade (“But I am a worm, not a  human being; I am scorned by everyone, despised by  the people. All who see me mock me…”), expresses  appreciation for God’s provision for him, rushes back  to his own personal tale of woes, begs God to come  quickly and save him, bargains with God that he will  publicly praise Him, and then actually does it. You  can almost hear the switch click as David slips into  worship. All the things He can remember about  God’s character he begins to sing in these final  verses.    And in the midst of this reading, my misery finds  company. I am comforted by the fact that believing 
61

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
doesn’t have to mean being perpetually perky. I am  renewed as I realize that one can worship God and  feel far away from His saving touch, simultaneously.    If I were God, I couldn’t handle all this messiness!  Fortunately for everyone, I am not God.    Thought for today:  The Lord is my shepherd, I lack  nothing. Psalm 23:1 (Today’s NIV)    Thought for tomorrow:  Sometimes when I’m in a  funky place, I don’t want to hear the theologically  sound answer; I just want to know that someone  understands my pain. I don’t even want someone to  give me a gentle and kind word of correction; I just  want someone to listen to my story. There will come  a time when the theologically sound answer is not  only what I want, but what I desperately need. A  gentle and kind word of correction is one of the  grandest acts of love that can be bestowed upon  another, when it is properly timed. One of the things  I love about God is His masterful timing. He knows  when to let us vent, and when to reel us in. I want to  encourage you today. Although we humans don’t  always have God’s impeccable timing, God himself  does. May today be a day you take your messy ball  of yarn called life to Him, so that you too, like David,  can experience God’s perfecting timing.    March 21    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 1 and  2 (Psalm 23 is going to pop up regularly in the  remainder of this devotional guide.  I hope you come  to love and appreciate it as much as I do!)      Anyone interested in hiring a good shepherd?  Today we aspire to be actors, lawyers, financial  planners, doctors, computer gurus, mechanics, rock  stars—pretty much anything but a shepherd. But  back in the day, way back when the scriptures were  being crafted, to be a shepherd was a pretty big  deal. It was also a big deal to be shepherd‐less.    Moses said to the Lord, “May the Lord, the God of  the spirits of all mankind, appoint a man over this  community to go out and come in before them, one  who will lead them out and bring them in, so the  Lord’s people will not be like sheep without a  shepherd.” Numbers 27:15‐17 NIV      Would you agree that if Moses says his people  need a shepherd, then he is implying that his people  are like sheep? Sheep receive more attention in the  Bible than any other animal. By 3000 B.C. sheep  were domesticated (probably before cattle). They  were important in every area of an Israelite’s life:  civic, religious and domestic. Abel, one of the sons of  Adam, was the first recorded shepherd (Gen. 4:2).  Shepherds had such an arduous task of sheep‐ herding that any decent shepherd knew every  individual sheep by name. A shepherd, much like a  parent of the very young, couldn’t leave those  critters alone for a second without fear of them  wandering off and getting lost.    Sheep are always led, never driven. (This will be a  very important point to remember.)  Sheep are  gregarious; we would call them extroverts! They do  not like to be alone. A happy sheep requires a  minimum of four other sheep to hang with. That’s  what the experts say. Another thing about sheep:  they are easily led, even astray. They will follow  whoever is at the front of the pack, even to their  own peril! That’s why sheep need a good shepherd  to keep them from danger. They also are defenseless  when it comes to their natural habitat predators.  Scientists believe that sheep intuitively know that  their only safety comes in staying together.  Shepherds are often the only line of defense  between a sheep and another animal looking for a  tasty meal.    A good shepherd cares deeply for the herd.  Shepherds have several tools that assist them in  effective shepherding: a sling (think David and  Goliath), a rod (a stick about 30 inches long with a  knob on one end), a flute (to play for amusement  and to calm the sheep), and a staff (a walking cane  with a crook on the end.)  I’ve never been a  shepherd, but I’m told that a shepherd sometimes  uses the crook to hoist lost sheep out of gullies and  such. For certain, the shepherd’s job was always to  get the sheep safely home—often in spite of  themselves.    God himself is compared to a shepherd: But he  brought his people out like a flock; he led them like  sheep through the desert. Psalm 78:52 NIV    And just in case we miss that comparison, we, His  people, are like sheep: Know that the Lord is God. It  is He who made us, and we are His; we are His  people, the sheep of his pasture. Psalm 100:3 NIV 
62

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for today: “ Look at the proud! They trust in  themselves, and their lives are crooked. But the  righteous will live by their faithfulness to God.”  Habakkuk 2:4 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  When one decides to turn  their life and will over to the care and control of  God, it just may be the single most important  decision they ever make. It’s a decision made in  humility – when one recognizes his need for a  shepherd. So I ask you: Are you in need of a good  shepherd?     March 22    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 3 and  4      Sheep don’t wake up every morning with the  intentions of escaping their shepherd or  their flock.  As we learned yesterday, sheep love to hang with  each other, and they come when the shepherd calls.  But what happens when they unintentionally  wander too far away?  What happens when they get  out of range of their shepherd’s voice? And even  more distressing: what happens when they get  paired with a sloppy shepherd?      In the absence of other data, I think we tend to  assume that God is like the authority figures of our  “seen world” experiences. Sometimes we’ve been  shepherded sloppily, and this makes trusting God  hard. If we’re going to make a decision involving  trust, there is nothing wrong with asking the  question: Can I safely trust God with my life? Ask  away. But remember, it is possible that human  shepherds, sloppy in their shepherding skills, may  have led you to some false beliefs about who God is,  how He loves, what He desires, and where He wants  to lead you.    Thought for today:  My people have been lost sheep;  their shepherds have led them astray and caused  them to roam on the mountains. They wandered  over mountain and hill and forgot their own resting  place. Whoever found them devoured them.  Jeremiah 50:6‐7 NIV      Thought for tomorrow: “For I know the plans I have  for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you  and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a  future.” Jeremiah 29:11 NIV    It’s in Christ that we find out who we are and what  we are living for. Long before we first heard of Christ  and got our hopes up, he had his eye on us, had  designs on us for glorious living; part of the overall  purpose he is working out in everything and  everyone. Ephesians 1:11 The Message    March 23    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 5 and  6      Perhaps you can relate to my story. Recently, I lost  my God‐confidence. Do you remember the scene in  Peter Pan when one of his fellow lost boys misplaced  his marbles? I felt like that guy. I completely lost my  God‐confidence and feared I would never find it. Oh,  I looked for it; I wondered where I left it; I shamed  myself for losing it; I even looked for someone to  blame for taking it. Nothing changed—I was still  without my God‐confidence—and feeling very, very  lonely. I wondered about my step three experience;  had I really “decided?” If so, then why did I feel so  decidedly unfound? Then I stumbled across this  scripture.     For this is what the sovereign Lord says: I myself  will search for my sheep and look after them. As a  shepherd looks after his scattered flock when he is  with them, so will I look after my sheep. I will rescue  them from all the places where they were scattered  on a day of clouds and darkness. I will bring them out  from the nations and gather them from the  countries, and I will bring them into their own land. I  will pasture them on the mountains of Israel, in the   ravines and in all the settlements in the land. I will  tend them in a good pasture, and the mountain  heights of Israel will be their grazing land. There they  will lie down in good grazing land, and there they will  feed in a rich pasture on the mountains of Israel. I  myself will tend my sheep and have them lie down,  declares the Sovereign Lord. I will search for the lost  and bring back the strays. I will bind up the injured  and strengthen the weak…Ezekiel 34:11‐16 NIV    I stopped reading. I felt lost; I thought perhaps in  some subtle way I had strayed. I hurt as one injured 
63

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
does, and I certainly was weak. But what good news!  Because the Lord, the good shepherd, says to me,  and to you, that He will look after us, He will rescue  us, He will bring us from afar—to our own land. He  will give us a safe place to rest and an abundant  place to eat. God Himself will seek out and find us.  It’s not up to us to work out our own path of  restoration; God does that. My mind jumped ahead  to the New Testament, an old favorite verse of mine,  forgotten in the land of lost where I had just  moments ago resided. In a blink of an eye I  recaptured my marbles—well, my God‐confidence,  at least!    Thought for today:  For it is God who works in you to  will and to act according to his good purpose.  Philippians 2:13 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Maybe you can’t relate to  me. But if you can, may I suggest that for today, stop  running around like a lost sheep. Sit quietly, bow  your head, and listen for the voice of the good  shepherd. Do you hear Him? He’s wooing you. He’s  calling you back. He’s saying, come, find your way  back to me. It is here that you will discover all that  you truly need. It is possible for me to live without  my marbles, but I’ve learned that it is impossible for  me to live peacefully apart from God. I’ve spent a lot  of time blaming myself and others for my restless  spirit. I’m choosing to set all that blame aside for  today and instead, ponder this wondrous truth:  there is a God who is wooing me.     March 24    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 7 and  8      Once, I was delivering a message at NorthStar  Community, where I have been give the job title  “minister.” I was talking about a personal spiritual  struggle, and this outburst of truthfulness elicited an  unsolicited response. A visitor to our community  came up and with great passion and no small  amount of agitation expressed her profound shock  that I would dare suggest that I struggle.    “How can you say that? You’re a minister! You’re  not supposed to struggle!” she exclaimed. I’m not  sure where this lady got her information. I only know    this: if ministers don’t struggle, then I must not be a  minister! I struggle—not all the time, but sometimes.  If I’m brutally honest, I’d say I struggle with some  degree of regularity. I’m okay with that, and here’s  why:    Jesus went through all the towns and villages,  teaching in their synagogues, preaching the good  news of the kingdom and healing every disease and  sickness. When he saw the crowds, he had  compassion on them, because they were harassed  and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.  Matthew 9:35‐36 NIV    My good shepherd knows that I will struggle, and He  loves me anyway. When I am harassed and helpless,  He is filled with compassion. This good shepherd, the  son of God, came for the very purpose of bringing  good news to me—a desperately devoted follower  who sometimes feels simply desperate. We, like  sheep, were created to need the Shepherd. Although  it is true that I am often powerless, it is always true  that He is powerful beyond all comprehension. If  you’ve felt like a lost sheep lately, will you take the  time now to accept the compassion of the great  healer himself: Jesus?      Thought for today: When he saw the crowds, he had  compassion on them, because they were harassed  and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.   Matthew 9:35‐36 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Sometimes it’s easy to get  the false impression that step three is a once‐and‐ done kind of proposition. You decide; God concurs.  Bam. You’re in the fold. My experience is more like  the laundry at my house. In a home full of  adolescents and adults who like to run and jump and  get really dirty, we need daily laundry runs to keep  up with all our dirty clothes. When I get busy and  distracted and forget to throw in the laundry each  day, this chore quickly becomes messy and  unmanageable. I get really cranky when this  happens. I can honestly say I have days when I forget  that I ever decided to trust God. And you know  what? Very quickly my life gets messy and  unmanageable, and I get really cranky. So like my  laundry, I’ve found myself in need of a daily decision:  is today a day when I decide to trust God with my 
64

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
life, or is it one of those days when I grow forgetful  and choose to ignore God’s voice?    March 25    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 9 and  10    In case you haven’t noticed, Jesus was a very  polarizing force in history. During his time on earth,  he was both beloved and betrayed.  He had a  relatively brief period of public ministry—about  three years—then he was crucified.  But the story  didn’t end with his heart‐wrenching death, of  course. Three days later, he arose from the grave. He  hung out for awhile, returning to his disciples, re‐ teaching and re‐casting his vision for their future  (and his). During the time following his resurrection  and before His return to heaven, Luke (a doctor and  chronicler of the life and times of Jesus) said this  about Jesus: Then he opened their minds so they  could understand the Scriptures (Luke 24:45).  Think  about it. These were his disciples—his desperately  devoted followers. These guys had left everything  for him, yet even they still needed Jesus to open  their minds so they could understand the scriptures!  If the disciples, taught by the master himself, needed  all this coaching, do you think that we can expect to  need some remedial assistance too?  Listen to the  voice of Jesus:     “If any of you has a sheep and it falls into a pit on  the Sabbath, will you not take hold of it and lift it  out?” How much more valuable is a man than a  sheep!”  Matthew 12:11‐12 NIV    The context of this conversation is vital. Jesus was  just about to violate the rule of law of the Sabbath in  favor of obeying the spirit of that same law. His  enemies, hoping to catch him in an act of  wrongdoing, used this as an excuse to plot his death.  Jesus, knowing this, withdrew from that place.     The fact that He was healing the sick escaped the  attention of his accusers.  Let’s not make the same  mistake.  The Lord is our shepherd.  A good  shepherd tends his flock—feeding them, watering  them, and protecting them from harm.    Thought for today: “How much more valuable is a  man than a sheep!” Matthew 12:12 NIV      Thought for tomorrow:  Have you wandered from  the protection of your Good Shepherd?  Have you  forgotten that your safety is found in the shadow of  the Prince of Peace? Have you been looking for love,  peace, rest, and respect in all the wrong places?  Ask  the Lord to show you today how you have been a  virtual enemy of the Good Shepherd.  Ask Him to  reveal to you the ways you’ve lost your focus.  Listen  to His voice as He speaks gently to you about the  important truths that have escaped your attention.   Ask Jesus to open your mind so that you can  understand the scriptures.  Ask God to give you an  unquenchable thirst for His word and an unwavering  commitment to peer intently into it.  Then expect an  answer.     You are far more valuable to God than you may  realize.  You can trust Him with your life.    March 26    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 11 and  12      Jesus loved to tell stories. Here’s one He told:    “What do you think? If a man owns a hundred  sheep, and one of them wanders away, will he not  leave the ninety‐nine on the hills and go to look for  the one that wandered off? And if he finds it, I tell  you the truth, he is happier about that one sheep  than about the ninety‐nine that did not wander off.  In the same way your Father in heaven is not willing  that any of these little ones should be lost.” Matthew  18:12‐14 NIV    I’ve heard it said that we get our first ideas about  who God is and who He is not by looking at our  earthly parents. I squirm at the thought. I have three  children, and it would be a shame if their only  perspective of God came from their experiences  with their father and me. We’ve done our best—but  I’m not in denial—we have had limitations as  imitators of Christ. I’m comforted, slightly, to know  that we are not the only models that they have of  God; we’re just the first. Have you gotten stuck in  the rut of unbelief because of the limited examples  and experiences you’ve had that reveal the true  character of God?    Jesus told a story to a crowd of people that reveals  the heart of His Father. He told his listeners that God 
65

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
cared not just for the masses; He cared for even one  lone sheep. He didn’t count heads and decide  whether the numbers were significant enough for  Him to make an appearance. This God that is far  beyond our understanding was willing to make  Himself available for just one. Would a celebrity of  our day make an appearance for just one? Would a  political candidate show up at a rally where just one  would attend? Would a teacher come to school  every day with an awesome lesson plan for just one?  Would a pastor preach to a congregation of just  one? God would. Not only would He do it, He would  be thrilled to do so. Truly. His Son said so, and He  should know.    Thought for today:  He (Jesus) had equal status with  God but didn’t think so much of himself that he had  to cling to the advantages of that status no matter  what. Not at all. When the time came, he set aside  the privileges of deity and took on the status of a  slave, became human! Having become human, he  stayed human. It was an incredibly humbling  process. He didn’t claim special privileges. Instead,  he lived a selfless, obedient life and then died a  selfless, obedient death – and the worst kind of  death at that: a crucifixion. Philippians 2:6‐8 The  Message    Thought for tomorrow: Like Father, like son. Whom  do you want to grow up to be like?    March 27    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 13 and  14      Daily devotions are so…private. No one needs to  know the answer to this question. If decide that the  Lord is your shepherd, do you know what to expect?  When I was growing up, I rarely went to church.  After I was married, my husband informed me that  we were going to church. This came as news to me.  Shhhh! We have a secret. Don’t spread this around,  we’re not proud of this, but it is the truth: we never  talked about God or any spiritual matter of any  importance before we got married. I know, I know.  Don’t email me and suggest all those good books  available about healthy dating for Christians. We’ve  been married almost thirty years. We confess! We    did it wrong! Don’t do it the way we did; discuss this  and other important issues before you get yourself  hitched. But the truth remains: Pete’s sudden  interest in all things God‐related startled me. I didn’t  know what to expect. I was afraid to ask. I did have  some knowledge of the twenty‐third Psalm…”The  Lord is my shepherd…” but I lacked understanding. I  don’t think I am alone. People were pretty confused  about what it meant to accept Jesus as the son of  God in Jesus’ day too. Some even thought he was  demon‐possessed. In response, Jesus explained what  it means to be one for whom the Lord is their  shepherd:    Jesus answered, “I did tell you, but you do not  believe. The miracles I do in my Father’s name speak  for me, but you do not believe because you are not  my sheep. My sheep listen to my voice; I know them,  and  they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they  shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my  hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is  greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my  Father’s hand. I and the Father are one.” John 10:22‐ 32 NIV    I’ve been finding my way back to God for many  years. My experience has been that the good  shepherd finds a way to speak to me, if I am willing  to listen. He’s never disrespected me by forcing His  will upon me. He never got behind me and pushed  (like sheep, most of us can’t be driven—remember  that sheep can only be led, not driven). Instead, He  has invited us to join Him in his grand epic  adventure.     Thought for today:  I am your Creator. You were in  my care even before you were born. Isaiah 44:2 (CEV)    You saw me before I was born and scheduled each  day of my life before I began to breathe. Every day  was recorded in your Book! You know me Inside and  out, you know every bone in my body; You know  exactly how I was sculpted from nothing into  something. Psalm 139:15‐16 (order reversed and  taken from both the Living Bible and The Message)    Thought for tomorrow:  I was once a very reluctant  follower. I didn’t know what to expect, and my fears  held me back from running hard toward the Father. I  was afraid to even begin the journey, because I fully  expected to disappoint Him. I’ve learned a sacred  truth in my spiritual pilgrimage, and I count it a 
66

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
privilege to share it: entering into a love relationship  with God is not a position secured by performance  and good behavior. You’ve had a place in His heart  since before the first star was hung in the sky.      March 28    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 15 and  16      My parents did a lot of things well. But they did  some things GREAT. Under this category falls the  celebration of Christmas. No matter what (seasons  of financial feast or famine), Santa didn’t skimp at  the Joneses’ house. When Santa has an excellent  track record for delivering the goods, kids get pretty  excited. We couldn’t wait for Santa to come. We  were so excited on Christmas Eve that my parents  had to go to great lengths to keep us in bed—at least  for a few hours. Eventually my weary parents would  drop off to sleep. One of the kids would rouse the  others and the four of us would bolt for the  Christmas tree. This was usually around four in the  morning. I cannot think of a Christmas when my  every need and want was not met. (There was that  time when Santa left the light on my bike and the  batteries ran out and were never replaced. I’m  almost over that.)      But here’s the thing about needs and wants. They  keep changing. As passionately as I longed for the  Barbie doll playhouse, the ten‐speed bike, the desk  set with a blotter in pink, the doll that was practically  alive, the new clothes, the new books, the jewelry,  etc….was it enough? Did a time come when I said,  “Hey, folks, enough is enough. Last year, I got all I  needed. This year, make sure Santa knows that I am  not in want. “ That never happened. Every year  brings a new set of needs and wants. But this  passage says that I shall not be in want. So what  does this mean?      Thought for today:  Don’t worry about anything;  instead, pray about everything.  Tell God what you  need, and thank him for all he has done.  Then you  will experience God’s peace, which exceeds anything  we can understand.  His peace will guard your hearts  and minds as you live in Christ Jesus.  Philippians 4:6‐ 7 NLT      Thought for tomorrow:  It’s easy to write a  devotional series designed to convince you that God  is worthy of our trust. It would be a piece of cake to  passionately preach on how God meets our every  need. But you’re no fool. Easy talk of how God  prospers us and blesses us, while true, isn’t the full  story. You deserve better than someone like me  trying to appeal to your basic instincts of lust and  desire. We’re almost finished with our month of  devotionals focused on step three: making a decision  to turn our life and will over to the care of God. Be  prepared. God and Santa are not the same  individual. Santa is all about bringing good boys and  girls what they want; God is all about giving all his  children (both the naughty and nice) what they  need.    March 29    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 17 and  18      “I shall not be in want.” The Hebrew word in this  passage for ‘want’ is ‘haser.’  Literally, it means “to  lack, be without, decrease, be lacking, have a need.”  A possible paraphrase is, “The Lord is my shepherd, I  shall not lack; I shall not be without; I shall not  decrease; I shall not be lacking; I shall not have a  need.” Wow. That’s a big deal.     Early this morning, long before the sun peaked  through my windows, my phone rang. A distraught  parent had just heard from the police. Their precious  daughter is in jail. This is her third DUI. She’s 23  years old, a single mother, and an alcoholic. “The  Lord is my shepherd, I shall not lack.” These parents  are wondering how to apply this scripture as they  deal with some very tough issues.    Last week a young woman showed up in my office  after a busy weekend. She’d wiped out her college  fund ‐ which was no small feat considering the  amount saved. This money symbolized the hopes  and dreams of her family. For them it spelled future  and sacrifice. For her it spelled D‐R‐U‐G‐S. Her  parents don’t know about the missing money, the  drugs, or the “wanting” of this young woman.  They’re still thinking that they are a family who is not  in want. They’d tell you they have everything they  need—the perfect family. “The Lord is my shepherd, I  shall not be without.” Soon these parents are going 
67

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
to wonder how to apply this scripture to their  perfectly need‐less life.    A few weeks ago my friend was struggling with a  son who is driving her to distraction. He’s messing  up; she’s trying to get it right as a parent—hard stuff.  She says, “I feel so alone.” I know she follows the  good shepherd. And yet she wants—she wants her  son to straighten out, her husband to continue to  offer her support and encouragement, her friends to  surround her, and her church to uplift her. She’s  working hard to figure out how to apply this  scripture. Because like the rest of us, she assumes  that if Psalm 23 is true, she shouldn’t feel so bad.    “I shall not be in want.” Don’t take it lightly. It’s a  simple phrase, but not satisfying if viewed from a  simplistic mindset. My friend, the follower of the  good shepherd, expressed her perception of “want”  to her husband, to her friends, and to her church  community. As she asked, she received. She was  reminded that although she felt alone, the truth was  that she was not alone. She had her husband, her  friends, and her NorthStar Community. This is one  special lady, because her next choice proved pivotal.  She still felt alone. But she chose to trust the process  of following. She chose to believe that she was not  alone. She allowed her community to show her a  new way of believing, thinking, and trusting. She was  choosing to follow because of her decision (to trust  in God) in spite of her feelings.    The story doesn’t end there; just as your story  doesn’t end with you! Today, another precious  woman called me and said, “I feel so alone.” I  listened to her story. The longer I listened, the more  I discovered that she was expressing a feeling, not a  fact. She was not alone. So with fear and trepidation  I ventured an observation, “It sounds to me like  you’re feeling alone, but you’ve given me several  examples that indicate that in fact, you are not  alone.” There was silence.    “You are right.” (I love those words.)  She  proceeded to give me another example. She told me  about a girlfriend who had told her, “You are not  alone. You have me. You have your NorthStar  Community. We’ll get through this together.”  Guess  who spoke those words of comfort? Yes, it was my  friend who had lived those words and suffered the  same pain a few weeks before this gal called.    Was the loneliness real? You bet. Did she have a  need, a want, a lacking? If so, could it be that even in    the need, the want, the lacking, the Father’s gracious  hand was providing?  Did God allow her a moment of  longing, so that in a few weeks she could experience  the joy of compassionate caring for another who  also felt alone?    Thought for today:  My God will meet all your needs,  according to His riches in glory.    Thought for tomorrow:  As we conclude our time  together, ask God to show you His hand in your life.  What we feel, what we want, what we desire, what  we perceive we lack, fluctuates. One time I dreamed  that a Barbie dollhouse would satisfy my every  longing, but times have changed. What hasn’t  changed is the very nature and character of God. Ask  Him to reveal His presence to you today. Perhaps  today is the day you’ll begin to realize that even your  unmet desires are part of a bigger picture, a grander  purpose, an epic adventure that yet awaits you.  Perhaps all this renewal of mind will aid you in  making your decision about step three.    March 30    Scripture reading for today:  Psalm 23; Judges 19  and 20      “I shall not be in want.” Can you articulate what  you want and need, or are you like me? Every  Sunday after church, my family sits down to a good  old‐fashioned family dinner—at the restaurant of  our choice! Getting to the restaurant is the hardest  part of our day. It goes like this –     “Where do you want to eat?”     “I don’t know, where do you want to eat?”    “I don’t know…”    Then, someone (never me) suggests a restaurant.  This is followed by all the protests from the family  members who don’t want to eat there; these are the  same family members who didn’t know or care  about our restaurant choice just moments ago. I  never enter that discussion. I really don’t know  where I want to eat. I just go where the crowd takes  me.    When we don’t know what we need or want– when  we are living as if we are “needless” and  “want‐less”—something is not right. Pia Mellody has  written a wonderful book (which I highly 
68

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
recommend) called Facing Codependency. In this  book she offers insights that are both profound and  true about how find ourselves in a state of want‐ lessness.    Even newborns have a way of expressing a need:  they cry. No one is confused when a healthy baby is  in a state of want. We may not know the exact need,  but we will go to any lengths to discover it and  rectify the situation. That’s healthy. But what if that  scenario is not normal? What if the baby is left to cry  for hours on end? What if wet diapers aren’t  changed regularly? What if hunger isn’t addressed  consistently? What if this state continues? What if a  young child is told to “Shut up!” or “Don’t feel that  way,” or “You’re wrong to think that Daddy doesn’t  love you. Daddy loves you, but sometimes he can’t  help himself. That’s why he hits you so hard.” What  if our every thought, feeling, need, and want is  ignored? Will we learn to trust our instincts? Will we  learn how to name our true emotions, our deepest  desires, our basic needs? And if we can name them,  have we experienced a life that leads us to  reasonably expect that they will be met?    Thought for today:  The apostle Paul says, “I have  learned to be content in all circumstances…”  (Not  the same thing as “needless and wantless” –  contentment is a beautiful thing!)    Thought for tomorrow:  Not caring where you eat is  no big deal if your family can be trusted to choose  wisely. But not being able to recognize your wants  and needs‐‐that’s a big deal. Today, make a  conscious choice to think about what you want and  what you need. Pay attention to the hand of God  moving in mysterious ways to provide for you.       Sometimes big pronouncements aren’t the best  kinds of decisions. Big pronouncements may be too  hard to swallow. Instead of deciding today to trust  God with every single detail of your life, why not  start smaller and see what happens? Ask God, “Lord,  show me the way you’d have me go today.”    Perhaps tomorrow would be a good day to practice.  Take just one day, and ask God: “How would you  have me live today? If I truly trusted you with today,  what would be my next right step?” Then take it.  Then ask the question again, and take that step. If  tomorrow seems like too big a decision, why not give    Him, say, tomorrow morning until noon? Then re‐ evaluate. You could take it in one‐hour chunks. Blog  me and let me know how it’s going. Did you decide  on an hour or a day? I’d love to hear from you.    March 31    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 23; Judges 21    A few devotionals ago, I talked about my friend who  had the courage to express her wanting, her  needing, her desiring. She said, “I feel alone.” Not  even a half‐hearted listener could miss the  implications. She felt alone, but she longed for  community. She desired a family that would love her  unconditionally and support her unequivocally. She  was having a rough time, and it felt bad. In her  misery, she wanted company.    There’s a guy named Paul. Historians tell us that he  wrote a number of the books in the Bible, including  first and second Corinthians. I think Paul can relate  to my friend.    Thought for today:  Praise be to the God and Father  of our Lord and Jesus Christ, the Father of  compassion and the God of all comfort, who  comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can  comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we  ourselves have received from God. For just as the  sufferings of Christ flow over into our lives, so also  through Christ our comfort overflows. If we are  distressed, it is for your comfort and salvation, if we  are comforted, it is for your comfort, which produces  in you patient endurance of the same sufferings we  suffer. And our hope for you is firm, because we  know that just as you share in our sufferings, so also  you share in our comfort. 2 Corinthians 1:3‐7 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Sometimes we cry out, like  a newborn baby, and it seems that no one hears.  Worse, we conclude that no one cares. What if there  is more going on in our lives than we can know?  What if there’s a larger purpose, a grander  adventure, a greater “YES!” awaiting us—but for  now, on this day—we must wait. It’s at times like  this when a good decision comes in handy. The  decision has been made; we’ve chosen to trust God  with the messiness of our lives. Instead of revisiting 
69

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
the decision, we can move forward to solve the  problem: we feel in want, but we know God meets  our needs. We feel bad, but we know there are more  explanations than we possess at the moment. We  can pause to prepare because first we decided to  believe.    It is on days like this that it helps to remember,  “The Lord is my shepherd.” The question that  remains is: will you follow? I hope today you will  take a moment and speak of your wants and needs  to the Father. Having come clean with the unmet  desires of your heart, I pray that you will be willing  to stick around and trust Him for the answer.                                                                             STEP 4 We made a searching and fearless moral  inventory of ourselves.    April 1    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 120, Judges 6 and  2 Peter 1. Pay special attention to verses 3‐11 in 2  Peter.       Today we turn our attention to step four—making  a searching and fearless moral inventory of  ourselves. This step is going to require courage.  Thankfully, God did not give his children a spirit of  timidity, but of power, love, and sound mind. We’re  going to need His power, His love, and the mind of  Christ to take this next step.    I find that self‐objectivity is a difficult task. It feels  burdensome at times. But learning how to see  myself accurately enables me to understand how  others see me. And why should that matter? Isn’t  other people’s opinions of me their problem, not  mine? Well….not exactly.    From the beginning of time, God has had us in His  mind, and He created us as relational beings. We  weren’t meant to live in isolation. In fact, when Jesus  was asked to name the most important  commandment, He couldn’t do it. He instead named  two: love God and love others (as you love yourself).  Isn’t that fascinating? He didn’t command them to  achieve world peace, end poverty, or fight for the  rights of the underprivileged. That’s not what He  said. He said: love God, love others, love self. We  love in the context of community. It’s all about  relationships.     So it does matter how other people “see us.” How  we relate to others and how others relate to us will  be key ingredients in our ability to follow those two  commandments that Jesus couldn’t separate.   Once I was walking out of a store, and my son  evidently watched me trudge across the parking lot.  When I climbed in the car, he asked, “Mom, are you  okay?”    “Yes, son, I’m fine. Why do you ask?”    “Your face looked kind of stressed.”    “It does? Thanks for telling me; I was just thinking.  I feel happy on the inside; my outsides must not  match!” 

70

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  He continued, “My friends tell me that I look  stressed when I walk around, even when I don’t feel  that way.”    “Huh,” I said. “I guess that’s why I ask you if you’re  stressed when I pick you up from school. You walk  out looking stressed. You and I must have faces on  the outside that don’t always match our true  feelings.”    “I asked my friends: should I look like this?” He  makes an exaggerated happy face that could not  possibly be considered an upgrade in facial  expressions. I laughed. He’s a funny guy.    “Maybe we should think about why people see us  differently than we see ourselves.”    “I guess.” He has finished with the conversation,  but I hadn’t. I realized that I learned a valuable  lesson that day—thanks to my boy. These kinds of  lessons and more await us as we enter into the  fourth‐step process.     Thought for today:  Some of our persistent hurts,  habits, and hang‐ups are annoyingly resistant to  removal because we don’t see ourselves accurately.  No wonder we end up confused about why others  respond to us the way they do! If Michael and I are  walking around looking grumpy, who wants to hug a  porcupine? We’re walking around wondering why  people are avoiding us, while people are avoiding us  because of the way our faces look while we’re  walking around. Does that make sense? Step four  will help us understand this stuff.    Thought for tomorrow:  Let a man examine himself.  1 Corinthians 11:28 NIV    April 2    Scripture reading for today: Psalm 121, 2 Peter 2  and 3      The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not be in want. He  makes me lie down in green pastures, He leads me  beside quiet waters, He restores my soul. He guides  me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.  Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow  of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your  rod and your staff, they comfort me. You prepare a  table before me in the presence of my enemies. You  anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. Surely    goodness and love will follow me all the days of my  life, And I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.  Psalm 23    I shall not be in want. I shall not be in want. Can  you imagine never being in want? Before we get into  a discussion about not being in want, let’s review.  “The Lord is my shepherd…” is the precursor to “I  shall not be in want.” Think of the first verse of  Psalms like an “If…then” statement. Verse one  reframed says, If the Lord is my shepherd, then I shall  not be in want. This state of satisfaction and  contentment does not come with a pair of ruby red  slippers like Dorothy wore in The Wizard of Oz. We  can’t just click our heels together and hope that all  our needs will be met. No—learning how to live  contently presumes that we’ve made the decision to  follow God. If I am to be a person who is not in a  perpetual state of “wanting,” then I’d better figure  out what it means to follow the good shepherd. Step  four is the next step in developing a skill that will  enable us to do just that.    You must pay close attention to what they wrote  (“they” being those who witnessed the splendor of  Jesus), for their words are like a lamp shining in a  dark place—until the Day dawns, and Christ the  Morning Star shines in your hearts. Above all, you  must realize that no prophecy in Scripture ever came  from the prophet’s own understanding, or from  human initiative. NO, those prophets were moved by  the Holy Spirit, and they spoke from God. 2 Peter  1:19‐21 NLT    So now you see. Part of deciding to trust means  that we must pay attention to those things that God  says are true, even when those true things don’t  match our current life experience.    Thought for today:  You shall know the truth, and  the truth shall make you free. John 8:32    Thought for tomorrow: Don’t forget: first we’ve  acknowledged our powerlessness and life  unmanageability, second we came to believe that  God could restore us, and then we took the third  step—deciding to entrust ourselves to God. Now  we’re on step four. Implied in the first three steps is  the acknowledgement that you and I have struggled  with seeing God, ourselves, and others accurately.  Our reality confusion may be because we don’t have  the necessary skill sets and/or we really don’t want 
71

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
to see the real deal. This needs to change.  We need  to wrestle with the truth. God says He is our  shepherd and we will not be in want—against the  backdrop of our perceived reality—we want we  want we want. Step four will help us sort out our  perceptions and reality.    April 3    Scripture reading for today: 1 Peter 1‐5      As we march through our fourth step in this  month’s devotional series, I hope you’ll grab a Step 4  Study Guide. You can find one on our Web site  (www.northstarcommunity.com). This is the kind of  step that requires a good bit of explanation, and I’m  not going to attempt that in this devotional series.     It’s my prayer that this month will raise our  awareness. Since we have acknowledged  powerlessness and unmanageability, figured out that  God exists, and decided to give Him control of our  lives, we’ve got some choices to make.     The fourth step requires us to take time and  examine our lives—thoroughly, honestly, and  reflectively. Have you ever had to complete an  inventory of your home? Take a moment and think  about writing down every single thing that you have  in your house. Don’t forget the junk under the  kitchen sink! The attic counts! Yes, you need to write  down everything in the basement too. This step is  just like that, except it is an inventory of ourselves— our assets, our feelings, our decisions, our  resentments and fears, our grudges and injuries,  wrongs done, and problem areas—the complete  package.    During our devotional time this month, I’m going  to be straight up with you: I want you to be stirred in  new ways to think about who you are and who you  want to become. I want you to seriously consider the  possibility that a thorough inventory might be in  your best interests.    Thought for today:  Now, who will want to harm you  if you are eager to do good?  But even if you suffer  for doing what is right, God will reward you for it.  So  don’t worry or be afraid of their threats.  Instead,  you must worship Christ as lord of your life.    1 Peter 3:13, 14 NLT      Thought for tomorrow:  Reading through 1 Peter  reminds me that God has some strong opinions  about the kind of person He wants me to become.  There are some rights and wrongs. And since I’ve  turned my life over to Him, I’m accepting the reality  that as He is Creator God, I must take His perspective  seriously. No more doing my own thing; I now have a  higher authority that I am learning how to listen to!    Early in my own recovery journey, I frankly could  not do an accurate step four. I lacked perspective. I  was extremely self‐unaware. I was defensive (and  still am lots of days). I didn’t even know how to  evaluate my life. What was I supposed to use as an  evaluative guide? How could I list my problem areas  when I wasn’t sure if the “problem” I was listing was  mine or someone else’s? (For me, blaming is easier  than taking ownership.)  I found it helpful to ask  God, over and over, to “show me what you want me  to see about myself.” For me, it was very helpful to  regularly read scripture. It gave me a framework for  self‐evaluation that was very helpful (and sometimes  painful.)    April 4    Scripture reading for today: 1 Chronicles 1 and 2;  Romans 1      According to The Twelve Steps for Christians, “A  moral inventory is a list of our weaknesses and our  strengths.” And so I ask you: who decides what is  weak and what is strong? Here’s the thing: one  man’s weakness can be viewed as another man’s  strength.    Example: Before I say this, know that I am not at  all making a political statement, so don’t get all  upset by this. Just read it. I was listening to a talk  radio host talking about how brave and courageous  George Bush is in regards to his protective measures  on behalf of our country; this person sees the  president’s actions as strong. Another guy I was  listening to said Bush is a bully and has unresolved  hostility issues. So in this man’s view, Bush’s  behavior is a sign of weakness. All I’m saying here is  that taking an inventory requires prayer, because it  isn’t an easy thing to do with rigorous honesty and  accuracy.  

72

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Another example: I’m on a plane this morning,  flying to visit my mom for her birthday, and I am  reading a sales catalog with a lot of pithy sayings:  • “Resolve to succeed. The greatest discovery one  can make is that nothing is impossible.” Really? Do  you agree? Is there anything that you have  resolved to succeed at (such as weight loss,  abstinence from a particular substance, or even  becoming a saintly, patient person) and failed?  How will you inventory that situation?   • “Excellence is the result of caring more than others  think is wise, risking more than others think is safe,  dreaming more than others think is practical, and  expecting more than others think is possible.” Now  that’s inspiring, but is it an indicator of strength  (big faith) or codependent folly? I don’t know!    And it is for this very reason that I beg you to learn  how to pray. Inventories can only be accomplished  with God’s help. I’m not asking you to become a  monk, just start like this: “Lord, show me what you  want me to see.” Now that’s a good beginning.    Thought for today:  When we lose our conscious  contact with God, or never pursue it, yucky things  happen.    “For although they knew God, they neither  glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but  their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts  were darkened.” Romans 1:21 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Folks, it could happen. As  you wade through your fourth step, keep reviewing  steps one, two, and three. If we try to do an  inventory strictly by our own wits, we may reap  futility and foolishness.     April 5    Scripture reading for today: 1 Chronicles 3 and 4;  Romans 2      I saw this sign while I was flying to Atlanta.  “Courage does not always roar. Sometimes, it is the  quiet voice at the end of the day saying, ‘I will try  again tomorrow.’” I love this. That’s a great attitude  to adopt as we take our inventory. We may have  some false starts. That’s okay. We can always say, “I  will try again tomorrow.”      One style of inventory is taking our lives in five‐ year chunks. This was tough for me, so I ditched that  idea. I decided if that didn’t work, I’d try another  approach. So I did further research, and found  another recommended style of inventory – and wow  – it was awesome. It was hard, but it was awesome.     For a recovering codependent, it would have been  easier to just keep plunking away at that five‐year  increment idea. Frankly, it took courage to admit  defeat. But that’s okay. A way was found.     So, my friend, be of good courage. And forget  about that roar. Just join me and say, “I will try again  tomorrow.”    Thought for today:  Or do you show contempt for  the riches of his kindness, tolerance, and patience,  not realizing that God’s kindness leads you toward  repentance? Romans 2:4 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  I suspect that many of us  think that this fourth step is a cruel attempt to  further deflate our already shaky self‐esteem.  Maybe that’s why we avoid it so aggressively. It is  not. God’s intentions spring from His loving kindness  (not out of a critical spirit), out of His patience (not  His wrath). You can do this.     April 6    Scripture reading for today: 1 Chronicles 5 and 6;  Romans 3      Recently I engaged in a lengthy conversation with  a person who is new to the recovery process. My  new friend was adamant that the fourth step was a  ridiculous waste of time. I’m familiar with this  perspective; no one I know ever really embarked on  this step with unbridled enthusiasm and vim, vigor,  and vitality. My experience is that either we prefer  to pretend that we don’t have any issues to  inventory OR we’re overwhelmed with the shame of  our own sense of inadequacy. Either response tends  to make us run from the process. But this gal that I  was talking to had a different view. Here are her  reasons (in no particular order of priority) for why  she is in need of recovery but not in need of  completing a moral inventory:  • Her life is too stressful; her ex‐husband is a jerk. 
73

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
• Her life is miserable; her children take advantage  of her.  • Her boss fired her; she has no clue why.    She thinks all those folks should take stock of their  lives; she is FINE! (F‐freaked out, I‐insecure, N‐ neurotic, E‐emotional).     Thought for today: There is no one righteous, not  even one; there is no one who understands, no one  who seeks God. All have turned away, they have  together become worthless; there is no one who  does good, not even one…for all have sinned and fall  short of the glory of God. Romans 3:10‐12, 23 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  I really don’t know my new  friend well enough to know if less stress, better kids,  and a friendly ex would make her life addiction free.  But scripture tells me this: all of us fall short. So as  long as she is distracted by the sins of her ex, her  kids, her former boss, etc., how does that help her?   I can relate to my friend; it’s easy for me to believe  that the people in my life that “cause” me problems  have sinned and fallen short. All sarcasm aside, that  may be true. But it is not all of the truth. In fact, all  of us, each of us, every single one of us—have issues  that need addressing. Step four gives us an  opportunity to consider what OUR issues are.  Frankly, that lady I listened to sounded ridiculous  blaming so many people for her troubles while she  was the one sitting in a jail cell. Honestly, that’s how  you and I sound too. It’s silly to waste our time  thinking about someone else’s inevitable  shortcomings when we’ve got a few of our own to  acknowledge. So, go start taking ownership of YOUR  stuff.     April 7    Scripture Reading for today:  1 Chronicles 7 and 8;  Romans 4      In our reading today, Paul (the author of the book  of Romans) discusses Abraham’s “greatness.”  Abraham was a historical figure to the Jewish  people—a true hero. Paul asks why he is such a  hero. Is it because of the great things he did? What  kinds of things constitute “great things?” He quotes  scripture in Romans 4:3: “Abraham believed God,  and it was credited to him as righteousness.” Ahhhh.       Paul states that it is Abraham’s faith that was the  truly great thing about him. In terms of walking  through the steps, that means he clearly marched  right through steps one, two, and three. And, if we  were in a third‐grade Sunday School class, perhaps  I’d hammer that point home for a while and move  on.    But we’re not. We’re grown‐ups. We can face the  facts. Abraham’s behavior was not always in sync  with his bold believing. Abraham certainly could  have benefited from a fourth‐step inventory. (If you  are interested, find a Bible with a concordance, look  up “Abraham,” and read all about his life. Remember  that his behaving was often suspect, but he was  declared “righteous” by God. Think about it.)    Anyone who is brave enough to work through a  complete moral inventory asks a question: what do I  see when I examine myself? Erwin McManus, in his  book Soul Cravings, writes about this experience as a  child:     This is a question I was asked to face years ago  when I found myself desperately struggling to  understand myself, trying to measure the weight of  this one life. ‘What do you see?’  Even at twelve I  knew this was a trick question. It really is a good  question, though. Your retina may be necessary for  sight, but your soul definitely shapes what you see.  My soul was confused and cold and growing  calloused, and I was quickly becoming blind to so  many things. When your soul is sick, one of the  symptoms is blindness. Bitterness, for instance, is like  a cancer that makes you blind. I had allowed hurt to  make my soul toxic. Bitterness is the enemy of love  because it makes you unforgiving and unwilling to  give love unconditionally. It is the enemy of hope  because you keep living in the past and become  incapable of seeing a better future. It is the enemy of  faith because you stop trusting in anyone but  yourself. 15    Thought for today:  If any of you lacks wisdom, he  should ask God, who gives generously to all without  finding fault, and it will be given to him. James 1:5  NIV                                                                
 Soul Cravings, by Erwin Raphael McManus, Nelson Books, Introduction to “Cravings” pages unnumbered. 74
15

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for tomorrow:  I am comforted by the  messy life of Abraham. Frankly, sometimes I fear  careful self‐examination because I am so scared of  what I’ll find. Why? Because I’m afraid if I  acknowledge the truth, it will make it more real.  That’s silly, you say—and you’re right. But I’ve dug  further and asked myself why I’m so silly. Recently  I’ve discovered that I fear what God and others will  think of me too. So it’s not just about worrying about  my own opinions, it’s also fearing judgment and  condemnation from God and others. I’m left with  one thought that causes me to walk through my  trepidation: even a goof like Abraham was dearly  loved by God. Maybe there’s hope for me too.    April 8    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 9 and 10;  Romans 5      You really need to read Romans 5, but if you don’t,  read this from verse 6: You see, at just the right time,  when we were still powerless, Christ died for the  ungodly.    This is a big deal. Long before you “came to  believe” or made the decision to turn your life over  to the care and control of God, Christ died for you.  He didn’t wait until you deserved it, or had made up  for all that you lack. He didn’t wait until you made a  commitment to Him. No, indeed not. First, He made  a commitment to you. (If you want to study the  extent of that commitment, I suggest you read our  Insight Journal Part III, which focuses on this topic.)    Very rarely will anyone die for a righteous man,  though for a good man someone might possibly dare  to die. (verse 7)  Is that what you think? In order to  get the blessings of God, we’d better be good. (This  is sort of like the “Santa‐goes‐to‐heaven” model of  believing.)  If that’s what you’ve been taught, you  were taught wrong! No, blessings don’t come to us  because we earn them, deserve them, or avoid  losing them by behaving better than most. Blessings  are bestowed upon us by God because of who He  is—not because He hopes we’re going to shape up.    But God demonstrates his own love for us in this?  While we were still sinners, Christ died for us. (verse  8)  At NorthStar Community, we like to define sin as  living independently of God. We realize that this is a  little less cumbersome than trying to list all the    possible ways we can behave badly. So let’s reframe  this verse in NSC lingo: While we were still living  independently of God (going our own way, making  our own decisions, deciding for ourselves what was  right and what was wrong), Christ died for us.  By  this definition, if we’re living like a nun but only  doing that because we ourselves think that’s a good  idea, then we’re sinners.     As you consider taking a serious look in the mirror,  you can be assured of one thing: although you may  cringe at what you see, God does not. He knows  your problems, but He focuses on your potential,  because he remembers: …while we were still  powerless, Christ died…    Thought for today:  Jesus …“gives strength to the  weary and increases the power of the weak.” Isaiah  40:29 NIV     Thought for tomorrow:  If Christ thought you were  worth dying for, don’t you think it’s time to consider  what value he saw in you? An inventory helps you  consider who you are, why you exist, and where you  are headed.    April 9    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 11 and 12;  Romans 6      A quick read through Romans 6 may evoke a wide  range of emotions…we should no longer be slaves to  sin…wow! That sounds great. Since sin is living  independently of God, and because we’ve  presumably been ready to acknowledge the first  three steps as true (Why else would we be at step  four? If you’ve not done that yet, stop now. Return  to step one. You’re wasting your time.) ‐ it means  we’ve come to accept the fact that independent  living has not served us well.     …we should no longer be slaves to sin rings like an  answer to prayer. Our plaguing hurts, habits, and  hang‐ups can be wiped out? Cool!     But suppose you’ve been at this believing thing for  awhile, and some of your hurts, habits, and hang‐ups  haven’t cooperated by fleeing at the mere mention  of your bold believing. Does Romans 6  leave you  wondering what you’re doing wrong? 
75

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  …in the same way, count yourselves dead to sin but  alive to God. Huh? How do you do that? I  recommend you start with an inventory.  I believe  that you have to count, take stock, pay attention to,  and re‐evaluate your life in order to make a wise  decision about what to ask God to kill off and what  to nurture.    So be brave. Start with bitterness. Ask the Holy  Spirit to reveal to you where bitterness has taken  root in your heart. (For a bit of a description of  bitterness and its ugly effects, see Step 4, Day 7 of  this devotional series.)  Grab a dictionary and study  the definition. Ask the Holy Spirit where the tender  wounds are in your heart that have festered into  bitterness. Then just write it down. Don’t filter it,  judge it, debunk it, ignore it. Try hard not to  medicate it with chocolate and peanut butter. Just  write it down.    Thought for today:  If we have been united with him  like this in his death, we will certainly also be united  with him in his resurrection. For we know that our  old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin  might be done away with, that we should no longer  be slaves to sin—because anyone who has died has  been freed from sin. Now if we died with Christ, we  believe that we will also live with him. In the same  way, count yourselves dead to sin but alive to God in  Christ Jesus. Therefore do not let sin reign in your  mortal body so that you obey its evil desires.  Selected passages, Romans 6    Thought for tomorrow:  I realize that right now you  are thinking about how I’m trying to trick you into  doing an inventory. You’re wrong. I’m making no  bones about it; just do it. Why? Because it’s good for  you. Medicating, avoiding, denying, repressing,  suppressing all our hurts, habits, and hang‐ups  equals letting sin reign in our mortal body so that we  obey its evil desires. If you continue in this manner,   God won’t stop loving you. Your stubbornness won’t  cause Jesus to renounce his crucifixion and  subsequent resurrection experience because he’s  irritated by your bad behaving. What it will do is  hinder you from experiencing the capacity to be free  that was given to you the very moment you allowed  Christ care and control of your life, believing that  only He could.      April 10    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 13 and 14;  Romans 7      I particularly appreciate scripture when I read a  chapter like Romans 7. Have you ever thought about  writing an autobiography? If so, tell the truth. Would  you be tempted to edit your stories? Sure you  would!  I’d prefer to write an autobiography that  captures my funny memories, my “victories,” my  happy times. If I could rummage around in my bag of  memories, I might pull out an occasional defeat—if it  ultimately had a great ending—like the time I made  alternate on my drill team but ended up getting to  help the team out when one of our captains couldn’t  perform. I’d tell that story. But believe me, there are  some stories I would not want retold. Especially  while my parents are still alive and well!     God didn’t do that in scripture. He had his divine  and human storytellers spill the beans. In Romans 7,  Paul does that when he, a virtual spiritual giant of a  man, says this, “For I have the desire to do what is  good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not  the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to  do—this I keep on doing.” I once had someone tell  me that this wasn’t really true of Paul, once he  became a believer. This must have been how he was  before step 3. Maybe this person is right. But as best  as I can determine with my limited knowledge, that  is not what the man said. He’s saying that he  struggles with matching his behaving with his  believing. He doesn’t say, “Hey, I used to be this  way. But once I came to believe, I was zapped. Now  I’m sinless.” He doesn’t say that in the chapter I’m  reading from. So even spiritual giants take time to  inventory their lives.    Erwin McManus has an entry in his book Soul  Cravings called, “Love is Like Stepping On Broken  Glass.” Ask the Holy Spirit to recall to your mind your  past love experiences gone bad. As you make the  list, take note of how these experiences made you  feel, and see if the Spirit reveals to you any patterns  of responding to this pain.    Thought for today:  Look deep into my heart, God,  and find out everything I am thinking. Don’t let me  follow evil ways, but lead me in the way that time 
76

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
has proven true. Psalm 139:23‐24 New Century  Edition      Thought for tomorrow: “How is it that the same  thing that can make your life a rhapsody can leave  you gutted, like a dead fish wrapped in day‐old  newspaper?”—Depeche Mode, in the song “The  Meaning of Love”    April 11    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 15 and 16;  Romans 8      You have just got to love Romans 8. “I consider  that our present sufferings are not worth comparing  with the glory that will be revealed in us.” (verse 9)  Revealed in us? Not to us? Not for us? No. In us.  Revealed in us. Glory revealed in us. That’s cool.    But to make room for God’s grand epic adventure  and glory, we’ve got to get the junk out of our trunk.  We’ve got to deal with suffering. We can’t medicate  or run from it. Well, that’s not quite true. We can do  both those things and more to avoid embracing our  suffering. But we won’t have room for all the glory.     McManus says in entry 4 in Soul Cravings (under  Intimacy) that “We are created to know God and to  know love.” But he doesn’t stop there. Love may be  what we’re created for, but it is risky business. “We  cannot live unaffected by love. We are most alive  when we find it, most devastated when we lose it,  most empty when we give up on it, most inhumane  when we betray it, and most passionate when we  pursue it.” (Entry 3, Intimacy section, Soul Cravings)    Ask the Holy Spirit to help you write out your  answers to these questions:  • When have I been most devastated by lost love?  • When have I felt empty as I have given up on love?  • When have I been inhumane as I betrayed the  ones I love?  • When have I failed to pursue love passionately  because I preferred to protect myself?    Thought for today:  Let me express my anguish. Let  me be free to speak out of the bitterness of my soul.  Job 7:11 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Messy loves sometimes  leaves us broken, sometimes bitter. Where are you    in your pursuit of love? As you inventory your love  life, ask the Spirit—is this what love is?    April 12    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 17 and 18;  Romans 9      This week I ran into an old friend. It had been a  long time since we had connected, but thanks to the  magic of email and prayer lines, I knew she was in a  world of hurt. I won’t spill her guts on you, but  things were bad. So I said, “Hey, I’m praying for  you.”     To which she said, “Well, goodness. Thanks, but  we’re all FINE. God is in control, no worries here!”  And off she marched with her bloodshot eyes,  droopy shoulders, and extra wrinkles in her face and  clothes. Suffering wears on us. It shows, even when  we try to deny it.     I understand my friend’s point. She’s afraid if she  acknowledges her suffering, the rest of us fellow  believers are going to give her a speech about  bucking up and God’s provision. Perhaps she thinks  only spiritual sissies cry in their corn flakes or lose  sleep over wayward children and unpaid bills. Since  my job title includes the word “minister,” I suspect  she has some preconceived notions about what I  think strong faith looks like (and if so, I hope she’s  wrong about me).    I’m still going to pray for my friend. I’m praying she  stumbles across Romans 9. Paul writes in verse two,  “I have great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my  heart.” Paul got his letters printed in the Bible. I  think he qualifies as a spiritual giant. And when faced  with the messiness of life—he admitted it—“I have  great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my heart.”    Maybe you believe that spiritual giants have short  lists and anemic emotions on their step four  inventories. I hope you rethink that. It’s okay for  “real” men and women of faith (those who’ve  marched through the first three steps) to tell the  truth.    So what about you? What’s on your list that  includes great sorrow and unceasing anguish in your  heart?   

77

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today:  The troubles of my heart are  enlarged; bring me out of my distresses.” Psalm  25:17 (NASB)     Thought for tomorrow:  There’s a verse tucked away  somewhere in the scriptures that tells us that we  can’t heal what we don’t acknowledge. Wait— maybe that’s Dr. Phil. Maybe he got it from the  scriptures! Either way, it’s true. If you want to get to  the good stuff—the big dreams, the peace that  passes all understanding, the fruits of the spirit—you  must be willing to tell the truth about where you’re  currently camped.     April 13    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 19;  Romans 10 – 11      I am reminded repeatedly why children often lead  us. Here are some encounters I’ve had with kids  lately.  • Last week a kid pitched a total fit in front of me  in the grocery checkout line. It was nap time and  this kid knew it; well, he knew he was miserable.  Perhaps he didn’t know quite yet that a nap was  what would restore him. But he knew he needed  something. His crying and stomping and sniffling  and head banging were all very effective  attempts to get his mother to set aside her  agenda and take him home.   • A recent visit with my nieces and nephews found  me in my happy place—surrounded by three  loving kids who just knew beyond a shadow of a  doubt that their aunt wanted to hear every  single detail of their lives. I heard about mucking  out a horse stall,  a detailed account of a week‐ long field trip, the latest school gossip, and my  third‐grade nephew’s decision to alter “career  paths” (yes, he said that).   • A four‐year‐old walked up to me at the  beginning of our celebration time in church and  told me how really mad he was that his daddy  called him stupid. He may have only been four,  but even he knew that was totally uncool—and  wrong.    Kids get it. They get that they are special and worthy  of an attentive ear and a compassionate response.    They have no doubt that being the center of  attention is their due. Of course, if one gets too  carried away with the center‐of‐attention notion,  that can be a problem. But I think a larger problem is  when we begin to believe that it is never okay to tell  the truth about how we’re feeling or when we come  to believe that we don’t deserve the opportunity to  be heard by an attentive and compassionate ear.    So what about you? Do you know when you’re too  tired, too hungry, or too stressed? Do you know  what you need when that happens, and do you take  appropriate action? Part of an effective step four  involves learning to see ourselves more clearly. Start  looking!    Thought for today:  Jesus said, “I tell you the truth,  unless you change and become like little children,  you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”  Matthew 18:3 NIV    “Therefore, whoever humbles himself like a child is  the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.” Matthew  18:4 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Take a few minutes to  list  times when you have an inaccurate sense of self.  Feeling inadequate, “less than,” “better than,” etc.  are all indicators that we’re not seeing ourselves  through God‐vision goggles. Code words: isolating  from others, being either too aggressive or non‐ assertive, fearing failure, appearing inadequate,  denying any wrongdoing, or having a negative or  inflated self‐image.    I don’t see myself as God does when ____ because  ____. This affects ____. This activates ____.  This  makes me feel ____.    April 14    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 20 and 21;  Romans 12      One of my favorite verses is found in this chapter  of Romans. It used to be my most hated verse. Every  time I ran across it in my reading, I eyed it with a  beady eye of suspicion. How in the world does one  offer their body as a living sacrifice? And is that even  appropriate?    Having offered my thoughts, feelings, and choices  to the altar of people pleasing on many occasions—
78

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
inappropriately—I asked myself, is this an  egomaniacal God I am being called to serve? Does  God need me to “worship and serve” Him so that he  can feel worthy? If so, how does that make him any  different from a mere mortal, some of whom require  loyalty and unwavering allegiance in order to feel in  control? Is God a control freak?     But even when I was reading scripture through the  lens of co‐dependency run amok, I was intrigued as I  read on…Be transformed by the renewing of your  mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what  God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will…” I  can know the will of God? Wow! I want that!     I’m not sure I ever returned to my questions in  paragraph two. Because in all this questioning a  thought occurred to me: If I can know the will of  God, then I assume God will provide a way for me to  do the will of God. Doing the will of God has got to  be a better proposition than trying to keep all the  people I know happy all the time. I decided to  rethink my people‐pleasing ways.    Thought for today:  If you’re tired of disappointing  people, and you want to find a more peaceful way to  live, try this: List the ways you seek the approval of  others. Our constant seeking of the approval of  others keeps us in a constant state of impression  management. Code words: caring more about what  others think about me than what is true of me,  feeling unworthy, fearing criticism, lacking  confidence, fearing failure, ignoring our own needs.    Example: I seek approval when ____ because  ____. This affects ____. This activates ____.    Here’s one way I might answer that: I seek  approval when I care more about what a person  thinks about me than I care about doing the next  right thing. I seek approval of others because  sometimes, immediate gratification of another’s  approval feels good. This affects me in a million ways  because people can be pretty demanding, and I can’t  make everyone happy all the time; it is too  exhausting! This activates feelings of guilt and  shame, and I feel like I’m losing pieces of myself in  my efforts to make all people happy all the time.    Thought for tomorrow: … Do not think of yourself  more highly than you ought. Romans 12:3 NIV. It is  arrogant to think that I can do for others what only  God can do. Seeking approval from other humans is    folly. Sometimes they’re going to be right in their  disappointments, sometimes wrong. I think I’m  better off entrusting myself into the hands of Him  who judges justly than counting on other people.    April 15    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 22 and 23;  Romans 13      “You are not the boss of me.”  Each of my children  has expressed this sentiment at one time or another.  Each time, Pete and I responded in unison.     “As a matter of fact, we are the boss of you.”  Perhaps you know that I like being the boss. But if  you know that fact, you also realize that Pete is a  happy third‐born and is just as content when he is  not the boss as when he wears the mantle of  responsibility of man in charge. So our unified  response is not all about wanting to be bossy. It’s  more about understanding Romans 13.     Right off the bat Paul issues a firm statement:  submit to authority. He doesn’t qualify this with  sayings like, “If you like your authority” or “If you  think your authority is worthy of your allegiance.” He  says simply, “Submit.”    The McBean children aren’t the only people who  don’t like people being the boss of them. Most of us  dream of being our own bosses and getting our own  big scoop of authority. And maybe someday we’ll get  some of that authority. But for today, let’s wrestle  with our own limitations. So how are we doing at  submitting to our earthly authorities?    Thought for Today:  Honor your father and mother.   Then you will live a long, full life n the land the Lord  your God is giving you.  Exodus 20:12 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: List all the people in roles of  authority that you resent and/or fear. Code words:  comparing self to others, taking things too  personally, fearing rejection, noting an arrogant  attitude, feeling inadequate, reacting rather than  acting.    I fear ____ because ____. This affects ____. This  activates ____. This makes me feel ____.  I wonder if  you are one of those people created to lead others.  If so, I suspect you will make a much more effective  authority if you know how to live well with your own 
79

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
authority figures. Maybe you never aspire to rule.  Whether you want to lead or to follow, it is always  appropriate to learn how to live well with authority.     April 16    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 24 and 25;  Romans 14      Monday, April 16, 2007. Another day that will be  seared into the memories of every student at  Virginia Tech, their parents, the faculty, visitors,  alumni—and the world. As I write this, more than 24  hours have passed since the “massacre at Virginia  Tech,” and we still are uncertain of the body count.  Inexplicably to most of us, a young man kills two  people in a dorm and then more than 30 in  classrooms on the Virginia Tech campus.     It’s so horrible, so baffling; most of us are still in  shock. But not the news media. Many of them are  clear on their response to this tragedy: judge.  Desperate to get word on my son’s safety and the  safety of his fellow Hokies, I watched the television  coverage of this unfolding nightmare with rapt  attention. What did I hear? A lot of armchair  quarterbacking, criticism, and judging all authority  figures currently working on the Tech campus.    Eventually I simply couldn’t take any more and had  to hope that emails and cell phones would give me  what I wanted—the sound of my son’s voice or word  of his status. Hearing my child’s voice was a relief,  but it could not ameliorate the rage I felt at the  reporters’ interviews of other people’s children.  They badgered them with questions like, “Do you  think you should have been told earlier about the  first shooting? Aren’t you upset that classes weren’t  cancelled? Why wasn’t your campus closed off?”    And then I went to scripture. You, then, why do  you judge your brother? Or why do you look down on  your brother? (Romans 14:10)      Ouch. Reporters judged officials; I judged  reporters. I was mad as only a scared mother can be,  and those lame questioners made a nice, safe,  anonymous target for my rage. I still believe that no  one was served by this rush to judgment that we  witnessed on all the networks covering this story.  But that gave me absolutely no right to join in the  fray.       According to Juanita Ryan, (you can hear her take  on this; her audio class is on our web site),  sometimes we become judgmental of ourselves and  others when we’re suffering. Sometimes working up  a good head of steam seems easier to deal with than  our own howling pain. Thanks to Dr. Ryan’s wise  words, I paused to prepare. I dug deep and found my  compassionate self. I’ve decided to spend the rest of  this week practicing the fine art of compassion—I’m  going to let go of my judgments of others—since I’m  the only person I have the power to change.    Thought for today:  So then, each of us will give an  account of himself to God. Romans 14:12 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  List your resentments. Code  words for resentment may include: feeling injured,  violated, left out, low sense of worth, angry, bitter,  or desirous of retaliation.     Example: I resent ____ because ______. This  affects _____. This activates _____. This makes me  feel _______.    April 17    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 26;  Romans 15 and 16.      One of the beautiful blessings tucked into the  fabric of step four is hope.  A thorough step four  requires us to lean into our pain. Listing my  resentments, disappointments, fears, sexual  misbehaviors, etc. requires me to uncover my eyes  and stare myself in the face. Step four wipes away  my illusions and good intentions, my dreams and “if  onlys.”  An accurate inventory tells me what is—not  what I wish. This kind of brutal honesty is  frightening, but if I can do this I will be developing  spiritual muscles that will help prepare me for God’s  grand epic adventure.    And that gives me hope. If I can embrace my  current suffering and make friends with the truth  about me, then I am one step closer to my true God‐ created identity. I realize after reading the book of  Romans that God is calling each of us to live larger  than any human is capable of doing. If I want what  God wants for me, I’d better be willing to get myself  ready to receive my call. So the bottom line is: as we  grow up, we need to grow strong. God has big plans 
80

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
for us, and we’re in need of character (which is far  different from acting like a character!).    Thought for today:  May the God of hope fill you  with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you  may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy  Spirit.  Romans 15:13 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Take time today and list  your strengths. God has given each of us gifts. What  are yours?      April 18    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 27 and 28;  Job 1      September is a month that will always be defined  by 9/11. April has become a month that  commemorates the tragedy at Virginia Tech. We  have other days in U.S. history that recall our  collective national tragedies as well as celebrations.  December brings Christmas; November,  Thanksgiving. The fourth of July is always a fun long  weekend.     It’s fitting that during this particular month, those  of us participating in the NorthStar Community  (whether in person or via the Web) are working on a  fourth step—a step that will include a remembering  of both tragedy and triumph.     The book of Job is the story of a family that  suffered for no good reason. Although Job’s  “friends” try their best to explain the horrid events  that unfold in this drama by finding fault with Job  and/or his family, God makes it clear in the first  chapter that those “friends” are way off base. As the  stories of slaughter from Virginia Tech assail us—if  the media is any kind of barometer—we want  answers. We want to know why one young,  disturbed man massacred over 30 students and  faculty members. We want someone to blame. He’s  a likely target, but is he enough? Can we blame more  people? Can we come up with some policies and  procedures that will give us the illusion of safety in a  world where suffering strikes in alarmingly random  ways?    Job provides no easy answers, and that’s good  news. In spite of our desire to distill life into easily  memorized formulas and platitudes, Job reminds us    that simple solutions rarely capture the complexity  and mystery of the will of God.    Here’s the deal. It’s freaky. In Job 1, Satan and God  are reported to have had a conversation. Let’s take a  look:     Satan – “I have been patrolling the earth,  watching everything that’s going on.”    God – “Have you noticed my servant Job? He is the  finest man in all the earth. He is blameless – a man  of complete integrity. He fears God and stays away  from evil.”    Satan – “Yes, but Job has a good reason to fear  God. You have always put a wall of protection  around him and his home and his property….reach  out and take away everything he has, and he will  surely curse you to your face!”    What a storyline! Think about what just happened.  God painted a virtual target on the heart of Job, and  pointed him out to Satan. Lest we forget, remember  that Satan has only one purpose: “The thief’s  purpose is to steal and kill and destroy.” John 10:10    As we read through this book, this small exchange  is going to haunt us.    Thought for today:  The thief’s purpose is to steal  and kill and destroy. My purpose is to give them a  rich and satisfying life.” John 10:10 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  Do you feel like someone  put a target on your heart and begged Satan to take  aim? If so, the book of Job is a must read.    April 19    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Chronicles 28, Psalm  122, Job 2      Have you ever had a day when you asked, “Can it  get any worse than this?”    Job did. One day the news got worse and worse.    First, a messenger arrived at Job’s house (where  they were feasting) and reported the death and loss  of all his animals and farmhands. That’s economic  loss.    Next, another messenger reports a freak fire that  destroys all his sheep and shepherds. More  economic loss. 

81

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Then, a raid is reported that cost him his camels  and servants. This is the virtual collapse of Job’s  financial empire.    Finally, the last and most horrendous loss: a  sudden wind sweeps in from the wilderness,  collapsing his house and killing all Job’s children.    And his initial response, In all this, Job did not sin  by blaming God. Job 1:22    In chapter 2, we realize that more bad news  follows swiftly on the heels of day one. Satan steals  Job’s health. No one said a word to Job, for they saw  that his suffering was too great for words. Job 2:13    Thought for today:  I remember my affliction and my  wandering, the bitterness and the gall. I well  remember them, and my soul is downcast within me.  Yet this I call to mind and therefore I have hope:  Because of the Lord’s great love we are not  consumed, for his compassions never fail.  Lamentations 3:19‐22    Thought for tomorrow:  I wonder how lonely Job  felt. All is lost. His friends come to sit with him, but  Job’s suffering is so overwhelming that no one can  find a word of comfort. People who suffer tell me  that sometimes having a friend just to sit with them  is the best comfort of all in times of great sorrow.  But we’ll soon discover that these friends can’t hold  their tongues for long. Although silence may be the  only response necessary in the face of great pain,  simply embracing our suffering is sometimes too  hard. We feel compelled to fill it with words. I  wonder if Job had the urge to run and hide. Have  you felt like hiding from others? List the times you  have isolated yourself. Isolation is a way of hiding  and/or self‐protection. It’s a way of avoiding pain  and not taking risks. Code words: fear rejection,  timid and shy, feel defeated, procrastinate, see  ourselves as unique, lonely, or blame others for our  relationship deficits.    I isolate ______ because ____. This affects ____.  This activates ____. This makes me feel ____.    April 20    Scripture Reading for today:  2 Chronicles 1 and 2;  Job 3        Suffered lately? Then you can relate to the words  of Job. Let’s review what we know:    Job lost everything. Was it a result of his sin? No.  Because he was “the finest man in all the earth. He is  blameless – a man of complete integrity. He fears  God and stays away from evil. And he has  maintained his integrity, even though you urged me  to harm him without cause.” (Job 2:3)    Job three contains Job’s first speech in response to  all this pain. In it, he curses the day he was born. Like  most of us, when faced with great suffering, we soon  lose perspective. Job has forgotten the years of  plenty, the parties, the blessings. His greatest fear  has been realized.     I remember one week when the greatest fear I had  was my daughter’s propensity to drive long  distances—alone—at night—down busy highways  and by‐ways. It never occurred to me that I should  be worrying about my son sitting in a classroom at  Norris Hall on the Virginia Tech campus (The year –  2007). Who knew?     One week I was humming when the days were  warm and sunny; the next night my son and I had a  good cry (having left the Virginia Tech campus on the  heels of a massacre).     One week I was looking forward to a lot of quality  time this summer with our three children; the next  week my mind was filled with sorrow for the families  who have had their family members snatched from  them in one morning of rage. I don’t know what to  choose to worry about, and I am beginning to think  worry is a waste of time for someone like me (who  doesn’t even know how to worry accurately).     I have to consciously remember that there are still  things worth humming over. I must intentionally  turn my mind to thoughts of vacation and quality  time; all these things are easy to forget when your  eyes tend to leak involuntarily.    In the week following the Virginia Tech tragedy,  my son and I stopped at a local coffee shop for a  snack; next to the register stood a pile of  newspapers. The headline story included the face of  the perpetrator. With calm and quiet resolution my  son stood at that stand and systematically turned  every paper over—facedown. Employees and  passers‐by could not see my son’s rage. No sorrow  was obvious on his countenance. He just flipped  those papers over.  
82

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  My friend behind the counter took my money and  glanced at my boy with sympathy ‐ sometimes  suffering shows up in weird ways and inconvenient  times.     This is the important point of this story: WHEN  SUFFERING SHOWS UP, DON’T SEND HIM AWAY.  Embrace him. Acknowledge him. Lean into him.  There are worse things than suffering. When we  push him back, ignore him, and deny him access into  our heart and mind, he’s a sneaky thief. He’ll still  find a way back in. He’ll creep in and set up a tent.  He’ll torment you in unexpected ways.     Thought for today:  I’ll never forget the trouble, the  utter lostness, the taste of ashes, the poison I’ve  swallowed. I remember it all—oh, how well I  remember—the  feeling of hitting the bottom. But  there’s one other thing I remember, and  remembering, I keep a grip on hope: God’s loyal love  couldn’t have run out, his merciful love couldn’t have  dried up. They’re created new every morning. How  great your faithfulness! I’m sticking with God (I say it  over and over). He’s all I’ve got left. God proves to be  good to the man who passionately waits, to the  woman who diligently seeks. It’s a good thing to  quietly hope, quietly hope for help from God. It’s a  good thing when you’re young to stick it out through  the hard times. When life is heavy and hard to take,  go off by yourself. Enter the silence. Bow in prayer.  Don’t ask questions: Wait for hope to appear. Don’t  run from trouble. Take it full‐face. The “worst” is  never the worst. Why? Because the master won’t  ever walk out and fail to return. If he works severely,  he also works tenderly. His stockpiles of loyal love  are immense. He takes no pleasure in making life  hard, in throwing roadblocks in the way.  Lamentations 3:19‐33 The Message    Thought for tomorrow:  List the areas of your life  that you have trouble expressing or even  experiencing feelings. Many of us learn to hide our  feelings. In unhealthy families, there are usually only  a very small range of emotions that are allowed. Our  true nature is distorted and reality is hidden. This  lack of emotional honesty can make us physically ill.  Code words: unaware of feelings, struggle with  relationships, depressed, chronically ill, realize that  one’s feelings are sometimes distorted or    inappropriate to a situation, or withhold  conversation.    I repress my feelings ____ because ____. This  affects ____. This activates ____. This makes me feel  ____.    April 21    Scripture Reading for today:  2 Chronicles 3 and 4;  Job 4      With friends like Eliphaz, who needs enemies?     There are no simple answers for suffering. I know  we all love a simple answer and an explanation for  suffering, but we don’t often get that. Can we let  that go? Can we be careful not jump to conclusions  simply because we feel angry, scared, frustrated,  and depressed?    Another thought. When we are deeply wounded  and in lots of pain, sometimes it feels safer to run to  anger. A spirit of criticism and judgment brings with  it the illusion of power. But it’s just an illusion. I  would recommend that we acknowledge our anger,  but recognize it for what it is; sometimes it’s a thinly  veiled screen that we try to hide our suffering  behind.     Our emotions are not sins. Emotions are emails to  the soul intended to: get our attention and teach us  profound lessons. Unfortunately, we sometimes  misuse the feeling of anger.    Thought for today:  So stop telling lies. Let us tell our  neighbors the truth…(Translation: It’s a lie to express  anger when we truly are feeling afraid.)  for we are  all parts of the same body. (Translation: We must  learn how to treat each other gently—with respect— including ourselves.)  And don’t sin by letting anger  control you. Don’t let the sun go down while you are  still angry, for anger gives a foothold to the devil.  Ephesians 4:25‐27 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  Make a list of ways you  inappropriately handle anger. Anger is a normal,  healthy emotion. But sometimes we don’t know how  to allow it to do its job (show us there is an issue  that needs addressing) and then let it leave. Most of  us either deny it or use it as a weapon of mass  destruction. Either way, this is not cool. It’s okay to  acknowledge one’s anger; it is not okay to be 
83

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
dishonest about it, or to give ourselves permission to  disrespect others by inappropriate expression of it.  Code words: resentment, depression, anxiety, self‐ pity, jealousy, or stress.    Example: I inappropriately deal with anger when I  ____ because ____. This affects ____. This activates  my _____. This makes me feel ____.     April 22    Scripture Reading for today:  2 Chronicles 5; Job 6  and 7      One of the great things about Job is his honesty.   New Testament writers remind us that much that is  written in scripture is placed there to encourage us,  guide us, exhort us, etc. I think Job is a great guy to  go to for advice when it comes to suffering.    As Job speaks, I’m reminded of one of the  prerequisites for an honest conversation. I’m careful  about throwing honesty around in a willy nilly  fashion. The older I get, the more cautious I am with  the gift of honesty.     I used to think that, since the truth will set you  free, stating the truth is always a good thing. And it  is—to a point. But I’ve also learned to moderate my  expressions. Why? Because sometimes what I  believe is truth is really better described as what  feels like truth to me at that moment. Sometimes, I  may believe something is true with all my heart,  even though I’m completely wrong‐headed.  Emotions cloud perspective. Trauma does strange  things to our brain.     Years ago we were in a car accident and I just  knew that my images of the accident were THE  FACTS. Taking an air bag to the face and the  subsequent concussion scrambled my brain.  According to my family, my memories were WRONG.  How can that be? To this day, when I remember the  accident, I see a vision that feels real to me. But even  I have to admit that the other four passengers saw  the same thing, and it is very different from my  “truth.” So now I tread cautiously around the edges  of my perspective on truth. Secondly, just because  something is true, it doesn’t mean it is appropriate  to share it. I’m trying to develop my spiritual muscles  by learning better how to respect truth. Sometimes  silence is the best policy. Sometimes it’s a tacit  endorsement of a lie to remain quiet. Scripture    warns us that there are times when to rebuke a  scoffer—even with the truth or when it would be  helpful for them to hear it—could be dangerous.  Both Old and New Testament writers warn us not to  rebuke a scoffer. Sometimes stating the truth is a  rebuke, and we shouldn’t speak it.    That said, Job just lets it all hang out. He must have  felt very safe with God to speak so frankly. Although  his friends clearly act like goofs, their friendship  must have a history of safety and love. Job obviously  has not a history of hiding his thoughts and feelings.  Job is a great model.    Thought for today:  Despite the pain, I have not  denied the words of the Holy One. Job 6:10    Thought for tomorrow:  Have you been a person  who can be honest in a safe way? Are you a person  people can be honest around, without fear of  speaking to a scoffer? Do you have a history of  honesty abuse? One last thought: it is helpful to  remember that although our brains may be fuzzy in  the truth department, God is a great source for a  truth checkup. If our truths deny the words of God,  we might need to rethink what we believe.    April 23    Scripture Reading for today:  2 Chronicles 6 and 7;  Job 8      “You’re getting what you deserve.” This  summarizes Bildad’s perspective on Job’s suffering.     “God will not reject a person of integrity, nor will  he lend a hand to the wicked.”    All true. But lest we forget, Job is in this pickle  because he was a person about whom God said, “He  is the finest man in all the earth. He is blameless—a   man of complete integrity.” Take that, Bildad.     I wonder if sometimes we avoid a fourth step  because, like Bildad, we are certain that anything we  unearth will reveal “all that we lack” (to quote Sarah  McLachlan). This is wrong. Although we like to tie up  suffering in neat bundles of clarity, it doesn’t work  that way. God’s ways are beyond our ability to  comprehend. There is a God, and we did not get the  job. There is more going on in the unseen world than  we know.  
84

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  God has plans for us—to prosper us, to give us a  hope and a future. How that looks is God’s design,  and it is not necessarily in accordance with our  desires. Know this: we can have a life of  contentment, prosperity, hope and future—by   God’s definition. If we have effectively claimed a  third step (turning our life and will over to the care  and control of God), we have already made the  decision to do life God’s way.    So get busy. Do that fourth‐step inventory.    Thought for today:  If any of you lacks wisdom, he  should ask God, who gives generously to all without  finding fault, and it will be given to him. James 1:5  NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Sometimes suffering is the  pathway to peace. Avoiding suffering can lead us off  the pathway and get us stuck in a ditch. Bildad  implies that Job’s problem has to be bad behaving.  But there’s another issue that Bildad hasn’t even  given a voice to: sometimes what we think of as  doing good is really not. For example, sometimes we  prefer taking care of others more than accepting  responsibility for ourselves. Frankly, it’s easier to get  distracted by other people’s needs than it is to step  up to the plate and take ownership of our own  issues. Code words: going co‐dependent, no core  identity, desire to feel useful and indispensable,  feeling responsible ‘for’ (rather than ‘to’), or  rescuing. Ask God to show you examples of “godly”  caretaking that is really not godly at all.    I take care of ____ because ____. This affects  ____. This activates ____. This makes me feel ____.    April 24    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 8; Job 9  and 10      I love Job. I love how truthful he is. I love the  messiness of his honesty. I love how he doesn’t feel  it necessary to butter up God. He’s able to express  how he feels—about himself, his circumstances, his  theology—the entire enchilada.  Job has some things  going for him that you and I may lack. Job has a  history of relationship with God. Chapters one and  two are proof of the intimacy between Job and God.  And there’s a lot to commend Job for in terms of his    knowledge of who God is and how God operates. In  my Life Recovery Bible, the commentator makes a  great point in chapter nine. “Job knew more than he  understood. He knew about God’s sovereignty and  justice and that no man is blameless when seen in  the light of God’s perfection. What he didn’t  understand is that God is merciful and that it is only  by grace that we do not receive our deserved fates,  which would be far worse than Job’s sufferings.  When we feel that God isn’t being fair, we should  remember that if he were, we would never be able to  enter his presence. When God is ‘unfair,’ it is always  on the side of mercy.”    Aren’t we all like that? We tend to know more  than we understand. For example, a woman may  know that adultery is seriously not cool, but I  wonder if she understands the impact if she follows  through and commits adultery. Does she understand  that her children may never be able to work through  the betrayals and heartaches that will inevitably  arise when the affair is discovered? In 10 or 15 years,  will she understand why her son is unable to commit  in a relationship? Does she understand that her  adultery makes it harder for her spouse to take  ownership of his own shortcomings in the marriage?  Does she understand that her daughter may be  suspicious and distrustful around even the nicest guy  in the world? No. She may not. Nor will she grasp the  doubling of this tragedy if her affair is with another  married man. It might be too painful to both know  and understand the will of God as it applies to her  choices. And that is also true for us.  I want to  encourage you to take seriously the implications of  your choices. I hope you will acknowledge to  yourself and to God that your knowledge and your  understanding may be worlds apart. Speaking what  we know without understanding what we’re missing  produces about the same results as if we didn’t have  any knowledge at all!    Thought for today: Trust in the Lord with all your  heart; do not depend on your own understanding.  Seek his will in all you do, and he will show you which  path to take. Proverbs 3:5‐6 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: One compelling reason that I  continue to make fearless moral inventories is  because I have a healthy respect for my own  capacity to be deceived. Denial is a powerful enemy. 
85

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
My hope is in the revelation of the truth to me by  the Holy Spirit. I hope that I can allow God to  transform me now, so that I won’t continue to harm  myself and others, and that I can change in order to  avoid causing any future harm that I could prevent. I  hope this for you, too.    April 25    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 9; Job 11  and 12    “Shouldn’t someone make you feel ashamed?”    The day began like any other, and unfortunately,  ended like many others. Another day when I sit and  watch one person take on the job of shaming  another. This, I think to myself, is why I sometimes  despair. I have no idea why we seem to think that  “making others feel ashamed” is of value. It seems to  me that shaming is packaged like a value meal.  Shaming is usually accompanied with a side dish of  self‐righteous indignation and a large helping of  anger.     During this particular meeting it is parental shame  that makes my heart weep. “I expected more of you  than this.” “You can do far better than this.” “Well, I  know you want to change, but I am just not so sure  whether you can. Son, you’ve proven to be a huge  disappointment to me.” “I just don’t understand  how you can be so stupid!” On and on it goes. Who  knows where it will stop? It certainly doesn’t end in  a child saying, “Gee, Dad! How right you are! I can do  better than this! I’m ready to go to any lengths to  become my best self!” It’s far more likely that this  kid will comply and lay low—going through the  motions of good behaving—and run out and self‐ medicate at the first distracted moment on the part  of his hyper‐vigilant parents. I know the heartbreak  of disappointed spouses, parents, siblings, and  friends. This time, they had so hoped it would be  different. They hoped their optimism would not be  misplaced. Relapse stinks. Living with disappointed  expectations stinks too. I get that. What continues to  baffle me is why caring people think that heaping  shame on another is an effective intervention tool.      I understand that the “shamer” has noble goals. Like  Zophar and Bildad, these folks sincerely believe that  they are trying to inspire, encourage, and motivate  positive change. Whether it is a parent, a spouse, a  sibling, or a dear friend, these masters of shame see  themselves as helpers—not hinderers—in the  restoration process. This is another mystery to me:  what evidence does anyone have that shaming has  ever worked? I grant you, it sometimes bows the  shoulders and head; it occasionally results in short‐ term compliance. But has it ever in the history of  mankind made the “shamee” a better person? I  think not.    And here’s another thought. Zophar, in his  misguided attempts to shame Job into better  believing and behaving, gets it wrong. God was  rewarding Job in His own mysterious ways. Zophar is  certain that this is all about punishment. Think about  that; Zophar could not even shame Job with any  degree of accuracy.    Two points not to forget: 1. Shaming doesn’t work,  and 2. Shamers generally make themselves look  foolish. In fact, Zophar revealed more about himself  than Job as he ranted on. Zophar was arrogant and ill  equipped to deal with Job’s suffering in a way that  pleased God. Soon we will read about God’s utter  displeasure with Job’s so‐called friends and his  indictment of these friends. So I will leave you with  this thought. If you know and love someone who is  in desperate need of a thorough fourth‐step  experience, please get out of their way and do not  hinder their progress. There is no value in your  attempts to shame, blame, and manipulate them  into compliance. Finally, if you are the one in need of  a fourth step, and you’ve allowed others’  mishandling of your suffering to make you stubborn  and recalcitrant, please rethink your position. God  judges each of us according to our deeds. He’s  perfectly capable of handling your foolish friends.  Since you are going to give an account of your  actions too, why not go ahead and take the next  right step?    Thought for today: After the Lord finished speaking  to Job, he said to Eliphaz: “I am angry with you and  your two friends, for you have not spoken accurately  about me, as my servant Job has.” Job 42:7 NLT 
86

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for tomorrow: It is possible to handle  misdeeds, pain, and suffering without shaming.  Consequences can be delivered and boundaries can  be drawn without belittling one another. We can  learn how to treat each other with respect. Job’s  goofy friends provide me with lots of motivation.  They remind me that it is possible to contribute to  another’s problems instead of helping to alleviate  them. I’ve got lots more to learn in this area; how  about you?    April 26    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 10; Job 13  and 14      Fortunately for Job, he understood baloney when  it was served up to him on a silver platter. He had  the good sense to realize that his friends were full of  hot air. That’s awesome, but unusual. Most people  tell me that they find the advice they receive  confusing and contradictory. Sincere in their desire  to do the next right thing, defining that next step is  often far more challenging than one might expect.    That’s why I love the fourth step. It’s an  opportunity for us to get alone with God and to  allow His Spirit to blow through our hearts. Later on  we’ll begin to share all that we’re writing and  thinking and feeling with another person. This is not  the time to be asking others to instruct us about  what we need to inventory.    I know we long for input from others, especially  when working on something as challenging as a  fourth step. I’d suggest you ask them about their  personal experiences with their own stepping.  Perhaps if you’re stuck on the “how tos,” your  advisors can share what’s worked for them.    But for today, I want to encourage you to follow  Job’s example. He eagerly went straight to the top  dog. He had a conversation with God himself. You  have this same access. Isn’t that awesome? Maybe  the only foolish thing you could do at this point is to  ignore the privilege and deny yourself the  opportunity of approaching the throne of grace  yourself—without needing any mediators. Isn’t that  awesome?    Think of it like this. If you find yourself in legal  difficulties, you can’t just pop over to the judge’s    house and hash it all out over a cup of cappuccino.  Lawyers, court clerks, and all sorts of paperwork is  required for you to get your day in court.    Not so with God. Today you can have a  conversation with Him. I pray that you will.    Thought for today: So let us come boldly to the  throne of our gracious God. There we will receive his  mercy, and we will find grace to help us when we  need it most. Hebrews 4:16 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: I know other people are  poor imitators of the God of mercy and grace. I also  know that we are called to pursue our God‐created  identities which include the ability to have the mind  of Christ, imitate Him, and even know and do His  good, pleasing, and perfect will. That’s a lot of  potential, and sometimes we all fall short. While  we’re all growing up in our salvation, let’s be gentle  with each other. Let’s look for our potential with at  least as much energy as we pour into picking at each  other’s wounds.    April 27    Scripture Reading for today:  Job 15, 16, and 17      “If you will listen, I will show you. I will answer you  from my own experience. And it is confirmed by the  reports of wise men who have heard the same thing  from their fathers.” (Job 15:17‐18 NLT) Eliphaz uses  personal experience and wise men’s agreement to  support his advice to Job.    Personal experience is an exceedingly important  tool. I love listening to the life stories of others; I  have learned some of my greatest lessons  vicariously. But there are limits. Eliphaz had both  experience and wise mentors, but his advice still  stunk.    I had an interesting conversation with a fellow  traveler on an extended flight to California. We were  about the same age, and we discovered a lot of  common ground. Our children share similar interests  and are close in age too. We discovered that we  hang out at some of the same sports events. Both of  us are in the middle of a tough semester of AP  history and math. I asked about her life experience,  and she shared it generously. My new traveling  buddy and I had some things in common, but we 
87

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
also had some glaring differences. As the  conversation progressed, I realized that her world  and mine were very different.     Her life is one of financial privilege. Her biggest  complaint about her youngest child’s school and  sport schedule had to do with an obstinate tutor and  tardy chauffeur. We have an obstinate tutor at our  house too, called Dad; I often serve as a tardy  chauffer. My life is one of privilege too. It’s just a  different kind of privilege.  It would have been easy  for me to conclude that our differences were too big  to make our life experiences worth sharing.  Once  we were flying above Vegas and hurtling toward Los  Angeles, I realized that her experience was going to  require some serious interpretation if I was going to  benefit from the pearls of wisdom embedded in her  life’s experience.  I was going to need to see past our  material distances and listen attentively to find our  common ground.    Thought  for  today:  All  Scripture  is  inspired  by  God  and is useful to teach us what is true and to make us  realize what is wrong in our lives. It corrects us when  we  are  wrong  and  teaches  us  to  do  what  is  right.  God  uses  it  to  prepare  and  equip  his  people  to  do  every good work. 2 Timothy 3:16‐17 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: I see two problems with  giving and receiving advice. 1. Sometimes the advice  is bad. 2. Sometimes the advice is good, but it comes  wrapped in a package that turns us off and distracts  us from the truth of the message. Discounting advice  that is either bad or uncomfortably delivered can  cost us a teachable moment.   Here’s one recommendation that might help prevent  wasted‐truth encounters. When offered advice,  always look for the opportunity to learn. Even bad  advice can get us thinking. We can process through  our response to it, and think long and hard about  why we think it’s bad. My flying buddy decided that  more hired help was the standard response to her  stress. This was neither practical nor right for me.  But I prayed and processed and realized in a  moment of clarity that our fears have less to do with  our schedules and a lot more to do with our beliefs  about our schedules. My new friend also enlightened  me as to my own wrong thinking. She was under no  illusions. A life of financial privilege did not come  with a get‐out‐of‐discomfort‐free card. She got that.    So in many ways, she is a lot wiser than me. I  appreciated her guiding me to a new perspective. As  bad a counselor as Eliphaz was, God can take even  his stinking thinking and use it to teach us.   If you’re  not sure if the advice you’re giving or receiving is  good or bad, right or wrong, utilize scripture as a  plumb line, testing to see if the wisdom of men is  consistent with the wisdom of God.     April 28    Scripture Reading for today: Job 18, 19, 20, and  21—feel free to skim!      Job and his friends were obviously confused and  sometimes condemning when it came to trying to  make sense of Job’s suffering. Can’t we all relate to  that? But again, Job leads us well. Even in the midst  of all this turmoil, Job is able to come back to some  very basic and life‐giving beliefs. Job totally gets who  is in control.    People with a history of hurts, habits, and hang‐ ups rarely relinquish care and control of their lives  without a lot of kicking and screaming. Even as I  write this, I realize that what I’m saying isn’t quite  true. The truth is, we do relinquish control. We give  ourselves over to abusers, we give ourselves over to  temporary solutions, we give ourselves over to our  own minds. Maybe it’s not as simple as saying we  have control issues. Could it be that what we really  struggle with is idolatry? We want to determine who  or what we worship. And we like our small gods.  They don’t ask much of us.    Thought for today: Many are the plans in a man’s  heart, but it is the Lord’s purpose that prevails.  Proverbs 19:21 NIV      Thought for tomorrow: How easy it is to say, “I have  control issues.” It’s a nice, neat, flip response. Say  that, and people nod their heads in understanding.  So let’s pause in our nodding and think about this.  Control issues? Really? That may be true. But could it  also be that we are out of control, and trying to  regain control by exhibiting controlling behaviors? So  stop saying you have control issues as if that’s a  virtue or a good excuse. List all the ways you attempt  to control. Code words: rigidity and lack of  spontaneity, manipulating others to gain approval, 
88

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
overreact to change, lack trust, judgmental attitude,  intolerant, or fear failure.    I attempt to control ____ because ____. This  affects ____. This activates ____. This makes me feel  ____.    April 29    Scripture Reading for today: Job 22, 23, 24, 25, and  26 (skim it).      I have these two cabinets in my kitchen that are  always messy. I hate that. I like my cabinets neat and  tidy. I think elves show up in the middle of the night  and rearrange my pots and pans into a jumble of  chaos just to make my life miserable! I also hate it  when my garage and car are messy.  Closets? I like  those neat as a pin too.    You would not know this if you visited my house.  What I like and what I tolerate are often two  different things.  I realized this about myself as the  result of working through step four; once I “got it” –  I developed some strategies to “solve it.”  Those two  cabinets are reasonably neat – the closets, garage  and car are works in progress.  But I’m getting there  – in large part because I took the fourth step.      Thought for today:  Don’t worry about anything;  instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you  need, and thank him for all he has done. Then you  will experience God’s peace, which exceeds anything  we can understand. His peace will guard your hearts  and minds as you live in Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:6‐ 7 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Honestly, there are probably  some things that you’ve spent more time worrying  over than it would have taken to acknowledge and  resolve. I know that when we’re not living in healthy  space we like having unresolved problems to distract  ourselves with, but when we do that, we’re wasting  our time in needless anxiety. Even a halfway attempt  at a fourth step can bring some awesome results. If  you’ve been avoiding your fourth step like the  plague, just do it halfway. I suspect that a half‐done  fourth step will be so rewarding that you’ll be  pumped to complete it. Let me know if it works for  you.      April 30    Scripture Reading for today: Job 27, 28, and 29— take your time on this one!      “But do people know where to find wisdom?  Where can they find understanding? No one knows  where to find it, for it is not found among the living.  ‘It is not here,’ says the ocean. ‘Nor is it here, says  the sea. It cannot be bought with gold. I t cannot be  purchased with silver. It cannot be purchased with  jewels mounted in fine gold. But do people know  where to find wisdom? Where can they find  understanding?” Job 28, selected verses NLT    Where have you looked for wisdom and  understanding?    I’ve stared into the face of the ocean and thought  to myself, If I got to do this every day, my life would  be wonderful.    I remember once upon a time a firmly held  conviction that if my kitchen was renovated to my  specifications, I’d be happy.    I love that wedding ring upgrade I got a few years  ago. I enjoy it every time my eyes hit its sparkle.     I thought if my children made a certain team and  played a certain position, got into the right schools,  and at the right time find the right spouse, I’d be  perfectly content. I’ve even thought that if I could  raise kids who didn’t self‐medicate and loved God  with all their hearts, minds, and strength, I could be  considered wise! Boy, was that delusional thinking!    But Job is right. Even if we acquire those things,  wisdom and understanding do not tag along with  them.    I love my ocean vacations, but running away and  joining the Navy isn’t in my future. I got that kitchen  renovation, and I’m still a mediocre cook who lets  her dirty dishes pile up in the sink. My wedding ring  upgrade didn’t bring with it new skill sets for how to  stay blissfully wed. I’ve had to look elsewhere for  that kind of wisdom. My children have made a  variety of choices—and I’ve learned that I really had  very little to do with them—whether they were for  good or not quite right.    So, where have you looked for wisdom and  understanding?    Thought for today: Take a few minutes and  inventory all the places you’ve looked to find your 
89

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
hope, your peace, and your purpose. How’s that  working for you?    Thought for tomorrow: God alone understands the  way to wisdom; he knows where it can be fund, for  he looks through the whole earth and sees  everything under the heavens. And this is what he  says to all humanity: “The fear of the Lord is true  wisdom; to forsake evil is real understanding.” Job  28, selected verses NLT                                                                                          STEP 5  We admitted to God, to ourselves, and to  another human being the exact nature of our  wrongs.    May 1    Scripture Reading for today:  Job 30 ‐ 32      One of my favorite Bible stories is found in Genesis  18. Three strangers have shown up at Abraham’s  house. It appears that two were angels, and one was  the Lord Himself. They spoke prophesies of a return  visit and delivered a promise. Truly, it’s a  restatement of a promise given many years ago. It  seems that in the grand scheme of God, Sarah is  destined to have a baby.    I suspect with the advanced age of both Sarah and  her husband, Abraham, those two had long ago  given up on having a child. Barren and elderly, Sarah  thought this idea preposterous. (Further reading of  the scriptures will tell us that indeed, God does  deliver on this promise.)  So what is Sarah’s  response? She laughs.    At this point in the story, we stumble upon my  personal favorite subplot. The Lord turns to  Abraham and asks him why Sarah laughed. (Imagine  your great‐grandma getting pregnant, and see if that  might bring a mirthful response from you!)    Sarah lies and says, “I did not laugh.”    The Lord says, “Yes, you did laugh.”    “I did not!”    “Did too!”    “Did not!”    “Did too!”  And thus, we have the first recorded  “He said, she said” conversation in history!    I always re‐read this account prior to completing a  fifth step. Like Sarah, I am often reluctant to admit  things to God, others, and even myself. And here’s  the part that really bugs me: I sometimes have  trouble admitting minor stuff too. Sarah was asked  to admit to laughter—not capital murder! And yet  she just couldn’t quite pull the trigger and say, “I  laughed.” 
90

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Who could fault Sarah for a little chuckle? I’ve  heard others take Sarah’s inventory and  commentate that this shows a lack of faith.  I don’t  know about that one! I’ve been pregnant three  times, and I am now past the typical years one thinks  of as childbearing. If God showed up at my house  with some buddies and told me I was going to have a  child—wow—let’s just say a little chuckle would be  the least offensive response likely to pop out of my  mouth.     Fortunately, we also have Job as a teacher and  guide. We know from watching him struggle that  God is not offended by our honesty. History has  revealed several key things that stir God’s wrath, but  us being honest with him is not one of them. So like  Job, we can be honest with God. That will be an  important point to keep in mind when you review  your fourth‐step inventory and approach the throne  of grace with it clutched tightly in your fist.    Thought for today:  For the word of God is full of  living power. It is sharper than the sharpest knife,  cutting deep into our innermost thoughts and  desires. It exposes us for what we really are. Nothing  in all creation can hide from him. Everything is naked  and exposed before his eyes. This is the God to whom  we must explain all that we have done. This is why  we have a great High Priest who has gone to heaven,  Jesus the son of God. Let us cling to him and never  stop trusting him. This High Priest of ours  understands our weaknesses, for he faced all of the  same temptations we do, yet he did not sin. So let us  come boldly to the throne of our gracious God. There  we will receive his mercy, and we will find grace to  help us when we need it. Hebrews 4:12‐16 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Confession isn’t for sissies.  But it has helped me take this important next right  step when I understand the character and intentions  of the One to whom I must come clean.    May 2    Scripture Reading for today: Job 33 ‐35      The fifth step is all about admitting stuff. Big and  small, good and bad—anything that ended up in our  fourth‐step inventory is about to be revealed to  others. Most unhealthy families don’t teach us how    to admit much of anything. In fact, most sick families  share a common trait: don’t tell. This serves no one  well. It keeps sick people from getting much‐needed  help. It makes innocent people bear the brunt of  others’ dysfunctions. It limits options and avoids  solutions.     In lots of families it is unsafe to reveal a  shortcoming, vulnerability, or weakness. This is a  shame, because God’s desire for families is for lots of  healthy problem solving within the home. Unhealthy  families tend to be chaotic, capricious, and  inconsistent. They can be rigid and rule‐driven or  absent of guidance entirely. Love is conditional, and  life is unpredictable. Discipline is sporadic and  sometimes cruel.     Even in healthy families, children can learn that  being yourself is not a good idea. When I was a kid I  loved to read. I was fascinated by the wonderful  world of books! I am quite sure I was obnoxious,  persistent, difficult, and boring in my nightly  recounting of every little detail contained in my  current reading pleasure. I believed I was sharing  precious gems. My family did not share this view.  And I get that as an adult.  As a child, I did not.  I got  teased about my voracious reading habits. No one  intended a bit of harm; they just wanted a moment’s  peace. As a child, I concluded that something was  wrong with being me, and soon I stopped sharing. I  don’t think many of us will be sent to juvie for  excessive reading. But if we learn to stop sharing the  innocuous part of ourselves, do you think it will be  easy to share the dark secrets of the soul?     Thought for today: He who conceals his sins does not  prosper, but whoever confesses and renounces them  finds mercy. Proverbs 28:13 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Admitting the exact nature  of our wrongs is a hard thing to do. But in the right  environment, having come to know the awesome,  loving God of scripture and with the right supporting  real‐life God‐representative—it can be a comforting  time of healing.    May 3    Scripture Reading for today: Job 36‐38 skim   
91

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  When I was in labor with our first child, I got so  scared I thought I was going to die from fright. My  husband still jokes that we used all our Lamaze  breathing techniques before we arrived at the  hospital. But a single thought carried me through the  day and into the evening: Many others have gone  before me, so I am not alone.   This same principle holds true for those of us  embarking on the confession process. Others have  gone before us, and have reported back. Good  things happen when we step up to the plate and tell  the truth about who we are and what we’ve been  doing. (For more information and scripture support  of this premise, check out The Christ‐Centered 12  Step Study Guide, which is available on our Web site  or our book tables.)    Thought for today:  Count yourself lucky, how happy  you must be—you get a fresh start, your slate’s  wiped clean.   Count yourself luck—God holds nothing against you  and you’re holding nothing back from him.  When I kept it all inside, my bones turned to powder,  my words became daylong groans. The pressure  never let up; all the juices of my life dried up.   Then I let it all out; I said, “I’ll make a clean breast of  my failures to God.”  Suddenly the pressure was gone—my guilt dissolved,  my sin disappeared. These things add up.  Every one of us needs to pray; when all hell breaks  loose and the dam bursts we’ll be on high ground,  untouched. Psalm 32:1‐6 The Message  For everything that was written in the past was  written to teach us, so that through endurance and  the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have  hope. Romans 15:4 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: We are so fortunate to live  in a time of history that affords us the benefits of  hindsight. Let’s not waste the blessing.    May 4    Scripture Reading for today: Job 39 –42      One Sunday I confessed a shortcoming in church.  Embedded in my sermon, I told a story about how I  was bad, so very, very bad, at remembering to  attach a document when sending out emails. I told    this to illustrate the point of love covering a  multitude of sins, because my team does that for  me. I’ll send out an email and tell them something is  attached, and they’ll send back some snappy reply  asking if I wrote it in invisible ink. Accountability  laced with lots of sugar—I love that. My shortcoming  has to do with a lack of attention to detail, but my  team demonstrates over and over how well they  love me—warts and all. That was my point but I  think God had an additional one. Since the day I  confessed this shortcoming, I have remembered to  attach documents most of the time. Now I get emails  back saying, “Hey, what’s up with you? You attached  the document…”  (Some people are never happy!)      God reminded me through this silly story that  when we confess something and bring it into the  light, powerful things happen. I can’t explain how  that confession has resulted in better attention to  detail on my part. But I can’t argue with the  evidence. I may not know how, but I do know who.  God is in the business of restoration and renovation.  He is Rapha God—healing us, one stitch at a time  (Rapha is Hebrew meaning healing, one stitch at a  time).    Thought for today: Are you hurting? Pray. Do you  feel great? Sing. Are you sick? Call the church leaders  together to pray and anoint you with oil in the name  of the Master. Believing—prayer will heal you, and  Jesus will put you on your feet. And if you’ve sinned,  you’ll be forgiven—healed inside and out. Make this  your common practice: Confess your sins to each  other and pray for each other so that you can live  together whole and healed. The prayer of a person  living right with God is something powerful to be  reckoned with. James 5:13‐16 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: Perhaps the only thing that’s  hindering your restoration and renovation is a  reluctance to confess. Is that possible?    May 5    Scripture Reading for today:  2 Chronicles 11 ‐ 13      “Who is this that questions my wisdom with such  ignorant words?” Job 38:2 NLT    This was written to Job but is applicable to us all. 
92

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Have you ever considered how often we question  the wisdom of God?    We question God’s wisdom every time we do what  feels good rather than doing what we know to be  right.    We question God’s wisdom every time we tear  down, rather than build up (self or others).    We question God’s wisdom every time we love  things and use people.    We question God’s wisdom every time we live  with the burden of shame and condemnation.    We question God’s wisdom every time we fail to  respond immediately when overcome with a feeling  of conviction.    We question God’s wisdom every time we live in  darkness rather than by the warm light of His love.  We question God’s wisdom every time we think and  do independently of Him.    It’s normal to question. We’ll discover as we read  along that God challenges Job without condemning  him. Asking tough questions is a natural part of an  intimate connection whether one is in relationship  with God or fellow humans. But we must realize that  we too question God’s wisdom.    Thought for today:  We have much to say about this,  but it is hard to explain because you are slow to  learn. In fact, though by this time you ought to be  teachers, you need someone to teach you the  elementary truths of God’s word all over again. You  need milk, not solid food! Anyone who lives on milk,  being still an infant, is not acquainted with the  teaching about righteousness. But solid food is for  the mature, who by constant use have trained  themselves to distinguish good from evil. Hebrews  5:11‐14 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  God is not shocked when  we do silly things. He does, however, desire for us to  learn from our mistakes. One of the ways we get  trained for our next grand epic adventure is by  developing the discernment to distinguish good from  evil. We must seek a heart transplant from God so  that our greatest desire is to avoid evil and to do  good.  The writer of Hebrews seems a bit agitated  that his listeners were slow to learn. I understand  that but would like to add my own thought: better a  slow learner than no learner at all.      May 6    Scripture Reading for today:  2 Chronicles 14 ‐ 16      I wonder if you thought yesterday’s devotional  about admitting that we question the wisdom of  God seemed out of place in this series. I brought up  the topic for two reasons:   1. To remind us that God is the kind of God who  doesn’t get insecure or defensive when we approach  him in a messy way; He can handle our “stuff”  without it becoming all about “Him.” (God’s  character empowers Him to meet us where we are  without demanding that we conform to who He  wants us to become. In God’s ideal plan, we should  see this same attitude modeled for us in other  humans. If we haven’t, then we are startled by God’s  response to Job.)  I think this is important to  remember so that we focus on being honest with  God, not just trying to sound good to Him in a  misguided attempt to win His approval. God deeply  loves us; we’re not in some sort of contest trying to  win His affection. If honesty in relationships has not  served you well in the past, I want you to realize how  hard step five is going to be for you to complete. It’s  not impossible, but it is a challenge. Even now I pray  that the Holy Spirit is at work—making you both  willing and able!  2.  I want us to get the point that a lot of our  wrongdoing is related to questioning the wisdom of  God. Actually, it’s not so much the fact that we  question God’s wisdom as it is that we don’t realize  we are questioning His wisdom. Confusing? How  about an example? Job questioned God straight up,  and God answered. I suspect that God appreciated  the fact that Job didn’t pretend with Him. It could  have gone down very differently. Remember back at  the beginning of Job’s trials when his wife suggested  that Job just get the misery over with and kill himself  (Job 2:9)? Job responded by trusting God. He  answered his wife by saying that God was in charge,  and not Job. Therefore, by implication, the number  of Job’s days were God’s business—not Job’s  decision. Job could have made a different choice. He  could have impaled himself on the nearest steeple or  fallen on his sword or thrown himself off the nearest  cliff. One who doubts the wisdom of God and isn’t  honest about his/her questions often makes choices  independent of his beliefs about who God is and 
93

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
how one lives because of that belief (and these  choices usually show up in an inventory). A doubting  Job, in great physical, emotional, and spiritual pain  could have committed suicide as a way to avoid his  messy life. So it is true that Job eventually questions  God, but in his daily life experiences, he doesn’t let  his doubt determine his behavior. He deliberately  chooses to step in the way that He understands God  would have him step—whether he agrees,  understands, or appreciates the stepping experience  or not. Thus, suicide is not an option. So my friends,  that’s why I am suggesting that it is far better to  acknowledge our questioning of God’s wisdom than  ignore our fits of unbelief.     Thought for today:  When Job prayed for his friends,  the Lord restored his fortunes. In fact, the Lord gave  him twice as much as before! Then all his brothers,  sisters, and former friends came and feasted with  him in his home. And they consoled him and  comforted him because of all the trials the Lord had  brought against him. So the Lord blessed Job in the  second half of his life even more than in the  beginning. Job lived 140 years after that, living to see  four generations of his children and grandchildren.  Then he died, an old man who had lived a long, full  life. Job 42, selected verses NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  So here’s what I’m thinking.  Step five is a lot like Job’s experience. Job tries to  make sense of his life, his suffering, and God’s plan  for him. After taking a fearless moral inventory (and  finding himself blameless—something we won’t  probably share with Job—but we know is true  because that is how God described Job) Job sits  down for a chat with God and others. In his  particular case, his “others” aren’t the epitome of  great sponsors, but God never disappoints. God  brings clarity to Job’s questioning without feeling  burdened to explain the reasons behind all Job’s life  experiences. Job learns something about himself,  God, and others. God gives Job further instructions  and Job steps as God speaks. And he is restored.  That sounds good to me!    That’s a nice outcome for a man willing to do both  a fourth and fifth step. What are you waiting for?          May 7    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 22 – 24; and 2  Chronicles 14      The following is from an interview with Corrie ten  Boom, who spent many years in a Nazi  concentration camp; Ms. Ten Boom was a Christian  imprisoned for being a sympathizer to the Jewish  people.    The special temptation of concentration camp  life—the temptation to think only of oneself, took a  thousand cunning forms. I knew this was self‐ centered, and even if it wasn’t right, it wasn’t so very  wrong, was it? Not wrong like sadism and murder  and the other monstrous evils we saw every day.    Was it coincidence that joy and power drained  from my ministry? My prayers took on a mechanical  ring. Bible study reading was dull and lifeless, so I  struggled on with worship and teaching that had  ceased to be real. Until one afternoon when the truth  blazed like sunlight in the shadows. And so I told the  group of women around me the truth about myself— my self‐centeredness, my stinginess, my lack of love.    That night real joy returned to my worship. 16    Thought for today:  The lamp of the LORD searches  the spirit of a man; it searches out his inmost being.  Proverbs 20:27 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  Who would blame Corrie  for thinking only of herself? Imprisoned in a death  camp, how does one come to believe that they are  sent there to serve others? I suspect that self‐pity  and the other cunning forms of self‐centered living  may slither through your inventory list. Who would  blame you for thinking only of your suffering? How  will you or anyone else come to believe that the  second half of your life might hold the promise of  joy? If it happened for Job and Corrie ten Boom, why  not you? The only thing holding you back may be a  willingness to be honest with God, self, and others.   May God grant you the wisdom and the courage to  allow His lamp to search your spirit!                                                                  
 Corrie ten boom, The Hiding Place (New York: Bantam books, 1971), pp. 27-28. 94
1616

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
May 8    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 25 and 2  Chronicles 15 – 16      Today is a great day to NOT skip your  recommended reading in the Psalms. It’s very step  five‐esque. Read away!    Thought for today:  So get rid of all evil behavior. Be  done with all deceit, hypocrisy, jealousy, and all  unkind speech. Like newborn babies, you must crave  pure spiritual milk so that you will grow into a full  experience of salvation. Cry out for this nourishment,  now that you have had a taste of the Lord’s kindness.  1 Peter 2:1‐3 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  One parting thought: don’t  forget why you’re doing this. Oh, sure, it has a lot to  do with the benefits reaped (and hoped for by the  psalmist) as one confesses, but here’s a big‐vision  thought for you: your willingness to keep stepping  through this process will determine the outcome for  others too. In your community, others are in need of  a person of integrity, wisdom, discernment,  kindness, patience, and willingness to serve others.  In case you haven’t noticed, we’re living in a world of  hurt. This hurt is no respecter of socio‐economic  status, race, creed, or any other measure we might  employ to determine whether others are  experiencing the good life. Our communities are in  need of spiritual advocates who get what the good  life really looks like AND who have the experience to  point others in the right direction.     God isn’t trying to get us to behave like nuns; He  wants us to grow up into the kind of people in whom  He can plant a grand epic adventure and watch it  thrive. (Maybe God will call you to be a nun with a  grand epic adventure and that’s cool, but my point is  that God is not withholding the good life from us or  asking us to live an austere life with no earthly  pleasures.)      May 9    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 26 and 2  Chronicles 17 and 18        I was watching an episode of Dr. Phil where a guy  (60 days sober) was declaring his utter recovered‐ ness. He was going on and on and on about how his  life was transformed. His future in‐laws weren’t  buying it. They argued that this guy had tried rehab  numerous times and managed to “walk the line” of  sobriety for months at a time—but never years. In  true Dr. Phil fashion, there was lots of drama and it  made for a great story.     So what do you think? Would you want him  marrying your daughter on day 72 of sobriety?    As you read Psalm 26, the psalmist is also speaking  of his integrity, innocence, pure motives, hatred of  evil, refusal to hang out with evil doers, and his firm  stance on solid ground. That’s awesome. But I  wonder…is it true? Surely it was true for Job, and  when he made those rash statements his friends  questioned his ability for self‐confrontation much  like those potential in‐laws on Dr. Phil and I do when  I read the words of this psalmist.    Thought for today:  For she cares nothing about the  path to life. She staggers down a crooked trail and  doesn’t realize it. Proverbs 5:6 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  God is the one to say how  we’re really doing. We give Him that opportunity  when we admit to him the exact nature of the  wrongs that popped up as we inventoried our life.  Let’s give him a chance to speak into our lives. If  we’re righteous as Job, the psalmist and the kid on  Dr. Phil—cool. If not, we know where to start  working on our stuff.    May 10    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 27 and 2  Chronicles 19 ‐ 20      Over the years my husband and I have occasionally  enlisted our children’s help in ministry. Usually this  has involved tapping into their musical abilities. Lots  of times it’s been a request for patience when our  family schedule has needed to flex in order to  accommodate a pressing need of a hurting person or  family. Once it resulted in a lost week of vacation as  we responded as a family to a ministry crisis.    Today, the tables turned. Our son needed his dad  to help him create a video for an assignment related 
95

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
to his youth ministry internship. I so enjoyed  watching Pete return the favor and rearrange his  schedule in order to accommodate Scott’s ministry  demands.     The story goes like this: Once, a long, long time  ago, when Pete was in college, he was taking an  applied math course. At midnight, after a rigorous  evening of rec basketball, Pete sat down to study for  a test the next day. After a few minutes, he realized  that no amount of study (at this late hour) could  prepare him adequately for that test.   For no reason that he can explain, he reached into  his desk and pulled out his very dusty Bible and  began to read. Suddenly, a peace that passes all  understanding overtook him, and he decided that  the best thing to do with such peace was to put it to  bed.    The next morning he woke up, went to math, took  the test…and aced it. By his own admission, Pete  realized that he had no clue where his answers  sprung from or how he managed to score better  than all his friends (who had foregone basketball to  study). Anyway, he followed the exact same routine  for the next test…and bombed it.     It occurred to me that Pete’s willingness to tell the  story was a great example of admitting wrong. I’ve  heard him use the story to illustrate both the  miraculous power of God AND to warn others that  presuming on God’s grace might not be the best plan  in the world.    The psalmist is counting on God to hold him close  even if his parents abandon him. This speaks to  God’s love, grace, and mercy. But I don’t think it  should give us an excuse to be cocky about our  wrongs. Wrongdoing is serious business in the  kingdom of God.     Thought for today:  Who can say, “I have kept my  heart pure; I am clean and without sin”? Proverbs  20:9 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  I know that lots of us have  experienced unmerited grace. Examples that come  to my mind include: a kid I know whose dad just  bailed him out of jail for the umpteenth time with no  thanks from the child, a wife I know who chooses to  forgive her husband’s infidelity, a child of alcoholic  parents who is choosing to not self‐medicate with  alcohol and drugs in spite of his chaotic family    system…the list is long. But unmerited grace should  not be used as an excuse for unwillingness to own up  to one’s wrongdoing. Just because you’ve dodged  the bullet today doesn’t mean you didn’t deserve  consequences for your actions. Why not own up and  do the right thing, even if it looks like you can skate  through with no ill effect?    May 11    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 28 and 2  Chronicles 21 and 22      Is it wrong to yell at your kids and call them  stupid?    Is it wrong to belittle your spouse in public, if you  make it sound funny?    Is it wrong to take a wallet that you find on the  street and consider this your lucky day?    Is it wrong to take supplies from your office and  use them personally, especially if you’re underpaid  and not appreciated?    Is it wrong to have sex if you’re not married?    Is it wrong to look at porn online?  Is it wrong overeat and under‐exercise? (Or  undereat and over‐exercise?)    Is it wrong to drink alcohol?    Is it wrong to live from paycheck to paycheck?    Is it wrong to help with your children’s homework?  Is it wrong to expect your children to manage their  own schoolwork without any input from you?    The answers to these kinds of questions will no  doubt vary for many of us. If you grew up in a family  where someone regularly smacked you around,  maybe a little yelling and name calling sounds like no  big deal to you. Perhaps living from paycheck to  paycheck is a giant step up from the welfare  existence you were accustomed to last year. Some  people can drink alcohol and it’s a fine choice; for  others it’s a slow form of suicide.     I’m not saying that all our dilemmas about right  and wrong are relative. Some are just plain right;  others clearly wrong. But there are some issues that  are fuzzy that reasonable people can disagree on  without either one needing a bad guy label. How we  answer these questions will determine what we  define as wrongdoing, and that’s an important issue  when it comes to doing a fifth step.   
96

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today: All scripture is inspired by God  and is useful to teach us what is true and to make us  realize what is wrong in our lives. 2 Timothy 3:16 NLT    If you’re having trouble making a list of “wrongs,”  take some time each day to peer intently into the  scriptures and see what looks back.    Thought for tomorrow:  Scripture helps me answer  some of my pressing questions about right and  wrong.  I’m glad God saw fit in His infinite wisdom to  provide this resource for us.    May 12    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 23 and  Psalm 29 and Mark 1      Admitting our wrongs is a three‐fold process of  confession. First, we admit our wrongs to God, then  we admit our wrongs to ourselves and then we admit  our wrongs to another human being. This process  can be a powerful, life‐changing experience. We all  long to be known; to share the secrets that are so  toxic to our souls; to experience the grace of being  loved and accepted – sins and all. The spiritual  discipline of confession provides the structure within  which we can experience this grace in practical  ways… Confession is an act of obedience to a (see  James 5:16) biblical imperative. It is an imperative  with a promise of healing. 17    Thought for today:  Blessed is he whose  transgressions are forgiven, whose sins are covered.  Blessed is the man whose sin the Lord does not count  against him and in whose spirit is no deceit. When I  kept silent, my bones wasted away through my  groaning all day long. For day and night our hand  was heavy upon me; my strength was sapped as in  the heat of summer. Then I acknowledged my sin to  you and did not cover up my iniquity. I said, “I will  confess my transgressions to the Lord”—and you  forgave the guilt of my sin. Psalm 32:1‐5 NIV    Thought for tomorrow:  I have this exercise DVD  that I love to do at home when my schedule is too                                                              
 Recovery from Guilt, 6 studies for groups or individuals by Dale and Juanita Ryan, Copyright 1992, this and other excellent series are available from www.christianrecovery.com, p.5. 
17

packed for a class or it’s too yucky to get outside. My  DVD‐driven inspiration keeps telling me that if I want  to “re‐sculpt” my body I will need to require my  body to do things it does not want to do. Did you  hear that? If we want to “re‐sculpt” our lives, we’re  going to need to require things of ourselves that we  don’t want to do. Like confession. I’d love to  continue this discussion, but I’ve been sitting for  several hours and now it’s time to go do some  vigorous exercise…even though my body would  prefer a nap.    May 13    Scripture Reading for today:  2 Chronicles 24 and  Psalm 30 and Mark 2      I love the gospel of Mark. I love how the writer  tells of Jesus’ power and provides evidence of how  Jesus uses the power given to him for good. Some  people misuse their power. Maybe you’ve suffered  at the hands of power misused. Have you ever  misused power and caused another to suffer? Jesus  didn’t do that. But what he did do is this: He made it  possible for people like us‐‐abused and/or abusers— to find a powerful solution to our unremitting pain  caused by power improperly used.     In particular, I hope you’ll read about Jesus’ call to  Matthew (also known as Levi): “Follow me and be  my disciple,” Jesus said to him. So Levi got up and  followed him. (Mark 2:14). Matthew was a tax  collector. His job was to collect taxes from the  Jewish community and send it to the Romans—the  oppressors of the Jewish people during this time in  history. A Jew himself, Matthew would have been  considered a terrible sinner by his fellow Jews. He  not only took from them and sent it to the enemy;  he personally profited from the exchange.     And this is the part that makes me cry. Jesus  invited Matthew to join Him in His grand epic  adventure. He took a guy that the community saw as  a bad guy, and he reframed the entire experience  through the wonderful power of grace and mercy.    Thought for today: “Then you will call upon me and  come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will  seek me and find me when you seek me with all your  heart. I will be found by you,” declares the Lord, “and 
97

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
will bring you back from captivity.”  Jeremiah 29:12‐ 14 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: The invitation to join Jesus  was not the transformation part of the story; it’s  simply the part that made the transformation  possible. Matthew could have told Jesus to go fly a  kite. He could have ignored the invitation to  discipleship. And you, of course, can do the same.  But it is my prayer that as the Holy Spirit whispers in  your ear, Come, follow me and be my disciple, that  you’ll haul yourself up and follow. But I’m warning  you, eventually you’re going to have to go through  the confession process in order to experience power  properly placed in your life.    May 14    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 25 and  Psalm 31 and Mark 3      Last night one of our sons asked me why  Lamentations was in the Bible.  Since he’s the third  born, I had the good sense to realize that he  probably wasn’t expecting an answer so much as he  was interested in a dialogue, so I said, “Why do you  think it’s there?”    “Well, since I doubt that God’s goal was to  encourage whining, I wonder if it has something to  do with this verse, Yet I still dare to hope when I  remember this: The faithful love of the Lord never  ends! His mercies never cease. Great is his  faithfulness; his mercies begin afresh each morning.”    “Funny that you came to that verse,” I said. “That  is exactly the same verse I was looking at earlier in  the week. I was feeling kind of whiney and decided  to hang with someone who could truly understand  me, so I read Lamentations. That’s the verse I  underlined!”    Notice that I didn’t answer his question, and his  prompt exit seemed to indicate that he didn’t notice  my non‐response. I think the kid just needed to  confess to me what he had just re‐discovered and  have someone who could join him in this reminder.    I think that because of the circumstances  surrounding the evening. We had returned home  from a tough lacrosse loss. He got hit so hard his jaw  wouldn’t work right, and he had a loose tooth (even  though he was wearing a helmet); his arm was    swollen at the elbow to about the size of Rhode  Island. He was so sore and tired that he wasn’t going  to tackle his dreaded math homework until the wee  hours of the morning. I suspect God knew my boy  needed to be reminded that the Lord’s love never  fails (even when the ref doesn’t call a penalty on the  guy who decked him), the Lord’s mercies never  cease (even when you’re tired and still have math to  do), the Lord’s mercies begin afresh each morning  (tomorrow will be another day).    Thought for today: Yet I still dare to hope when I  remember this: The faithful love of the Lord never  ends! His mercies never cease. Great is his  faithfulness; his mercies begin afresh each morning.”   Lamentations 3:21‐22 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: I hope you can recall these  truths too as you approach Him with your  confessions. If you’re hesitant to approach God,  notice what you’re thinking about God. Maybe you  need to start out by confessing your forgetfulness of  His character.    May 15    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 26 and  Psalm 32 and Mark 4      I suppose most of us think that the easiest part of  “admitting wrongs” is to ourselves. I wonder if  you’re tempted to skim over that little two word  phrase “to ourselves” because you think that since  you already did your fourth step, what more is  needed?     But lest we forget, most of us are masters at  deception ‐ especially self‐deception. For instance, I  was out shopping for some new wardrobe additions,  which is not my favorite thing to do. Fortunately, I  ran smack into a good story, and that made the  whole trip worthwhile.    I was in my changing room, minding my own  business, when much to my dismay another  customer began berating the salesperson. Normally,  I ignore berating. But this particular salesperson  happened to be a personal friend. And I can speak  with complete confidence on this: she is an  awesome help if you’re stuck in a changing room  trying to find a new outfit that you’ll wear for ten 
98

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
years and you only have ten minutes to look, decide,  and purchase.    “What’s wrong with these manufacturers? They  keep making these clothes smaller and smaller. I’ve  been a size eight for 30 years! Take it all back.  Obviously, this has become a cheap store with  tawdry merchandise.”  She then flung a pile of  clothes at my friend and stormed off.    Okay, I looked. All I can say is that from my  viewpoint, that woman is definitely not a size eight.  That’s all I’ll say on the subject. My lips are sealed.    But the moment inspired me to flee my shopping  nightmare and return to my studies. Truthfully, we  can all relate to this woman who can’t quite admit to  herself that she is no longer a petite size eight.     Thought for today: All a man’s ways seem innocent  to him but motives are weighed by the Lord.  Proverbs 16:2      I also like how the New Living Translation words  this verse…People may be pure in their own eyes, but  the Lord examines their motives.    Thought for tomorrow: So I think sometimes this is  the hardest part of step five: telling ourselves the  truth.  Tomorrow, I’m going to borrow liberally from  some advice the Drs. Ryan offer in their Bible study  entitled “Recovery from Guilt.” I think they have a  lot to say to us that might help us over this particular  recovery hurtle.    May 16    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 27 and  Psalm 33 and Mark 5      In Drs. Dale and Juanita Ryan’s bible study called,  Recovery From Guilt, which you can find at  www.christianrecovery.com, they speak of the two  reasons why we need to admit the truth about  ourselves to ourselves. “First, admitting our wrongs  to ourselves means that we are no longer deceiving  ourselves. This admission involves embracing parts of  ourselves that we have rejected. It involves a  complex process of integrating what some have  called the shadow parts of ourselves into our self  understanding. Second, admitting our wrongs to  ourselves means that we need to show mercy to  ourselves. We need to stop demanding perfection    and face our human failings with the same  compassion for ourselves that God extends toward  us.” (p.5)    I wonder what’s lurking in your shadows, waiting  to be exposed to God’s warm and gracious light.    Thought for today: This is the verdict: Light has come  into the world, but men loved darkness instead of  light because their deeds were evil. Everyone who  does evil hates the light, and will not come into the  light for fear that his deeds will be exposed. But  whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so  that it may be seen plainly that what he has done  has been done through God. John 3:19‐21 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Have you ever thought it  odd that God forgives you but you refuse to forgive  yourself? What does that mean? Would that imply  that you’re more just than God? (That can’t be the  answer.)  So what does it mean that it’s okay for God  to extend forgiveness but for us to refuse to extend  it to ourselves?  It’s a common complaint. “I just  can’t forgive _______ .”  So we sigh and move along  the same dark paths. It’s just too much, too hard— this forgiveness gig. But pause to prepare. Stop and  reread John 3. Read that last sentence over and over  until you see it. Do you? When you forgive—whether  it is yourself or someone else—IT ISN’T YOU DOING  IT AT ALL! God is doing it through you. And the facts  are in: God is in the forgiveness business. He knows  how to do it and He practices what He hopes we’re  preaching. Admission moves us closer to forgiveness.    May 17    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 28 and  Psalm 34 and Mark 6      One time I had something tough that I needed to  admit to another human and I chose poorly. Here’s  just a sample of what I heard that day. “I can’t  believe you did that. What were you thinking? I’m  very disappointed in you. You call yourself a  believer? If you just read scripture and prayed more,  none of this would have happened!”      I didn’t give up. Armed with what I knew from  God’s word, I just had a feeling that this was not the  response God would have wanted me to receive.  This time, Eureka! I can’t say it was fun, but it was 
99

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
fantastic. My second friend had what it took on that  particular day not to let me off the hook of my  wrongdoing and yet somehow managed not to  skewer me with the hook’s pointy edge. In fact, I felt  as if my friend deftly and gently acted as God’s  assistant while He performed open heart surgery,  healing my aching broken heart.    Sometimes we shop around, looking for people to  tell us what we want to hear. This is not what I’m  talking about. I’m asking you to shop ‘til you drop –  until you find the person that can tell you what God  wants you to hear – without blame, shame, or  condemnation. This takes a very special person. (The  very kind of individual that you are growing into!)    Thought for today:  For the word of God is full of  living power. It is sharper than the sharpest knife,  cutting deep into our innermost thoughts and  desires. It exposes us for what we really are. Nothing  in all creation can hide from him. Everything is naked  and exposed before his eyes. This is the God to whom  we must explain all that we have done. This is why  we have a great High Priest who has gone to heaven,  Jesus the Son of God. Let us cling to him and never  stop trusting him. This High Priest of ours  understands our weaknesses, for he faced all of the  same temptations we do, yet he did not sin. So let us  come boldly to the throne of our gracious God. There  we will receive his mercy, and we will find grace to  help us when we need it. Hebrews 4:12‐16 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Hebrews four makes  reference to scripture being sharper than a two‐ edged sword. Some translations say it is sharper  than the sharpest knife. I’ve heard theologians speak  about how the words used in this passage are  surgical terms. Certainly that’s what I experienced  during my fifth‐step process. It was like surgery.  We’ve been pretty skilled at medicating our aches  and pains, hoping to avoid suffering. A step five  affords us the opportunity to begin healing the sore  that so desperately needs medical attention—a  wound that is hurting our spirit.    May 18    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 29 and  Psalm 35 and Mark 7        “What should I do?”    “Tell me what to do!”    “I just wish I knew what to do about this.”    Recovery is all about death and rebirth. Letting go  is required. We let go of self‐destructive behaviors,  old ways of thinking, and anything else that stands in  our way of becoming a sane person. Picking up is  also happening. We begin to replace some old ways  with new, healthier, and more productive choices.  It’s not just about letting go; it’s important to realize  that we are replacing old with new.    This messy letting go and picking up results in  more than a few moments of disequilibrium. Even  though we know it’s good stuff, it’s confusing too. So  we’re tempted to try to take a shortcut and just get  someone else to tell us what to do, how to think,  and what to feel.     There’s another complication. As we work through  our steps, being of service to others is a key element.  It’s part of picking up. The “others” that are  equipped to listen to a fifth step are “us”—those of  us who have chosen this path for our own lives. This  can be a case of good news/bad news if we’re not  super careful.  An “other” who listens regularly to  spoken inventories can become more interested in  telling others what to do than working their own  recovery program. So be cautious. Don’t ask your  listener to tell you what to do; allow them the  privilege of listening. If you are an “other,” watch  yourself. Be careful that you don’t slip into problem  solving, advice giving, or playing‐God mode. The key  ingredient in a fifth step is admission. A fifth step is  NOT: a time to discuss how the wrongs came about,  a time to strategize future changes, and it is not  about seeking advice or getting counseled. It should  never be packaged with judgment—yours or others’.  This is very simple: admit wrongdoing and be  specific.     Thought for today: O Lord, we acknowledge our  wickedness and the guilt of our fathers; we have  indeed sinned against you. Jeremiah 14:20 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Horrible things sometimes  pop up in our inventory. It’s shocking. It’s natural  and normal to pause and dissect it. Of course we  want to make sense of senseless bad acts. Face it.  Even we don’t always understand the choices we’ve  made. But this is not the time to pick at those scabs. 
100

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
We’re just naming them! I find it helpful both to  prepare and to debrief with prayer. Think of prayer  as powerful bookends that surround your life’s story.  Ask for God to reveal truth, empower you to admit  truth, and guide your “other.”  Afterwards, I  particularly appreciate an extended time of silence  with God. It makes sense to me that after a time of  talking, I need to counterbalance that with at least  as much time listening. It’s amazing how much we  can learn about what we should do after an  extended time alone with the Lord.    May 19    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 30; Mark 8  and 9      “I’ve done it. I’m ready to go over it.”    “Okay.”  Prayers are lifted up, and the fifth‐step  process begins. My friend whips out her index card  and enumerates her sins which include eating too  much chocolate and not exercising enough, but she  fails to mention that time she “accidentally” left her  child at daycare for three days because she got high  at lunch and hung out in a crack house until her  money ran out.    I’m tempted, oh so tempted, to go codependent.  So I pray for the powerful working of God’s mighty  Spirit in me. If I don’t watch it, I’m going to have a  really long inventory of my own from today’s  session!    Quickly she moves on to her strengths. One of the  strengths she lists is her love for God and His word.  She’s right. This is true of her, and I nod  appreciatively as she lists all the evidences of her  devotion to God.     Then she asks for feedback. It is perfectly  appropriate for her to do so. But as I pause to  prepare, I’m remembering what she is NOT asking  me to do: she’s not asking me to absolve her of guilt,  advise her, counsel her, solve her problems, or judge  her list. We’ve established the ground rules long  before I agreed to listen to her story, and both of us  understand my part in this meeting.    “I know you love God’s word and Him. I’m sure  your choices are confusing to you in light of your  desperate desire to follow him. I know you want to  step when He speaks. I know you study scripture. I  know you desire scripture to inform every step.”      “Oh, I do!!! In fact, this one is my favorite:“It is  what comes from inside that defiles you. For from  within, out of a person’s heart, come evil thoughts,  sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, greed,  wickedness, deceit, lustful desires, envy, slander,  pride and foolishness. All these vile things come from  within; they are what defile you.”  She’s quoting  from memory Mark 7, verses 20‐23.    I sat there silent and still. Her postcard‐sized list  had not mentioned anything more foolish than a  penchant for desserts. I know her story and I would  have thought her list would have been an itsy‐bitsy  bit longer. But it’s not my job to judge the list. I’m  here to tell the truth and affirm her when she tells it  too.   It’s not my job to pretend I’m the Holy Spirit  and try to guide her into all truth. That’s His job.    I notice that tears begin to puddle up in the  bottom of her eyes. Eventually they begin cascading  down her face. Wiping furiously, soon she gives up  and allows them to soak her shirt. Something  marvelous and mysterious is happening, and I’m  trying my best not to ruin it.    “There’s some other stuff too.”  And for the next  three hours I listen without moving a muscle as this  young woman pours out her foolishness, pride,  slander, envy, lustful desires and adulterous acts, her  greed, wickedness, and sexual immorality. She talks  about her history of stealing and then goes so far as  to admit that the only reason she hasn’t murdered is  because her aim was off.  That’s what can happen  when we allow God to be God, and stop deluding  ourselves that we got the job.    Thought for today: Jesus says…“If you love me, obey  my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he  will give you another Advocate, who will never leave  you. He is the Holy Spirit, who leads into all truth.”  John 14:15‐17 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: The Holy Spirit is a powerful  advocate. I pray that you will invite Him not only to  participate, but to lead any fifth‐step session. He’s  thoroughly not codependent. He won’t worm His  way into the meeting if you don’t want Him there.   My friend was an addict who loved God and  struggled with obeying his commandments. But even  her most inadequate attempts to live her true God‐ created identity did not invalidate Jesus’ promise.  Gracious and merciful God did for my friend what 
101

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
she could not do for herself; He showed her who she  was AND who He dreamed she would become. I’m  so appreciative of the Holy Spirit’s presence in that  room—closing my lips and opening her heart.     May 20    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 31 – 32;  Mark 10      …for your loyalty is divided between God and the  world.    In Mark 10, a rich young man, who has no trouble  at all inventorying his strengths, asks Jesus how he  can inherit eternal life. This is my speculation, but do  you think he was looking for Jesus to say, “My  friend! You’re in the family! Someone as “good” as  you has nothing to fear.”? I don’t know, call me  crazy, but I think that’s what the guy was expecting.    Here’s a really cool thing about Jesus. He gets us.  Even as the young man approaches and calls Jesus  “Good Teacher,” Jesus offers a gentle rebuke. This is  the same Jesus who gladly hangs out with tax  collectors and prostitutes, so a rebuke delivered as a  result of one question, “Good Teacher, what must I  do to inherit eternal life?” certainly has my  attention. Jesus gets this guy, and He desires for this  fellow to get it too.    The invitation to grow is given, and the man “went  away sad.”    If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves  and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is  faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and  purify us from all unrighteousness. 1 John 1:8‐9 NIV    Thought for today: So humble yourselves before  God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. Come  close to God, and God will come close to you. Wash  your hands, you sinners;  purify your hearts, for your  loyalty is divided between God and the world. Let  there be tears for what you have done. Let there be  sorrow and deep grief. Let there be sadness instead  of laughter, and gloom instead of joy. Humble  yourselves before the Lord, and he will lift you up in  honor. James 4:7‐10 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Dr. Dale Ryan says, “There’s  that one little thing, that if you don’t get it, you miss  it.”  I hope in the future this guy gets that one little    thing about himself that is causing him to miss it. I  hope the same is true for us, too.  It’s okay to be sad,  sorrowful, and grieving. My prayer is that you will  embrace your suffering AND trust God to come close  to you.    May 21    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 33 and 34;  Mark 11      I used to have a lot of secrets and didn’t even  know it! Have you ever been in the midst of a  conversation, and someone says something, and you  have an “Aha” moment? That’s exactly what  happened to me! I was attending a support group  that focused on codependency issues (if you don’t  know what that is all about, we have an Insight  Journal all about it, Climbing Out of Codependency,  that you can get on our web site  www.northstarcommunity.com) and the facilitator  was talking about keeping secrets.    She explained to us that keeping secrets is  “normal” in unhealthy families but not in healthy  ones. This was a news flash to me! It changed my  life. I can’t describe what happened, except to say  that this one bit of new information opened my  world and flooded it with a shining light. I began to  remember things long forgotten. I recalled things  that had happened to me as a child that I “managed”  with silence.  Once I began this journey, I gained new  insights. I had hidden these events from myself and  had failed to revisit them since childhood. My adult  eyes saw them from a wildly different perspective  than my “child” eyes had experienced them!    There was some pain involved.  I had a relative  who mistreated me. As a child, I felt “less than” and  “not good enough.” Although I could acknowledge  that this person was a “character,” I had never  realized that this behavior was very inappropriate.  Even now I resist typing “abusive.”  There, I did it. It  was abusive behavior. It was cruel. And this truth is  very hard to admit. There are some repercussions  for telling this truth. But, oh the consequences for  keeping it secret is so much more destructive.    If you’ve got some secrets that you’ve been  holding—yours or someone else’s—they are taking  their toll on you. I don’t know why God and I  couldn’t have just worked through all this in my 
102

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
private prayer time, but the 12 steps have shown me  the value of having another person hear this  information too. I don’t know why this is crucial to  healing, but I can say that it has certainly been  essential for me.    Thought for today: There is a way that seems right  to a man, but in the end it leads to death. Proverbs  14:12 NIV    As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens  another. Proverbs 27:17 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I can’t lie to you. This will  cost you. If you take this step of ridding yourself of  all secrets, you’re going to lose your title of  “King/Queen of Denial.” You’re going to be humbled  by the process, so there goes the inflated ego and  false pride. Unforgiveness is going to be an issue too;  often this kind of honesty brings with it a godly  supply of forgiveness. And last, but not least, you will  lose the loner lifestyle. Your secrets don’t make you  as different as you’ve believed. Once I started being  honest, I found a whole new group of friends just  like me! No longer hindered by my self‐imposed  prison of uniqueness, I could get with the program  and start finding my joy. It’s a tough job handling all  the freedom that comes from no longer being  secretive, but someone’s got to do it!    May 22    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Chronicles 35 and 36;  Mark 12      When I was growing up, my favorite place in the  whole wide world was my grandmother’s house. I  loved visiting her. My best friend lived right across  the cracked concrete driveway, so I had easy access  to a heavenly place of refuge. It was never a problem  when family and friends would come to visit my  “Mama” and she would shoo me outside for some  fresh air. I didn’t understand it then, but as an adult I  realize that many people knew my grandmother was  a safe haven—a good person to listen to a fifth step.    My best friend, Beth, and I enjoyed our shooing  experiences. Sometimes we’d drag canvas  “butterfly” shaped chairs up under the trees in the  back yard and tell our own secrets. Other times,  we’d push gently back and forth on the glider    conveniently located on the screened porch. Usually  we would bide our time, waiting for the evening’s  activities like flashlight tag and capture the flag.     As I grew older, the cares of my little world taught  me what others had known for many years: my  grandmother was a saint. She could listen to a  confession of wrongdoing and somehow  communicate a blessing back to the confessor. I  eventually abandoned the butterfly chairs, red  pitcher, flashlight tag, and capture the flag. But I  have never let go of the blessing that came as a  result of my grandmother’s attentive,  compassionate, and listening ear.    A fifth step is crucial for a million different reasons.  But my favorite reasons are the blessings. Here are a  few that I particularly appreciate:    If you’ve ever had someone listen to your  wrongdoing, and respond appropriately, you never  get over the experience. A piece of gratitude gets  lodged in your heart and refuses to budge. After  that, you can never live comfortably in your  resentments again.    If you’ve ever had someone accept your  wrongdoing AND hold your potential in their hands  simultaneously, it’s like experiencing heaven on  earth.    If you’ve ever had this gift, you will always dream  of someday returning the favor. Someday, I hope I  can sit with one who embraces suffering AND  captures the vision of God’s big dream for them. I  consider it my job to listen to suffering, and speak  back blessing. I learned the value of that from my  grandmother.    Thought for today: Wounds from a friend can be  trusted, but an enemy multiplies kisses.  Proverbs  27:5‐6 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I don’t know if you’ve ever  had someone who can bestow a blessing like my  grandmother did. We might be more familiar with  someone who condemns us for wrongdoing and  demands that we straighten up and fly right. Perhaps  we’ve even met those who pity our pathetic states.  A real blessing comes when we can admit  wrongdoing without thinking that our wrongs  disqualify us from living God’s grand epic  adventures.   
103

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
May 23    Scripture Reading for today: Ezra 1 and 2; Mark 13      Do you ever struggle with the sins of others  blocking your view? Is there a person in your life  whose offense against you has been so great that it  makes all your sins look small (and not worth  mentioning)?      David is a biblical character of epic proportions. He  was the slayer of the giant, Goliath; “a man after  God’s own heart;” the best king to ever rule Israel;  shepherd; musician; writer; and good looking. David  had it going on.     He had some hardships too. His brothers ridiculed  him, and as Rodney Dangerfield would have said,  “He got no respect.” As an apprentice to King Saul,  David triggered Saul’s insecurities and was  eventually hunted down like a dog. On and on go  David’s traumas.    David has a lot of life events that could easily block  his view of personal sin. David’s humanity does  result in making sinful choices, including adultery  and murder—serious stuff. For years David hopes  that his role as King and his history of heroic deeds  will cover over his sinful behavior.    God has other ideas. He loves David too much to  allow him to be devastated by a failure to complete  a meaningful step four and five. So God sends  Nathan, a prophet, and David’s sin is exposed. The  list of all the people hurt by this sin was enormous,  and we’ll talk about that in a later step. But to me,  the fascinating part of David’s confession is his  awareness of the enormity of his sin before God.    “Against you, and you alone, have I sinned; I have  done what is evil in your sight.” Psalm 51:4 NLT      David has a moment of clarity and realizes that  although he has sinned against many, his greatest  sin is against God.    Thought for today: All a man’s ways seem innocent  to him but motives are weighed by the Lord.  Proverbs 16:2 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: God has big dreams for you  and me too. So if your fourth step is no longer than a  short grocery list, give this some thought and prayer.  Does anything new come to mind that you need to  confess when you consider God’s desires for your    life? Stack that up against your current life choices,  and see if your view clears.    May 24    Scripture Reading for today:  Ezra 3 and 4; Mark 14      But prove yourselves doers of the word, and not  merely hearers who delude themselves. James 1:22  NASB      We are easily deluded. Obvious, right? We’ve got  bigger problems than our delusions. As each of us  draws nearer to God, there is an enemy who is not  happy that we’ve finally seen the light. Satan is real.  In John 10:10 his life purpose is clearly stated, “The  thief’s purpose is to steal and kill and destroy.”    Whether you are actively stepping through the 12  Christ‐centered steps to recovery or taking a  different path, I don’t want you to be misinformed.  You have an enemy. There is a spiritual force of  darkness that is hell‐bent (no pun intended) on  stopping you from living out God’s grand epic  adventure. I know you have some tough truths to  confess. Guilt, shame, and those dreaded “If onlys”  may be leaving you blue. But unconfessed sin isn’t  the only problem; we have a force that is  intentionally seeking to steal our hope, kill our  dreams, and destroy our potential.     In that same John 10:10 passage, Jesus contrasts  His purpose with Satan’s when he continues with  “My purpose is to give them a rich and satisfying  life.”  He is talking to you. You were created for a  rich and satisfying life. So don’t delude yourself. If  you are experiencing a “less than” life, something is  wrong.    Fortunately, I delivered the bad news before the  best news of all : you’ve got the power! I don’t mean  this in some distorted feel‐good representation of  God’s truth. You personally are powerless. But when  you become a follower of Christ, you receive a gift— a bestowed gift of power. It’s the power that can  save your soul. It’s huge. You have the capacity to  live free.    Telling you that you have power is not enough to  unleash that soul‐saving power in your daily living  experience. Right this moment I am sitting in my  study not far from my exercise room.  I have my  exercise DVDs , treadmill, weights, medicine ball, 
104

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
bands, and other instruments of torture that are  supposed to be good for me. I have the potential to  be physically fit at my fingertips 24/7. But if I don’t  go up, stick on my shoes, and plug in the tape or turn  on the treadmill or lift those weights and stretch  those bands, I will not live up to my fitness potential.  It’s still true‐‐I’ve got the power potential—but  without using my muscles, all I really have is a dusty  room and a huge portion of guilt.    Thought for today: So get rid of all the filth and evil  in your lives, and humbly accept the word God has  planted in your hearts, for it has the power to save  your souls. But don’t just listen to God’s word. You  must do what it says. Otherwise, you are only fooling  yourselves. James 1:21‐22 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: You have the grand privilege  of taking this next step. The power potential is huge.  But you’ve got to be willing to accept God’s fitness  plan: confess, accept, and then follow.     May 25    Scripture Reading for today: Ezra 5 and 6; Mark 15      If you’re not a big reader and you skim the  recommended chapter reading today, you know this  isn’t a pleasant time for Jesus. He goes to trial,  charged with a crime he didn’t commit. He’s mocked  by all and beaten by many. Within hours he is  crucified, dead, and buried, and he takes the hopes  and dreams of all his believers with him. They don’t  have the benefit of flipping a page in scripture and  sighing with relief when the next chapter heading  blares out “The Resurrection.”   Hope will soon be  restored, but on this day, there is no hope in the  hearts of those who believe.    Thought for today: Therefore, brothers, since we  have confidence to enter the most Holy Place by the  blood of Jesus, by a new and living way opened for us  through the curtain, that is, his body, and since we  have a great priest over the house of God, let us  draw near to God, with a sincere heart in full  assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled to  cleanse us from guilty conscience and having our  bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold  unswervingly to the hope we profess, for he who    promised is faithful. And let us consider how we may  spur one another on toward love and good deeds. Let  us not give up meeting together, as some are in the  habit of doing, but let us encourage one another— and all the more as you see the Day approaching.  Hebrews 10:19‐25 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Is today one of those no‐ hope days for you? You’re not alone. I hope you’ll  take the time to read and ponder the experience  Christ had in Mark 15. (You can find an in‐depth  study of Jesus’ last week on earth at  www.northstarcommunity.com. Look for the Insight  Journal, Finding Our Way Back To God, Part 3.)    May 26    Scripture Reading for today: Ezra 7 and 8; Mark 16      Has your recovery journey left you feeling  bewildered? Just recently one of my friends said, “I  thought I’d feel better than this. For years, my wife  told me that if I stopped drinking, our life would be  so much better. And in some ways it is, but it’s not  perfect. I’m scared. I feel all these feelings and I  don’t know what to do with them.”    My friend reminded me of the value of  perspective. Perfect? Is that what he was shooting  for? It reminds me of our confusion in pre‐recovery,  when we often mistake God’s job for ours. Playing  God, being God, hoping to become perfect in all our  ways—that’s part of our delusional system.    Highly successful people, people who make a  difference, people that we hope one day to emulate  — make mistakes. A famous model said recently, “I  look at those magazine pictures of myself, and they  aren’t me! Even I don’t look like the me those  pictures portray.”      We’re not hoping to come out of this step‐five  experience as perfect people—that’s not in the  cards. But we are challenged to consider our  potential. Let me ask you a question. If I told you  that you were guaranteed to win Olympic Gold in  the figure skating competition in 2008 if you entered  into a rigorous training program with Will Ferrell  (think about the movie Blades of Glory) AND your  success would make you famous beyond your  wildest dreams, would you train? Of course you 
105

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
would. You’d go for the gold if you were guaranteed  success.    What do you think God has been saying to you all  this time? God’s children are destined for  greatness—kingdom‐defined and God‐decided glory.  You were created for a grand epic adventure. Not  perfect, but perfectly glorious.    Thought for today: But you are a chosen people, a  royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging  to God, that you may declare the praises of him who  called you out of darkness into his wonderful light.  Once you were not a people, but now you are the  people of God; once you had not received mercy, but  now you have received mercy. 1 Peter 2:9‐10 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: You’re a kid of the King!  Queen Elizabeth visited the state of Virginia for our  400‐year anniversary. The news media diligently  instructed us on the proper etiquette in case we  happen to bump into her while she’s here. High‐end  hotels don’t call it the “royal treatment” for no  reason. And you, my friend, are royalty. Royalty  carries both privilege and responsibility. As kids of  the King, we live with some expectations that non‐ royal types never have to concern themselves with.     Dear friends, I urge you, as aliens and strangers in  the world, to abstain from sinful desires, which wage  war against your soul. Live such good lives among  the pagans that, though they accuse you of doing  wrong, they may see your good deeds and glorify  God on the day he visits us. 1 Peter 2:11‐12 NIV    So here’s what I’m guaranteeing you. In the future,  you’re going to be an Olympic champion in the  kingdom of God. You’re going to have power that  will save your very soul. You’re going to learn how to  know and do the will of God. You’re going to be  given the mind of Christ. You’re going to be able to  tell the difference between good and evil—and  choose good. You’re going to have both the capacity  and the willingness to love God, others, and self.  You’re promised a future and hope. Promise. That  and more is guaranteed for you—sitting like some  beautifully wrapped gift, waiting for you to crack  into it. But first, you’ve got to train…            May 27    Scripture Reading for today: Ezra 7 and 8; Numbers  1 and 2      Talk about inventories! Check out the counting  found in the first two chapters of Numbers. Numbers  is a logical name for this book, but the editors of the  New Life Translation Recovery Bible point out that  the Hebrew name for the book is “In The  Wilderness.”    If you’ve never been a big fan of this book, you  might not know that the Israelites, freed by God  from their slavery in Egypt, did not have to spend  forty years traveling to the Promised Land. The trip  itself was pretty short.    But the Israelites ended up in the wilderness as a  consequence of refusing to act on God’s promises.    How many wilderness years have you  experienced? Wilderness living may not be your  destiny, but it could end up your final resting place if  you are unwilling to act on God’s promises to you.    Thought for today: It is for freedom that Christ has  set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let  yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery.  Galatians 5:1 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: The Israelites rejoiced when  freed from their captivity. They resisted living in a  way that would prevent a repeat of that slavery  experience. Past events in our lives may have caused  us to experience captivity at the hands of another.  But the past is over, and we stand on the precipice  of a personal choice: will we stand firm, or will we let  ourselves be burdened again by the yoke of slavery?    May 28    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 3 – 5 (skim)      I can’t wait to hear what you think about the last  half of chapter 5. I’m fascinated that a suspicious  husband can accuse a wife of infidelity and “The  husband will be innocent of any guilt in this matter,  but his wife will be held accountable for her sin.”  It’s  called a jealousy offering. I don’t understand these  historical references, but I do hear this message loud  and clear: even undetected sin is serious. Suppose a 
106

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
man’s wife goes astray, and she is unfaithful to her  husband and has sex with another man, but neither  her husband nor anyone else knows about ,”…even  without getting caught…consequences happen.    I never will forget this husband who confessed to  me about his adulterous affair and then minimized it  by saying that it was okay, because no one knew. It  wasn’t six months later when the “no ones” turned  into the almost everyone and the consequences of  that sin are still being revealed. Years have passed,  and now the small children, who he assured me  were “too young to understand”, have grown up and  can speak for themselves. They come and sit next to  me at ballgames and tell me things. They tell me sad  things ‐ stories that remind me that we’re kidding  ourselves if we think secret sin doesn’t count or  presume that it will ever stay secret.  We need to get  with the program and realize that we wear blinders  if we think sin is a small thing that’s hardly worth  mentioning.    Thought for today: “There is nothing concealed that  will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made  known. What you have said in the dark will be heard  in the daylight, and what you have whispered in the  ear in the inner rooms will be proclaimed from the  roofs .”  Luke 12:2‐3 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Are you sure you’ve  completed that fourth step rigorously?    May 29    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 6 – 7      Earlier in this devotional series I mentioned the  twin concepts of “letting go” and “picking up”— essential skills for transformation. Pete’s  grandmother quit smoking (letting  go) AND started  eating celery like a fiend (picking up). My friend  stopped hanging out in bars (letting go) AND started  attending AA meetings (picking up).    Whether you are sharing your step five or you are  one of the honored ones who listens to them, I have  an idea of something that I hope we will seriously  “let go” and never “pick up.”  As we grow up, our  self‐awareness increases. (I’m not talking about self‐ focus or selfishness or self‐absorption; I’m talking    about understanding who we are and what patterns  need to change in our lives.)    One pattern that is rampant in pre‐recovery is the  tendency to judge, blame and shame. Judging and  blaming others is a fast and cheap manipulation  designed to get the attention redirected from our  own shortcomings by highlighting the defects of  others. One time this couple came to visit me and  dragged their big problems with them. It seems the  wife had begun a torrid Internet affair and her  husband discovered the infidelity. This posed quite  the dilemma for the husband—a minister committed  to concepts like reconciliation and forgiveness. This  gentleman desired to live his faith with integrity and  his pain was intense. He was struggling with feelings  of betrayal, rage, and anger. He felt responsible to  rush to forgiveness, but his feelings were dragging  their feet and not cooperating with his theology. Like  Job, he was trying to make sense of his pain, his  beliefs, and his part in the story—messy but good  stuff.    The wife was a trip. I expected…embarrassment?  Remorse? Sadness? Guilt? Shame? I don’t know! But  certainly not what I watched happen in that  meeting! If I didn’t know the background story I  would have assumed that the wife was the offended  party in this broken relationship. She blamed her  affair on her husband’s insensitivity (evidently he  doesn’t put his shoes away), his work schedule (he  feels it inappropriate to leave work for 3 hours in the  middle of the day for her to take a tennis lesson),  etc. Married to a man with big shoes who often  leaves them in odd places, with a heavy work  schedule not to mention his sports commitments,  etc. I understand her frustrations to a point. Even I, a  woman who likes to support her gender’s issues,  couldn’t see how shoes and schedules merited a  response of infidelity. But I also understood that this  conversation had nothing to do with shoes or  schedules. It was about judging and blaming.    Fortunately, both of these suffering people agreed  to enter into a community of support. A few months  later, they popped back in for another visit. This one  was really different! Gone was all judgment and  blame on the part of the wife toward the husband;  her focus had shifted. Tears ran down her cheeks as  she judged, blamed, and shamed herself. She had  forgotten all about his shoes and schedules. All she  could focus on was her sin!  Here’s what I told her. 
107

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Judging, blaming and shaming is not helpful in  healing. No one ever got “better” from a tongue  lashing, whether you’re lashing out at yourself or  someone else. All that gets you is more pain.     Let’s set aside all this blaming. Let it go.     Thought for today: … If any one of you is without sin,  let him be the first to throw a stone at her.  John 8:7  NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Jesus told a story in John 8  about a woman caught in adultery. Masterfully, he  neither minimized her sin nor shamed her. The law  said that if two people are caught in adultery, their  punishment should be stoning—the community  would throw stones at them—until they died.  As  you read John 8, notice what Jesus does. He  reluctantly answers their demand for judgment with  one condition. “All right, but let the one who has  never sinned throw the first stone!”  The scriptures  go on to say that beginning with the oldest, all the  accusers slipped away without casting a single stone.  That is the absence of judgment that can spring from  humility birthed as a result of self‐awareness. But  Jesus doesn’t end the confrontation with a feel‐good  backing away from blaming. “Go and sin no more.”   Sin matters. Jesus says we need to stop it. But he  says it without judging, blaming, or shaming. Let’s  join him in this, shall we?    May 30    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 8 – 10      “I am not up to this. I can’t believe he asked me to  listen to his fifth step. I thought it would be a good  experience, I didn’t know listening to all  this….darkness…would feel so….bad.”  Rookie. That’s  what he called himself after his first stab at listening  to someone share their step five. Although he had  been through this step himself, he had never been  “another human being” before.  He’s correct. He is a  rookie.     I remember the first time I tried to make a  homemade apple pie. A newlywed, I realized that my  beloved loved apple pies. I got his favorite apple pie  recipe from his mother (an experienced, excellent  cook) and went to work.       “What is this green stuff?” Pete asked. He asked  like a newlywed husband, with a scrunched up face  and a tone that could only be described as disgust.     “What green stuff?”  I ask  defensively. Gee Whiz, I  just baked this guy a pie from scratch. What does he  expect?     “This stuff.”  He spears it and puts it under my  nose with disdain. You would have thought he found  a fly or finger tip!     “It’s apple peel! Get it? Apple pie, apples, apple  peel!”  That should clear up his confusion.    Then he does a very bad thing. He laughs. This is  no chuckle, this is a laugh until you fall out of your  chair guffaw. This is the kind of laugh I’ve heard and  usually love, when something is really hilarious and  he’s thoroughly enjoying himself.    How was I supposed to know apples were peeled  before placing in a pie shell? An experienced cook,  Pete’s mom never considered telling me to peel the  apples—that would be a rookie mistake, a mistake  she hadn’t even considered making in 20 years or so!    After pouting for a few days, I learned from this  rookie faux pas. Today my family swears I make the  best apple pie in the world. But it has been an  acquired skill.    So I encouraged my rookie listener of step five and  I want to encourage you as well: rookies make  mistakes. I could have decided to give up on pie  making. It would have been easy to turn the reins  back over to the expert and bring veggie trays to all  family functions. I chose to humble myself and keep  plugging. I commend this to you: keep learning.  Don’t stop because of some grand delusion of  perfection. Learn from errors today, and someday  you may be a person who can guide others gently.  I  have a note in my well‐worn cookbook to tell my  daughter and future daughters‐in‐law how to make  the perfect McBean apple pie.  Long ago I penciled in  the peeling instruction. I was afraid I would forget  what rookies need to know.    Thought for today: Listen carefully to my words, let  this be the consolation you give me. Job 21:2 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Sometimes all it takes to  turn a life around is the presence of a good listener.    May 31   
108

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 11 and 12— read it carefully.      I read an interesting article in the paper this  morning. It was about complaining. A pastor decided  that complaining, sarcasm, and gossiping were all  things that his congregation should “let go.”  He had  a bunch of arm bands made, and asked his  congregation to wear them as reminders to stop  complaining.    A psychologist commentated on this practice by  saying that some people solve problems by  complaining. In fact, she has written a book about  the value of complaining. She believes that  complaining can be a positive step toward problem  solving.    In today’s recommended reading, complaining  abounds, and it looks very unattractive. In chapter  12, God gets really tensed up when Miriam and  Aaron criticize Moses. At least in this one instance,  complaining is a definite no‐no. Interesting.     Although the complaining is annoying and petty, I  particularly love what we learn about Moses in this  story. Now Moses was very humble – more humble  than any other person on earth (v. 3).  In this  recovery journey, none of us can go too far off track,  if we will humble ourselves.     Humility helps us stay teachable. It makes us hard  to offend. It makes us less likely to be judgmental of  others. In any and every situation, we can eagerly  expect to learn something new. It makes us more  enjoyable to be around. We’re leaving the fifth step  and heading toward step six—a step that’s going to  require a humble spirit.    Thought for today: God blesses those who…realize  their need for him. Matthew 5:3 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: I hope that step five has  been a blessing to you. My prayer is that you  continue to draw nearer to God and receive His  promises with open arms.    STEP 6  We were entirely ready to have God  remove all these defects of character.    June 1      Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 13 and  Nehemiah 1 and 2      What do you think it means to be “entirely ready”  to have God remove our defects of character? A  timid knock on my office door introduced me to a  young woman who knows what it means to be  “entirely ready.” It’s been several years since she  escaped a family system riddled with substance  abuse, physical abuse, and neglect. In the beginning  it was hard. She missed her family, even with its  messy ways. She left to save herself, but she  sometimes wondered why.    Then she met the man of her dreams. Instantly she  felt a cosmic connection and “just knew” that he was  the one for her. Such assurance in her newfound  love emboldened her, and she joyfully accepted his  suggestion to move in together at her place. It made  such perfect sense. They’d save more money and  would marry eventually. No rush, really, after all, he  was her destiny.    Until she got pregnant. Then he split. She was  heartbroken but soon rallied. He was just shocked,  she reasoned, and needed some time to sort things  out. Even the vicious rumors carried to her door step  by supposed friends did not deter her. She deduced  that they were probably jealous of a love so true.  She told them, “If you only knew how he treats me  when we’re alone; you’d know how much he loves  me!”    She continued to be entirely ready to accept his  lame excuses and erratic behavior. Months passed.  She waited patiently for her destiny. When the baby  arrived, he got a big kick out of pointing out his  newborn son to family and friends. She smiled with  delight and thought, “I was right!”    He forgot to pick them up from the hospital, and  her humiliation knew no limit. After calling a friend  to rescue her and the baby, she walked into the  apartment, only to find her destiny in the company  of another damsel. When the dust cleared and all  the company fled, she confronted him. She’d never  done this before and was shocked when he smacked  her hard across the face, almost causing her to drop  their son.    Now she tells me that it was at that moment she  realized that she may have left the abusive home she  grew up in only to recreate it with this man. She  wants to know what I might suggest that she do. She 
109

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
doesn’t want to end up like her mother. She reports  that she is perfectly open to any ideas I might offer  her—except one. She cannot live without this man.  She is “entirely ready” to do anything it takes to help  him understand that she is the one for him. It would  be an added bonus if he would stop reminding her  so much of her own father.    I tell her, sadly, that I am fresh out of ideas. It’s the  truth; I am. What I can say, and I doubt she will hear,  is that being “entirely ready” to have her defects of  character removed by God is the ONLY way she will  find herself in a position to receive God’s big dreams  for her. Independently of God, this mighty spiritual  act of restoration cannot occur. Unfortunately,  studies and statistics confirm the sad truth that  many of us re‐create our unhealthy childhood homes  in spite of our best intentions to do otherwise.    She shakes her head in confusion and says that she  just doesn’t get it. She doesn’t know how to be  “entirely ready.” I assure her that indeed, being  “entirely ready” is one of the things she does best. I  point out her readiness to accept this man as her  savior. In so doing, she willingly submits herself to  him. Thus far, this young woman has spent a year  being “entirely ready” to live any way this man  dictates. “Entirely ready” involves trust. And  although she’s never chosen to be “entirely ready to  have God…” she certainly has been “entirely ready.”    “What am I ‘entirely ready’ for?” She asks.    “Thus far, it seems as if you’ve been ‘entirely  ready’ to live with your hurts, habits, and hang‐ups.  You’re ‘entirely ready’ to live with your defects of  character. You’re ‘entirely ready’ to believe that your  destiny is set, and transformation is not possible.  You’re ‘entirely ready’ to believe that it is reasonable  to entrust your destiny to another person, but not to  God.“    She left pretty discouraged. But she could not offer  one word of disagreement.    Thought for today: “Let’s go at once…we can  certainly conquer it!” Numbers 13:30 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: My friend is onto some  measure of the truth. On her own, independently of  God, she really doesn’t have much choice but to  accept the destiny set before her. Transformation  isn’t possible by self‐effort and well‐wishing.  Transformation is a God thing. Don’t miss that: God    is in the business of transformation. He can, and He  will. It would be a sight to behold if all of us were as  ready to have God do His thing as this young lady  was to have the man of her dreams.  Numbers 13 is  such a blessing! Notice that God sends scouts to  explore a land he’s already promised to give them!  They miss that key piece of information, and instead  go and explore this land for the purpose of deciding  whether they can conquer its inhabitants and win  the land by force. Only Caleb sees clearly that they  haven’t been called to conquer the land, merely to  step when God speaks. A key ingredient required to  get “entirely ready” is learning how to listen closely  to what God is really saying. Don’t miss the blessing  in step six. God isn’t asking us to tackle our defects  of character by force and remove them from our  hearts; He’s simply asking if we’re ready for Him to  remove them.  “Let’s go at once…we can certainly  conquer it!” Numbers 13:30 NLT  This is a viable  option for those who understand God can and will  and who are ready—entirely ready—to step  accordingly.    June 2    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 14; Nehemiah  3 and 4      Be careful about how you define “entirely ready.”  In Numbers 14, the Israelites hear about the  consequences that God has chosen to mete out as a  result of their sin. They don’t like what they hear and  suddenly, they’re “entirely ready” to enter the land  God promised them (remember, this was the very  land they pitched a fit about entering in chapter 13).  “Let’s go,” they said. “We realize that we have  sinned, but now we are ready to enter the land the  Lord has promised us.”    You know, it just doesn’t work that way. Getting  caught in wrongdoing isn’t automatically erased by  trying to go back and rectify the wrong. Sure, they  admitted they were wrong (step five), which was  good. But they weren’t prepared to actually repent.  They just wanted to make their consequences go  away. That’s not quite the same thing, is it?    This step is a paradox. It is passive, in that we are  preparing to ask God to remove our defects of  character; it is powerful, because willingness  compels us to act. Apart from God, we can do 
110

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
nothing. We can be sincere, passionate, and  purposeful. But on our own, independent of God, we  are incapable of self‐transformation. Only God  transforms. Only God saves. This step is asking us to  believe that without God’s help, we can do nothing.  And it is challenging us with an invitation to accept  the help only God can provide.    Thought for today: The Lord will fight for you; you  need only to be still. Exodus 14:14 NIV     Thought for tomorrow: How about you? Are you  ready to have God do for you what you cannot do  for yourself?    June 3    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 14 and 15;  Nehemiah 5      Seriously looking at all our defects of character can  be overwhelming. It’s enough to make you want to  run for the hills! So I want to give you a strong word  of encouragement, and I pray it will be the kind of  tonic that makes you willing to stand firm and  continue on the path of recovery.    I believe that as we age, God intends for us to  grow. We may get wrinkled and our joints may make  funny noises, but we can also get wiser. I think God  builds within us the capacity to gain wisdom and  understanding for a reason. I don’t believe this is for  the purpose of us all becoming a bunch of smarty  pants, but so that our experiences can benefit  others. Scripture indicates that’s how it can work;  we are students of life who become coaches for  those who are following along behind us.    If we aren’t willing to be brutally honest with  ourselves, we may miss this precious benefit of  aging. Without being willing to have God remove our  character defects, we could find ourselves old but  unwise. We may be willing but ill‐equipped to carry  God’s message of hope to hurting people.    Recently I spent time with a family whose aging  parent was NOT coping well with the wrinkling and  crinkling process. It was sad. The same character  defects that had been obvious in this person’s prime  seemed magnified in old age. The children and  grandchildren not only had to deal with the  consequences of an aging family member with little    wisdom, they missed out on the privilege of learning  from one who could have been a tremendous life  coach. If we skip step six we may miss out on our  best selves, and so will those who love us.    If you’re thinking about skipping over this step and  rushing ahead, I hope you’ll reconsider.    Thought for today: Investigate my life, O God, find  out everything about me; cross‐examine and test me,  get a clear picture of what I’m about; see for yourself  whether I’ve done anything wrong—then guide me  on the road to eternal life. Psalm 139:23–24 The  Message    Thought for tomorrow: I’m not too keen on the idea  of someone—even God—testing me, examining me,  poking and prodding into the recesses of my  character day in and day out. I’d feel like a bug under  a microscope. But when I read Psalm 139 and I  realize that this kind of evaluation is for a purpose,  then I’m cool with it. God isn’t testing us with the  hopes of chastising, blaming, and shaming. God  desires for us to submit to this process for the  purpose of preparation. So I say: Have at it!    June 4    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 16; Nehemiah  6 and 7      One of my exercise video gurus likes to challenge  me through my television screen. He says things like,  “Hey, we’re here for you! We’re in this together! If  one of us falls behind, it hurts the whole team!” I’ve  never figured out exactly how my exercise coach can  determine whether I’m helping or hurting the team  via DVD, but I do know that at least in principle, he’s  right.    In Numbers 16, one guy conspires with two others,  and ultimately their rebellion causes the death of  14,700 innocent people. This didn’t happen  capriciously. What we learn is that one bad apple  can spoil a whole bunch of other apples. “But the  very next morning the whole community of Israel  began muttering again against Moses and Aaron...”  And thus, a plague was birthed.    So if you’re okay dragging your defects of  character around behind you like a ball and chain, I  want you to know that I am definitely not okay with 
111

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
it! Why? Because you might be an apple that’s  hanging out near me in the same barrel! You might  be rubbing up next to my husband, my kids, or my  community. You might be hanging out with a future  child in‐law (whose name I may not know, but for  whom I have been praying for since the births of  each of my children). You may be hanging out with  my brothers or their wives, my nieces and nephews,  my parents, or my mother‐in‐law. You might be  hanging out in my church or at my kid’s school. You  may even be bagging my groceries. You might be  near my friends or my friends’ kids.    What you and I choose to do with our defects  matters. It matters to our families, friends, co‐ workers, and even our enemies. We need to take  this into consideration as we make this very big  decision.    Thought for today: “…what does the Lord your God  require of you? He requires you to fear him, to live  according to his will, to love and worship him with all  your heart and soul, and to obey the Lord’s  commands and laws that I am giving you today for  your own good.” Deuteronomy 10:12‐13 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: God requires stuff of us, not  to be a “big old bad dictator,” but so that things will  go well with us, with our families, in our  communities, and in future generations. Did you  know that who you are could make such a huge  difference in our world?    June 5    Scripture Reading for today: Skim Numbers 17, 18,  and 19      Character defects are those undesirable parts of  ourselves that must be removed if we are going to  become our real, God‐created selves. They are our  faults, weaknesses, shortcomings, failings,  limitations, manipulations, obsolete survival skills— the parts of us that make us cringe with  embarrassment and shame. If we are to grow into  our potential, we must be willing to acknowledge  each of these limitations (steps four and five help us  do this) and consciously choose to ask God to  remove them. Anything that holds us back from  living large and loving others has potential for    making the list of things we need to be willing and  entirely ready to ask God to remove!    A friend of mine was sharing her particular defect  of character with me, and I thought it might be  helpful to share with you. Because she grew up in a  family that constantly criticized and belittled her, she  grew up defensive and angry. She just always had to  be right. For her, there was no higher value than  being right. She decided that years of always being  wrong could only be counterbalanced by years of  always being right. Consequently, my friend became  a real pain in the neck. No one wanted to hang out  with her. Oh, she got what she wanted; she was right  all the time, and everyone knew it. But what she lost  was the opportunity for meaningful relationships.    What was her defect of character? She came to  believe that this compulsion to be right all the time  was wrong—a shortcoming in her life. This was a  huge admission, because it was also the coat of  armor she used to shield her wounded spirit; it  defined her as valuable. I love how she accepted  responsibility for her part without getting distracted  by the failings of others. I particularly appreciated  how powerless she felt over this compulsion to be  perfect. I was impressed by her persistence as she  asked God to remove this character flaw, and how  entirely ready she was for Him to do so. If you met  my friend today, you would never think she was  once a person others avoided. Allowing God to  remove her propensity to be right left a space as big  as Texas, which God filled with a very charming gift  of being real.    Thought for today: Humble yourselves before the  Lord, and he will lift you up. James 4:10 NIV    God decided to give us life through the word of  truth so we might be the most important of all the  things he made. James 1:18 NCV    Thought for tomorrow: The most important thing  God made on planet earth was each of us. He’s got  big plans for us. Once we understand that we have  intrinsic value based on who God is, we will be free  to let go of all those things we cling to, hoping that  they will give us value because of what we do.  Sometimes our defects of character are tricky to  discern, because they come disguised as things that  we think actually add value to who we are.   
112

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
June 6    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 20; Nehemiah  8 and 9      Sometimes our defects of character are tricky and  disguised. They show up as false beliefs, bad  attitudes, and other subtle barriers to becoming all  that we were created to be. Consider today’s  reading. If you’ve been following along with the  reading, you have no doubt realized that Moses led a  whiney bunch of followers on a circuitous desert  pilgrimage destined for the Promised Land. Every  time he turned around, Moses was forced to fall on  his face before God in an attempt to save their sorry  souls. These rebellious, complaining followers were a  thorn in his side. Could you blame Moses for getting  annoyed?    In Numbers 20, Moses gets fed up. Again he has to  run to God to rescue his wayward flock. God  acquiesces and gives Moses one command, “As the  people watch, speak to the rock over there, and it  will pour out its water.”    So, the scripture says, Moses did as he was told.  Almost. “He took the staff from the place where it  was kept before the Lord. Then he and Aaron  summoned the people to come and gather at the  rock. So far, Moses is right on track. “Listen, you  rebels!” he shouted. “Must we bring you water from  this rock?” Then Moses raised his hand and struck  the rock twice with the staff, and water gushed out.  So the entire community and their livestock drank  their fill.”    The chapter goes on to say that Moses and Aaron  are disciplined by God for their lack of trust, and,  after all those years, they are not allowed to enter  the Promised Land. Huh? Moses shouted rather than  spoke, and he struck instead of waiting for the  waters to flow. Does that seem like a shortcoming  worthy of banishment from the Promised Land?  Obviously the answer is yes. But why?    Thought for today: If any of you lacks wisdom, he  should ask God, who gives generously to all without  finding fault, and it will be given to him. James 1:5  NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I’ve pondered and prayed  for wisdom and understanding regarding the life of    Moses for years. I do not presume to have a clue as  to the mysterious ways of God in this story. What  I’m currently taking from this account leads me to  take seriously the charge set before me in step six.  I’ve got defects of character. All my efforts to “do  good” do not “cover over” my limitations. It’s not  okay to get it mostly right and to think I can ignore  the areas in my life that reveal a lack of trust in God.  Defects of character are serious business.    June 7    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 21,22, 23, 24      What characters we discover in the scripture for  today! Reading and re‐reading this saga brings all  sorts of life lessons to my mind. But for today, focus  on this one thing: God’s purpose prevails.    Balaam was a great magician (Joshua 13:22) and  evidently his community thought he had great  power. Magic isn’t something that desperately  devoted followers of God are supposed to mess  with. Although from a cultural perspective Balaam  had influence and power, from God’s perspective he  was in dire need of character renovation.    In fact, it’s laugh‐out‐loud funny that God  instructed Balaam through a TALKING DONKEY!  Seriously, I can’t make this stuff up! Isn’t that a  hoot? In the world’s eyes, this guy was clever, but  God used a lowly donkey to set Balaam straight.    I find great hope in this story. First, I am  encouraged that even a donkey—a stubborn and  lowly creature—can be used by God. Second, even a  sorcerer like Balaam, who is disobedient and self‐ important, can see the light and obey God.    I’m a person who is well aware of my defects. I’m  even aware that I’m often unaware of my character  flaws. So it thrills me to my very core to know that  God’s purposes are far more “prevailing” than even  my shortcomings.    Here’s the other part of this story that I absolutely  love. As far as we can tell, neither the donkey nor  Balaam rose early each morning and acknowledged  God. Balaam readily admitted his powerlessness, but  we have no indication that he was a man who gave  much thought one way or the other regarding God.  So if we believe, if we acknowledge, if we trust, if we  inventory, if we admit, and if we prepare, imagine  what God can do with us! 
113

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for today: God decided to give us life  through the word of truth so we might be the most  important of all the things he made. James 1:18 NCV    Thought for tomorrow: I know—we just read James  1:18! Read it again. And remember: God is not a  man, so he does not lie. He is not human, so he does  not change his mind. Has he ever spoken and failed  to act? Has he ever promised and not carried it  through? Listen, I received a command to bless; God  has blessed, and I cannot reverse it! Numbers 23:19‐ 20 NLT  God decided to give you life so that you  might be the most important of all the things He  made. That’s His decision. Frankly, you can choose to  spend your life living as if this is not true. You can  live as if your life holds little value. You can act as if  you have no purpose in life but to satisfy your own  cravings. You can dream small and achieve little (sort  of like a donkey, whose grandest adventure on any  given day is when he’s stubborn and recalcitrant and  makes his rider work really hard to keep him on the  path he’s supposed to travel). But from this day  forward, I want you to make decisions like that in  the light of truth – God decided for you to have a life  of value, a life that would make a difference. Balaam  didn’t fit this category of “less than” living. To quote  Austin Powers, Balaam thought “he was all that and  a bag of potato chips too.” (You might want to  ponder which category you might fit into: under‐ or  over‐valuing yourself.)  I suppose some of us, like  Balaam, might have dreams for an important life—a  life carried out on our terms—by our own definition  of what “important” means. But that’s not our  decision, is it?    June 8    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 25, 26;  Nehemiah 10      Have you ever set out to read the Bible from cover  to cover? Did you succeed? I’ve done it a few times,  but I’ve tried to do it many, many more times than  the few successes I can barely boast of. I get stuck in  some of those Old Testament books. I like the  stories, but sometimes the long list of genealogies,  the hard‐to‐comprehend mysteries beyond my  limited cultural comprehension buried in the stories,    and even the outdated minutia of rules, regulations,  and detailed offerings wear my enthusiasm down for  the task of reading. Or at least, that’s how it used to  be for me when I tried to read the Bible.    I don’t know what’s happened, but over time, I’ve  come to see it differently. Oh sure, there are the  confusing and confounding parts; they are still  present as I read along. And I admit I skim some of  the lists. But I don’t skim too quickly, because a gem  of insight is often tucked in the most obscure of  verses.    Take for example the seduction of the Israelite  men by the Moabite women. Did you miss that?  Does it seem so long, long ago that its relevance  fades in comparison to your personal concerns like  paying for your child’s tuition or getting that car  repair taken care of before the engine falls out? Is it  less confusing to skip the section where the Lord is  described as having “fierce anger” against the  Israelites?    Do you cling to the hope‐filled verses of God’s  mercy and grace? Rightly so! Do you appreciate the  reality that Christ took on the burden of all our sins,  so that we might be freed from them? I’m sure you  do! But during this devotional series, we are going to  pause and not run from the reality that God is not  only merciful but just. History has proven to us,  whether it is a convenient truth or not, that God  cares about how we behave. God isn’t zoned out and  in denial about the peccadillos of mere mortals. He  doesn’t wear ruby‐red slippers (like Dorothy in The  Wizard of Oz) and just hope everything turns out all  right.    God cares about our defects of character. They  stand as stumbling blocks that must be removed if  we are to live our lives according to our true God‐ created identity.    Thought for today: He himself bore our sins in his  body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and  live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been  healed. 1 Peter 2:24 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: We love the truth that our  sins are forgiven; we hope that our wounds will be  healed. But that’s not the only reason Jesus came.  He came that we might live righteously. It’s time for  us to make a commitment to do our part: get ready.   
114

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
June 9    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 27, 28, 29      Do you remember Joshua? He was the guy, along  with his buddy Caleb, who believed God’s promises.  In Numbers 13, scouts were sent to explore the  Promised Land, and most turned out to be ninnies.  Scared witless, they forgot not only God’s  instructions (to explore the land) but His promises  (to give them the land).    Fear and anxiety can do that to us. It makes us  forgetful. We can forget who God is and what He’s  up to. We grow forgetful of who we are and what  we’re created for. In all this confusion, it’s hard to  tease out our defects of character and separate  them from our fears, worries, and generalized  malaise.    Sometimes we have a Joshua experience. We do  something really marvelous that delights the Lord,  but it takes a long, long time before the fruit of that  one decision ripens. Joshua and Caleb leaned into  their fears and spoke faith‐filled truths. But that  didn’t get them morphed into the Promised Land like  something out of a movie scene. God’s blessing on  their obedience took time to unfold. In Numbers 27,  we see that blessing delivered. I wonder if you—like  Joshua—have made a really great decision, but the  blessing is taking time to be delivered?    Today my son is awaiting a package. I think it  contains a cool piece of sports apparel with the Red  Sox label prominently displayed. He is driving me  crazy tracking the package online and hoping for his  gift sooner rather than later. He’s so impatient, he’s  begun to doubt the routing messages. He fears his  precious shirt is lost. Aren’t we all like that?    I want you to do me a favor. I want you to  remember one simple truth: you don’t have to figure  out all the answers, you simply have to get ready  and willing for God to show you the way. Are you  ready?    Thought for today: For you have been born again.  Your new life did not come from your earthly parents  because the life they gave you will end in death. But  this new life will last forever because it comes from  the eternal, living word of God…So get rid of all  malicious behavior and deceit. Don’t just pretend to  be good! Be done with hypocrisy and jealousy and    back‐stabbing. You must crave pure spiritual milk so  that you can grow into the fullness of your salvation.  Cry out for this nourishment as a baby cries for milk,  now that you have had a taste of the Lord’s kindness.  1 Peter 1:23, 2:1‐3 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  Some days our problems  seem so large that they obscure the view of our  promises. Keep looking; don’t give up.    June 10    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 30; Nehemiah  11 and 12      The Bible is rich with instructions. Some very  specific and culturally driven—like Numbers 30.  From our perspective, sometimes it takes serious  “pausing to prepare” to take the scripture and apply  it to our daily living. One way I like to prepare is to  study the historical context of a passage. If I’m going  to try to grasp meaning for myself, it behooves me  to understand first the intended meaning of the  passage to whom it was written. I might look in  some study guides, concordances, Bible dictionaries,  etc. We are fortunate today because we have online  resources too. Then I ask myself the question: what  principle can I extrapolate from this teaching that is  applicable for my culture?    I think the same principles apply when we have  conversations about defects of character. Some  defects cross all cultures. For example, murder is  wrong. It’s bad for society, and most cultures  establish laws that are consistent with that belief.    My mother says that in her day, women who  engaged in premarital sex were considered wanton  and very naughty. In my day, I’ve witnessed a real  shift in cultural mores regarding this practice. Some  believe that premarital sex is perfectly acceptable in  a monogamous, committed relationship. The  younger generation tells me that they feel that  “friends with benefits” is perfectly normal; they find  “committed” to be a limited perspective.    So is “character” relative? Does “defect” depend  on one’s own personal code of conduct? What do  you think?    Thought for today: The person who sins breaks  God’s law. Yes, sin is living against God’s law. You 
115

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
know that Christ came to take away sins and that  there is no sin in Christ. So anyone who lives in Christ  does not go on sinning. Anyone who goes on sinning  has never really understood Christ and has never  known him. Dear children, do not let anyone lead you  the wrong way. Christ is all that is right. So to be like  Christ a person must do what is right. 1 John 3:4‐ 7  (New Century Version)    Thought for tomorrow: This is an important issue to  ponder. Our ability to understand the nature of  character defects is going to affect our capacity to  fulfill our commitment to working an effective step  six.    June 11    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 31 and 32;  Nehemiah 13      Yesterday we ended our devotional with a  question: how does one decide what is and what is  not a defect of character? Lots of people have gone  before us and explored this topic. Below is a list of  possible shortcomings that others have identified as  commonly held character weaknesses. See if any  strike you as personal possibilities:  unhealthy dependencies on people,  circumstances, things, compulsions, or obsessions  controlling and manipulating as a lifestyle  consistent feelings of desperation that drive our  choices  debilitating fears  anger issues  negative, limiting beliefs  worry as a lifestyle  the need to understand  the need to blame  waiting to be reasonably happy  the false belief that we aren’t responsible for  ourselves  the false belief that we cannot take care of  ourselves  self‐hatred  lack of trust  inappropriately placed trust  addictions (alcohol, drugs, shopping, over‐ exercising, smoking, over‐eating…compulsions run  wild)    persistent feelings of guilt (an “I did wrong” feeling  of sometimes true, sometimes false guilt)  shame (otherwise known as a feeling of “I am  wrong” –a feeling of being broken, “less than”)  inability to feel/numbness  inability to deal appropriately with feelings  fear of love, joy, commitment  closed mind and/or heart  attraction to people, things, behaviors that cause  problems  need to be perfect  need to fail  past abuse and/or present abusing  need to be a victim  selfish, self‐centered living  inability to feel empathy  need for chaos  need for dysfunction  limiting false beliefs about God, self and others  (your beliefs may seem normal to you, but have  others given you input that could mean that you  are wrong?)  fear of intimacy  failure to know, appreciate, and be true to our  God‐created identity    Thought for today: Do your best to present yourself  to God as one approved, a workman who does not  need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the  word of truth. 2 Timothy 2:15 NIV     Thought for tomorrow: Perhaps it would be helpful  if you took this list with your personal defect  “suspicions” to a dear, dear friend. And if you can  ask this without going postal based on their  response, ask them: do you see this in me?    June 12    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 33 and John  13      We’re hitting the home stretch in Numbers. As this  book draws to a close, Moses recounts the history of  the wilderness experience for a new generation.  Before the next grand epic adventure begins, God  causes the people to pause to prepare.    I have found this true in my life too. Sometimes  before God speaks and asks me to step, I find myself 
116

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
looking back, remembering my past, thinking about  who I am and how I have come to believe. During  the next few devotionals, I’m going to encourage  you to consider pausing to prepare as well. I’m going  to spend each day illustrating one common  character defect. Your part, should you choose to  accept it, is to think: could this be a shortcoming in  me?    In the gospel of John, chapter 13, Jesus predicts  that one of the disciples is going to betray him. The  disciples glanced around the room, wondering: who  is this guilty betrayer? Certainly the disciples didn’t  nod in silent recognition. They didn’t glance at each  other, muttering softly, “It has to be Judas.” But did  Judas see himself as disloyal? Did the other disciples  ask themselves: could it be me?    As we’re going through the list of potential  problems that any one of us might suffer from, I pray  that we will all be aware that we have this in  common with the disciples: it is sometimes hard to  see ourselves and others accurately.    Thought for today: No temptation has seized you  except what is common to man. And God is faithful,  he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can  bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide  a way out so that you can stand up under it. 1  Corinthians 10:13 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I get nervous sometimes  when I think about the extent of my hurts, habits  and hang‐ups. I used to think that one day I’d be  completely “renovated” and could cease the  uncomfortable practices of inventories, lists of harm  done, and making amends. I know that was silly and  naïve, but it’s the truth! But greater than my natural  reluctance to be honest about my shortcomings is  the encouragement I receive from looking back. I can  remember where I’ve been and how far I’ve come.  That’s seriously cool. It motivates me to push  through my anxieties. I want to be more than just  okay. I want the abundant life God has for me. I  desire to be entirely ready for the next step!    June 13    Scripture Reading for today: Numbers 34, 35, and  36        Potential Problem: unhealthy dependencies on  people, circumstances, things, etc. and/or  inappropriately placed trust    Think of all the whining we’ve read about in  Numbers. Those guys were barely in the desert  before they were ready to head back to captivity.  Instead of pausing to prepare, taking a deep breath,  and carefully recalling the true state of their lives,  they panicked. And in the panicking, they chose to  depart from reality and run straight into fantasy.  They began to creatively remember their lives in  Egypt. They talked themselves into believing that  captivity hadn’t been “that bad.” When faced with a  challenging situation, the Israelites wanted  inappropriately to trust their captors rather than to  trust their God.    When we have unhealthy dependencies on any  person, place, or thing, we’ve run to la‐la land too.  Sometimes we do all sorts of mental gymnastics  trying to convince ourselves that our object of  obsession is worthy of so much power and trust. This  causes us a lot of anxiety, and sometimes we even  start acting and sounding a little kooky. We put  ourselves in terrible situations when we trust in  anything that is untrustworthy.    This reminds me of a woman I know who is very  angry with her family because they won’t accept her  new husband. In fact, her mother is so distraught,  she refuses to have any contact with her until she is  no longer involved with this man. Wow. Does that  sound harsh to you?    Let me tell you what this guy did. This newlywed  pair has a long and stormy history that includes  abuse, fraud, cheating, lying, stealing, etc. Did I  mention that the bride found out that she had  contracted HIV from this man and still proceeded  with the wedding march? This woman, who has  invested so much time and effort in this relationship  (I guess you could say she gave her life for him)  simply cannot NOT depend on this man. She feels  she must have him in her life. She believes he will  change. So, in full knowledge of all the past, she  chooses to marry him. This is what we might call an  unhealthy dependency.    I know a guy who has had so much interpersonal  turmoil and betrayal that he’s decided to love things  and use people. He refuses to depend on anybody  for anything. He’s got a wall of protection around his  heart so high and deep it makes the Great Wall of 
117

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
China project look like child’s play. He has an  unhealthy dependency on self. He’s figured out that  people sometimes disappoint, but he hasn’t quite  gotten hold of the fact that he’s “people” too.    Let’s not miss the point. We were created to  depend on each other, love each other, and care for  one another, but we were never supposed to think  that people, places, or things could substitute for the  source of all our true security—God himself. We  were created to depend on Him to save, guide,  nurture, restore, renew, counsel, convict, and  forgive us. Sometimes God even uses other humans,  life events, etc. to serve as emissaries of his saving,  guiding, nurturing, restoring, renewing, counseling,  convicting, and forgiving. But we must learn to hold  lightly and gently to these fleshy fleshly things,  trusting that God is the source and provider of all the  things we truly need.    Thought for today: So don’t be misled, my dear  brothers and sisters. Whatever is good and perfect  comes to us from God above, who created all the  heaven’s lights. James 1:16‐17 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: My friend with the wayward  husband and the distraught mother has forgotten  that God has plenty to say about the qualifications  and requirements of husbanding, and this dude  failed the test. She’s depending and trusting in the  wrong person. My friend who lives behind the brick  wall of resentment and bitterness forgot that he was  called to love God and others—not to live a life of  isolated self‐protection. This friend has taken too far  the principle that people aren’t to be unhealthily  depended upon and has forgotten that healthy  dependence is part of being a follower of Christ.  Anytime our behaving is incongruent with our  believing, we need to sniff around for a character  defect.    June 14    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 1; James 1;  Psalm 35      Potential Problem: desperation    The psalmist was definitely desperate when he  penned this psalm! This week I listened as a family  recounted a long litany of desperation. I can’t share    it with you, but trust me, it is desperate.  Imagine  the worst seven things that could happen to your  family, multiply that by two, and you will get a  glimpse into the desperation this family is currently  experiencing.    Desperation takes our breath away. It leaves us  feeling as if there are no solutions. It is often  accompanied by its little friends—helplessness and  hopelessness.  It’s a dark night of the soul that lasts  for what seems like eternity.    I felt desperate the first time I was exposed to  scuba diving. I’m at best an adequate swimmer. I’m  not confused about this. I give myself almost zero  chance of surviving a crisis in water. If something  goes wrong, I quickly move from fun in the water to  desperate and drowning. Anyway, once we were on  vacation and my dad, who is an awesome swimmer,  brought his scuba diving gear along and let us use it  in the hotel pool.    I thought it would be fun. But once the heavy  tanks were strapped on my back, and the regulator  was firmly in my mouth, I started having those first  little tinglings of desperation. I ignored them initially,  but as I paddled to the deep end of the pool, the first  indication of “wrong” manifested. These tanks were  for my dad, and I was considerably smaller. So as I  dove down, the tanks moved down too. Suddenly I  found myself standing on my head at the bottom of  the pool. Those tanks were acting like a weight, and I  couldn’t move. I did hear a funny muffled noise, and  as I cranked my neck in an awkward position to look  up, I could see my three brothers and my dad  floating on the surface, watching this debacle and  laughing hysterically. I however, was in full panic  mode. I was sure death was eminent.    Desperation does that. I quickly forgot I was in a  pool and that my dad was perfectly capable of  swimming down and whisking me up to the surface  in a millisecond. Desperate people don’t think  clearly. They just get desperate, flail around, and  forget much of what they knew seconds before their  encounter with desperation.    Thought for today: If you need wisdom, ask our  generous God, and he will give it to you. He will not  rebuke you for asking. But when you ask him, be sure  that your faith is in God alone. Do not waver, for a  person with divided loyalty is as unsettled as a wave 
118

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
of the sea that is blown and tossed by the wind.  James 1:5‐6 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: My dad scooped down and  hauled me up without rebuke (okay, they all  continued to laugh) but no rebuke. God wants to do  that with us, too. Desperation is only a shortcoming  if it results in flailing around, trusting in the wrong  people or things, or developing unhealthy  dependencies to quiet our panic. If we will trust God,  then desperation can be a blessing. At the first  tingling of despair, we can pause to prepare. We can  ask our generous God, and He will give us the  wisdom we need. But remember, our faith must be  in God alone.    June 15    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 2; James 2;  Psalm 36      Potential Problem: a controlling and manipulative  style of relating to others; selfish and self‐centered  living.    They lie awake at night, hatching sinful plots. Their  actions are never good. They make no attempt to  turn from evil. Psalm 36:4 NLT    I don’t believe that most of us deliberately,  consciously, intentionally “lie awake at night  hatching sinful plots.” I suspect if most of us realized  our actions were “never good,” most of us would try  to change. Nor do I think that the average Joe has  any desire to be near evil, much less think they need  to turn from it.    I suppose that’s why this character defect is such  an important one to consider.    What keeps you awake at night? Are you worried  about your children, your spouse, your finances,  your love life, your job, etc.? Are you lying in your  bed, fretting about what others may or may not be  up to, figuring and calculating how you’re going to  try to convince “them” to do what you believe is in  their best interest? I can almost hear your response:  Isn’t that what all parents (spouses, employees…)  do? Well, no, it’s not. (It’s what we all consider  doing!)    Here’s why. If we’re lying awake thinking of new  ways to get our kids (or anyone) to live the life we  dream for them, we’re participating in evil. We’re    hatching sinful plots. What? How can that be? Well,  it is controlling, manipulative, selfish, and self‐ centered. We each have our own life. We have the  responsibility to choose our big dreams, and others  must be afforded the same privilege.    We may presume that we know what others’ lives  should look like. And perhaps it appears that we  really do. But we certainly don’t know what God has  in mind. What if our controlling manipulations work?  Are we perhaps interrupting the plans of God? We  may keep our kid out of juvie, we may hire enough  lawyers so that licenses aren’t revoked and prison  time is averted—but to what end? Sometimes the  only way we learn is through the school of hard  knocks. What if consequences brought to bear early  in life are the very things that will refine a person  and help them to become their true God‐created  identity? Did you ever think of that?    I am the mother of three children;  I’ve been there  and done this. I’ve done it wrong, and I’m trying to  learn how to do it differently. Why? Because I have  come to believe that even successful manipulation is  a poor and inadequate imitation of choosing faith. A  faith choice might still require us to lie awake  vigilantly and pray. A faith choice absolutely requires  that we learn how to address problems and concerns  with our children (and others we love). But we must  learn how to do such things absent manipulating,  controlling, selfish, and self‐centered living.    If we’re on step six, than we’ve already committed  to step three. That means that to live as if we are  God (as opposed to living so that we might become  imitators of Christ) is evil.    Thought for today: This is what the Lord says: “Don’t  let the wise boast in their wisdom, or the powerful  boast in their power, or the rich boast in their riches.  But those who wish to boast should boast in this  alone: that they truly know me and understand that I  am the Lord who demonstrates unfailing love and  who brings justice and righteousness to the earth,  and that I delight in these things. I, the Lord, have  spoken!” Jeremiah 9:23‐24 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: I know how hard it is to stop  trying to fix problems. I like fixing things. But many  of the problems that weigh us down aren’t ours to  fix. Here’s a hard truth: If others’ problems are  keeping you up at night, is your desire to solve them 
119

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
motivated by love? Or because you’re selfishly trying  to ease your own pain? Think long and hard about  this.      Sometimes it feels so good to be a hero, even if  just for a moment. But our greatest attempts to live  the super‐human life are pale and pitiful compared  to the riches of God.    June 16    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 3; James 3;  Psalm 37      Potential Problem: Need for chaos and destruction     I ran into her in the parking lot at the beginning of  what was going to become a long, hard day. As she  came rushing up, my heart did a little blip and I felt a  vague, sinking sensation. I had intended to run a  quick errand and rush home. I had a big project and  a short deadline which I was looking forward to  achieving. Quelling this desire to rush off and  achieve, I listened to a long drama of trauma unfold.    After I made my escape, I asked myself what was  up. I love people and their stories. I love a good  interruption. I’ve been known to miss dinner, sleep,  and even a good workout session for the privilege of  listening to a story—even one fraught with suffering.    So why was I so bugged? Setting aside project,  deadline, and the need to achieve, I cloistered  myself in my study and spent some serious time in  prayer. Many things were revealed to me that  resulted in a decent sized inventory (see step four).  One of the things that I came to realize was that my  friend had moved from telling her story into the  world of embracing chaos and destruction.    That little blip and vague sinking sensation were  clues that I was being approached by a storm cloud,  not a woman in need of a listening ear. There’s a  difference. Life is filled with opportunities to suffer.  We’re not supposed to go looking for them, embrace  them to the exclusion of everything else life has to  offer, or even try to keep the chaos and destruction  alive and well. My friend was doing just that.  She  seemed to thrive on having a story that indicated  how crazy her life was. She had grown to love the  darkness.    If you find it easier to manage the chaos and  accept destruction as a way of life than to live a    peaceful life, then that’s a character defect. I hope  you’re entirely ready to let it go, because I can  assure you, you are wearing out the people that love  you. If you’re a person who is being worn down by  one who loves the darkness of confusion more than  the clarity of God’s light, be careful.    I’m not suggesting that you be unkind, but check  your boundaries and make sure you’re not becoming  more concerned about “fixing” another person’s life  than they are concerned about having it fixed!    In hindsight, it would have been kinder for me to  have interrupted my friend’s soliloquy and gently  inform her that I was on my way to work on  something that couldn’t wait. It was not kind of me  to allow her to ramble on for an hour as if that was  normal. I was not kind, helpful, or loving on this day.  No wonder it turned out to be such a long, hard one.    Thought for today: Woe to those who call evil good  and good evil, who put darkness for light and light  for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for  bitter. Isaiah 5:20 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: If we’re going to be entirely  ready, then we must be willing to accept the reality  of our defects of character and be relentless in our  pursuit of readiness.    June 17    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 4; James 4;  Psalm 38      Potential Problem: Emotions run wild (fear, anger,  worry, guilt, shame)—either too much or too little  emotion for the situation at hand—and an inability  to appropriately respond to those emotions (or lack  thereof).    I spend an inordinate amount of time in my local  grocery store. I don’t know why, really, since I’m not  known for my culinary prowess. Actually, now that I  think about it, this all makes perfect sense! Most of  my time is spent people watching! (No wonder I  never make it home with my completed grocery list!)    During my people watching, I’ve seen a lot of kids  have a lot of fits. Screaming, crying, kicking, gnashing  of teeth—all of it happens in the checkout line of any  local grocery on any given day. Since my children are 
120

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
older, I’ve come to relax and enjoy these  experiences—until yesterday.    It was nap time and this little one was obviously  tired. Unfortunately, her mom wasn’t paying  attention.  In the produce section, she was rubbing  her eyes and trying to get out of the cart. At one  point, she was so close to toppling out of her seat  that I reached over and grasped her outstretched  arms, nudging her little legs back into the sitting  position (mom was off in the fruit section chatting  with a friend). By the time we made it to the cereal  section, she was starting to whine and her mother  shushed her in a distracted sort of way (no eye  contact). Frozen foods was a disaster; the toddler  was now in the kicking‐feet‐and‐flailing‐arms stage  of a full‐blown fit. Mom kept her head averted and  seemed to be really fascinated with the frozen  waffles. By checkout, this precious little girl was  writhing around and flinging anything she could  reach out of the cart and onto the floor. And then it  happened. Her mother slapped her hard across the  face.    Silence. The child stared up at her mother with a  look of horror, mirroring the images on the rest of  the unwitting observers who had the misfortune of  being present in the store at this particular moment.  “Shut up! I said shut up! You’re driving me crazy!”    Once I was in this same store with a toddler who  also caused quite a stir. I was hustling through the  store basically grabbing two of everything. I placed a  dozen eggs on the top of my bulging cart and then  got distracted by a friend who wanted to share a  great story. Without my noticing, my son opened the  carton and began to take one egg out at a time and  drop them to the floor. Then I began moving again,  and he continued dropping those eggs in slow,  regular, intervals. I didn’t notice this strange feat  until check out. I was sooooo embarrassed. Try  telling a cashier that it’s quite possible that a dozen  eggs are scattered and broken from Aisle 11 all the  way to frozen foods. It’s hard to explain.    So when I heard the smack, and the screaming  mom, I wondered: what caused this? Does she often  do this or was this a freak occurrence? Is she  embarrassed? Did she just lose her job? Are her  parenting skills sub‐par? Is she sleep deprived  herself? Did her husband just leave her? Did she just  lose her charge cards or find out she had to pay for a  new transmission? I don’t know. What I do know is    that stuff happens in life and we respond to it  emotionally. However, it is a serious shortcoming  not to know how to appropriately respond to our  emotions.    Thought for today: What is causing the quarrels and  fights among you? James 4:1 NLT     Thought for tomorrow: Emotions spring unbidden  from our inner selves. They’re the result of what  we’re thinking and believing in the midst of each  situation. The lady with the tired baby responded in  anger (who knows what else she was feeling before  she erupted‐‐embarrassed, worried, afraid?). I was  clearly embarrassed by my tike’s stealthy attempts  at turning the grocery store into a sporting event.  Emotions happen. Sometimes hormones and  neurons and learned behaviors and all sorts of  factors play into our feelings. Emotions like anger,  fear, worry, etc. are like the red warning lights on  our cars’ dashboards. They’re God‐given and  intended to get our attention. I know that mom was  tired and stressed, but her character is in serious  need of becoming “entirely ready to ask God”  because what I witnessed yesterday has a name: it’s  called child abuse. If you too are a person who  struggles with understanding how to deal with  emotions, recognize it for what it is: a learning  opportunity. Relationships are at stake here, people,  we need to get with the program and figure out  what’s going on. No doubt about it, part of that  figuring should include a well‐worked step six.    Read the rest of James 4 if you want to see one  perspective on that issue.    June 18    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 5; James 5;  Psalm 39      Potential Problem: negative, limiting beliefs  including the belief that we aren’t responsible for  ourselves and cannot take care of ourselves; false  beliefs about God, self, and others    One of the reasons I am so hard core in my  commitment to daily disciplines like scripture  reading and study is because I’m such a goof when it  comes to limiting beliefs. It’s true, I’ve acquired a lot  of bogus beliefs and stinking thinking, have jumped 
121

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
to a myriad of bad assumptions, and drawn a host of  cockeyed conclusions in my fifty‐plus years on planet  earth. Some of these are so firmly entrenched that if  I knew I was believing them, even I wouldn’t agree  with myself! I suspect that’s one of the reasons that  being “sort of” ready doesn’t cut it when it comes to  defects of character (particularly this sneaky one).  It’s so confusing because sometimes we BELIEVE that  we BELIEVE a certain thing to be true, but our  actions reveal that in fact, we do not. Can you  relate?  Let’s listen in as someone writes about his  personal struggle with confused believing…    “I hate going to sleep at nights, I always have.  Don’t get me wrong, it’s not the sleep itself I hate,  far from it. It’s the inevitable sleepless hours  immediately preceding the sleep that gets me  torqued up. You see, the time spent lying in bed  prior to sleep is really the only time all day I am  really forced to take an in‐depth look at myself; the  only pure and unadulterated time to examine all of  my imperfections. I wasn’t born this way, though;  God does not do that to people. I grew up in church,  just like a lot of kids do. Sunday morning Bible  studies, sermons, youth group, small groups—you  name a church activity—I grew up going to it. It’s  easy for a kid to conclude that religion is all about  following rules. Buddhists have the eightfold path.  Hindus have the caste system. Jews have the Torah.  Christians probably have the longest list of do’s and  don’ts of all, though hardly any come from the Bible,  based on what I’ve seen. A woman at church once  told me dancing was a sin because of the sexuality of  the movement. Obviously, she’s never been down to  the local assisted living home on line dancing day.  Nothing will kill the overly intense sex drive of a  teenager like gyrating old people. (Taking that  information to its logical conclusion, dancing might  help you secure a place in heaven, but I digress.)   The heavy‐handed influence of this form of rule‐ oriented religion forces people into two groups: rule  followers and rule breakers. Some people believe  breaking rules is considered “sin,” which, based on  what I’ve been taught at times, is a Christian term  for “making God love you a little bit less.” Enter my  sleepless nights. Once I’ve done everything possible  to avoid sleep; once I’ve read, played Xbox, watched  TV, and the like, I get to lie in bed thinking about all  the things I’ve done during that day to make God  love me less. I am a rule follower. I believe what I’ve    been told about God. He is all loving, all knowing, all  powerful and more. He loved me enough to let his  Son, who never sinned, die for my wrongdoing and  somehow consider it an even exchange. To me that  seems like trading twenty pesos for a bajillion  American dollars, but I’m no finance major.  Somehow in spite of all of that, I cannot seem to do  my part in a given day to minimize the behavior that  causes Him pain. I’m a rule breaker. I’ve been taught  everything I need to know to “get in good” with God,  but I still can’t seem to do it. I used to think I could  get everything right for at least a day, and then build  on that. Maybe I could put two perfect days  together, who knows? Once I accomplish that,  perhaps I can throw together a whole work week, or  any five‐day stretch. My calculations tell me,  however, I have yet to put together a perfect  minute. Thus, I am perpetually confronted with  these things every night, between the hours of 11  p.m. and 2 a.m.” (From the letter of a desperately  devoted follower of Christ who was feeling pretty  desperate on the day he wrote in.)    Thought for today: Obviously, the writer is talking  about confusing beliefs, some of which are  downright false. He knows that “getting in good”  with God cannot be about doing everything right.  After all, he believes all those other character traits  He learned about God too—especially the whole  Jesus story. But do you hear the suffering that occurs  when false beliefs unwittingly co‐mingle with truth?  Whether little listening ears sometimes hear a story  and jump to the wrong conclusion or sometimes  we’re taught bad theology, all of us at one time or  another will find our beliefs a bit jumbled in our  heads. If left unchecked in a world of false beliefs,  my friend may soon find himself living in a world of  compromised choices. His pain and suffering may  escalate. He could even decide that his faith has  more to do with rules than relationship, and that  would really be troubling.    Thought for tomorrow: This is good, and pleases  God our Savior, who wants all men to be saved and  come to a knowledge of the truth. 1 Timothy 2:3‐4   NIV   It’s normal to end of up with conflicting beliefs  as we journey through life; it’s awesome to know we  have a God who doesn’t want to leave us in our  confusion. Are you “entirely ready” to let God have 
122

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
his way with you? It is God who works in you to will  and to act according to his good purpose. Philippians  2:13 NIV    June 19    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 6; John 1 and 2      Potential Problem: the need to understand  According to most experts, the gospel of John,  written by John the apostle, brother of James, was  penned between A.D. 80 and 90. After years of  reflection, John records a perspective that is the  most unique of the four gospels. This used to freak  me out. I thought all the gospels should “match.”  Any little confusion in timeline or tweaking of a  story, and it sent me into an anxiety attack.  On more than one occasion, I can remember  lamenting to my husband (who didn’t seem at all  bothered by the serious lack of matching between  this gospel and Matthew, Mark, and Luke), “I just  want to understand.” What can be wrong with that?    It turns out that a lot can be wrong with the “need  to understand.” In fact, it can become a real  shortcoming. Our son Scott has run into this “need”  recently, and I suspect he has an increased  appreciation of the ability to “let it go.” As an intern  with our Minister to Students, Scott has been  facilitating a discussion on various world religions  with the youth group. He’s worked like a dog,  studying and researching each religion. He worries  that he might misspeak, and in so doing, potentially  misrepresent a faith experience that he’s only read  about.    So he was quick to report in on one particular  evening when one of the youth “grilled” him  extensively about a particular religious group. (As a  former youth teacher, I am enjoying watching my  son experience youth ministry from the other side of  the lectern.)  Whether right or wrong, there was  some thought given to this question: was this a case  of the “need to understand” gone astray? Was this  kid interested in the topic, hoping for clarification, or  just having a bit too much fun needling the new guy?    Sometimes the “need to understand” can become  a thinly veiled attempt to play God. Other times it  can be an excuse for not stepping as God speaks in  the areas that we DO understand. Lots of times it’s  simply a waste of time. There are things that we can    never understand, nor are we supposed to try.  Weighing the motives of the hearts of others isn’t  really within our ability (much less our job  description); trying to figure out what God is up to in  each and every situation is simply not going to  happen; getting so smart that we understand every  little thing about every single verse in the Bible—I’m  working on that one—but I’ve stopped demanding  instant knowledge. The willingness to be “entirely  ready” even in the face of limited understanding?  Priceless.    Thought for today: Seek the Lord while he may be  found; call on him while he is near. Let the wicked  forsake his way and the evil man his thoughts. Let  him turn to the Lord, and he will have mercy on him,  and to our God, for he will freely pardon. “For my  thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your  ways my ways,” declares the Lord. “As the heavens  are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher  than your ways and my thoughts higher than your  thoughts.” Isaiah 55: 6‐9 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I love the lyrics found in the  music of Andrew Peterson. In one of his songs  there’s a line…”afraid that I will find that His (God’s)  love is no better than mine.” Fear not. God’s love is  far better than anything we’ve experienced in  ourselves or others. That’s just one of many  mysteries that we quite possibly will never  understand. But here’s the deal: God gets it. You can  trust Him with the stuff you have to let go. It’s my  prayer today that whatever you’ve spent too much  time trying to understand (why he doesn’t love you  anymore, why she cheated on you, why this  happened or that didn’t, etc.), you will be “entirely  ready” to let God remove that need to understand.  (Don’t miss tomorrow’s devotional—it’s on that  pesky need to blame.)    June 20    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 7; John 3 and 4      Potential Problem: The need to blame    Before you read ahead in John, glance back at John  2. Fascinating. Jesus’ mother is at a wedding, and  they run out of wine. This is a huge wedding blunder,  and Mary walks right up to Jesus and presents the 
123

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
problem to him (“They have no more wine.”).  Obviously, she expected him to solve this problem.    Jesus responds, “Dear woman, that’s not our  problem, my time has not yet come.”    “But his mother told the servants, ‘Do whatever he  tells you’.” And the rest of the story, as they say, is  history. Jesus does what his mom requests.  Neither party blamed the other. Jesus didn’t blame  his mother for not sticking with the grand plan; Mary  didn’t blame Jesus for reminding her that his mission  was still in the covert stage. They didn’t ruin a  perfectly good wedding with the defective need to  blame. It says afterwards that they spent a few days  together. No one withdrew into their corners to lick  their wounds. A problem was stated; a solution was  found.    Has the “need to blame” been a problem in your  life? Think about it. Take a few minutes to pray  about this one.    Thought for today: But whoever catches a glimpse of  the revealed counsel of God‐ the free life!—even out  of the corner of his eye, and sticks with it, is no  distracted scatterbrain but a man or woman of  action. That person will find delight and affirmation  in the action. Anyone who sets himself up as  “religious” by talking a good game is self‐deceived.  This kind of religion is hot air and only hot air. James  1: 25‐26 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: Is there any place for blame  in the midst of a free life filled with delight and  affirmation in action?    June 21    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 8; John 5 and 6      Okay. Let’s move away from our themes of  “entirely ready” and “defects of character” and turn  our attention to God. But before we think about who  God IS and what He WILL do for us, take a close look  at John 6:60‐71. Camp in it. Read it in a bunch of  different translations. Meditate on it. Ask God about  it.    Now. Notice the following:    “Many of his disciples said, “This is very hard to  understand. How can anyone accept it?”      Jesus was aware that his disciples were  complaining, so he said to them, “Does this offend  you?...The spirit alone gives eternal life. Human  effort accomplishes nothing. And the very words I  have spoken to you are spirit and life. But some of  you do not believe me.” (For Jesus knew from the  beginning which ones didn’t believe, and he knew  who would betray him.)  Then he said, “That is why I  said that people can’t come to me unless the Father  gives them to me.”    At this point many of his disciples turned away and  deserted him.    Thought for today: None of this is easy. Thinking  about our defects is not easy. Coming to see that all  our years of failed self‐effort were destined to be a  waste of time is not easy. Trusting God to do for us  what we haven’t been able to do for ourselves is not  easy. And the truth is that many will turn away. I  hope it won’t be you.    Then Jesus turned to the Twelve and asked, “Are  you also going to leave?”    Simon Peter replied, “Lord, to whom would we go?  You have the words that give eternal life. We believe,  and we know you are the Holy One of God.”    And within a few chapters we’ll discover that  Peter’s best intentions, his big statements of faith,  his self‐confidence, and even his love for the Lord  were not enough to keep him from denying Jesus.  Still, Jesus restores him. He raises him up. Peter  becomes one of the key leaders in the Christian  church. That’s God, doing for us what we can’t do for  ourselves.    Thought for tomorrow: It is God who works in you to  will and to act according to his good purpose.  Philippians 2:13 NIV.    God removes…all these defects of character.    June 22    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 8; John 7 and 8      Today one of my girlfriends and I were lamenting  the long list of shortcomings that is on each of our  inventories (step four). We realized that when we  began this 12‐step process and made our first step‐ four inventory, we didn’t have the insight to discern  our defects, but now the picture is clearing up. Some 
124

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
days we don’t like what we see. But. (In a sentence,  the most important truth usually follows the “but.”)    But in spite of all that we see about ourselves, we  draw comfort from the truth that God is and God  will. He has a plan and a purpose for our lives (see  Jeremiah 9:11). It isn’t up to us to fulfill them; IT IS  UP TO HIM. If you don’t hear another thing, hear  this: if you will be responsible to God, He will take  responsibility for you! How awesome is that? It is so  awesome, I want to repeat it: if you will but believe  and be responsible TO God for every single detail of  your life, God is and God will accept responsibility  for the outcome while simultaneously meeting your  every need (forget about your every want; that kind  of self‐centered defect will be removed as you  proceed). Let the truth of that run around in your  head and heart.    Thought for today: Now it is God who makes both us  and you stand firm in Christ. He anointed us, set his  seal of ownership on us, and put His Spirit in our  hearts as a deposit, guaranteeing what is to come. 2  Corinthians 1: 21‐22 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: God is in the business of  supporting us each and every day. We have a part in  positioning ourselves in such a way that we can  recognize the support He provides (steps one  through six), but make no mistake: He provides. He  does this not because we are inherently deserving,  but because he is inherently loving. When life’s  circumstances call that truth into question, we can  know this: we simply don’t have all the facts, see the  big picture, or know what is taking place in the  unseen world. God is love. He will never violate His  character nor abandon His plans. God is and God  will.    June 23    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 9; John 9 and 10      At NorthStar Community (NSC), we spend a lot of  time in community. We learn from each other’s  mistakes. We don’t try to dust ourselves off, polish  our crowns and show up to our group meetings and  worship experiences all neat and tidy and perfect.  We don’t have conversations about how we wish  “others” could get it together. We realize that we    are those “others” and so on our good days, we’re  gentle with ourselves and others.    There’s actually biblical support for building a faith  community on these principles.    …these things happened to them as examples and  were written down as warnings for us. 1 Corinthians  10:11 NIV    Now these things occurred as examples to keep us  from setting our hearts on evil things as they did. 1  Corinthians 10:6 NIV    Many people get stuck in their spiritual journeys  because they simply fail to believe that God is and  God will.    Another thing we believe at NSC is that God has  big plans for all of us—a place in His story—a  purpose for living and a reason for getting entirely  ready to have God remove all our nasty little defects  of character. We believe God doesn’t discriminate.  We believe He’s less concerned with our current  state than He is with our potential. That’s important  because sometimes we fall short of God’s big  dreams for us and lose our place in the story.    Everyone I know who has lost their place in the  story has a tendency to fall into patterns of thinking,  believing, and responding to the world that  ultimately lead to pain and suffering. Defects of  character emerge. The blame game is initiated.  Others fall into the role of perpetual victim.    Even with all the misbehaving that goes along with  losing one’s place, getting off track, and falling into a  rut of resistance, I’m still a raging optimist. I know  that God does not interrupt the shortcomings and  foibles of others capriciously. Some mistake God’s  patience for a lack of His presence. That’s not true.  God is and He will, even as He allows his children to  choose for themselves how they will live. Some have  made quite a mess of things.    Unbelievably, even this messiness can be good  news. God has allowed others the freedom to  choose and even lose their place in the story, but He  has not allowed the experiences to go to waste. He  has given us a way to look back and learn from their  mistakes. I suppose that’s why living and loving in  the context of a faith community is so crucial. It’s  one of the ways God accomplishes what He is up to  and will see accomplished.    Thought for today: Therefore, since we are  surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us 
125

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so  easily entangles, and let us run with perseverance  the race marked out for us. Hebrews 12:1 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I wonder if this news makes  it a bit easier to stare hard into the face of our  shortcomings and accept God’s offer to help.  “Entirely ready” is like a get out of “defect” free  card. We can join a community where we’re not  alone; others have experienced the same troubles  and shared the same shortcomings. We can learn  new ways of believing, thinking, feeling, and  behaving. We can allow God to guide us, provide for  us, and equip us with what we need to thrive on  planet earth. Lots of times God uses our community  to fulfill His promises to us. We can do this because  God is and God will. Even in this moment God is in  the unseen world, cheering us on to victory. It is past  time for us to reject the lies that no one  understands, that nothing will ever change, and that  there is no hope. Are you ready?    June 24    Scripture Reading for today: Esther 10; John 11 and  12      Years ago, before my daughter grew up; she was a  little girl who loved to play softball. One year  Meredith had a teammate who was particularly  precious. This kid was (and is) awesome. She liked  softball, but I wouldn’t say she loved it or made it an  obsession. She enjoyed it, and she seemed to feel  absolutely no pressure to perform. It didn’t bother  her a bit that she went the entire season (every  season) without swinging a bat. Oh, she got up to  the plate to bat. She just never swung at the ball.    Lots of times she’d “get lucky” and get hit by a  pitch or walked by a pitcher having a bad day. She  loved those days and would trot off to first with a  fist‐pumping delight usually reserved for a sweet,  home‐run hit. Most days, she went down with three  strikes.    The girls’ coach (a remarkably patient woman) was  known to mutter from the dugout, “Why are you  taking that bat with you? Just leave it here in the  dugout. Save your strength.” It was said in jest and  everyone knew it. Soft chuckles of acceptance and    love blanketed the little girl who loved to play ball  but hated to swing for the fences.    Softball lovers everywhere would consider this  kid’s failure to swing a defect of character. But she’s  grown up into quite an accomplished woman even  with her history of “no hit” seasons. Big deal. So she  never hit a baseball. But when we leave our spiritual  bats in the dugout, that’s no laughing matter.    God has told us that He is “Rapha” (“rapha” is a  Hebrew word literally meaning “to heal, one stitch at  a time”) God. He has promised to adopt us, heal us,  restore us, renew us and in the process to transform  us. He’s got a big job. Fortunately, He’s God and can  handle it.    But we have a job, too. Sure, he gives us the  willingness, the ability and the resources to  accomplish it. He designs us with the perfect  temperament type, love language, gifts, talents,  shortcomings, and character defects to make us  perfect for the mission He’s sent us to accomplish.  But we’ve got to be willing to pick up the bat. We’ve  got to learn how to read the pitch and swing at the  appropriate time. We’ve got to allow God to teach  us the proper way to swing, and let go of our  improper techniques that hold us back. Step six is  one step in the process required to become an  awesome player in the kingdom of God.    Thought for today: Now the Lord is the Spirit, and  where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. And  we, who with unveiled faces all reflect the Lord’s  glory, are being transformed into his likeness with  ever‐increasing glory, which comes from the  Lord,  who is the Spirit. 2 Corinthians 3:17‐18 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I suggest that it is far better  to go down swinging, learn from our strikeouts, and  return to swing another day than simply to stand at  the plate and hope we get hit by an incoming pitch.  Are you ready to rise above your limitations?    June 25    Scripture Reading for today: Zechariah 1; John 13  and 14      “Teresa, you just don’t understand.”    “Okay, explain it to me.” 
126

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  “I’ve never had what I need in life. I’m like Sarah  McLachlan, in that song she sings, when she says  she’s ‘trying to make up for all that she lacks’.”    I don’t say this, but I think it. When we’re  determined to trust in our shortcomings and defects  over and above all else, I suppose any excuse works.  My friend has made some terrible, unconscionable  life choices. If you knew her story, it would be hard  for you to not judge her. You would have to work  hard to make eye contact, and not avert your eyes  from the carnage of her life. The reason she is giving  to justifying her horrible life is simple: she lacks.    Thought for today: …the Lord your God has been  with you, and you have not lacked anything.  Deuteronomy 2:7 NIV    The Lord is my shepherd; I have all that I need.  Psalm 23:1 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Scripture teaches us that we  can all have lives that thrive. We can rise above our  limitations as we find our way back to God. The key  is in the finding our way back. It’s okay to wrestle  with what it means to say that we have all that we  need. But how does one hold onto this truth in the  midst of deprivation, abuse, neglect, and evil? How  does one respond to this spiritual perspective after  one’s husband has just told his wife of many years  that he’s leaving, and he’s already signed a lease on  a new bachelor pad?    I’m not saying it’s easy; I am suggesting that if  we’re followers of Christ, we must deal with the  promises of God as they apply to our situation. So  here’s what we know about who God is and what He  says He will do. God acts as our protector, provider,  and gift giver. God is holy, and He never delights in  the things we do that we might call “bad behaving.”  God delights in us. When God looks at us, He sees  our potential; He recognizes His handiwork  (Ephesians 1:4). God is never in denial and is aware  of our problems, but He doesn’t allow our human  frailties to define us. This is true of God even if we’re  in the middle of a situation that seems to defy that  reality.    Simply put: God is and God will, but He cannot and  will not if we’re living independently of Him, going  our own way, doing our own thing, making excuses  for our shortcomings, and buying the seductive    deception that He isn’t and doesn’t want to meet  our every need.    Part of allowing God to remove our defects of  character must involve a decision on our part: we  must learn to trust in the very character of God. He  says He’ll meet our needs. He does not say how,  when, where, or from whom the help will be  delivered. So while you’re waiting for God to do His  thing, get busy doing yours: make your day‐to‐day  thoughts, actions, and decisions align with what you  know is true. Just do it.    June 26    Scripture Reading for today: Zechariah 2; John 15  and 16      Who is this God who is and will? What can we  expect from Him?    It’s in Christ that we find out who we are and what  we are living for. Long before we first heard of Christ  and got our hopes up, he had his eye on us, had  designs on us for glorious living, part of the overall  purpose he is working out in everything and  everyone. Ephesians 1: 11‐12 The Message    He came and preached peace to you who were far  away and peace to those who were near. For  through him we both have access to the Father by  one Spirit. Ephesians 2:17‐18 NIV    This is what we can expect from Him: He wants us  to discover both our identity and purpose through  the eyes of Christ as opposed to from the world in  which we live. He has His eye on us and big plans for  glorious living—plans that somehow, in some  amazingly mysterious way take into account and do  not interfere with all the big plans He has for all the  other kids that He loves and also has His eye on. He  wants us to be a people of peace—the peace comes  from the Father by the Spirit. You can’t buy it in a  bottle, smoke it, or hum your way to it. It’s a gift  from God Himself.    Bottom line: God is and God will. Who God is and  what He will do is not dependent upon us. The  reality of God is not established as a result of what  we choose to believe. God is God. Whether we have  access to His big plans for us does depend on  whether we choose to become entirely ready to let  Him have His way with us (this often accomplished 
127

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
by completing steps 1‐12 of the Christ‐centered 12  steps).    God is in the business of taking ordinary,  sometimes ragamuffin humans and bestowing upon  them glory. That’s huge. It’s hard to fathom.    “Teresa, I hear what you’re saying. I really do. But  I’m not glorious; I’m merely a survivor. I don’t have  one speck of glory in my life. Maybe I’m not the type  of person He uses…”    This gal has my curiosity aroused. I believe that  God’s word is truth. If He says He created us to be  manifestations of His glory, then by golly, so it will  be. So I ask a question. “Tell me why you say you’re a  survivor.”    “Well, I survived having my first child at 15. He’s  grown now and a marvelous young man. I guess  we’re both survivors.” Then she looks down with a  self‐deprecating little laugh that lacks humor.    “SURVIVOR! YOU CALL THAT SURVIVING? MY  GOSH, YOU’VE LOST YOUR PLACE IN THE STORY!!!” (I  tend to get over‐excited when I encounter someone  in need of finding their place in God’s grand epic and  glorious adventure.)    “Here’s a different perspective. You could have  aborted your son or thrown him in the trash. You  could have given him up for adoption—a good  choice and far better than option one—and this  choice would have allowed you to resume your  teenage life. But you didn’t. You chose to keep him  and raise him and provide him with a good home.  Woman, that takes courage. That’s stepping up to  the plate. You are no survivor, you’re a Princess  Warrior! You fought for your place as his mother,  and by all accounts he’s a fine adult. Not everyone  can say they have fought so hard against desperate  odds and come out with such excellent results. I  think to say you are a survivor is to lose your place in  the story.” She straightened up her shoulders, lifted  her head and returned to her place on the line.      This is the line that believers straddle: one foot in  the seen world (unplanned pregnancies, abuse,  neglect and other messy life experiences here) and  another firmly planted in the unseen world (the  kingdom of God on earth). It’s not an easy job, but  God gives us the equipment to flourish in the midst  of the battle.    Thought for today: Remember the former things,  those of long ago; I am God, and there is no other. I    am God, and there is none like me. I make known the  end from  the beginning, from ancient times, what is  still to come. I say: My purpose will stand, and I will  do all that I please. Isaiah 46:9‐10 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I don’t know about you, but  with all this power, potential, and purposing of God,  I’m ready to do whatever it takes to get into the  game, the race, the story—any adventure He has  planned for me.    June 27    Scripture Reading for today: Zechariah 3; John 17  and 18      Some of the defects of character that I hear about  as I listen to my friends’ stories make me cry. In fact,  I just hung up the phone with a precious friend. I’ve  been crying for her, with her, and about her  circumstance for a good long time this afternoon.  She’s a Princess Warrior, and she felt no need to  conclude her story like so many do: Why did God let  this happen to me?    My friend’s approach to her horrible situation  reminds me of a guy named Joseph. You remember  him, don’t you? Joseph was a “pretty boy” in the  Bible. He was his daddy’s favorite and because of  this he was rewarded with an amazing coat of many  colors. He was also selected by God to be a leader.  Joseph became a great leader and saved the lives of  many, because God is and God will. But Joseph had  some tears to shed and suffering to endure on the  road to his grand epic adventure.    He made a crucial mistake and told his brothers  about a dream he had where he ruled over them.  This did not make the brothers happy. Couple this  with his favored‐child status and that incredible  coat, and you end up with family drama. The  brothers toss Joseph in a well, sell him into slavery,  and tell their father that Joseph was killed by lions.  Things don’t get less traumatizing once Joseph lands  in Egypt. He is sexually harassed by the boss’s wife,  refuses her advances, and lands in jail, falsely  accused by the scorned woman of rape. Eventually,  after further trials and tribulations, God’s purpose  prevails and Joseph’s dream comes true. (Don’t  make the mistake of thinking that all the messiness  was in any way NOT part of God’s plan;  God used 
128

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
the suffering to fine tune Joseph’s character so that  he could stand up under all the blessings God was  going to heap upon him.)    Because God is and will, He arranges for a reunion  with the brothers. It’s a long story worthy of your  attention, but this is a daily devotional—not a book!  For our purposes, the key passage is found in  Genesis 50, verse 20: “You intended to harm me, but  God  intended it for good to accomplish what is now  being done, the saving of many lives,” says Joseph to  his brothers, when they realize that he is alive.    Thought for today: God‐vision goggles (an ability to  recognize the workings of the unseen world in the  midst of seen‐world stuff) provide a glimpse into the  unseen world that refreshes our view;  Joseph had  those goggles firmly in place. Suffering is inexplicable  in the seen world. While the seen world disappoints  and distresses, the unseen world enriches and  enlarges our perspective. Joseph didn’t fall into the  trap of denial and pretend the well‐and‐slavery‐ selling incident was an accident. He didn’t travel to  the land of bitterness and believe he was destined to  a life of abandonment at the hands of an absent  God. No doubt he spent a lot of time pondering his  fate, searching for meaning, and it seems he peered  intently into the unseen world. He turned to God  and believed. When his brothers arrived on the  scene, he was able to help them with their famine  problem. Eventually, the family was reunited. In the  process, many lives were saved.    Thought for tomorrow: God’s plans for you may not  involve the same kinds of trials that Joseph  experienced, but don’t get distracted in the midst of  your trials. God is at work. Cooperate. My friend  who is suffering under great duress reminded me  that God is still at work in her life no matter how bad  the current circumstances appear. She reminded me  that she is choosing to believe that God is and God  will. It’s a privilege to have a friend like that.    June 28    Scripture Reading for today: Zechariah 4; John 19  and 20      I had a friend try to tell me that she was certain  that God’s purpose for her life involved leaving her    husband and marrying her boss. She wasn’t asking  for my opinion, and I respected that by keeping my  big mouth shut. But it didn’t preclude me from going  home and giving her premise serious consideration.  Every single one of us has a purpose, and it involves  the saving of many lives. Joseph saved people as the  result of excellent business practices that led to a  supply of grain that could save other nations from a  severe famine. That’s literally saving physical lives.  Others save lives as they encourage and uplift,  thereby refreshing spirits and enabling people to  keep on keeping on. Some do it by making coffee  and conversation with lonely, thirsty people in  convenience stores and coffee shops. The list of  ways God uses us to help people find their way back  to God is endless. The point isn’t where we are  called or even so much the particulars of what we  are called to do. The point is that we are called by  God—the God who is and will –to be the kind of  person who can exhibit the character necessary to  do whatever the thing is he or she needs to do at  any given moment that will “save” others from a life  of quiet desperation and despair.    With that definition, my friend leaving her  husband for her buff boss doesn’t qualify as a  purposeful, Christ‐centered life choice. That decision  is more intimately related to a character defect. It’s a  selfish, self‐centered, desperate attraction to a man  who has no respect for the sanctity of marriage (his  or hers). It’s going to create chaos and confusion,  spawn guilt and shame, break hearts, and wreck  homes. I sure wish my friend had a working  knowledge of the sixth step.    Thought for today: You’re a hardheaded bunch and  hard to help. I’m ready to help you right now.  Deliverance is not a long‐range plan. Salvation isn’t  on hold. Isaiah 46:12‐13 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: My friend made the decision  to divorce her husband and marry the “love of her  life” despite the efforts of many to save her from  herself. That was five years ago. Yesterday she called  me, devastated. The “love of her life” just left her for  his buff boss. Some of our mutual friends believe this  is what she deserves. I can’t find the energy to  delight in her suffering, because she doesn’t suffer  alone. Sometimes our hardheaded defects of  character result in the suffering of many (as opposed 
129

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
to the saving of many). I know. She should have  known better. I know. But so should we. Aren’t we in  danger of instigating pain and suffering in the lives of  ourselves and others when we continue to be hard  to help?    June 29    Scripture Reading for today: Zechariah 5 and 6; John  21      God is and will. He is incomparable, irreplaceable,  the only God we’ve ever had or ever will have (all  our pathetic substitutes are faux gods—hardly worth  our consideration). We can acknowledge this, and  learn how to listen for His quiet voice of support and  guidance, or we can continue to be hardheaded.       Who can forget the story of Moses? He was a Jewish  son born during a time when all Jewish sons were  supposed to be killed at birth. Moses survived.  Because God is and God will. Enslaved in Egypt, the  Jewish people had grown and flourished under the  tyrannical and cruel reign of the latest Pharaoh.  Huh? Flourished. Yes. Because God is and God will.  They were driven harder, punished more, killed  intentionally, fed less, given fewer supplies and  greater quotas; still, they thrived. Because God is  and God will. Ultimately, Moses leads his people to  freedom and they cart off a fortune in Egyptian  plunder. Why were the Egyptians willing to free  these slaves and send their wealth with them?  Because God is and God will.    During this time, the Jewish people lost sight of  God. They got caught up in their suffering. I wonder  if we’ve somehow gotten caught up in the pain of  our own particular bondage—our shortcomings,  defects of character, false beliefs, and trinket gods of  our limited understanding. Maybe along the way we  lost our God‐vision goggles and in the process, lost  our place in the story (God’s grand epic adventure  for us). Maybe our lives lack meaning and purpose— not because we have none—but because we’ve lost  sight of the richness of the life we already possess.  We’ve let seen world things distract us from the  utter “ISness” and “WILLness” of God. If so, now  might be a great time to lift this prayer up to Him.      Thought for today: Father God, restore to me the joy  of your salvation. Psalm 51:12 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: We can pray this because  God is and He will.    June 30    Scripture Reading for today: Zechariah 6, 7 and 8      One defect of character that is pesky and must be  mentioned before we head off to step seven is  grandiose thinking. When one of my brothers was  about three, he got involved in some serious  grandiose thinking. He told anyone that would listen  that when he grew up, he was going to drive a trash  truck, fly an airplane, work with a “dirt picker upper”  truck, be a racecar driver AND be a dog catcher with  a cool truck. That’s grandiose thinking; it would be  awfully hard to perform all these jobs satisfactorily  and simultaneously. Sometimes when we remember  who God is and what He will do in our lives, we  ourselves get all excited and grandiose. Please don’t  let the awesomeness of God lead you to faulty  thinking about what He might call you to do as he  teaches you who you are to “be.”    God is in the business of doing grand things in  sometimes unexpected places. I suspect many a  grand epic adventure is lived out in relative  anonymity in the seen world. (But what a party they  must throw in the heavenlies when we step up to  the plate, swing for the fences, and hit God’s plan for  us out of the ballpark!)    I happen to know people who work in a gas station  in my neighborhood. I imagine they get paid  minimum wage to sell gas and other convenience  items. But several of these employees seem to know  the larger truth—the sacred and secret truth—that  even in relative obscurity, they are called to step as  God speaks and to save the lives of many. They know  their place in the story.    Every morning I pop in and get a fresh cup of  coffee. Recently, upon returning from a trip, I  resumed my routine and headed off to work via my  local full‐service gas station. The attendant greeted  me with a hearty smile and a question, “Where have  you been? We’ve been worried sick about you. I  even put you on my church’s prayer line! If you  hadn’t shown up today, we were going over to that 
130

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
church and see what was going on with you! Next  time you leave town, I expect you to tell me.”    It so happens that during my absence, I had  developed a painful health condition and had  entered the store on this particular morning not only  jet‐lagged, but in rather significant pain. I can’t tell  you how this woman’s concern for me lifted my  spirits. She felt like a life saver to me on that cold,  blustery day. I walked out of that station with a big  cup of coffee and a smile on my face. I was missed.  Someone noticed I was gone. I left that place well  aware of my blessings and hardly noticing my  discomfort.    The gas company pays them to sell cigarettes and  soda and crackers. God is going to reward them for  their calling as missionaries in their community. I bet  some would say that working in a convenience store  is not their ideal place of employment. (Not very  grandiose sounding, is it?)  But if one knows the  sacred and secret truths about the God who is and  will then they know that anywhere God plants us is  the ideal place to thrive.    Thought for today: I will give you a new heart and  put a new spirit in you;  I will remove from you your  heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will  put my Spirit in you and move you to follow my  decrees and be careful to keep my laws. Ezekiel 36:  26‐27 NIV    The Lord has already told you what is good, and  this is what he requires: To do what is right, to love  mercy, and to walk humbly with your God.” Micah  6:8  NLT    Thought for tomorrow: How limited is our vision  without God‐vision goggles! While we’re staying up  late strategizing about how to execute some  grandiose plan of our own, God is at rest, calmly  executing His purposes that are guaranteed to  prevail.                    STEP 7  We humbly asked him (God) to remove our  shortcomings.    July 1    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 40, Proverbs 14;  Zechariah 9       Confession time: I didn’t grow up believing in  shortcomings. In the 70s and 80s, we were reading  books like I’m OK, You’re OK. In my psychology  classes I studied theories about human  development; most of them seemed to indicate that  my parents had done something to mess me up  because, after all, I was born perfect. (The fact that  parents could harm children is a little inconsistent  with everyone always being OK, but sometimes  people don’t want you to get confused by the facts.)   Perhaps no one actually said this, or meant it, but  that’s what I heard.     B. F. Skinner, a noted behavioral psychologist of  the day, reportedly raised his kid in a box! The  underlying belief in his theory was that we are born  like a blank slate, and if parents write carefully on  the slate, they create good kids. When I was in my  twenties, single and childless, these theories were  fine with me. I liked the idea that if, by chance,  someone found a “shortcoming” in me, it was surely  someone else’s fault: bad writing on a blank slate!    Then I grew up. I birthed babies. These theories  didn’t sound so cool once I became the parental  unit. In spite of my best intentions and in defiance of  all psychological theories, I never birthed a single  blank slate. When we met our firstborn in the  delivery room, her dad, fearing that the bright lights  of the operating room would hurt her newborn eyes,  shielded them with his hand, and up she gazed. She  crinkled that little forehead and studied us with rapt  attention. She looked like she had several questions  and wanted answers immediately. We hadn’t had a  chance to whip out our chalk and write on her slate,  but we soon discovered that this look was vintage  Meredith.    Our second born also came mysteriously pre‐ wired. That kid slept all the time. Initially, I thought it  was because we gave him a pacifier. He gave that up  years ago, but that young man still loves to sleep.  Scott can relax and live fully present in the moment. 
131

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
He never makes you feel rushed. He’s always got  time to sit and listen.    The third pregnancy was a challenge. I worried  during the day because the baby never moved. I  couldn’t sleep at night because he kicked and carried  on. He’s an adolescent now and is still a nocturnal  creature. Of our three, he is the most likely to have  trouble sleeping if his routine is disrupted.  Michael  keeps our evenings lively, with lots of activity and  friends. He still loves to move and kick and carry on.    These three kids have the same parents, yet each  child is very different. I bet you have stories like this  one as well.     Once the blank‐slate theory didn’t pan out, it  wasn’t long before the “born good only to be ruined  by your parental units theory” also took a hit in my  book. Our kids weren’t always good, and sometimes  I couldn’t find a way to blame myself or my spouse  for their bad behaving.    And the “I’m OK, You’re OK” belief didn’t work for  us either. We weren’t okay all the time. So here’s  what my husband and I have decided. It doesn’t  much matter how we acquired our particular  shortcomings, who is to blame, or even why we are  the way we are.     Thought for today:  The first man seems right until  the second man speaks.  Proverbs     Thought for tomorrow:  What does matter, and  matters quite a lot, is that our shortcomings hinder  us. God doesn’t want us to be limited in any way; He  wants us to live a free, abundant life. So those  shortcomings have got to go!    July 2    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 41, Proverbs 15;  Zechariah 10      As a person who really loved my years studying  psychology, I value the things we learn from that  field. What I particularly enjoy is when man’s  research catches up with God’s word! When it  comes to shortcomings, scripture puts a different  spin on defects of character. Genesis, the first book  found in scripture, says this: “…every inclination of  his heart is evil from childhood.” Genesis 8:21 NIV      Hold your horses. Don’t go jumping to conclusions.  Evil at its core can best be defined as any time we  live independently of God. That’s what this verse is  conveying. It’s not saying we’re all serial killers who  are beyond redemption. It’s simply saying that for  any individual not to find their way back to God, the  God who so lovingly crafted them before He hung  the first star—that’s evil. You see, the best life any of  us can hope for is a life lived within the frame of our  God‐created identity. That’s where the good stuff is  found. Nothing else will ever quite measure up to a  life lived the way God created for us.     This is what I like to call a divine paradox. Because  God says the nature of man—to grow forgetful of  Him—is evil. But this same God looked at the work  of His creative hand, humankind, and pronounced it  “very good.” We have been pronounced “very good”  by God Himself; yet we have a predisposition to live  independently of Him, which is evil.    We were created to live in awesome, intimate  relationship with God, others, and even ourselves.  But we have this nasty tendency to grow forgetful:  forgetful of God, forgetful of why we exist, and  forgetful of our true God‐created identity. As we  forget, we lose sight of how much we are loved. We  grow insecure and look for love in all the wrong  places. We lose our place in the story that God has  written out for us. We look for meaning and  significance in all the wrong places. The by‐product  of all this forgetfulness is the development of  shortcomings. All of us have shortcomings,  limitations, defects of character, and on occasion,  bad behavior. As I said yesterday, the how we got  here may be far less important than our need to  simply acknowledge that shortcomings exist. Having  accomplished this feat in previous steps, we can look  forward now, if we ask humbly, to God doing for us  what we cannot do for ourselves.    Thought for today: “It’s in Christ that we find out  who we are and what we are living for. Long before  we first heard of Christ and got our hopes up, he had  his eye on us, had designs on us for glorious living,  part of the overall purpose he is working out in  everything and everyone.” Ephesians 1:11‐12 The  Message    Thought for tomorrow: I pray that today is the day  you make that grand decision.  
132

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  July 3    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 42, Proverbs 16;  Zechariah 11      I used to be a very skittish parent. When my  children were young, my husband and I had a  passionate desire to shield our children from any  influence that would harm them. And sometimes,  looking back, I think we went a little overboard. Like  the time we didn’t let our daughter watch the movie  E.T. because it had a bad word in it (they named a  male body part)…and she was 16. Just kidding. She  was eight—probably the only child in America who  didn’t get to watch E.T. until she was practically able  to vote.    Our sons didn’t escape this vigilance either. When  Scott was in kindergarten, there were some “trading  cards” that were all the rage. Baseball cards were  fine, but we didn’t like these cards for some reason. I  can’t remember why, but I thought they were evil.  And so I didn’t want him to have any. He disagreed.  And so he acquired a few and began trading them at  school. He hid them in his backpack. I suspect he  thought he was pretty clever, but one day I caught  him. He came through the door and must have made  some clandestine trades on the bus. He paused in  the entrance foyer to hide his stash, and I just  happened to see his reflection in our glass fireplace  screen. That furtive behavior combined with a  mother’s intuition soon brought the house of cards  crashing down. I swear, that kid thought I was  psychic for years! He thought I had eyes that saw  through walls and around corners. I didn’t disavow  him of this belief. It came in handy as a parenting  tool.    I wonder what my son thought of that “ability.”  Did he think I was eagerly spying on his every move,  hoping to catch him in an act of disobedience? Could  it be that he thought I was trying to catch him in the  act of behaving well, so that I could reward him  richly with those words of affirmation that I love to  dole out? Hmmm…I need to ask him.    Thought for today: “For the eyes of the Lord range  throughout the earth to strengthen those whose  hearts are fully committed to him.” 2 Chronicles 16:9  NIV      Thought for tomorrow: I hope my son knows that a  parent keeps an eagle eye on her children for the  purpose of strengthening them—not to punish or  even reward—but as a loving act of vigilance. I’m not  talking about codependent, super controlling, over‐ the‐top skittish parenting, but I am talking about  parenting the way God does: imitating Him. Second  Chronicles tells us that God is super‐vigilant in a  thoroughly non‐codependent way. God is in the  business of watching for someone—anyone—who is  committed to Him, SO HE CAN STRENGTHEN THEM.  God knows a lot of stuff that I don’t. He gets the fact  that children eventually grow up and will choose for  themselves how they will live and who they will  serve. My daughter can watch ET or Desperate  Housewives or any darn thing she pleases now that  she’s all grown up. Scott can trade baseball cards or  porn magazines with his friends now that he’s in  college and has his own pad. So now I know this. It is  a far better thing for me as a parent to model and  teach and encourage my children to have hearts that  are fully committed to God than it is to make sure  they are shielded from the world. (That’s not to say  I’m going to stop shielding; I’m just trying to not “go  codependent.”) So we ask God to remove our  shortcomings (things that self and others need  shielding from), but we ask humbly. For we know  that when we ask with hearts that are fully  committed to Him, God himself reaches across  eternity to strengthen us. I trust that truth fills us all  with awe.     July 4    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 43, Proverbs 17;  Zechariah 12      “Humility is one of humanity’s most elusive and  attractive characteristics. While we ourselves may  not pursue humility, we are drawn to it in others.  Humility not only draws others to us, but draws God  to us. Humility is not about having a low self‐image  or poor self‐esteem. Humility is about self‐ awareness. It is important to be self‐aware in  relationship to our gifts, talents, skills, and intellect,  but in regard to our spiritual health, it is far more  essential that we are self‐aware in the arena of  personal character. If you see yourself for who you 
133

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
are and embrace it honestly, humility is the natural  result. God isn’t asking you to say something about  yourself that isn’t true. God is asking that we take a  good, long look in the mirror and see ourselves for  who we truly are, and then after that, to have the  courage to ask for help. Humility begins by emptying  ourselves of ourselves. It is about coming to God  without agenda and without reservation. If you are  still relating to God through negotiations, you have  not yet found the path of humility. This is not an  emptiness that makes us hollow, but a humility that  makes us teachable. There is much to discard if we  are to engage in this particular quest. We must make  ourselves nothing in order to receive everything that  God longs to give us.” from Uprising—A Revolution  of the Soul by Erwin McManus (p. 46, 56)    Thought for today: It’s my prayer that the words of  Erwin McManus will inform your understanding of  step seven. The kind of humility McManus writes  about is key if we want to see ourselves accurately,  knowing the truth about ourselves: the good and the  yet‐to‐be‐transformed!    Thought for tomorrow: “It’s common knowledge  that God goes against the willful proud; God gives  grace to the willing humble.”  James 4:6 The  Message    July 5    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 44, Proverbs 18;  Zechariah 13      “I know mistakes were made. I regret my part in  this whole thing.”  He squirms in his chair, avoiding  eye contact with his wife of 30 years.    “What part do you regret?”  She asks. (I think to  myself, This woman is brilliant.)    “Do we really need to keep rehashing this? Like I  said, mistakes were made.” He glares at her across  the distance that adultery brings to a marriage. He  seems pretty angry for a guy who just got caught  with his hand in someone else’s cookie jar. But he is  admitting wrongdoing, isn’t he? To the detached  listener (in this case me) it almost sounds like he  said, “Mistakes were made. But not by me.” And I  ask myself an old and oft‐repeated question:  Where’s the humility?      It’s a dangerous question to ignore.    I concluded yesterday’s devotional with this verse:  “It’s common knowledge that God goes against the  willful proud; God gives grace to the willing humble.”  James 4:6 The Message    As I sit in silent agony watching a marriage dissolve  like ice cream on a summer day, I wonder. Is the  truth of this verse common knowledge? Because if it  were, I think all of us would take our “mistakes”  more seriously.    The word “goes against” in this passage is the  Greek word, antitasso. It means to resist. It refers to  a well‐planned, military‐like operation of prepared  resistance against someone else. So I want you to  think about this for a moment. At any given moment  on any given day, when we are acting full of  ourselves, arrogant and pride‐filled, God is executing  a well‐prepared, military‐esque strike against us.  This does not in any way minimize his love for us. In  fact, it’s a clear indicator of his grace towards us.  God is adamantly opposed to anything that seeks to  steal his rightful place in our hearts.    Thought for today: “The pride of your heart has  deceived you…Pride goes before destruction.”  Obadiah 1:3, Proverbs 16:18 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I warn you in a spirit of love:  be aware of the force we are up against when we  choose to live independently of God (an act of  outrageous pride and arrogance).    July 6    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 45, Proverbs 19;  Zechariah 14      “I think this is an act of the devil, come to kill,  steal, and destroy me.”     “I wonder why God made me this way.”    Normally when faced with a shortcoming in  ourselves or in others, we want to know why. Why  this particular defect of character? How did this  happen? In fact, as we learned in last month’s study  of step six, our search for understanding can become  a defect of character in and of itself! Sometimes this  quest for understanding can distract us from looking  for a solution to the problem. But as I said, it’s 
134

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
normal to ask questions during times of serious  wrongdoing.    As I sometimes sit and listen to woeful stories of  abuse and neglect, mistake‐making and wrongdoing,  I must admit, I’ve had a natural tendency to think  Satan himself is having a field day. After all, scripture  says, “The thief comes only to steal and kill and  destroy…” John 10:10 NIV Certainly there is plenty of  stealing of dreams, killing of hope, and destroying of  lives going on in our world today. It makes sense that  the author of all this mayhem is the devil.    But obvious answers aren’t always the entire  story. Return with me to James 4:6 NIV: “God  opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.”  Yesterday’s devotional said that God resists the  proud. He opposes their every move.    So I want you to give this some serious, prayerful  consideration. Are you currently struggling with a  shortcoming that seems resistant to removal? Have  you wondered if Satan is blocking God’s way? Have  you questioned God, wondering why He hasn’t lived  up to his promises to heal you? Are you assuming  that God’s mercy and grace precludes any act of  judgment on God’s part? Could it be that we’ve  presumed upon God’s grace?    Thought for today: “The Christian can rebuke the  devil all day long, but it will be to no avail, for his  problem isn’t the devil—his problem is God!” from  Sparkling Gems from the Greek by Rick Renner (p.  437)    “You’re cheating on God. If all you want is your  own way, flirting with the world every chance you  get, you end up enemies of God and his way.” James  4:4 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: I have been giving the  enemy too much credit. Satan cannot thwart the  work of God! But according to James, if we’re  approaching God asking Him to deliver on His  promises with a spirit of pride rather than an  attitude of humility, God is resisting us. So let’s take  a fresh look at our shortcomings and take more  seriously the attitude with which we approach the  throne of grace. Sometimes the grace and mercy of  God comes delivered by the strong hand of His  discipline.    July 7      Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 46; Proverbs 20;  Jeremiah 1      Yesterday’s devotional delivered a tough message:  God opposes those of us who are prideful. According  to the Greek word for “opposes,” God launches a  well‐prepared, carefully crafted military attack  against those who refuse to humble themselves  before Him. This is serious business!    As I was working through James four, doing my  word studies and realizing just how serious God is  about the need for humility in our lives, several faces  flashed before my mind’s eye. I thought about  people whose lives seemed like they were going  downhill fast, and I so hoped they would recognize  how their pride was sinking them into deeper  distress. Then I realized that my very thoughts were  arrogant! Who was I to judge them? Wasn’t that  prideful? Does that mean I’ve invoked the  opposition of God in this area of my own life? Filled  with an uncomfortable feeling of wrongdoing, I  decided to follow my own imaginary advice to my  imaginary bad‐behaving friends, and I asked God to  remove this defect of character: the propensity to  judge others (an act of arrogance).    Since I’m holed up in a hotel room with only my  Bible study supplies, I was mercifully not distracted  from my quest. First, I sat quietly with myself. I  thought about my propensity to rush to judgment. I  was reminded of Juanita Ryan’s teachings on  suffering (you can find her audio study on the  NorthStar Web site at  www.northstarcommunity.com/Step4.htm ). Ryan  believes that we use judgmental attitudes to protect  us when a current‐day circumstance stirs up old,  unhealed wounds in our hearts. She’s a wise woman,  and I trusted that I should explore this thought as  perhaps a gentle nudge from the Holy Spirit. I took  each face, each precious face that was currently  haunting me with its suffering (and arrogance, from  my view). I thought about their lives and about mine.  At what points do our stories intersect? And in each  situation, their stories and my past sufferings had  several elements in common. No wonder I was  tempted to judge them harshly; each one of them  represented a past harm done (by me or to me) in  my own life. All feelings of judgment evaporated. I  could move on. 
135

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Now I could feel the pain and suffering. I  experienced the past memories. I allowed myself to  feel these strong emotions without running to a jar  of peanut butter or putting in an exercise video to  distract me. I just allowed myself to marinate in the  pain—present and past. Once I could fully identify  the nature of suffering, I was filled with a desire to  help those who were currently in this same kind of  distress. I realized that the pain of my past, although  strongly memorable, is no longer sharp and pointed.  But, oh, I could remember the day when it defined  me. I recalled how I must have looked to the outside  world—arrogant, tough, angry, and filled with self‐ assurance—while on the inside I was struggling just  to breathe. I realized my pride‐full acting buddies  had far more going on in their hearts than they were  showing with their bravado. This truth I could  embrace with compassion.    Thought for today:  “Humility and fear of the Lord  bring wealth and honor and life.” Proverbs 22:4 NIV     Thought for tomorrow: The Lord used Juanita Ryan  to remind me to be gentle with myself and others;  He used McManus to shed some light on my next  step. Humility isn’t about a feeling so much as it is a  commitment to obedience. I can choose to walk  humbly with my God even as I trust him to remove  my shortcomings that seek to shame me.  Humility,  and the search for it, is tricky business. Isn’t the  seeking after humility an indication of arrogance?  Erwin McManus, in his book, Uprising, provides a  thought‐provoking look at this essential element of  life lived God’s way. He suggests that we are not  called to pray for humility so much as we are  commanded to be humble (p. 61). McManus adds,  “While humility is a divine attribute, it is placed  squarely on our shoulders to choose this path.”  I  think I am beginning to see some light at the end of  my own personal tunnel of pride. I have asked God  to remove my defect of character (in this case a  judgmental spirit), but it is now my job to walk in  faith and to boldly believe that God is doing what He  promised (removing my shortcomings). Now I must  choose to walk in humility as opposed to arrogance.  I started the morning focused on a shortcoming and  now find myself all pumped up to figure out what  the next right step is for me in God’s grand epic  adventure. That’s called process. I’m not going to    wait until I perceive myself to be practically perfect  (as defined by the absence of all thoughts that might  be construed as judgmental) before I do what God  has called me to do. Now I have a new mission: how  does one love a friend who’s acting all puffed up on  the outside but is suffering on the inside? I can’t say  how it is that my whole attitude and focus of  concern shifted, but I do know “who;” God is  working in and with and through me, doing for me  what I can’t do for myself. The tendency to jump to  conclusions and judge people by their actions  happens. But one doesn’t have to be overcome by it.  Pausing to prepare, listening to the Spirit of God  whistle through our hearts, choosing to set aside the  natural and pursue the “supernatural” way of  viewing God, self, and others can lead us to new,  refreshing ways of relating to each other. This takes  time. This requires us to be self‐aware (e.g. I’m  thinking judging thoughts), and then selfless (e.g. I’m  choosing a different way; this different way is  uncomfortable; it’s taken me time to allow God to  reveal a new way of viewing things; “natural” feels  right; but wait, I want to live life the way God says is  right.)    July 8    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 47; Proverbs 21;  Jeremiah 2      One of the great paradoxes of a faith journey is the  tension between God’s opposition to evil and His  awesome love for us. When we live independently of  Him (that’s evil) He still loves us, but He hates what  we do. In fact, he opposes it. God—all‐knowing, all‐ powerful, creator God—opposes evil doing. So it’s a  cool thing when we recognize the paradox in our  own lives, and we get to experience the complicated  and vast mercy of God. In yesterday’s devotional I  told you about my journey through the valley of  pride. Clearly, scripture teaches that God doesn’t like  it when we’re prideful. But as I traveled through the  valley, God granted me grace. He restored me,  revived me, inspired me. I didn’t stay stuck in the  valley of the shadow of death, I was allowed passage  out. And I left the valley with a question: Now what  do I do? And I believe he answered!  I returned to my scripture study with a question:  how does a servant of God love on people who are 
136

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
prickly and definitely not lovable at the moment?  Pride is a prickly shirt, and it stings not only the  wearer, but those who draw near. So without being  judgmental, but trying to use good judgment, what’s  next?    Run away from infantile indulgence. Run after  mature righteousness—faith, love, peace—joining  those who are in honest and serious prayer before  God. Refuse to get involved in inane discussions; they  always end up in fights. God’s servant must not be  argumentative, but a gentle listener and a teacher  who keeps cool, working firmly but patiently with  those who refuse to obey. You never know how or  when God might sober them up with a change of  heart and a turning to the truth, enabling them to  escape the Devil’s trap, where they are caught and  held captive, forced to run his errands. 2 Timothy  2:22‐26 The Message    My goodness; imagine that! Perfect advice for just  my situation penned thousands of years ago and  tucked away in a little book in the back half of the  Bible!  Those precious faces who had appeared in my  mind and heart as I studied on pride and arrogance  didn’t pop into my thoughts randomly. It’s true;  every single one of them is in the midst of serious  bad behaving and mocking God in the process.  (Don’t we mock God when we act as if it’s OK to live  independently of Him, having a form of godliness but  denying its power?) That doesn’t mean that two  wrongs make a right! It’s not right for me to judge  them (another thing God says we are not to do)  simply because they’re acting up. But they are acting  up!    Anyway, 2 Timothy tells me what to do. Paul tells  us in this letter to Timothy that we are to be patient  (“aneksikakos”), meaning, “an attitude that is  tolerant and that bears with a bad, depraved or evil  response. (June 24 study in Rick Renner’s book,  Sparkling Gems from the Greek)    Bad, depraved, and evil behavior is what it is. It’s  not judgmental to recognize it. In fact, to pretend  otherwise is to live in the land of denial. But it is also  important to be patient, trust God in the processing,  don’t rush to judgment, and not become  argumentative. We must learn how to listen and  keep our cool. We must act in faith that if God’s not  finished with us just yet, He’s probably still got the  time and energy to also work with others. And don’t  forget that all of this must be done with compassion;    a person misbehaving and unrepentant is one who is  definitely caught and held captive, forced to run the  devil’s errands.     Thought for today: “And the servant of the Lord  must not strive; but be gentle unto all men: apt to  teach, patient.” 2 Timothy 2:24 (KJV)    “And the Lord’s servant must not quarrel; instead,  he must be kind to everyone, able to teach, not  resentful.” 2 Timothy 2:24 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: One of the blessings of living  a step‐seven kind of life is when the emptiness left  behind (after the removal of a shortcoming) is filled  with the promises and blessings of God. This is one  of those times. There is a way to exercise  discernment (dude, that is seriously wrong) and not  rush to judgment (and I’m going to yell at you,  decide you’re an evil person, etc.). We can do this.  But only if we allow God to have his way with our  shortcomings.    July 9    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 48; Proverbs 22;  Jeremiah 3      I’ve been re‐reading Abraham Twerski’s book,  Addictive Thinking, for the billionth time.  This time  through, I was struck by his strongly worded warning  about the addicted mind’s strong resistance to  change. Addicted thinkers hate change of all kinds  and will go to any length to maintain the status quo.  That can be a serious stumbling block for a person  working step seven. Willingness to change is  absolutely essential to the recovery process.     After a fun trip to Atlanta to surprise my mom on  her birthday, it was time for me to head home. Of  course, my flight was delayed. I wandered down to  one of the newsstands in the area of my departure  gate and chose a book and a bottled water to  distract me while I waited.  Total cost: eleven dollars  and some change. I handed the clerk a twenty and  held out my hand.    She looked at my hand, glanced at my face, fished  in her cash drawer and handed me a one dollar bill  and various coins. I stared at my change and  considered my choices. After a brief pause, I told her  that she hadn’t given me enough change. I reminded 
137

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
her that I’d given her a twenty, and she owed me  seven dollars and a few cents. She smiled, nodded,  reached randomly into her drawer and pulled out  two twenties, more change, and added a five for  good measure.    I quickly handed her back the money, and told her  that this time she’d given me too much. By this time  the line behind me was stretching out longer than  the cue of angry customers at the departure gate of  a flight that had just announced its third delay of the  morning. The man behind me began to offer  suggestions. “Lady, just take what she gives you.  Hey, consider it your lucky day.”    “What’s taking so long? Geez, I’ve got a flight to  catch!” This sentiment was quickly spreading among  the crowd of book buyers and magazine grabbers.  Even some kid who couldn’t have been over ten and  stood a whopping three feet tall started hassling me.    I wanted to shout back to the crowd, “It’s not my  fault! This poor lady doesn’t even speak English!  She’s going to get in big trouble, maybe fired, when  someone tries to balance her cash drawer tonight!  I’m trying to help her out! Don’t you guys get it?”    As it turned out, I ended up sitting next to the man  who had suggested that I consider this my lucky day.  He bought a magazine, a candy bar, and a soda and  proudly announced that he grossed a profit of  twenty dollars and some change. He teased me for a  solid ten minutes about my lack of entrepreneurial  spirit. To him, this was all a big joke.  I think that it was at this moment that my character  was seriously called into question. Frankly, cheating  that nice lady wasn’t even a temptation for me.  What tried my spirit was this guy in seat 15B. I  silently plotted revenge. I thought of great  comebacks and biting repartee. My favorite line that  I considered using was this: “I just feel like my  integrity is worth a lot more than twenty bucks and  some change.”  Oh, how I wanted to say it. But I  refrained. Why? Because I recognized an  opportunity for change.     Sometimes character is forged in grocery lines and  traffic lights, on ball fields and shopping malls, at  home in the middle of an argument with your  spouse, or at the end of a long car trip with whining  children. Refraining from blasting Mr. 15B was going  to require change; “putting him in his place” would  have been a piece of cake.       Giving back extra change and not blasting some  stranger on an airplane are minor moments in a  lifetime of character development opportunities; it’s  not like someone asked for a kidney (and I only had  one to give). But I believe that if we ignore these  seemingly small and inconsequential opportunities  to develop our character, then we will not be  equipped to handle the profound issues that arise  when we heed God’s call. If I want to be a person  who participates in God’s grand epic adventure and  helps change the world, I’d better be a person who  can handle “change.” This is a far more serious  matter than having a few people yell at you at a  newsstand and one guy tease you on a crowded  airplane.    Thought for today: Show me your ways, O Lord,  teach me your paths. Guide me in your truth and  teach me, for you are God my Savior, and my hope is  in you all day long. . . . Good and upright is the Lord;  therefore he instructs sinners in his ways. He guides  the humble in what is right and teaches them his  way. All the ways of the Lord are loving and faithful  for those who keep the demands of his covenant. For  the sake of your name, O Lord, forgive my iniquity,  though it is great. Psalm 25:4‐5, 8‐11 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: If you’re feeling frustrated  with God’s seemingly slow response to your request  for the removal of your shortcomings, could it be  that what is really going on is a stubborn resistance  to change?    July 10    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 49; Proverbs 23;  Jeremiah 4      Someone once told me that polls indicate that  people’s number one fear is public speaking but I  don’t believe it! I think any reasonable person will  agree that the scariest thing in the world is driving  down Interstate 95 late at night in bumper‐to‐ bumper traffic with a bunch of people who think  nothing of going 90 miles per hour. That’s what I was  doing last night. And I couldn’t summon an ounce of  courage. Ever since a young man lost control of his  vehicle and hit our family head on in an accident,  I’ve been a skittish passenger (to express it kindly). I 
138

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
tend to scream at odd times, grab the arm rest, and  brace myself with my feet. I’ve been known to yell,  “Watch out!” when there was really nothing much  worth seeing. After getting popped in the face with  an air bag, I have completely lost my faith in drivers  and cars staying in their lanes and not causing me a  problem. Frankly, I’m a big chicken when it comes to  car trips.    So it is strangely comforting to me that God isn’t in  the business of looking for courageous people to  fulfill his big dreams. According to Erwin McManus in  his book Uprising, God is in the business of  transforming the hearts of cowards while calling  them to live courageous lives.  He makes a solid case  for this perspective. He reminds us that Adam and  Eve hid, and Abraham lied. He recalls that Moses ran  and David deceived. He recounts how Esther was  uncertain and Elijah considered suicide.  He  recollects that John the Baptist doubted, Peter  denied, and Judas betrayed.     I’m no stranger to fear. So I can speak with some  authority on the subject when I say that it is possible  to be afraid and not allow that feeling to overtake  you.  I really didn’t want to leave Pennsylvania last  night at 8:00 in the evening and drive late at night on  a crowded highway. It would have been easy to talk  Pete into another night’s stay in a fancy hotel. But I  would have known that this insistence was born of  fear—not faith. I made a different choice in spite of  my fear. Why? Because for me, I believed I needed  to express courage even in this small thing. If we  came home last night, both of us could get a full  day’s work in the next day. Although that would be  great for me, it really was essential for Pete. So I  chose, with fear and trembling, for the sake of the  one I love, to not let fear become my captor.    I used to think that there was no safer place to be  than living in the midst of God’s will. I’m not so cocky  nor naïve any more. Although I know God will never  leave or forsake me, which is a very safe and  comforting truth, I also know God is willing to go  places mere mortals would never dare tread! God  may send me to do things that are inconvenient,  uncomfortable, and sometimes frightening. How will  I be prepared for the call to an important feat if I  wimp out in the small things (like car trips late at  night on busy roads)? That’s why it’s important to  practice the discipline of courage even in the face of  fear and especially when it seems like a “small    thing.”  Failure to act in the small things might leave  us ill prepared for God’s invitation to participate in  one of his grand epic adventures.    Thought for today: I eagerly expect and hope that I  will in no way be ashamed, but will have sufficient  courage so that now as always Christ will be exalted  in my body, whether by life or by death. For me, to  live is Christ and to die is gain. . . .Whatever happens,  conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel  of Christ. Philippians 1:20, 21, 27 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Courage is not the absence  of fear. Whoever needs to summon up courage in  situations where fear is absent? I hear, “I’m afraid. . .  .I’m worried. . . .I’m anxious…” on a regular basis.  And I think, “Welcome to my world! These feelings  are not strangers to me either.”  The emotional  response of fear is not an automatic get‐out‐of‐my‐ responsibility card. It is simply an invitation to be a  person of courage.     July 11    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 50; Proverbs 24;  Jeremiah 5      Yesterday our community lost someone very near  and dear to our hearts. We gathered together,  huddled, and tried to absorb the shock of it all. Later  in the evening, Peter and I huddled again. Sitting on  our patio, watching the light of day fade, we were  comforted by an unusually cool breeze (in our area  July is usually very hot). We talked quietly about how  we practice believing on our “regular” days—those  days when trauma is held at bay. And what we  practice is what shows up on days like today, when  we are scorched by suffering. You can’t muster up  faith. Faith is what pops out when stress is applied  with such force that nothing fake or pretend or even  greatly desired can exist under the pressure.    So as I sit here on my porch this morning, long  before the sun has chosen to join me, I’m reminded  of the value of the “we” in step seven. Removing our  shortcomings is a team effort. And “we” need to  spur one another on. Because when a community  and family are assaulted by the unspeakable, it takes  a village to survive the day. 
139

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  I urge you, brothers, by our Lord Jesus Christ and  by the love of the Spirit, to join me in my struggle by  praying to God for me. Romans 15:30 NIV    The Greek word for struggle in this passage,  sunagonidzomai, means an intense agony, a violent  struggle, anguish, contending with the enemy, a  violent fight in a contest. (Rick Renner’s Sparking  Gems from the Greek, June 29)    My friends, that’s the battle we face as we seek  the removal of shortcomings. Did we think it would  be easy? Our false beliefs, our confused views, our  bad habits, our unhealed hurts, our persistent hang‐ ups—all of which hinder our ability to live our God‐ created identity—did we think they’d disappear  without a fight? No! We’re at war.     But that’s not my central point for today. Today I  want to remind us of why we’re willing to fight the  good fight: because others are depending on us.  They don’t know and we can’t believe it. We’re far  more sure of our need for help than our ability to  provide it.     I have so many unanswered questions this  morning about the loss our community is enduring.  But one thing I know: our comforters will be the  ones who’ve fought the fight, persevered through  their own experience of suffering, and found  themselves (sometimes unwittingly, other times  reluctantly, definitely not anticipating this outcome)  completely and utterly prepared to do every good  work the Lord sets before them.    Thought for today: All praise to the God and Father  of our Master, Jesus the Messiah! Father of all  mercy! God of all healing counsel! He comes  alongside us when we go through hard times, and  before you know it, he brings us alongside someone  else who is going through hard times so that we can  be there for that person just as God was there for us.  WE have plenty of hard times that come from  following the Messiah, but no more so than the good  times of his healing comfort—we get a full measure  of that, too. When we suffer for Jesus, it works out  for your healing and salvation. If we are treated well,  given a helping hand and encouraging word, that  also works to your benefit, spurring you on, face  forward, unflinching. Your hard times are also our  hard times. When we see that you’re just as willing  to endure the hard times as to enjoy the good times,    we know you’re going to make it, no doubt about it.  2 Corinthians 1:3‐7 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: Thank God for wounded  warriors. Thank God for their willingness to continue  to fight the good fight in the face of what many  would consider a mortal wound. Thank God the  suffering has not been wasted but is even now being  revealed for what it is: a gift from God, wrapped in  an incomprehensible package. In recovery, it’s easy  to get self‐focused and self‐pitying. But don’t forget  that there is more going on here than you can  presently discern. It really isn’t all about you; it’s a  little about you and a lot about your transformation  into a person God can call into action at a moment’s  notice.    July 12    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 51; Proverbs 25;  Jeremiah 6      “Shortcoming: Anything in our life that keeps us  from being our God‐created self; those traits that  restrict and block our ever‐increasing glory and the  transformation process.” 18    A number of years ago, our daughter played on an  all‐star softball team with a coach who didn’t believe  in her ability to pitch. In fact, during practice, he  didn’t even allow her to practice her pitching.  Through a series of circumstances—and certainly  against the coach’s expectations—our daughter  ended up pitching an awesome game (practically a  no hitter) in 106‐degree heat and carrying the team  to victory. Make no mistake; it shouldn’t have  happened. He didn’t want her on the field but his  picks for stardom disappointed. Her greatest  adversary on the field that day happened to be her  own coach. I’ve been thrilled with God’s choice of  this daughter for our family since the day of her  birth. But I will never forget the day when our  daughter overcame intense adversity in spite of  personal suffering and snatched a victory out of  almost certain defeat—all for the sake of her team.                                                              
18

 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 7, A NorthStar Community Publication, p.9. (Available at www.northstarcommunity.com/step7.htm). 140

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  It’s been years since I asked her about that day,  but I hope that when she is faced with a difficult  trial, that memory sustains her. I believe that on that  day, she lived out her God‐created identity. You  could see it in her eyes: no mere mortal was going to  keep her ever‐increasing glory from shining through.  I’m not talking about the victory, though it was very  sweet. I’m talking about the willingness to take the  field with her head held high in spite of weeks of  humiliation.     All of us have hurtful experiences in our lives.  Sometimes these experiences foster false beliefs and  painful hurts, habits, and hang‐ups. In fact, I consider  it a miracle when the cruelty of others doesn’t  create a festering wound.     God is in the restoration business. And although  He cares about healing our pain, there’s more to the  story. He wants to remove our shortcomings—no  matter how, when, where, or why we acquired  them—because He has big plans for us.     On any given day, you might be the most unlikely  team member called off the bench and into the  game. You may feel that you are not only ill‐ prepared but actually the “least of” the players God  could have called off the bench. Perhaps some fool  taught you that. But I want you to know that you’re  a bigger fool if you believe them. On any given day,  God can choose to work through you. Maybe you  have a coach that doesn’t believe in you; so what? If  God believes that you are the man or woman for the  job, what else do you need? Maybe your coach  doesn’t even let you practice; so what? I bet there’s  another way to practice. My kid came home and  threw a couple hundred pitches in the back yard  with her dad each night. You have work to do. Let  God do his part, and you get busy doing yours!    Thought for today: “The work of God is this: to  believe in the one he has sent.”  John 6:29 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: On any given day you do not  need to believe in yourself if you will choose to  believe in the one who sent you. He will honor this  faithfulness.     July 13    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 52; Proverbs 26;  Jeremiah 7        “Shortcoming: Anything in our life that keeps us  from being our God‐created self; those traits that  restrict and block our ever‐increasing glory and the  transformation process.” 19    I love my life. Every day brings with it a new  opportunity. Somewhere I have a file labeled “job  description,” but let me tell you, it’s incomplete.  Take for instance the times when I get to meet with  a family in crisis. On those days, I feel so  underdressed! Let me explain: those meetings  should come with a striped shirt and a whistle. I feel  like a referee. When the in‐fighting heats up, I work  hard to stay “present.”  It would be easy to sit there  and fantasize about what kind of referee uniform  this particular battle requires. I’ve decided that I  prefer the attire of the officials in a tennis match,  and their accents aren’t bad either. But I digress.    Anyway, no matter how I dress for the occasion,  when families fight there is always one consistent  presence in the room: shortcomings. Actually, there  are two things that follow along with the family:  shortcomings and blaming.     As a referee, I am not always called upon to give  my opinion. Some families appreciate feedback, and  others just prefer to duke it out. But if I had the  privilege of providing objective feedback, I’d say:  “Please, people, pause to prepare.”    Prepare for what? Prepare for the real battle at  hand. In the midst of family discord, with fingers  wagging and accusations flying, sometimes we miss  the larger picture. This is not about who is right and  who is wrong; the stakes are much higher. Family  fighting is all about losing our place in God’s story for  us. It’s about restriction and bondage. It’s about  stymied transforming and ever‐decreasing glory.  Frankly, it is unseemly.  Why? Because it is petty and  self‐serving to sit around pointing out another’s  “problem” without any apparent concern for a  solution. The only shortcomings we need to focus on  are our own.     Thought for today: “Then I acknowledged my sin to  you and did not cover up my iniquity. I said, “I will                                                              
19

 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 7, A NorthStar Community Publication, p.9. (Available at www.northstarcommunity.com). 141

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
confess my transgressions to the Lord”—and you  forgave the guilt of my sin.” Psalm 32:5 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I used to click my tongue  and shake my head at the brutality of a family in  survival mode. I don’t feel that way any longer. I’ve  come to realize that anger is sometimes used to  comfort us in the midst of great suffering. I used to  think that people who were always acting like  victims and blaming others were arrogant and  prideful, and that is sometimes true. But a larger  truth may be that they are people in pain who are  dealing with their wounds in the only way they know  how. What I’m suggesting is that the road to  recovery is not paved with a spirit of recrimination. It  won’t get any of us where we truly want to go. So  please, people, pause to prepare. Put your blaming  down and pick up a spirit of humility. Ask God to  remove your shortcomings, and trust Him to do  what He needs to do with other people’s  shortcomings!    July 14    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 53; Proverbs 27;  Jeremiah7    “Ask: Asking God to remove our shortcomings  acknowledges an important truth: He’s got the  power and we do not.” 20      A few years ago a group of successful female  athletes were rewarded for their fine performance  with a visit to the White House. A brouhaha  occurred when many of the girls showed up in flip  flops. Pundits “tisk tisked” over their apparent  disrespect of the President evidenced by their overly  casual foot apparel. Clearly, these people were not  fashion aficionados. Any decent dresser knew that  those shoes were high fashion that year. No one ran  through Target and picked up those shoes! These  girls paid big bucks for pairs of shoes that looked like  beachwear.    Despite what seems like much ado about nothing, I  believe the pundits had a point (not a particularly  good one, but we can work with it). I agree that                                                              
 The Christ-Centered 12 step Study Guide, Step 7, A NorthStar Community Publication, p.9 (Available at www.northstarcommunity.com.) 
20

when one approaches a person holding a position of  honor, one should approach with respect. In fact, I  think each of us should always be approaching  everyone with respect. That said, I think all of us  agree that we have a tendency to approach people  differently.    When I’m hanging out at the beach with my family  and close friends, I go days without touching a  hairdryer or make‐up brush. Heck, I have been  known to go days without brushing my hair! But if I  were going to visit, say, a queen or king, president or  dictator, I’d probably get a quick lesson on proper  protocol. Someone somewhere would see that I  knew how to approach this dignitary without  offending (at least I hope so).     So what exactly are the rules of engagement for  one who approaches God? Scripture tells us that we  can approach the throne of grace with confidence,  but I don’t think that means we should approach  God cockily. In fact, most people who encounter a  God‐representative seem to become filled with a  holy fear/respect, according to biblical accounts. And  why not? Don’t you think it’s amazing when God  sends an emissary across eternity just to meet with  you?    So why not more brouhaha? Know this: step seven  is a privilege, not a punishment. We are the luckiest  ducks in the world to be able to have a meeting with  God. God Himself invites us to ask Him for stuff and  then promises delivery on our requests that are  within His will. We don’t have to win a sports event,  walk on the moon, discover the cure for AIDS, or  save a bus full of hostages to meet with the ultimate  ruler of the planet. How cool is that?    Thought for today: “Ask, and it will be given to you;  seek and you will find; knock and the door will be  opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he  who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door  will be opened. Which of you, if his son asks for  bread, will give him a stone? Or if he asks for a fish,  will give him a snake? If you, then though you are  evil, know how to give good gifts to your children,  how much more will your Father in heaven give good  gifts to those who ask him?” Matthew 7:7‐11 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Is it possible that you have  taken too lightly this grand privilege?   
142

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
July 15    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 54; Proverbs 28;  Jeremiah 8      “Remove: A gradual, healing, spiritual process of  transformation.” 21      I love to read success stories. I particularly  appreciate the stories of strangers I read in self‐help  magazines or short stories. They’re so neat and tidy.  God’s intervention and rescue often are  communicated in tidy sound bites. They’re the kind  of stories you can read in totality while waiting for a  kid to get out of school or waiting to get your teeth  cleaned.    As much as I enjoy a quick, inspiring read, I find the  real deal far more satisfying. If we knew the people  behind the stories, I think we’d hear a far different,  more complex, completely‐resistant‐to‐cliché kind of  story. Real people with real stories of transformation  know nothing of quick fixes or magic wands. They  know both the joy of victory and the agony of  defeat, with both happening sometimes on the same  day!    So as you’re humbly asking God to have his way  with you, be gentle with yourself. There are very few  true stories of miraculous 150‐pound weight losses  taking place in a week! It’s a process; it takes time.     Thought for today: “I have come as Light into the  world, so that everyone who believes in Me will not  remain in darkness.” John 12:46 (NASB)    Thought for tomorrow: If you’ve ever lived with  oppression, bondage, and darkness, you know what I  mean when I say sometimes the presence of light  can be blinding. I wonder. Do you think that  sometimes God goes slowly with us for a reason? Is  it possible that too sudden a transformation from  darkness to light might send us scurrying deeper into  our cave of despair? The miracle of healing is no less  miraculous if it takes time. It may not fit so nicely  into an essay of 800 words or less; but to those who  experience it, it’s priceless.                                                              
21

 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 7, A NorthStar Community Publication, p.10. (Available at www.northstarcommunity.com.)

  July 16    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 55; Proverbs 29;  Jeremiah 9      How can I ask this:     Do you really truly believe that God is who He says  he is?  I   ask because sometimes we act as if God stands at  the precipice of eternity, wringing his hands over our  sad states. He is not. He is the God who is and who  will. He is the God who can and who wants to. I pray  that you will take some time today to consider that.  Ask the Holy Spirit, “What do you desire for me?” Sit  still, and listen for a response. You have access to  God Himself! Utilize it.    Thought for today: “And we know that in all things  God works for the good of those who love him, who  have been called according to his purpose.” Romans  8:28 NIV    “Being confident of this, that he who began a good  work in you will carry it on to completion until the  day of Christ Jesus. . . for it is God who works in you  to will and to act according to his good purpose.”  Philippians 1:6, 2:13 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: If you love Him, you can be  assured you were called. If you love Him, you can be  confident that He has begun a good work in you. If  you are confident of this good work, you can be  assured that He will carry it on to completion. It is  God who does the work, but we must cooperate.  Some days I am so befuddled that I can pray only  one question, “Lord, if I loved you, if you called me,  if I were confident in this calling, if I believed that  you were at work in me, and that work was good,  what would I do with my day?” Once you’ve  followed that line of prayerful reasoning, your day  will take care of itself. In spite of how you feel, or  what you’re worrying over, or even your doubts and  disbelief, God will take care of the day. I’m reminded  of the man in scriptures who cried out to Jesus,  “Lord, I believe. Help me in my unbelief.”  That  prayer had a guaranteed answer.    July 17   
143

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 56; Proverbs 30;  Jeremiah 10        “Remove: A gradual, healing, spiritual process of  transformation. This is not instantaneous. This is not  a step of struggle, but one of acceptance followed by  responsibility. When we believe that God is in the  business of transformation, we cooperate with the  process. This process brings the pain of loss. These  patterns of behavior, although destructive and often  deadly, have been with us for a long time. We can  count on them to produce comfortable, predictable  results. Sometimes this step leaves us filled with self‐ pity AND it pushes us to move past it. It reminds us  of the consequences of our shortcomings, and calls  out to us to let go of the idolatry of self‐defeating  hurts, habits, and hang‐ups. It calls us to run toward  the light, and our true God‐created identity.” 22  I am weary, O God; I am weary and worn out, O God.  I am too stupid to be human, and I lack common  sense. I have not mastered human wisdom, nor do I  know the Holy One. . . Every word of God proves true.  . . give me neither poverty nor riches! Give me just  enough to satisfy my needs. For if I grow rich, I may  deny you and say, “Who is the Lord?” and if I am too  poor, I may steal and thus insult God’s holy name.  Proverbs 30:1‐3, 5, 8‐9 NLT  Part of my daily routine includes a seventh‐step  prayer. Perhaps that’s why I love Proverbs 30! I can  so relate to this saying of Agur. Here’s a guy who is  exceedingly aware of his shortcomings and confident  enough in God’s love to ask for what he needs.  That’s awesome. But some days it is also wearying to  acknowledge that part of my daily routine still  requires the need of a seventh‐step prayer! Am I  ever going to find myself “transformed?”    My children get asked a lot of questions. Curious  acquaintances sometimes seem more comfortable  asking my children about the nature of NorthStar  Community than asking my husband or me. Michael  was in elementary school when a teacher asked him  what his mother spoke about every week, and he  replied, “The Christ‐centered 12 steps.”    “I know she’s done that, Michael, but what is she  currently speaking about?”                                                              
22

 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 7, A NorthStar Community Publication, p.10. (Available at www.northstarcommunity.com.) 

  “The Christ‐centered 12 steps.”    “OK. I hear you. She did that. But I’m talking about  each Sunday now. What’s she doing now?”    “The Christ‐centered 12 steps!”    “Oh. Maybe I should just ask your mom.”  The  curious adult prepared to walk off, convinced that  my son simply didn’t understand the question. But,  just as he was turning to leave, Michael added  another comment.    “OK, you can ask her. But when you ask her, and  she tells you that she’s teaching on ‘The Christ‐ centered 12 steps,’ believe her. She’s not as patient  as I am.”  Kids always tell the truth!    Thought for today: “But you must not forget this one  thing, dear friends: A day is like a thousand years to  the lord, and a thousand years is like a day. The Lord  isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some  people think. No, he is being patient for your sake.  He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants  everyone to repent”. 2 Peter 3:8‐9 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: I’m not a math whiz so I  haven’t figured it up, but in 8½ years, every week  I’ve prepared a message that focused on one of the  12 steps. Inevitably we round a corner, and the  seventh step gets its turn. Why is that? Are we slow  learners? Are we doing something wrong? Well, yes,  sometimes we are slow to learn and, for sure, we’re  doing lots of things wrong. But that’s not why we  keep finding ourselves in the middle of a seventh‐ step moment.    We’re here because it’s where God wants us— constantly aware that we’re a work in progress and  He’s in charge of construction. Fortunately for us,  God is patient—far more so than me (or Michael).    July 18    Scripture Reading for today: Psalm 57; Proverbs 31;  Jeremiah 11      But you must not forget this one thing, dear  friends: A day is like a thousand years to the Lord,  and a thousand years is like a day. The Lord isn’t  really being slow about his promise, as some people  think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does  not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants  everyone to repent. 2 Peter 3:8‐9 NLT 
144

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Sometimes we all get worn out with our recovery  efforts. So let me encourage you with this thought:  where do you think you would be without them?  Some people get weary and worn out and simply set  them aside. And for a while, nothing particularly  dramatic seems to happen. Sobriety continues to be  the norm; work continues to hum along. The family  continues on its usual trajectory. But over time, old  ways of thinking, believing, and behaving begin to  creep back in, and then life can get bad—fast.     I like to think of it like this. I think eating a big bag  of M&Ms tastes good. But I’ve learned that as soon  as they’re past the lips and residing on the hips, I  regret my overindulgence. I get tired of hitting the  pavement every morning come rain or shine for my  four‐mile walk. Sometimes in the evening I’d prefer  being a couch potato to hitting the floor for my ab  workout. I’ve even been known to get bored with my  daily quiet time routine. But as I age, I’ve come to  understand that saying “no” to what feels good is  actually saying “yes” to God’s best. Weary and worn  out is not a good enough excuse to check out; it’s an  opportunity to test the strength of our character!    I like the idea that I’m taking care of my body so  that when my grandchildren arrive, I’m going to be  able to keep up with them! I appreciate the fact that  years of daily quiet time results in the occasional  God‐insight that fills me with awe. I love how it feels  to end my day with a sigh of satisfaction rather than  a moan of guilt, remorse, and shame. Enough said. If  I haven’t wearied you too much with all these words,  go and seize the day!    Thought for today: But the day of the Lord will come  as unexpectedly as a thief. Then the heavens will  pass away with a terrible noise, and the very  elements themselves will disappear in fire, and the  earth and everything on it will be found to deserve  judgment. Since everything around us is going to be  destroyed like this, what holy and godly lives you  should live, looking forward to the day of God and  hurrying it along. On that day, he will set the  heavens on fire, and the elements will melt away in  the flames. But we are looking forward to the new  heavens and new earth he has promised, a world  filled with God’s righteousness. And so, dear friends,  while you are waiting for these things to happen,  make every effort to be found living peaceful lives  that are pure and blameless in his sight. And    remember, the Lord’s patience gives people time to  be saved. 2 Peter 3:10‐15 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: My son, Scott, will hassle me  about this devotional if I fail to make myself  perfectly clear. We don’t choose how we live on  earth in a desperate attempt to hold out for heaven.  Life on planet earth is not intended to be suffered  through; it is meant to be embraced and found  abundant (John 10:10). That said, in 2 Peter, Peter  himself warns us to not mistake the Lord’s patience  for inattention or apathy. God cares how we’re  living. So as we thank God for His patience with us,  let us not forget that He is patient with a purpose.  He’s giving us time to work our program.    July 19    Scripture Reading for today:  Hebrews 1 and 2;  Jeremiah 12      It has been suggested that the book of Hebrews  was written “to demonstrate the wisdom of  following Christ and the foolishness of looking  elsewhere for salvation.  Hebrews was written to  encourage Jewish believers who were being severely  persecuted.  Many of the Jewish Christians of the  first century thought about returning to the Jewish  faith.” 23      Can you relate?  Some days it just seems easier to  stick with the familiar.  If you have some time, give  some consideration to what is familiar in your life –  but not effective.  Just because it’s comfortable does  not mean it is comforting.      The seventh step is NOT about sticking with the  familiar while we wait for God to zap us with a new  perspective – absent all our annoying little defects of  character.  This step challenges us to ACT.      A – take action.  What is the shortcoming that you  are most aware of?  Act against it; don’t just suffer  through it.  Are you annoyed with your financial  mismanagement, and do you believe that you suffer  with the defect of irresponsible spending?  Then ACT  on that conviction – go to any lengths.  Set up a  budget (a realistic one) and decide to live within it.   Get help, utilize your community resources.                                                              
 The Life Recovery Bible, copyright 1998 by Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. P. 1577. 145
23

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  C – commit to the process.  It’s not enough to  daydream about a time when you will no longer  have your plaguing deficiency.  Commit to the belief  that God is going to remove it – and begin today to  practice what it’s going to be like to live without it.    T – think.  Pause to prepare.  Ask yourself – what if  God’s already removed this particular shortcoming,  and I haven’t noticed?  Habits are habitual for a  reason!  We’ve practiced them for a long time.   Perhaps you don’t need that particular dependency  any longer – and you don’t know it because you’re  so busy continuing to practice it!  Maybe you don’t  “need” to over‐spend anymore – who knows?  Today  might just be the day you’re ready to accept God’s  gift of freedom.    Thought for today:  Since he himself (Jesus) has gone  through suffering and testing, he is able to help us  when we are being tested.  Hebrews 2:18 NLT    Thought for tomorrow:  I know that you may believe  (with good reason) that you are unable to stand up  against your defects of character and win.  I am  challenging you to remember that you don’t have to  do it alone.  Jesus himself is our advocate; ask Him  for the help you need.    July 20    Scripture Reading for today: Hebrews 3 and 4;  Jeremiah 13      Shhhh. This is a well kept secret. Memories aren’t  perfect. In fact, sometimes they are downright  distorted. Let me give you an example. When I was a  kid, I used to think my parents expected me to make  straight A’s. I now realize with the clarity that only  20/20 hindsight can bring that I then set about  convincing myself that my belief was true. The only  problem with this scenario is that it wasn’t true.      Here’s how it happened. Once I brought home a  report card that had a B in gym, and I think my dad  said something like, “Couldn’t you do any better  than this?” He was kidding. I should have known  that, but I was a little distracted going about revising  memories to suit my view of reality. Truth is, my dad  was very open about his own academic travails, and  he seemed OK with not being the perfect student.      One thing is for sure: my brothers seemed to have  a much clearer picture of reality. None of them  displayed any indication that all A’s were a  requirement at the Jones household. I could have  noticed the fact that no one freaked out when they  came home with a variety of grades on their report  card. But I didn’t. I was stuck in the place of, “Don’t  confuse me with the facts. I know what I believe.”    I learned this in a circuitous way. As our children  were growing up, I tried to impress upon the  perfectionists‐in‐training that it was OK to not  achieve academic perfection. I tried to teach them  that sometimes other priorities would supersede  their studying. So it came as a great shock to my  system when one of my precious children seemed to  think that I expected grade perfection. Truly, it was  an “aha” moment.     Somehow, it brought to my mind in perfect clarity  the many ways my own parents had not pushed me  to perform, and it made me painfully aware that this  drive to compete, compare, exceed expectations and  succeed at all costs lived deep within me; it was not  a system imposed upon me.    In truth, all of us are like this. We all have belief  systems that have a tendency to get out of whack.    Thought for today:  There is a way that seems right  to a man, but in the end it leads to death. Proverbs  16:25 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: The problem with false  beliefs (other than that they’re false) is that they  determine our steps and lead us down paths we  were never intended to trod. If I had not marched  through life thinking that my parents were  responsible for my need to succeed and my desire to  please through performing, I would have never  encountered my own personal shortcoming of  perfectionism. I could have gone through my entire  life believing a lie and failing to accept personal  responsibility for my own believing. I am very  thankful that “it is God who is at work in you, both to  will and to work for His good pleasure.”  Philippians  2:13 (NASB) I’m glad I’m not left to my own devices,  or else I could be in big trouble!         
146

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
July 21    Scripture Reading for today: Hebrews 5 and 6;  Jeremiah 14      Yesterday we touched on the possibility that our  confused memories and false beliefs might be  contributing to our stubborn and seemingly  resistant‐to‐remove shortcomings. After all, if our  confusion and false believing has resulted in our  failure to recognize our shortcomings, we’re  probably not humbly asking for their removal. So  they’re still wreaking havoc with or without our  acknowledgement.    It’s like the guy I know who lost his job and is still  wondering what happened. You see, my friend  always assumed that he was the smartest tool in the  shed at work, and the rest of those guys and gals  were a few bricks short of a load. So‐and‐so did not  understand this‐and‐that. What a bunch of clowns!  He was sarcastic and annoying and impatient. He  embarrassed people in company meetings and was  unapologetic about his disdain for upper  management. So it came as quite a shock when the  company let him go. Amazed at how they could fire  the most valuable player on the team, he confidently  predicted their swift and sudden demise. He’s still  scratching his head at their viability, increased  productivity, and apparent seamless transition after  his unceremonious exit.    Thought for today: “Who can say, ‘I have kept my  heart pure; I am clean and without sin.’”  Proverbs  20:9 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: My friend doesn’t seem to  have any awareness of his own “lack”—his lack of  connectedness to others, lack of awareness of how  others perceive him, lack of humility, lack of  sensitivity, and lack of empathy. That’s a problem.  He may be right about being a sharp tool. He may  have been the smartest guy in his company, but he  wasn’t wise. And his propensity to revise history by  making himself a hero and those around him goats  did not serve him or anyone else well. Who can say  that they’ve got it all together? No one. But if  perchance we find ourselves getting a little too big  for our britches and our heads don’t seem to fit  easily through doorways, perhaps it is time to pause    and prepare. All have sinned and fallen short—not  just those clowns at the top!    July 22    Scripture Reading for today: Hebrews 7 and 8;  Jeremiah 15      Do you remember my story from yesterday? I told  you about a friend who was let go by his company.  My point in telling the story was to illustrate the  dangers of becoming a person who never notices  their own shortcomings. The good news for my  friend is that the story doesn’t end on such a sour  note.    He had a tough time getting another job until he  was interviewed by a guy who could see beyond the  façade of arrogance. During the interview process,  the interviewer asked my friend if he could offer him  some feedback. My friend accepted the offer.    My friend was told that although his qualifications  were marvelous, his people skills were in obvious  need of improvement. The interviewer confessed  that he’d love to have his expertise but was  concerned about his ability to work as a team player.  (Certainly, this was not new information; but the  difference was that my friend desperately needed a  job, so he listened.)    A deal was made. The company representative  agreed to hire my friend on a trial basis. My friend  agreed to weekly feedback sessions with the  understanding that he was going to need to make  some serious changes to earn a position with this  company.    For the next six months, both boss and trial  employee worked hard together. It was humbling;  some days it felt humiliating. The boss gave specific  feedback and spelled out concrete alternatives that  the trainee was expected to achieve.     “Teresa, at first, I was really bad at receiving  feedback and implementing change. But I got better  at it.”    “Why do you suppose you improved? Wasn’t it  hard to hear your shortcomings listed every single  week?”    “Yeah. But I also knew that my boss was sacrificing  for me. I went six months with many interviews and  not a single job offer. He didn’t have to take me on  as a project; he could have just passed me over. The 
147

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
other thing that was really great about this was the  way he gave feedback. I could just tell that even  when I did something he didn’t like, he never acted  disappointed in me. He always just treated it like it  was another opportunity to learn. Eventually, I  believed him. Now, even at home, I seek out and  appreciate feedback. This is the best thing that ever  happened to me in my whole life. I am a different  person today because one person was willing to tell  me the truth about myself and give me a chance to  change.”    Guess what? The boss retired and gave his recruit‐ in‐need‐of‐feedback his job. By all reports, everyone  is pleased with the results.    Thought for today: For whoever exalts himself will  be humbled, and whoever humbles himself will be  exalted. Matthew 23:12 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I know it is natural to dread  the exposing of shortcomings. It’s true that not  everyone has the skill set, the wisdom, and the  patience to do what this boss did. But here’s the  thing. More people would be able to be a blessing in  this area if they would take the time to walk through  the twelve steps. I’m proud of my buddy who finally  was willing to take a look at his “lacking,” but I am  awestruck by the sacrifice of the guy who hired him.  Talk about a person living large! Wow! This man  truly lived the abundant life. He gave up a chunk of  time every week, and for what? On the surface it  appears he trained an employee. But in the larger  view, he did far more than that: he saved a man. It  came as no surprise when I learned that he was a  committed believer in recovery. His day job involved  running a mid‐size company, but his passion was  throwing lifelines to those in desperate need of a  second chance. Wasn’t it great that he didn’t just  hand the guy a job? If he had, failure would have  been the inevitable outcome. Instead, he offered  someone a chance to become the person who God  dreamed of when He was creating them.    July 23    Scripture Reading for today: Hebrews 9 and 10;  Jeremiah 16        The last two devotionals have focused on a guy  who had trouble facing shortcomings, eventually  became willing, accepted feedback, and experienced  the joy of life transformation. I write about him in  short little snippets, but all this morphing took place  over a long period of time.    More from my friend who was willing to  experience morphing: “For a long time, I kept asking  my manager, ‘What do you want me to do?’ and  sometimes he had an answer. But those weren’t the  real opportunities to learn. I came to appreciate the  times when he spoke more about who he wanted  me to be and less about what he wanted me to do. I  didn’t get it at first, but telling me what to do was  merely behavior management. Teaching me how to  ‘be’ a man of wisdom, discernment, and integrity  provided me transferable skills.”    “Like what?” I asked.    “Well, like the time I lost a big client because I got  aggravated with what I thought was a stupid request  for a service they didn’t really need. My boss didn’t  teach me how to not fly off the handle (which  wouldn’t have worked anyway), instead, he poked  and prodded to help me understand why I behaved  the way I did.”    “What did you learn?”      “For one thing, I learned that the client was  interfering with my desire to feel successful. I get  angry with people who interfere with my goal to  succeed. I was more anxious that I was going to fail  than I was angry that the client was making a foolish  request. Then, I tried to justify my bad behavior  because I thought making a mistake was the same  thing as admitting that I was a mistake.”    “Hmmm.”    “So what I learned is that my anger was more a  symptom of my shortcomings, including fear of  failing, the need for constant approval (I thought if I  was really smart people would value me), and fears  of rejection and punishment, which all led to a  tendency on my part to reject and to punish.  Anyway, I found a lot of shortcomings and ironically,  none of them had much to do with anger  management. I surely needed to manage my anger,  but the anger was more of a symptom than a root  cause. As long as I just dealt with the symptom,  change wasn’t happening. I was just trying to control  my behavior.” 
148

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  “Wow. It sounds like you and your supervisor  really worked hard at ferreting out the root issues.”    “Yeah, we did. And that’s how I acquired  transferable skills. I have learned so much about  myself that I think it has helped me understand not  only myself, but others too. So I don’t need to run to  my mentor all the time (although at one time that  was essential) to tell me what to do; he taught me  principles that guide me in a wide range of life  experiences. If I’m living like the man I was created  to ‘be,’ I’m usually able to figure out the next right  thing to ‘do.’”    Thought for today: “Humble yourselves before the  Lord and he will lift you up.” James 4:10 NIV    “If any of you lacks wisdom, he should ask God,  who gives generously to all without finding fault, and  it will be given to him.” James 1:5 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Numerous discussions with  my friend taught me that even though most people  would have concluded he was an arrogant so‐and‐ so, the truth of the matter was that he was a person  overcome by shame. That’s why he couldn’t tolerate  a single hint of “lacking;” it was too painful. At his  core, he thought he was broken; his defense was  constantly accusing others of the thing he most  feared about himself. I’ll write more on how he  overcame this affliction tomorrow. But for now, ask  yourself: could this be my problem too?    July 24    Scripture Reading for today: Hebrews 11 and 12;  Jeremiah 17      I suppose some of you are marveling at a boss who  could be so helpful to a young man in need of, to  quote Dr. Phil, “a relationship rescue.” Would it help  you to know that these two men were not  strangers? Both attended the same church and had a  history of shared values and mutual respect. Does  that enlighten the context of the story (see the past  few devotionals)?    So when the man asked for a job, he was asking  someone who knew him. When the potential  employer offered feedback, he did it in the context  of a trusting relationship. The feedback was  meaningful and accurate. As you know, the    experience went well, but it could have gone sour  fast.    Initially when the mentor told his potential mentor  candidate that he came off as a person who could  not succeed as a team player, the response was  defensive.    “Well, that’s just because I’ve never been on a  team worthy of my loyalty.” The young man huffed  and puffed and provided examples of the  inadequacy of his past teammates.    Relationship is a beautiful thing—especially one  that has had the gifts of time, experience, and  context. All that huffing and puffing did not dissuade  the older man from his viewpoint because he knew  the deal; he had history with this guy. The soon‐to‐ be mentor utilized his past relationship experience,  and pointed out (respectfully but candidly) an  opportunity that this fellow had at church to  participate on a team—and blew it. It was a  beautiful example because it was on point, and both  men knew it. Clearly the problem on this team had  been with this young man, and the “coach” had the  goods. But the message was delivered without  blaming and shaming; it was a kind, gentle, accurate  recounting of an example that snuck past this man’s  defenses and hit the heart hard.    That’s why community is so valuable. It’s hard to  bluff your way around someone who has known you  for twenty years. AA has experienced years of  success with alcoholics helping fellow alcoholics get  sober. They attribute their success to God and  community. The old adage that “it takes one to know  one” is an old adage for a reason! Shared suffering  makes it easier to relate to and understand one  another.     Thought for today: “As iron sharpens iron, so one  man sharpens another.” Proverbs 27:17 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Tomorrow we will continue  our discussion on the “how‐tos” that this young man  practiced as he experienced life transformation. But  make note of this: he probably could not have done  this alone—even with the help of a lot of good  reading materials. It took community. It was a “we”  effort. God used people with skin on to represent  Him, and I believe this older gentleman did an  awesome job of being God’s ambassador. I won’t  take time to go into all the details, but even the 
149

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
mentor asked for mentoring throughout this  process. This was a team effort all the way. How are  you doing in building community for yourself?    July 25    Scripture Reading for today: Hebrews 13; Jeremiah  18 and 19      Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a huge  crowd of witnesses to the life of faith, let us strip off  every weight that slows us down, especially the sin  that so easily trips us up. And let us run with  endurance the race God has set before us. Hebrews  12:1 NLT    It’s one thing to recognize our shortcomings; it’s  quite another to experience their removal. This  friend of mine that we’ve been learning about for  several days had to humble himself; he had to  believe that change was necessary—for him. He had  to learn how to process information differently. No  longer could he rely on his old standby belief that he  was right and the world was wrong. He had to be  willing not only to acknowledge his fear of failure,  but to recognize it for what it was: an indication of  faith gone awry. Although he claimed to be a  committed believer, his fear of failure was really  revealing that he trusted far more in his ability to  perform perfectly, avoid mistakes, and win the  approval of others than he trusted in the God who  saves. (Who needs saving if they’re perfect?) Let’s  pause on that one. Fear of failure sounds so sad, but  it is really quite arrogant. It’s implying we think that  with enough effort we can live without wrongdoing!  (Wouldn’t that make us God?) And this obsession  with winning the approval of others: isn’t that  idolatry? Wasn’t he caring more about what mere  mortals thought of him than of God?     Honestly, when carefully presented with plenty of  examples for support, he didn’t even try to deny his  false beliefs. But acknowledgement alone does not  produce transformation.    So what did he do? He began living an “as if” life:  “as if” he knew he was going to make mistakes and  “as if” a mistake did not mean he was broken—just  in need of learning something new. His boss actually  had him make a mistake and then have to confess  his wrongdoing—nothing major, just little things.    And he couldn’t offer an excuse or justify his goof.  He simply had to confess, “I did this wrong.”    He also had to live “as if” he was humble and  contrite of spirit, so he had to practice valuing  others. This was particularly taxing after years of  undervaluing others in a misguided attempt to  elevate self worth. So his mentor made him practice,  practice, practice. One assignment involved going to  his local grocery store chain and asking if he could  bag his own groceries (a store noted for their  excellent customer service). This is a huge no‐no in  this company. He asked, the bagger explained that  he could get in trouble for such a practice, and the  guy had to watch as the bagger bagged. He thanked  the bagger twice for his service. He ultimately  enjoyed that assignment so much that he still loves  expressing appreciation to baggers, and he never  tries to bag his own groceries in a fit of impatience.  He regularly humbles himself in this way by allowing  another to serve him, and he takes the time to  recognize this blessing for what it is and express  appropriate appreciation.    Another practical assignment that the boss gave  him was to ask people questions that he knew would  net him a resounding, “No!” response and to accept  that response with grace. This guy had a nasty habit  of never taking “no” for an answer. For example, he  had him go to a fast food drive‐through window and  ask if they gave away free food. When they said,  “No!” he was instructed to thank them for  considering his question and drive off, but he had to  make sure he waved to the guys as he drove past the  window. This was pretty embarrassing, but it was  funny.     In a variety of ways, the awesome mentor was  trying to get his student to think differently, perceive  more accurately, behave more consistently with his  stated core beliefs, and ultimately experience his  faith genuinely‐‐not just as a concept, but as a daily  living experience.     Thought for today: And now, dear brothers and  sisters, one final thing. Fix your thoughts on what is  true, and honorable, and right, and pure, and lovely,  and admirable. Think about things that are excellent  and worthy of praise. Keep putting into practice all  you learned and received from me – everything you  heard from me and saw me doing. Then the God of  peace will be with you. Philippians 4:8‐9 NLT 
150

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for tomorrow: Sometimes we sit around  waiting for God to remove our shortcomings. We  measure that by how we feel. We may see that our  fear of failure means that we avoid our own  inadequacies by pointing out the shortcomings of  others. We ask God to remove our judgmental spirit,  and we wait to feel generous and gracious toward  others. If that’s your idea of step seven, pull up a  comfortable chair, because you’re going to be sitting  for a long, long time. Philippians says instead to  discipline your thoughts, put them into practice, and  then you will feel the God of peace with you. Hey,  He’s been there all along. But it’s only as we walk in  faith that we find ourselves experiencing the fruit of  faith. So what do you believe intellectually that you  need to put into practice and act ‘as if’ today?    July 26    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 20; Psalm 58;  Ecclesiastes 1      “I just don’t think I’m up to it; with my limitations,  I think you’d be better off asking someone else.”    “I want to forgive, but not just yet‐‐I’ve got more  to figure out.”    “I just can’t accept God’s forgiveness. I’m very  confused.”    It’s not just the proud and arrogant who struggle  with the twelve steps. Sometimes the broken and  downtrodden fall into a trap of inaction too. In the  Old Testament book of Ecclesiastes, the writer (who  many believe was Solomon, the guy who asked God  to make him wise) searches for the meaning of life. I  hate to spoil a good story, but he never finds it. In  fact, after all his searching he concludes: “Here now  is my final conclusion: Fear God and obey his  commands, for this is everyone’s duty.” Ecclesiastes  12:13 NIV    I love puzzles, I enjoy observing people, I spend a  good bit of every day asking God to show me the  next right thing to share on Sunday mornings that  will encourage people to seek God and find the  abundant life. I actually enjoy living a life that many  would think is rather serious. I like thinking. I don’t  like checking my brain at the door and just rushing  through life. That said, it’s not enough to just learn  things. God wants us to live what we’ve learned.       Thought for today: “Trust in the Lord with all your  heart; do not depend on your own understanding.  Seek his will in all you do, and he will direct your  paths. Don’t be impressed with your own wisdom.  Instead, fear the Lord and turn your back on evil.  Then you will gain renewed health and vitality.”  Proverbs 3:5‐8 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I hate to say this, but it’s  true. Sometimes we get all cocky just because we  can explain a step or we can speak with some degree  of understanding about topics related to our hurts,  habits, and hang‐ups. Cool. But in order to really live,  we must be a people who actually act on what we  learn. The writer of Ecclesiastes didn’t figure out a  lot, but he did get this: what we do come to  understand, we must act on.    There’s a lot about life we will never understand.  But understand this: we are responsible for what we  do understand. So if you know of a particular  shortcoming in your own life, you know enough. It  doesn’t matter how it got there or even why it’s  been so resistant to removal. What matters is that  you know that one thing. Now, you can humbly ask  God to remove it. Next, you can begin to live “as if”  He has. Then you can continue on down the road to  recovery. Will you, just for today, choose to live an  “as if” life? “As if”…you knew with certainty that you  can’t live the abundant life independently of God.  “As if”…the abundant life is with you as long as  you’re stepping as God speaks. Maybe there’s a lot  you don’t know; but I’ll bet there are a few things  you know that you’re not practicing. You can  practice cherishing and respecting your spouse. You  can practice parenting your children by being fully  present: not neglecting, abusing, or shaming them.  You can stop taking things that aren’t yours. You can  work a full day and not cheat your employer by  shaving your hours or slacking off when no one is  watching. You can honor your employees by paying  them a fair wage. You can stop spending more than  you make. You can find a way to share what you  have with others. What else do you know to do that  you’re not practicing? While we’re humbly asking,  let’s not forget to act ‘as if’.    July 27   
151

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 21; Psalm 59;  Ecclesiastes 2      Have you ever made an amends to someone you  deeply wronged? Yikes! It’s hard stuff. I must  confess, sometimes the only reason I choose to do  no harm is because I really get tired of having to  make the same old amends. I find serious amends‐ making to be a wonderful deterrent to future bad  acts.    So it surprised me when my girlfriend, who had  just made an amends to a previous husband and  child (both of whom she left for her Internet lover),  made a startling confession. It seems that her  marriage of five years (to the Internet beau) is in  trouble; she’s embroiled in a torrid affair with a co‐ worker. It is not the affair that startles me; it’s the  affair in light of her recent amends. I listened to my  friend’s fifth step; she did a great job. Her eighth‐ step list of harms done and subsequent amends was  sincere. Who would want to endure a sequel of  sorrow that adultery inevitably causes? And yet  someday she will, because she is repeating the  pattern that she so painfully acknowledged a few  short months ago. When she went through the last  affair and its disastrous aftermath, she became an  outcast in her community. After entering recovery,  many saw her as a poster child for the twelve‐step  process. In a way, her life was the epitome of a story  found in the gospel of Luke—sort of a one‐woman  play.    “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a  Pharisee (these were ancient‐day poster children  who assumed and presumed that they followed all  of God’s laws perfectly) and the other a tax collector.  (Typically a tax collector was a Jewish citizen who  was hired by the Roman oppressors to collect taxes  from their fellow Jews—taxes no one felt they owed.  Oftentimes tax collectors were unscrupulous in their  collecting—skimming money and cheating both Jews  and Romans alike). The Pharisee stood up and  prayed about himself:   ‘God, I thank you that I am  not like other men‐‐robbers, evildoers, adulterers—or  even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week and  give a tenth of all I get.’  But the tax collector stood  at the distance. He would not even look up to  heaven, but beat his breast and said, ‘God, have  mercy on me, a sinner.’  I tell you that this man,  rather than the other, went home justified before    God. For everyone who exalts himself will be  humbled, and he who humbles himself will be  exalted.”  Luke 18:10‐14 NIV    My friend graciously allows me to share her story  because she learned something in the process that  both of us think is worth sharing. “You know, it was  terrible when I was the ‘bad girl’. It felt great when  all of a sudden I was getting a lot of affirmation for  working an intentional recovery program. But in  hindsight, I think I never experienced true humility  with my first stab at recovery. I think I lived in  humiliation and then found comfort in false pride. I  thought I had it all together.”  She was a modern day  tax collector who became a Pharisee, only to be  slammed down by relapse. She thought she had  learned so much that she was immune to messing  up. She was wrong. Knowledge alone isn’t enough.  Humiliation isn’t the same as true humility.    Thought for today: “My people are destroyed for a  lack of knowledge.” Hosea 4:6 NIV    This is true, but sometimes we’re destroyed by a  false sense of security when we learn some cool new  stuff. It’s not the knowledge that frees us from our  hurts, habits, and hang‐ups; it’s allowing God to have  his way with us. It’s when we take what we know  and apply it.    “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of  knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and discipline.”  Proverbs 1:7 NIV    Knowledge without respect for God, knowledge  absent of the wisdom and discipline to apply what  we know—is just another way to feel good about  ourselves without truly becoming our God‐created  identity.    Thought for tomorrow: The seventh step doesn’t  have much room for faux humility. The humiliation  that accompanies public wrongdoing does not  necessarily translate into humility, and neither does  over‐reliance on our own ability to effectively work a  recovery program. The Pharisee messed up when he  assumed that he was right and without shortcoming.  The tax collector was forgiven for his shortcomings  because he humbly asked, but that doesn’t  necessarily mean all is right with his world. I hope  that the tax collector took his newfound forgiveness  and used it wisely. Maybe he quit his job as a tax  collector. Perhaps he kept the job, but made sure he 
152

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
was ruthlessly honest in executing his duties. I hope,  in spite of his “less than” feelings, that the lowly tax  collector began to live an “as if” life—doing the next  right thing. How about you? Where are you in the  process?    July 28    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 22; Psalm 60;  Ecclesiastes 3      I’m pretty sure none of us will get to the place  where “boasting” is going to become a healthy part  of our daily living.     Thought for today: “This is what the Lord says, ‘Let  not the wise man boast of his wisdom, or the strong  man boast of his strength, or the rich man boast of  his riches, but let him who boasts boast about this:  that he understands me and knows me, that I am the  Lord who exercises kindness, justice and  righteousness on earth, for in these I delight,’  declares the Lord.” Jeremiah 9:23‐24 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: In light of this passage,  humility is a commodity that is easy to acquire. God  reminds us that nothing is “boast worthy” except  those times when we know that we know that we  know—who God is and what He’s up to. How  confident do you feel in your ability to understand  the thoughts and intentions of Holy God?    Hmmm…me too! There’s a lot I don’t understand  about God’s ways either!    I’ve been reviewing some old messages that I  taught last year on the nature of love. In spite of my  reluctance to listen to myself, I found one sentence  in all that talking that I actually loved, “We are  limited in so many ways, but God is limitless in His  capacity to help us.”      To think that God is limitless in both His desire and  capacity to help us is truly something worth boasting  about. We serve a God who loves us and is more  interested in helping us than He is in what He can  get from us. How cool is that?    July 29    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 23; Psalm 61;  Ecclesiastes 4        Yesterday I had a weird experience that I want to  share with you. Someone gave me some very  helpful, constructive feedback, and I took absolutely  no offense! Imagine that! During my devotional  study time this morning, I processed through why I  was so willing to hear someone speak to me about a  shortcoming and so eager to respond to correction.  (Ask those who know me well; this is not my typical  response.)    I think the main reason has much less to do with  me than it did with the person speaking to me. With  this individual I feel accepted, secure, and  significant. I believe this is a safe relationship. I am  convinced this person loves me for who I am, not  what I may or may not be able to do for them.     This thought led me to a moment of clarity.    The more I come to believe what God says about  how He sees me—as his child, friend, one with Him  in spirit, a saint, redeemed and forgiven, complete in  Christ, free from condemnation, established,  anointed and sealed by God, a citizen of heaven, not  given to a spirit of fear, one who can find grace and  mercy in time of need, chosen and appointed to  bear fruit, a minister of reconciliation, etc.—the  more willing I will be to hear the Holy Spirit speak to  me about a shortcoming. I will be eager to respond  with humility.    Thought for today: “Therefore, since we have a  great high priest who has gone through the heavens,  Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to the faith  we profess. For we do not have a high priest who is  unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we  have one who has been tempted in every way, just as  we are – yet was without sin. Let us then approach  the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may  receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of  need.” Hebrews 4:14‐16 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: It is helpful for me (and I  hope for you too) to be reminded that step seven is  attainable not because of our efforts but entirely  because God is able to deliver on His promises. It is  who God is that allows us to approach this step with  confidence (God‐confidence).       
153

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
      July 30    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 24; Psalm 62;  Ecclesiastes 5      My brother is an experienced hunter, and he can  spot things in the woods that novices like me miss.  He learned how to track things down; he studied  nature, and he practiced his skills.    I’ve got another brother who is an awesome tennis  player. He can anticipate a cross‐court backhand and  actually return it. He learned how to track down  tennis balls and return them effectively by studying  the game and practicing his skills.    My dad is a pilot. He has been able to track down  airports and identify troubling weather indicators in  order to fly many miles for more years than he cares  to count‐‐safely. He did this by becoming a perpetual  student of flight and by practicing his flying skills.    Along the way, I am sure each of them  experienced times of poverty – times when Bob  couldn’t track down a covey of pheasant, Tim  struggled with his serve, and Dad struggled to learn  how to fly a new and different kind of aircraft. In  order to get to the top of their “game”—regardless  of the kind of game—these guys had some  shortcomings that had to be removed.    I am neither an experienced hunter, awesome  tennis player, or gifted pilot. And that’s OK.    But all of us are called to become experienced at  love. That’s a game we’re created to participate in.  How do I know this? Because God said so when he  told us the greatest commandment of all was to love  Him, others, and self. Hunting, tennis playing, and  flying are good things. But the best thing—the  essential thing—is love.     Along the way, whether we are loving God, self,  and others in the woods, on the courts or in the air,  at home or at work—wherever we find ourselves  living and loving‐‐we’re going to discover some  shortcomings in ourselves. The good news in all this  is that we can become students of love, and we can  practice our skill sets. The best news of all is that \  we don’t have to rely solely on our ability to learn  and our agility on the court.      Thought for today: In Luke 4:14‐21, Jesus quotes a  passage from the Old Testament when he tells us his  mission in life: “God’s Spirit is on me: he’s chosen me  to preach the Message of good news to the poor,  sent me to announce pardon to prisoners and  recovery of sight to the blind, to set the burdened  and battered free…”     Thought for tomorrow: Since I’m a Jones by birth, I  spent time in the woods as a child, learning how to  handle firearms and even a bow and arrow. I chose  not to hone that skill set as an adult. I’ve played my  fair share of tennis, but I’ve not committed myself to  become a devotee of the game. I’m just happy to  keep my husband moving from side to side and am  thrilled when once in awhile I win a game or two.  I’ve been up in lots of airplanes with my dad over the  years, but everyone would be in trouble if I had to fly  one. Acquiring a skill set that enables to to love God  and others is not a skill set that I can choose to opt  out on. Because it is such a vital part of life, it’s also a  place where more than a few shortcomings can lurk.  If you’re uncertain about the nature of your  shortcomings, even with a month of devotionals on  the topic, you may want to do some careful analysis  of your love life. How are you loving God, others,  and self?    July 31    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 25; Psalm 63;  Ecclesiastes 6      As we conclude this devotional study on the  seventh step, it is my prayer that God has guided  you to new understandings of yourself. I know He’s  been gentle and patient, because that is His way. I’ll  bet He has been persistent, because His dreams for  you are big and your need to fulfill them is great.     Although He loves us just the way we are, He loves  us too much to leave us there—especially if our lives  have any plaguing hurts, habits, or hang‐ups. I hope  you’ll take some time today and reflect back on this  month’s devotional materials. Pray earnestly for  God’s Spirit to quicken your mind and heart to those  truths He wants you to hone in on as you continue to  grow up in your salvation.   
154

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today: Choose your favorite verses from  this month’s study, put them on index cards, or write  them in your journal. List them on the inside cover of  your Bible, or begin your own personal indexed  notebook of favorite passages you want to apply in  your life.    Thought for tomorrow: Tomorrow begins a new  study series. If you have any questions for me before  we proceed, please email me at  AskTeresa@hotmail.com. I can’t wait for step  eight—how about you?    STEP 8 We made a list of all persons we had  harmed and became willing to make amends to  them all.    August 1    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 26; Psalm 64;  Ecclesiastes 7      Our youngest son is learning how to drive. I  suspect he’d like to skip the “learning” portion of  this process and jump right into the “driving without  parental units in the car” experience. Fortunately for  him (whether he appreciates this or not) we are  experienced at the fine art of teenage driving, and  we’re making him learn before we allow him to  leave the driveway unsupervised.    I wonder if you’ve glanced at step eight and desire  to skip it as badly as Michael desires to skip past the  “learning” driver stage to the “permitted” driver  stage. Wouldn’t it be less painful to just say to  yourself, “Hey, mistakes were made; I won’t do that  again. Let’s allow bygones to be bygones, we’ll just  forgive and forget, and I’ll just skip this little step. I’ll  start all relationships in the future with a clean slate  and wipe from my memory all the relationship boo  boos of my past.”    Forget it.    This step is more than necessary; it is essential.  You can’t get to the abundant life you desire (and  God has planned for you) until you deal with all the  messiness of past broken relationships.    Now let’s get started.    Thought for today: “Fools mock at making amends  for sin, but goodwill is found among the upright.”  Proverbs 14:9 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: You’re not going to want to  miss this step. Some of the topics we’re going to  cover include: defining “harm” (sometimes we’re  ignorant of our harmful ways), empathy, willingness,  and even the simple‐but‐profound, three‐letter  word, “all.” We’re going to talk about sins of  commission and omission. We’re going to dig deep  into the amends process. I can’t wait to get started!    August 2    Scripture Reading for today: Ecclesiastes 8, 9, and  10      In step eight, you’re going to make a list of all the  people you’ve harmed and you’re going to become  willing to make amends to each and every one of  them. I know that it is natural for you to desire to  digress on this point and distract yourself with  thoughts of the offensiveness of others towards you.  Don’t digress. Hang in with the process.    The old adage, “nothing changes if nothing  changes,” is a great principle to apply at this point.  Previously, most of us have preferred to ruminate  over the wrongs others have committed against us.  Scripture turns us around and points us in a different  direction. Before you read the verse that will make  this point painfully obvious, I want you to pause to  prepare. In your heart of hearts, you desperately  desire to be turned around. Your life has…some  limitations…unfulfilled dreams…painful points…and  you’d love to find your freedom from these plaguing  problems, right? If so, you’re going to have to decide  to be willing to be turned. It’s not comfortable or  convenient, but turn you must—if you ever hope to  find the abundant life Jesus spoke about.    Thought for today: Jesus says, “This is how I want  you to conduct yourself in these matters. If you enter  your place of worship and, about to make an  offering, you suddenly remember a grudge a friend  has against you, abandon your offering, leave  immediately, go to this friend and make things right.  Then and only then, come back and work things out  with God. Or say you’re out on the street and an old 
155

 

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
enemy accosts you. Don’t lose a minute. Make the  first move; make things right with him. After all, if  you leave the first move to him, knowing his track  record, you’re likely to end up in court, maybe even  jail.” Matthew 5:23‐25 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: If you’re serious about this  God thing, you’ve got to take these instructions from  His son and apply them to your daily life experience.  It’s my prayer for you that you will ask God to make  you willing to be made willing to be turned upside  down, so that God can then place you right side up!    August 3    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 27;  Ecclesiastes 11 and 12        Speculation has it that Solomon is the author of  the book of Ecclesiastes (although he is not  specifically named in the text). Solomon is the son of  King David, whose life we’re about to study as we  read through 1 and 2 Samuel. If you have a Life  Recovery Bible (Tyndale Publishing, 1999), you can  find a brief biography about the life of Solomon on  page 429. As we read along, think about the fact that  the writer of Ecclesiastes may be the product of the  family system you’re currently diving into. Think  about this: our history shapes our present and  future, and there is value in studying it.    When presented with the opportunity to ask for  his greatest wish, Solomon requested wisdom. As a  result, he became the wisest guy who ever lived. He  did a lot of great things and passed on to future  generations a bunch of good information.    But Solomon wasn’t perfect. As wise as he was and  as much as he loved God, he compromised all he  believed in by disobeying God in the area of his  sexuality. And he reaped some serious  consequences. (Soon you’re going to discover that  this is exactly how Solomon’s daddy messed up.)     Thought for today: “Jesus said to his disciples,  ‘Things that cause people to sin are bound to come,  but woe to that person through whom they come. It  would be better for him to be thrown into the sea  with a millstone tied around his neck than for him to  cause one of these little ones to sin. So watch  yourselves.’” Luke 17:1‐3  NIV      Thought for tomorrow: One year we thought we  picked out the perfect gift for my mother‐in‐law’s  birthday: a new golf bag. Our daughter was very  young at the time, and in her gift‐giving excitement  she sometimes would blurt out the contents of the  gift or “help” by spontaneously ripping off the gift  wrap. We were so pleased with our gift choice— thinking ourselves quite clever—and we definitely  didn’t want the surprise ruined. As we sat down to  dinner with the carefully wrapped golf bag at Nana’s  side, Pete said to our daughter, “Don’t let the cat out  of the bag!”    Her cute little face crinkled up and her head tilted  to one side. A moment of silence passed, and then  she chimed in, “Now, that’s a good clue!”    Oh well. What can you do?     I hate to “let the cat out of the bag,” but our  history holds as many clues to our harming habits as  Solomon’s. Have you ever thought about that? What  “harming habits” might you have replicated from  your family system?    August 4    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 28; 1 Samuel  1      Oh, my gosh! If you are reading along, you are in  for a real ride in this section. Soap operas are written  with less drama than you’re about to vicariously  experience as you read the Samuels. Harry Potter’s  adventures are child’s play compared to the saga of  King Saul and David.     Anytime I prepare to re‐read 1 Samuel, I think  about severed relationships. I think about how even  the sweetest of loves can turn sour in a moment’s  notice. I think about the sorrow of banishment.    Do you walk around with a knot in your stomach?  Are you prone to anxiety attacks? Are you fretful?  Do you have some relationships that are so painful  you try to avoid the people involved? Do you  struggle to sleep at night—your mind racing,  replaying the “should’ves” and the “would’ves” if  only you “could’ves?” Are you embarrassed by how  you’ve mishandled a relationship?     It seems to me that all broken relationships carry  with them a side order of banishment. Banishment is  a terrible thing. Avoiding or being avoided happens 
156

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
when we make a relationship “boo boo” and don’t  have the skill set to go back and figure out how to  repair and restore the rift that our harming caused.    Thought for today: “…But God does not take away  life; instead, he devises ways so that a banished  person may not remain estranged from him.” 2  Samuel 14:14 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: As a people commanded to  love God, others, and self we are not created to live  easily with banishment. We are created to carry  within our hearts a huge capacity to receive and to  give love. One of our primary purposes for existing is  to dispense this love with boundless enthusiasm and  generosity of spirit. 2 Samuel 14 reminds us that God  does not take away the inevitable bumps in the road  of relating one to another, but neither does He leave  us without resources for renewal. I pray that you will  be encouraged to know that a season of banishment  does not mean a life of estrangement—as long as  you learn how to live life on God’s terms.    August 5    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 29; 1 Samuel  2 and 3      I’m sitting in on a class that is talking about the  stories we tell about our faith journeys. The lecturer  makes the point that Christians love a “good”  testimony. I know exactly what he means! It’s the  kind of sharing that involves drama and flair. “I once  was lost—a low‐life, a loser, a thief, and a scoundrel.  Then I came to know Christ, and now look: I am not  only saved—I have the abundant life!” If the speaker  is entertaining and fills in the gaps with a lot of wild  stories involving mis‐spending one’s youth, the  listener is captivated.    This story of instantaneous change is simple and  easy to quantify from bad to good. Awesome.     Not all testimonies are that simple. For those of us  who have more complex stories, we find the tidiness  of this kind of narrative vaguely dissatisfying.     What about the person who was also a low‐life,  loser, thief, and scoundrel who came to know Christ  and still struggles with low‐life habits, loser choices,  honesty, and ethics? Was this person simply less    sincere? I don’t think so. The truth is that some  people’s stories are simply more complicated.    For example, take a look at today’s reading. Eli the  priest did a marvelous job mentoring Samuel and a  lousy job raising his own sons. “Now the sons of Eli  were scoundrels who had no respect for the Lord or  for their duties as priests.” 1 Samuel 2:12 NLT  That’s  messy. This was a good priest who managed to raise  low‐life boys, even though they had been brought up  believing in God and worshiping Him.    I suspect that after we’ve worked through seven of  the twelve steps in this process, we’d like to think  that life should get easier. We’d like to think that we  could just wipe the slate clean of our past wrongs  and hopefully keep it clean in the future—neat and  tidy ‐ bad to good. We all long for the “good”  testimony.     Maybe that will happen for you. But most people I  know and love have more complicated stories that  are definitely not easy. An honest faith journey  recounting may help us discover that although life  may not get “easy,” it can get better. One of the  ways God plans for us to have a more abundant life  is by teaching us how to live with the messiness of  the lives we are currently living. And in the course of  living, when we inevitably find ourselves in the midst  of a broken relationship—experiencing banishment  in one form or another—God teaches us how to  restore relationship. Subsequent steps will provide  more details about this process. This particular step  is about getting honest about the banishment.    Thought for today: “Search me, O God, and know my  heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. See if  there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the  way everlasting.” Psalm 139:23, 24 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Frankly, we need to give up  on the childish notion of an easy life. Let it go. It’s  holding us back! When Jesus said He came so that  we might be free, so that we might experience  abundant living—He wasn’t thinking about easy!  How different would your expectations be if you set  aside your silly notion of an easy life (and got busy  living the good life)? 
 

     
157

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
August 6    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 30; 1 Samuel  4 and 5      When I made my first “list” it came in two parts. I  compiled the first section quickly—it was the list of  people I had obviously harmed. You know what I  mean. It’s easy to recall the names and faces of  people we have harmed in ways that we cannot  deny, rationalize, justify, or blame someone else for  the wrong done. I had a second section too. This list  expanded as I matured. Sometimes we have to grow  up a bit before we can recognize the truth of our  harming ways.    Once we had friends visit us with their small  children. We had recently moved into a new home,  and I had saved my pennies until I could re‐carpet  the living and dining rooms. Don’t ask me why I did  this, but I chose a very beautiful, barely off‐white  carpet. We didn’t allow our children to eat unless  they were sitting at the kitchen table or den, so the  lovely carpet was unblemished and not much of a  maintenance problem for me—until our visitors  arrived.    I knew they allowed their children to carry food  and drink everywhere, and so I specifically shared  with our guests that the children were not allowed  to take snacks into my “formal rooms.” They didn’t  pay me a bit of attention. Their children ran through  my home with sippy cups brimming with grape juice.  Soon a trail of grape juice stains blanketed my  precious new carpet (anything you save and save  and save for tends to seem precious).    The parents of these wild things looked at me,  laughed and said, “That’s what you get for making  such a foolish choice in carpet colors! We would  never put a white carpet in our house!”    I thought to myself, “That’s the point. This isn’t  your house.” At this time in our lives, we had very  few recovery principles in our possession, and so I  handled the situation very poorly. I kept my mouth  shut and a deep resentment lodged in my heart.    They did not make my first version of my list of  persons I had harmed; they didn’t make my second  list either. However, they did make my 4.0 version. It  took me awhile to get past my perception of their  offensiveness and see more clearly my own.       When I failed to address their boundary‐less,  disrespectful behaviors towards my family, I did  harm. I took from them an opportunity to learn how  their actions impacted others. I wronged these  people. I encourage you to allow your list to expand  as God transforms you. Maturity, renewed  perspectives, more education, and broader life  experiences inform our hindsight. All of this will  require us to be flexible and open to adding to our  list. If not, we’re going to be stunted in our growth.  We might end up running around with a sippy cup  hanging out of our mouths far longer than is age  appropriate.    Thought for today: “Do not say, ‘I’ll pay you back for  this wrong!’ Wait for the Lord, and he will deliver  you.” Proverbs 20:22 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I must confess that after the  juice‐spilling incident, my resentment grew in direct  proportion to my desire for revenge. If I couldn’t get  justice (stains removed) I wanted payback. In fact, I  thought payback might just be how the Lord would  deliver me! In my immature thinking, I thought  Proverbs 20:22 was saying that although I could not  exact my own revenge, God would do it for me.  That’s not what happened. Instead, I continued to  grow up while waiting for God to smite the evil  grape‐juice spillers. I came to realize that when  Proverbs said “’I will get even for this wrong.’ Wait  for the Lord to handle the matter” NLT,  God handled  me! He revealed to me that I too had harmed this  “offensive” family by not being willing to lovingly  confront the situation. God handled me because I  did far more harm to the relationship by being  unforgiving, resentful, revengeful, non‐ confrontational, insincere, etc., than they did by  being careless with a few juice cups. Now when I  read this proverb, what I hear is: Teresa, be slow to  arrogance, thinking that you are so harmed by  another that the urge for revenge is appropriate.  Hold up, pause to prepare, and God will deliver you.  He’ll grow you up, and teach you a broader view of  this current situation than your limited maturity can  currently comprehend.     There’s always more to the story, and often it  involves me seeing more clearly how I am harming  another. I pray that all of us will increase our  sensitivity this month, and may our lists be true! 
158

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
 

August 7    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 31; 1 Samuel  6 and 7      “I am just so sick of this recovery talk. Why can’t I  just get on with living?” The irony of the statement  did not escape me. Here she sat, grumbling about  “recovery talk,” when just a few short months ago  she was faithfully walking the talk. Having  abandoned it for her own way of doing things, she  sits in front of me in large part because she got tired  of walking the talk. She “got on with living” and  presently finds herself losing every single thing she  thought her life was worth living for. Soon her angry  outburst is accompanied by hot tears of remorse,  regret, and shame.    “I just got tired of trying to do the right thing every  day and not feeling any better.” But before you send  her a sympathy card, remember that her  commitment to doing “right” is measured in months  as compared to years and years of practicing all  kinds of bad‐girl behaving. During those short  months of recovery, she was causing less harm,  experiencing fewer negative consequences, and  even receiving what the casual observer would think  of as blessings. But on this day my friend didn’t want  me to confuse her with any facts. She just wanted to  be angry that God wasn’t giving her the great life.    “It just wasn’t good enough. I want more from  life.” She didn’t want a decent life; she wanted a  great life—as defined by her. One of the tough  truths of recovery is that sometimes it gets worse  before it gets better. We may set aside our particular  bad habit, but that doesn’t mean we immediately  begin to feel like a million bucks. For people who  don’t like to delay gratification, the fact that it takes  lots of time to “become” our God‐created identity  and develop the maturity to appreciate that  “becoming” is a tough truth.    I hope you’ve read 1 Samuel 7. You’ll recall that in  chapter four Eli, his family, and the entire nation of  Israel suffered consequences for their disobedience.  In chapter seven the Israelites ask Samuel to plead  with the Lord to save them, and He does.     But let’s not skip over the introduction to chapter  seven: “The Ark remained in Kiriath‐Jearim for a long  time—twenty years in all. During that time all Israel   

mourned because it seemed the Lord had abandoned  them.” 1 Samuel 7:2 NLT     “Not so!” we cry with our theology intact; The Lord  will never leave us nor forsake us! Those Israelites  got it wrong—again.  (But if we’re honest, we can  relate to how they feel.)    Do you remember what Eli’s daughter‐in‐law said  in the face of all those consequences? “She named  the child Ichabod (which means “Where is the  glory?”), for she said, “Israel’s glory is gone.” 1  Samuel 4:21 NLT She concluded this as she lived  through the dire circumstances that came as a result  of poor sowing, and she netted terrible reaping.    It’s easy to toss stones over our shoulders towards  times long gone. Those Israelites make tidy targets  for our disdain of their poor theology and blatant  rebellion. My friend’s obvious lack of perspective can  have us wagging our heads in thinly veiled judgment  too.    But hold on for a second. Are you patient with  your own “becoming,” even when it’s painful? Even  when it seems like life isn’t great (and you think it  should be if you’re doing it “right”)? My friend  abandoned her God‐centered, recovery‐focused life  simply because she thought “it” was taking too long.  God wasn’t providing sufficient reward to keep her  head in the game. The Israelites lived for twenty  years with the thought that God abandoned them.  What about you? Step eight will require us to be  willing to “become.” It doesn’t say we’ve got to rush  to get there, already be there, or even know exactly  what the “becoming” is going to mean. Step eight is  about process—not making the perfect list.    Thought for today: “For God can use sorrow in our  lives to help us turn away from sin and seek  salvation. We will never regret that kind of sorrow.  But sorrow without repentance is the kind that  results in death.” 2 Corinthians 7:10 NLT       Thought for tomorrow: “Became: This is a process.  If we will be responsible to God and make the list, He  will take responsibility for us, and make us willing.  This is a deep mystery, and takes place in the heart. 

159

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Part of trusting God to do His part is simply making  the list, in spite of our reluctance and our pain.” 24    My friend and the Israelites were suffering and  sorrowful. But was there repentance? I don’t  suppose speculating about that on their behalf is  very recovery‐friendly. However, asking that  question of ourselves might be an excellent next  right step. A clue to the answer will be found in our  willingness to make as thorough a list as our  limitations will allow and to become willing to make  amends to them all.    August 8    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 32; 1 Samuel  8 and 9      You have got to read 1 Samuel 8! It’s an amazing  story. The people of Israel are asking for a king; God  chooses to grant their request. He grants their  request in spite of his displeasure with that request.  (Isn’t that interesting? Sometimes we think God  hears our requests and says yes, no, or wait. It’s  amazing to think that sometimes He says, “OK,  you’ve refused to listen to me. So I’m going to give  you what you’ve asked for, but you’re not going to  like it for long…”)  Here’s what God says about this  situation in the early verses of this chapter: “Samuel  was displeased with their request (for a king) and  went to the Lord for guidance. ‘Do everything they  say to you,’ the Lord replied, ‘for it is me they are  rejecting, not you. They don’t want me to be their  king any longer. Ever since I brought them from  Egypt they have continually abandoned me and  followed other gods.’” 1 Samuel 8:6‐8 NLT    Note the following: The people acted like goofs for  a long time, and God noticed. God was not hasty in  His actions; He was patient. But enough is enough,  and God is going to give them their request. (This  reminds me of the verse, “He gave them the desires  of their heart, but sent leanness to their souls.”)      The law of cause and effect is in play. Because the  people have stubbornly resisted the authority of  God, God is going to give them over to the desires of  their own hearts. The effect is that there are going to  be negative consequences. Due to God’s patience,                                                              
24

 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 8, p.8. A NorthStar Community publication.  

negative consequences may appear to be delayed,  thereby confusing us if we’re not paying attention.  The Israelites have been systematically showing by  their behavior that they don’t much care what God  desires for them. For awhile it’s going to seem as if a  king is a good idea; but eventually, the law of cause  and effect kicks in.    This same law is valid today. God has commanded  that we love Him, others, and self. That’s his  command. Sometimes the effect of our failure to  love God, others, and self in a healthy way can be  missed—for a while. We can behave badly in the  love department and show up every Sunday for  church all cleaned up, dressed up, and demonstrate  a form of godliness, but eventually time will reveal  the truth about how we’re really doing in the area of  submitting to the authority of God. And God says we  are to love Him, others, and self; if we’re not doing  that, eventually an “effect” will be felt.    Take for example this guy whose wife has left him.  He keeps calling her, asking her to go to counseling,  making an appointment to meet with their pastor,  etc. Now he’s interested in his marriage. Now he’s  confused about why she packed up her bags and  moved three states away. Now he wants  suggestions, counsel, advice, and if at all possible, an  ally in wooing his wayward wife back home. She’s  not coming back. Why? Because after 20 years of his  infidelity; abuse; negligence; demeaning put‐downs;  lack of respect; absence of cherishing; selfish, self‐ serving workaholism—she’s done. He doesn’t get  this.     “How could a good Christian woman do such a  thing? You’re a minister. Can’t you do something? A  woman is supposed to stand by her man.”    “Well, pal, it’s called the law of cause and effect.  After years of demonstrating that you don’t want to  be a husband, she finally believes you. She’s done.  This is the effect. It was caused by your harming  ways.”     Thought for today: “A new command I give you:  Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must  love one another. By this all men will know you are  my disciples, If you love one another.” John 13:34‐35  NIV    Thought for tomorrow: The best definition of harm  that I know of is this: anytime we step in 
160

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
contradiction to God’s voice. God wants us to love  Him, others, and self. He has some principles about  how that should look; we don’t get to make it up as  we go along. If you’ve defined love differently than  God has instructed, expect “effects.”    August 9    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 33; 1 Samuel  10 and 11      One morning on vacation Pete and I woke up early  and headed out to play tennis before the  thermometer hit 100 degrees. Others had similar  ideas. Soon, a father with two young children  appeared on the court behind us. Soon I was  reminded of step eight.    It was already blistering hot, and dad was bringing  two of his young children down to “practice” their  tennis. First, he had them hitting against the practice  wall. At ages three and four, that wall must have  looked pretty daunting. But not to worry: dad  decided to make a “game” of practice.     “OK kids. Here’s how we’re going to do it. One  person hits against the wall until they miss, and then  the next person steps up until they miss. This is  going to be great fun! I’ll go first.”    Bam, bam, bam went the ball against the wall, as  the patriarch of the family managed to succeed at 20  or so hits before having to cede the practice round  to his three‐year‐old. Junior then promptly hit his  ball over the wall and into the pool. Up stepped big  sister. She did the same.    “Too bad you guys haven’t got your ‘A’ game this  morning. Daddy’s turn!” Bam, bam, bam—this time  he got about ten smacks on the wall before his ball  sailed over the wall and into the pool. Slamming  down his racket, he reluctantly nodded toward  Junior. I wondered if this is Dad’s ‘A’ game; and all  that wondering promptly cost me a point. (My  husband is all about playing tennis and is not the  least concerned about the family dynamics playing  out on the court beside us.)    Eventually, the children begin to look longingly  toward the pool. I suspect that they are not wishing  for their tennis balls back. I think they want to go  frolic in the cool mountain water like the other  children their age. Unable to manage to get the ball  to hit the practice wall, they are relegated to the    sidelines while their father acts like each shot will  determine his rankings on the tennis circuit.    Finally, mom shows us with an infant in tow, and  after Dad releases some tension by yelling at her for  interrupting their practice session, he storms off the  court leaving mom to gather up all the practice  supplies that are not already in the pool.    Thought for today: “The end of all things is near.  Therefore be clear‐minded and self‐controlled so that  you can pray. Above all, love each other deeply,  because love covers over a multitude of sins.” 1 Peter  4:7‐8 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I can’t help but wonder:  What was the desired outcome for this parent  today? Was he hoping to get his kids fit for tennis?  Does he dream of this brother‐sister duo someday  beating out the Agassi/Graf siblings?  I certainly have  had some days as a parent when I have had to learn  from my mistakes. Maybe he’ll self‐correct as the  day goes on, take those kids to the pool, and stop  expecting them to have the skill sets of a ten‐year‐ old. But if he doesn’t, harm is happening. And  ultimately, it won’t matter what his intentions were  on this hot morning; he’s failed at the one thing that  God calls us to set our heart on—loving each other  deeply. At any given moment, when we are unwilling  or unable to love each other deeply, we have  harmed.    August 10    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 34; 1 Samuel  12 and 13      Our tubing on the river provided another  opportunity to define “harm” and sparked a lively  debate. Here’s what happened. Our party of seven,  along with 40 strangers, began an excursion down  the river on individual tubes.     One of the instructions we were given was to stay  together. Not mentioning any names, but some in  our family take instructions more seriously than  others. Much to our surprise, we discovered the only  person in the world who is incapable of successfully  tubing—even with a favorable current. Within  minutes, this woman’s family had deserted her and  whisked themselves down the river, leaving her 
161

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
floundering with no discernable forward progress.  Certainly this violated the stay‐together rule!     Our group likes staying together, and it wasn’t long  before we realized that one of us was missing. It  seems our daughter took it upon herself to help the  woman. Grabbing whatever we could to hold our  position, we waited for Meredith and her hapless  new friend. Eventually, they managed to catch up.    My guys were pretty sure that this woman’s  husband would be sleeping on the couch after he  left her stranded in the middle of the river. They’re  reasonably confident that it won’t be a pull‐out  sofa—more like a small loveseat. They think the  husband harmed the wife by not sticking with her.    Although the entire group felt Meredith was  extremely kind to offer herself as a personal tug  boat, we split on whether not helping would have  been harmful. Recalling the river guide’s  instructions, stragglers would be left and retrieved at  a later time. Technically speaking, she eventually  would have gotten home! Was harm averted?     Thought for today: “Be kind and compassionate to  one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ  God forgave you.” Ephesians 4:32 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: We never did reach  consensus on whether it was the McBean family’s  job to provide a river rescue or simply enjoy the  adventure we paid for without concern for a  stranger with a tubing‐skill handicap. But one thing  we all agreed on: kindness and compassion are  always appropriate. Sometimes, it’s not about  whether we’re “harming” or not so much as it is  whether we’re expressing ourselves as Christ did. I  can appreciate the fact that Meredith didn’t “owe”  this lady a tow. But I admire the fact that she didn’t  check her compassionate spirit at the riverbanks in  lieu of a lazy day of tubing without thought to  anyone or anything but her own good time. Who  would you need to add to your eighth‐step list if you  considered the absence of kindness and compassion  harmful?    August 11    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 35; 1 Samuel  14 and 15        I hope all of us realize that this step is about the  process of becoming. It is a tough step, and we need  to be gentle with ourselves as we grow into  willingness.    Willing: Prepared to accept full responsibility for  our own lives and the harm our choices (intended or  not) have done others. The previous steps help  prepare us for “willingness.” Most of us have  patterns of blaming others, avoiding responsibility,  and seeking retribution for the wrongs done us.  Willingness means we make it our job to focus on  our own behaviors and stop distracting ourselves  with the shortcomings of others.    Are you becoming willing?    Thought for today: “Anyone who claims to be in the  light but hates his brother is still in the darkness.  Whoever loves his brother lives in the light, and there  is nothing in him to make him stumble. But whoever  hates his brother is in the darkness and walks around  in the darkness; he does not know where he is going,  because the darkness has blinded him.” 1 John 2:9‐ 11 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I don’t think it is humanly  possible to see ourselves accurately without  accepting the light of God. We receive this light as  we choose to become willing to accept what it  reveals. May your day be filled with light so that your  tomorrows may bring God (and self and others)  delight.    August 12    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 36; 1 Samuel  16 and 17    Harm: Harm is caused   ‐ physically (injuring or damaging persons or  property, financial irresponsibility resulting in loss  for another, refusing to abide by agreements legally  made, neglect or abuse of those in our care),  ‐ morally (inappropriate behavior regarding moral  or ethical issues including: fairness, doing the “right  thing,” irresponsible behaviors at work, home, etc.,  ignoring the needs of others    or usurping the welfare of others with our own  selfish pursuits, infidelity, abuse, lying,   broken  trust), and 
162

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
‐ spiritually (failure to live out our God‐created  identity to the detriment of others; failure to  support and encourage that same living in others).    The root of harm is usually selfishness; it is  complicated by our narcissism (inability to see  another’s perspective) and defensiveness  (unwillingness to look at ourselves accurately).    Becoming willing to deal with all this stuff is tough.  I’m reminded of something Jesus said: “Apart from  me, you can do nothing.” Certainly that applies to  our ability to recognize how we’ve harmed others.    Thought for today: Love from the center of who you  are; don’t fake it. Run for dear life from evil; hold on  for dear life to good. Be good friends who love  deeply; practice playing second fiddle. Don’t burn  out; keep yourselves fueled and aflame. Be alert  servants of the Master, cheerfully expectant. Don’t  quit in hard times; pray all the harder. Help needy  Christians; be inventive in hospitality. Bless your  enemies; no cursing under your breath. Laugh with  your happy friends when they’re happy; share tears  when they’re down. Get along with each other; don’t  be stuck‐up. Make friends with nobodies; don’t be  the great somebody. . . . Don’t insist on getting even;  that’s not for you to do. “I’ll do the judging,” says  God. “I’ll take care of it.” Our Scriptures tell us that if  you see your enemy hungry, go buy that person  lunch, or if he’s thirsty, get him a drink. Your  generosity will surprise him with goodness. Don’t let  evil get the best of you; get the best of evil by doing  good. Romans 12:9‐21 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: Wow! I find plenty of  harming to deal with when I read instructions like  this! How about you?    August 13    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 37; 1 Samuel  18 and 19      Frankly, I have very little trouble admitting I have  harmed others; just don’t make me acknowledge  that to anyone else! Most of us know when we’ve  blown it. For me, the trouble comes when I ask  myself if I’m willing to make amends.     This is a very slippery slope. We must pause to  prepare. I have witnessed awesome amends and    awful amends; heck, I’ve done both awesome and  awful amends to others. Amends is not saying we’re  sorry we got caught. It’s not saying, “I did wrong, but  you did worse.” It has not one tinge of accusation.  Amends is not, “Mistakes were made, can’t we just  move on?” An amends is never “I feel terrible that I  did that to you…” (with the hidden agenda of trying  to make the offended make us feel better). If any  one of us tries to pass those scenarios off as part of  amends making, we’re going to make a bad situation  worse—and rightfully so—for those are not amends.     Amends: The process of sincerely seeking to repair  the damage done. Mike O’Neill (Power to Choose)  describes this as a two‐step process: apology and  restitution. Today we’re going to address apology.    Apology: “I was wrong.” It is not “I am sorry.”  Being sorry and acknowledging wrongdoing are two  different issues. Sorry is ambiguous in nature. What  exactly are we sorry for? Are we sorry that we got  caught, have to deal with this, that the behavior was  lousy, that we have to deal with this conflict? More  drama doesn’t make for a better apology! When we  go to the shame‐based “I’m sorry” place, sometimes  we just fall all over ourselves and are willing to  confess anything and everything for the sake of  placating the person we have harmed. Making an  apology isn’t about confessing that which is not true.  Humans err, and some of those mistakes are  whoppers. Admitting that is good. But that is not the  same as shame‐based amends, which says, “Hey, I  am a sorry person.” A heartfelt apology will include a  deeply remorseful expression of regret for harm  done. Accepting responsibility for the wrong  behavior is the heart of an effective apology and can  be a humbling experience. Think of it like this: it  takes more character and integrity to go to a person  and tell them the exact nature of the wrong done  than it does to grovel with an expression of regret  that is ill‐defined. Be specific. 25    Thought for today: “You have heard that it was said  to the people long ago, ‘Do not murder, and anyone  who murders will be subject to judgment.’  But I tell  you that anyone who is angry with his brother will be  subject to the judgment…Therefore, if you are  offering your gift at the altar and there remember                                                              
25

 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 8, A NorthStar Community Publication, p.9.
163

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
that your brother has something against you, leave  your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be  reconciled to your brother, then come and offer your  gift.” Matthew 5:21‐24 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Don’t miss tomorrow’s  devotional; we’re going to learn about O’Neill’s  second part of the amends process.    August 14    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 38; 1 Samuel  20 and 21      In Mike O’Neill’s workbook, Power to Choose, he  considers the amends process incomplete if all we  do is acknowledge our harming ways. “I did wrong  when I ______.” This is an excellent first step of the  two‐step process. O’Neill encourages us not to stop  with step one.    Restitution: “What can I do to make this right?”  Just saying you’re sorry isn’t enough! Nor is it  enough to decide for yourself how to make it right.  An apology without restitution is not an amends.  Sometimes restitution takes place before the  amends. If you owe back child support, pay it, says  O’Neill. If you can’t make good on the full amount,  then O’Neill recommends that you send what you  can every month. I suggest that you also get real  about what you can truly afford to send. I wouldn’t  expect you to be able to buy yourself big‐boy toys (if  you’re a guy) or a bunch of new clothes with all the  accessories (if you’re a gal), unless and until you  have first covered your financial obligations to your  children. Trust me. It is unlikely you will be given an  opportunity to apologize until you make some good‐ faith restitution. 26      Perhaps you realize that some harms result in  injury too profound to repay. That’s true. Whether  the injury is financial, emotional, spiritual, or  whatever, you still need to ask the restitution  question and proceed as best you can.    Thought for today: “In everything, do to others what  you would have them do to you, for this sums up the  law and the Prophets.” Matthew 7:12 NIV                                                              
26

  Thought for tomorrow: Everyone’s heard of the  golden rule. But I want to suggest the Platinum Rule:  Treat others as they’d like to be treated. At  NorthStar we have an awesome trainer guru who  helps us work on improving our serve. When she  first marched out the Platinum Rule, this room full of  believers said, “Hey, you can’t top the golden rule!”  But in fact, you can. In Philippians 2 we are called to  even higher ground than gold. Think about which is  easier: treating others as you like to be treated or  treating others as they like to be treated. Isn’t it  option two? Doesn’t that require us to think harder  and longer? Of course it does. We have to become a  student of every person we desire to relate to. I love  words of affirmation and quality time; I really love  them when they come as a pair! But my husband is  an “acts of service” kind of guy. I can affirm him until  the cows come home, and he thinks, “Why does she  keep going on and on with all that affirming  nonsense? Can’t she just remember to buy me  orange juice, peanut butter, and crackers at the  store?” If I want my man to feel loved, I can forget all  that flowery flattery and just make sure I keep the  pantry stocked. Which is the greater sacrifice: to love  the way that’s easy and natural for me, or to love  the way that means something to him? Restitution  requires whipping out the Platinum Rule.    August 15    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 39; 1 Samuel  22 and 23      Boy, that King Saul is giving David fits, isn’t he?     There’s a book called Walking on Eggshells. The  book addresses the challenges of dealing with  people who start out acting like they love us to  pieces, and eventually become people whom we  suspect would like to chop us into pieces. It makes  us feel like we’re walking on eggshells. I suspect  David felt that way with Saul, especially in the  beginning when Saul ran hot and cold in his feelings  for David.     In the next few days, I’m going to give you some  opportunities to examine God’s perspective on  various kinds of relationships. It’s my prayer that  these additional scripture passages will jog your 
164

 The Christ-Centered 12 Step Study Guide, Step 8, A NorthStar Community Publication, pp.9 and 10.   

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
spirit, helping you to recognize possible harming  ways that you did not know were harming.     Thought for today: David needed to rely on God to  help him know how to deal with a boss who was  trying to cut him into little pieces. Working  relationships are discussed in 2 Timothy 2:15; 1  Timothy 6:1‐2; Ephesians 4:28 and 6:5‐9; and 2  Thessalonians 3:6‐10.    Thought for tomorrow: Are you harming anyone at  work?    August 16    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 40; 1 Samuel  24 and 25      Sometimes God uses scripture to teach us how to  love well with minimal harm, but He does it subtly.  Take for example David and Saul’s relationship. God  doesn’t fax a message and say: hey, respect your  boss even if you think he/she is a big goof.     But he teaches us that same principle in 1 Samuel  24.    Thought for today: “’The Lord knows I shouldn’t  have done that to my lord the king,’ he said to his  men. ‘The Lord forbid that I should do this to my lord  and king and attack the Lord’s anointed one, for the  Lord himself has chosen him.’” 1 Samuel  24:6 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: David’s life is illustrating a  principle that scripture supports: even at work, even  when our boss is a goof, even when our employees  are knuckleheads, we need to treat them all with  gentleness and respect. It’s not about whether they  deserve it, or whether it’s convenient or easy; we do  it because God said so. We do it because as  desperately devoted followers of Him, we’re  committed to following Him even when it’s  annoying, inconvenient, and just plain hard.     August 17    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 41; 1 Samuel  26 and 27        I have the greatest life! I get to listen and learn  from all sorts of smart and cool people every day.  Yesterday I asked one of my favorite therapists what  he thinks makes for a healthy family. I loved his  answer. He said healthy and unhealthy families have  the same kinds of problems, crises, etc. but healthy  families: name their problems, expect to find a  solution, grow in their awareness of both individual  and family system “weaknesses,” search for  solutions, and do all of this with honesty and  respect.    He went on to say that lots of this is about learning  how to cope effectively (as opposed to in a  maladaptive way) with strong emotions and serious  issues. Whew! My family often exhibits strong  emotions (some negative) and serious issues. I’m  encouraged to hear that we’re…sort of…normal. I’m  glad normal doesn’t mean perpetually perky!    Thought for today: God tells us about emotions in  lots of places in scripture (both by implication and  through direct teaching). Here are a few places that  I’ve found personally helpful: 2 Timothy 1:7, 2:14  and verses 23 and 24; James 1:19‐20; Ephesians  4:26‐27, 31‐32; Philippians 4:2‐9; James 4:1‐10;  Matthew 5:21‐26.    Thought for tomorrow: Are you able to identify both  your strengths and weaknesses in the area of  emotions? Can you honestly name your problems?  Do you expect, and are you eagerly seeking,  solutions to your life struggles? Are you dealing with  all your interpersonal relationships honestly and  respectfully? If not, you’re harming.    August 18    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 42; 1 Samuel  28 and 29      Can David catch a break? David has some “issues,”  but his warrior spirit and fighting abilities are not  among them. In chapter 29 he’s rejected by a group  of people who should appreciate him, but they do  not. Whether we’re in a position of authority or  under someone’s authority, we often find ourselves  feeling unappreciated and even rejected. How are  we supposed to respond?   
165

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today: 1 Peter 2:13‐14 and Romans  13:17 speak to this subject.    Thought for tomorrow: Issues of authority are  difficult. No matter what, we are supposed to be  people who respond with gentleness and respect.  This is a tough challenge, especially for those of us  who have a natural inclination to push back against  any kind of authority figure. Yesterday Pete (my  hubbie) was driving down a narrow hilly road, and  someone passed him on the downhill section! For  those of you who don’t live in our area: no one  should EVER pass anyone on that particular road!  Pete reports that he was probably going 30 to 35  mph. (I think the speed limit is 25 mph, which does  require you to apply your brakes if you want to stick  to the letter of the law.) Pete’s point is that he  wasn’t dawdling. Mr. Calm said he had an urge to  really give that guy a piece of his mind when he  found himself behind him at the next traffic light,  which we all found amazing from a man who’s  usually quite collected. He didn’t. Why? Because he  decided anyone who would drive like that might also  have a semi‐automatic rifle stuffed under the  driver’s seat. I think there’s a far better reason for  Pete to have maintained his cool. It’s what a  desperately devoted follower needs to learn how to  do. Sometimes our relationships with authority  figures (and our positions as authority figures) teach  us the patience necessary to apply the principles of  gentleness and respect in all sorts of life situations.     August 19    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 43; 1 Samuel  30 and 31      The death of Saul ends an era of gossip, slander,  and scheming between Saul and David, but it doesn’t  end the problem. In the years ahead, David, his  family, and his community are going to continue to  struggle with these harming ways.    Thought for today: Everyone knows it is not right to  gossip, slander, and scheme! But have we been  willing to be honest about our own harming ways in  these particular areas? Perhaps it would help us if  we read James 4:11‐12 and 1 Peter 2:1‐3.      Thought for tomorrow: Can you envision a world  where people who disagree do so with gentleness  and respect? Can you envision a world absent of  gossiping, slandering, and scheming? I personally  would like that to be the case in our upcoming  elections! Do you think I should count on that?  Here’s the thing: each of us has the ability to make  this happen. We can choose to stop this bad  behaving. If each of us stopped this behavior,  without concern for whether others do or not,  wouldn’t we have a safe and secure community to  live and love in?    August 20    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 44; 2 Samuel  1 and 2      Although David was not Saul’s biological son, in  many ways they had a parent/child relationship.  Upon the death of Saul and in spite of Saul’s crazy  jealousy of David, David grieved the loss of his  mentor. Not all family is determined by DNA; lots of  family is a gift from God. It’s the people he brings  into our lives to encourage, exhort, enrich, and (on a  good day) entertain us!     Harming in families happens; and it’s always a  tragedy. What’s worse, sometimes we continue  harming from one generation to the next while  thinking nothing of it. It’s what we learned, a way of  life, and to us it’s normal. Normal doesn’t always  equal healthy. We owe it to our families to see what  God has to say about healthy families (and unhealthy  ones).    Thought for today: Family relationships are  discussed in: Exodus 20; Deuteronomy 6:1‐4; 1  Timothy 5:3‐4; Ephesians 5:1‐4; and Ephesians 5:21‐ 33 (to name just a few). Since we all live in families, I  recommend you find a place in your notebook to  keep track of all the things you come upon in  scripture that can guide you in how to create a  healthy family. It’s never too late to learn.    Thought for tomorrow: Most of us intend to create  awesome families; all of us fail at this from time to  time. Be alert. Keep learning.     
166

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
August 21    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 45; 2 Samuel  3 and 4      Throughout the life of David we note that he has a  messy relationship with his neighbors and  community. Wasn’t it Robert Frost who said  something like “fences make good neighbors?”  We’ve lived in the same house for 20 years;  sometimes it requires a lot of maturity to live well  with your neighbors and honorably in your  community.     We had a cat who used to love to jump on my  neighbor’s car. I’m sure they hated that! But they  were very kind and generous to us—gracious and  long suffering. They used to commend our cat for  keeping down the vole population in their lovely  yard. This kind of gentle patience could not have  been easy for people who had no pets. I hope I can  model this same attitude. God has things to say  about how to live in community.    Thought for today: Care to consider whether you  are living well or not with your neighbors. Read  Proverbs 3:29‐32, 3:27; 1 Timothy 5:1‐17; James 2:1‐ 10; and Romans 12:4‐13.    Thought for tomorrow: How’s your citizenship? If  you were a Scout, would you qualify for a badge of  honor in this area?    August 22    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 46; 2 Samuel  5 and 6      David was an awesome warrior but in many ways  an awful family man. One of the signs of trouble in  this arena of David’s life is found in 1 Samuel 6. It  seems like Michal, daughter of Saul and wife of  David, was “filled with contempt” as she observed  David celebrating the return of the Ark to the City of  David.     I’m quite sure I don’t understand all the subtleties  of this text. But I get this: a woman who has  contempt for her spouse is headed for trouble.  That’s why I preach the gospel of choosing a spouse  well. Because once you have them, it becomes one’s    destiny to treat one’s spouse with both respect and  an attitude of cherishing. Michal couldn’t do that. No  doubt, David didn’t make it easy for her to choose a  respectful, cherishing attitude toward him. Michal’s  father took her and separated her from David for  several years—handing her over to another man to  spite David. Eventually David is able to negotiate the  return of Michal, but it seems the damage was done.  Upon her return, she comes home to a house filled  with “other wives.” These two never seem to get on  track again.     Thought for today: Read 2 Timothy 2:22, Ephesians  5:3, Romans 14:11‐14, and Matthew 5:27‐30 for  further insights into God’s perspective on sexuality.    Thought for tomorrow: If we could learn how to  treat our spouses with gentleness and respect— cherishing them morning, noon, and night—I suspect  we’d have fewer instances of sexual sins and  adultery. Are you guarding your marriage? If you’re  not married, are you developing the kind of  character that will make you the kind of spouse that  it is a delight to cherish and respect if God has  marriage planned for your future?    August 23    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 47; 2 Samuel  7 and 8      One of the things that makes it easy to stick to our  Bible‐reading plan in the Samuels is all the intrigue.  In future chapters, things continue to stay messy and  difficult for King David. Have you ever thought that if  you were the king of your kingdom that life would be  easy? Do you fantasize about ordering your spouse,  employees, and children around? Have you ever  thought about writing up a “to do” list and then  expecting your minions to follow through with your  orders? I suppose with enough manipulation,  control, and anger there would be times when we  might have the illusion of this kind of power. If so,  Lord help us. We weren’t created to rule and have a  wonderful life. Even King David, given a lot of power  by God Himself, did not have an easy life once he got  the crown and cool kingly clothes.    To the extent that we are given authority, we need  to be certain we understand the burden of 
167

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
responsibility that comes with that authority. God is  clear about communicating our place in the area of  rights versus responsibilities. Those who are given  positions of “authority” must be aware of how  dangerous and awesome a responsibility that is. All  leaders are called to be servant leaders. It is never  about getting to a place where we can push others  around.    Thought for today: I love 1 Peter 3:13‐22 and 4:1‐ 6—a marvelous discussion of rights versus  responsibilities.    Thought for tomorrow: In my life, I find that if I stick  to taking care of my responsibilities, God seems to  be quite capable of watching out for my rights.  However, when I start feeling empowered and  entitled, my life can slide downhill at an amazing  speed.    August 24    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 48; 2 Samuel  9 and 10      Even I can sometimes muster up the maturity to  love those that love me well. I’m blessed with people  in my life that are great at loving me. Sometimes I  can imitate this awesome loving myself. But I find it  extremely difficult to love my enemies.     Jesus set an extremely challenging example when  he taught us to not only love those who love us, but  love those who are our enemies as well. He taught  this; he lived it too. This kind of high‐class living  shouldn’t have come as a surprise to us. As far back  as the Old Testament, God was giving us a foretaste  of the kind of awesome lovers he was going to equip  us to become.    In 2 Samuel 9, David discovered Mephibosheth, a  relative of Saul. David extends him love. By any  standards this was risky behavior—potentially loving  an enemy. But David does it anyway.     Thought for today: For further instruction on loving  our enemies see: 1 Peter 3:8‐9, Romans 12:14‐21,  and Matthew 5:38‐48    Thought for tomorrow: I’m glad that we have  scripture to teach us that it is God who makes us    both willing and able to do His good, pleasing, and  perfect will. I don’t think I could love my enemies  without God’s power. Failure to do so, however, is  harming behavior. I can’t stop with this statement. I  must add that loving your enemies is not the  equivalent of letting them walk all over you. Once I  had a friend whose husband slapped her around on  a regular basis. I suggested that this man was more  of an enemy than a friend. She agreed and said  that’s why she stayed with him. This statement  required serious pausing to prepare on my part.  Finally, I was able to calm my heart and say this,  “You know, I do not think God is telling us that to  love our enemies is the equivalent of saying one  should tolerate abuse from a husband. Wouldn’t it  be a far more loving thing to hold your spouse  accountable for his misdeeds, believing that he can  change, but for sure not become a stumbling block  by allowing him to continue to sin against you?”  Sometimes the most loving thing we can do for  another person is to honestly name a problem and  lovingly hold them accountable for their wrongs  against us. Simply tolerating abuse can never be a  loving act. So please, be careful how you interpret  this devotional. Don’t allow its principles to be mis‐ applied. I think it is possible to lovingly, respectfully  address behaviors that lead us to believe someone is  our enemy without causing harm ourselves. It may  take a small army of resource people to help us sort  this all out, but it’s an effort God endorses.    August 25    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 49; 2 Samuel  11 and 12    “In the spring of the year, when kings normally go  out to war, David sent Joab and the Israelite army to  fight the Ammonites. They destroyed the Ammonite  army and laid siege to the city of Rabbah. However,  David stayed behind in Jerusalem.” 2 Samuel 11:1  NLT      Obviously, Joab was quite capable of fighting  Ammonites. The problem is not Joab’s military  capabilities. The issue is that David shirked his  responsibility as a king. Kings are supposed to march  off to war with their armies and lay siege on things, 
168

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
whether they’ve got awesome generals on staff or  not.    This is a bad sign for David. He’s lost his groove.  This one single act of failure to act kingly puts David  in a position where he will now make a series of  extremely poor choices that will ultimately harm  David, his family, his army, and his entire  community. I guess how we behave really does  matter.    Thought for today: David covets Bathsheba, and the  trouble really heats up for this King. For more  information on stealing, greed, and coveting see  Exodus 20, Ephesians 4:28 and 5:5.    Thought for tomorrow: I’ve never wanted someone  else’s husband; I’m quite happy with the one I’ve  got! But I have wanted other things that didn’t  belong to me. When we desire things that aren’t  ours, we’re doing harm.    August 26    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 50; 2 Samuel  13 and 14      At our house we are in the midst of discussion  about a possible familial character defect. Suffice it  to say that a series of events has caused Pete and  me to re‐evaluate some patterns of behaving in our  home, and we’re making the necessary adjustments.  This is clearly and painfully requiring all the 12 steps  and a generous helping of humility and faith.     Harming habits often pass from generation to  generation. As we pass down other traits,  unfortunately, we also manage to teach defects of  character too. My husband has beautiful brown eyes  and I have green eyes. Our daughter has stunning  baby blues. How did that happen? Genetics. Both  her grandfathers’ eyes are blue, so obviously she got  those two recessive genes. Our boys have green to  greenish‐blue eyes; no one got those pretty brown  eyes. And that’s the way it goes. We don’t often find  ourselves in control of what the next generation  receives from us.    Eye color is no big deal, but passing down a  harming habit is huge. In today’s reading, we’re  beginning to observe the reaping and sowing in the  life of David and his family. David had a lot of    potential positives to give his kids: giant slayer,  warrior, care and respect for authority, a man after  God’s own heart. But he had some pretty potent  defects too. He committed murder to cover up  adultery; he sometimes hid from his responsibilities.  We have at least one story of a wife (Michal) who  felt very uncherished and was certainly treated  without respect (Remember how he cheated with  Bathsheba? That was very disrespectful.)  Perhaps  most damning of all: he refused to be honest and  confess his shortcomings until confronted by  Nathan.    That’s a big problem; when we do harm, and we’re  willing to acknowledge it, that’s cool. If we don’t  know we’ve done harm until someone points it out  to us, it’s awesome when we take that feedback and  handle it humbly. But when we get caught in a  wrong we know we’ve committed, and then we  acknowledge it—that puts everyone in an awkward  position. Concerned and wounded parties have to  process whether one has admitted wrongdoing or  simply gotten caught.    Thought for today: Amnon became frustrated to the  point of illness on account of his sister Tamar, for she  was a virgin, and it seemed impossible for him to do  anything to her…So Amnon… pretended to be ill…”I  would like my sister Tamar to come and make some  special bread in my sight, so I may eat from her  hand.”…Tamar went to the house of her brother  Amnon, who was lying down…when she took it to  him to eat, he grabbed her…”Don’t my brother!” she  said to him…But he refused to listen to her, and since  he was stronger than she, he raped her. 2 Samuel 13,  selected verses NIV    Thought for tomorrow: David had some “issues”  with sexual immorality. His son followed suit with his  own issues—ultimately raping his sister and then  hating her after the rape more than he had loved her  before the encounter. Even with several  opportunities to make this very harmful encounter  less harming, Amnon refused to right his wrong. The  family responds to this outrage without confronting  Amnon directly, without providing appropriate  assistance to Tamar, and without David being willing  to intervene and encourage his family to make  necessary changes. Harming ways are inevitable.  People mess up. But once we become desperately 
169

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
devoted followers of Christ, we have the capacity to  not only change but to experience transformation.  The process is painful. It requires honesty;  confession and correction are essential. Healthy  families are not problem‐free; they are families who  don’t run from their problems. Our family is working  on ours not because we particularly want to but  because we need to if we’re going to live God’s  grand epic adventure for us. I pray today that your  family will enter into the process and allow God to  have His way with you!!    August 27    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 51; 2 Samuel  15 and 16      I have a girlfriend who has a trust issue with her  beloved husband. He doesn’t trust her. She’s upset  about this sad state of affairs. She thinks he is being  judgmental and critical; I suspect he believes he’s  trying to preserve the financial well‐being of his  family.    Here’s what happened. My girlfriend stopped  drinking about ten years ago to the relief of all who  loved her. She was not able to be a social drinker;  her drinking was a hazard to society. Sobriety was a  blessed gift to herself, her family and her  community.    Everyone assumed that this would bring a halt to  all the harming behaviors that had occurred during  the drinking years. Everyone’s assumption was  wrong. My friend had more than a drinking problem;  she had a series of maladaptive ways of dealing with  her emotions, her problems, and even the  annoyances of everyday living. Although drinking  was a poorly chosen solution to her problems, it was  more a symptom of the problem than the cause of  all the chaos.    My friend stopped drinking and started shopping.  She used all her finely honed skills of secrecy, deceit,  and manipulation to hide her wild and crazy  spending sprees from her husband ‐ until the  creditors came banging on his office door. My friend  had accrued an amazing amount of debt and  managed to drain virtually all their assets without  her husband’s noticing.    Now she’s mad that he doesn’t trust her with the  charge cards or the checkbook.      Two observations: from my perspective, the  husband is making a reasonable choice in light of  current circumstances, and I’m not convinced my  friend truly realizes how much harm she’s caused.    Thought for today: For a couple of passages related  to handling our finances, check out Proverbs 6:1‐5  and Matthew 6:19‐34.    Thought for tomorrow: Yesterday we discussed the  awkwardness that occurs when a person is caught in  wrongdoing without first confessing. My friend got  caught. She is not helping rebuild trust by continuing  to act like she is the victim. One way to combat the  suspicion of family members who naturally question  a wrong‐doer’s sincerity is to become willing to  make amends. That means both acknowledging  wrong (without minimizing or excusing) and making  restitution. Call me crazy, but I think financial  mismanagement of such huge proportions deserves  some consequences and appropriate checks and  balances for future financial situations. One way to  test our own progress in the willingness department  is to see how gracious we are in making restitution.  How’s it going for you?    August 28    Scripture Reading for today: Jeremiah 52; 2 Samuel  17 and 18      The life and times of David provide plenty of  fodder for wrestling with the messiness of life.  David, “a man after God’s own heart,” filled with  faith, blessed by God, given the job of King by God  Himself—what could be better? What kind of life  would we expect David to live?    Here’s a better question: having turned our own  lives over to the care and control of God, what kind  of life do we expect to live ourselves? Exemplary?  Transformed? Righteous? Holy? Pure?     What about those times when we live “less‐than”  lives—when we’re dishonest, treacherous,  disrespectful, unkind, greedy, selfish, self‐absorbed,  mean‐spirited, vengeful?    As we read through 2 Samuel, notice how David  continues to show us that loving God does not  guarantee that we will always successfully model  God’s love for others. David didn’t deal well with the 
170

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
rape of Tamar, the eventual revenge of Absalom on  Amnon (something that wouldn’t have been an issue  if David had dealt with Amnon’s sin himself), and  Absalom’s attempted coup against his dad, David.    I don’t know what to say about all this messy living  except this: we are completely incapable of  following all the rules, being right, doing right, and  not harming others. We mess up. Kings and paupers  mess up. Bosses and employees mess up. Parents  and children mess up.     Everyone messes up with stunning regularity. No  one gets it right all the time.    Thought for today: “And I know that nothing good  lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. I want to do  what is right, but I can’t. I want to do what is good,  but I don’t.  I don’t want to do what is wrong, but I  do it anyway…I have discovered this principle of life –  that when I want to do what is right, I inevitably do  what is wrong. I love God’s law with all my heart. But  there is another power within me that is at war with  my mind…Oh, what a miserable person I am! Who  will free me from this life that is dominated by sin  and death?” Romans 7:18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: A dear friend of mine  reminded me of this chapter this morning. After the  morning I’ve had, it couldn’t come at a better time!  As Liz says, if the story ends at Romans 7:24, we may  as well all just give up. But the story doesn’t end  with “Oh, what a miserable person I am!”     “Thank God! The answer is in Jesus Christ our Lord.  So you see how it is: In my mind I really want to obey  God’s law, but because of my sinful nature I am a  slave to sin.” (Romans 7:24) This is true for kings and  regular guys like us! But it’s not the only truth—not  even the most important truth. Listen to this: “So  now there is no condemnation for those who belong  to Christ Jesus. And because you belong to him, the  power of the life‐giving Spirit has freed you from the  power of sin that leads to death. The law of Moses  was unable to save us because of the weakness of  our sinful nature. So God did what the law could not  do. He sent his own Son in a body like the bodies we  sinners have. And in that body God declared an end  to sin’s control over us by giving his son as a sacrifice  for our sins.” Romans 8:1‐3 NLT        So, yes, we’re all capable of acting pretty  wretched. But that’s not the central point. The  central point is that the coming of Jesus has made it  possible for our wretchedness not to be the  determining factor of our fate. When we accept the  saving mercies of Christ, we’re also accepting His  offer of freedom. We no longer have to be  controlled by our natures, but instead, can allow the  Holy Spirit to guide, direct, counsel, and confront us.  I’m glad I don’t have to put my hope in how I or  others behave! How about you? Are you willing to  allow The Spirit of God to guide you?    August 29    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Samuel 19 and 20      If we’ve gotten this far in our devotional series on  the eighth step and are still confused about who  needs to go on our list, let me offer a suggestion.  Listen to the small and large things that the people  that love you and have displayed massive amounts  of loyalty to you tell you about yourself. Often in  their gentle or direct words, we can gain insights into  how others perceive us. Sometimes hidden harm  waits to be discovered if we’re willing to pay a bit  more attention to the feedback we’re receiving.    David got some feedback after the Absalom  debacle. You’ll recall that Absalom fought to  dethrone his father, King David, and the king’s army  defeated Absalom’s assault and killed Absalom in the  process. David’s response was to publicly grieve the  loss of his son (the same son he had ignored for  years). One can only imagine how devastating it was  for the men who had put their own lives in harm’s  way to see their King mourning the loss of the man  they had to kill in defense of the king.    Thought for today: “Then Joab went to the king’s  room and said to him, “We saved your life today and  the lives of your sons, your daughters, and your  wives and concubines. Yet you act like this, making  us feel ashamed of ourselves. You seem to love those  who hate you and hate those who love you.” 2  Samuel 19:5‐6 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Listen to the people who  love you, hold your tongue, and try to beat down  your natural inclination to defend your own 
171

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
reputation. Sometimes we do indeed act like we love  those who hate us and hate those who love us. Isn’t  that sad?    August 30    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Samuel 21 and 22      David’s song of praise in chapter 22 is a reminder  to us all of the faithfulness of God. I used to wonder  about David’s personal commentary on God’s  rescue: “He led me to a place of safety; he rescued  me because he delights in me. The Lord rewarded me  for doing right; he restored me because of my  innocence for I have kept the ways of the Lord; I have  not turned from my God to follow evil. I have  followed all his regulations; I have never abandoned  his decrees. I am blameless before God; I have kept  myself from sin. The Lord rewarded me for doing  right. He has seen my innocence.” 2 Samuel 22:20‐25  NLT    Hmmm. Really? I don’t think so. Murder, adultery,  and bad parenting all are indicators of failure to  follow all the regulations and abandoning some of  God’s decrees.     The Lord rewarded David and restored him  because of who God is, not because David always  got it right. We indeed are told that we can stand  blameless before the throne of grace, but not  because we’ve figured out how to follow all God’s  laws. We are declared blameless because Jesus, the  Son of God, did right, was innocent, and never  abandoned God’s decrees. Our holy, blameless state  is a gift from the only one who truly lived that state  of humble, loving obedience.     So if you’re trying to figure out a way to think that  you’re getting it all right all the time, let it rest. It’s  OK. Being blameless has already been done. We can  embrace our harming ways without fear of  condemnation. We can do this. Not because we’re  good, but because we are forgiven.     Thought for today: “Be kind and compassionate to  one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ  God forgave you.” Ephesians 4:32 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: If I could give you a gift, it  would be the gift of clarity regarding God’s  forgiveness. Have you ever watched the movie    classic, It’s a Wonderful Life? In the closing scenes  Jimmy Stewart figures out that he is free to tell the  truth about his past sins, because his past sins are  already forgiven and he is finally free. He is free to  tell the truth and free to accept God’s great gifts and  grand epic adventures. Jimmy Stewart dreamed that  his adventures would involve world travel and doing  great things. His vision was clouded, and for years he  missed the grand epic adventure God was giving him  each day. Finally, broken and wretched, Stewart  found forgiveness and freedom on one snowy  Christmas Eve. If you’ve never watched this great  movie, you’re missing out! Watch it and see if there  might be a truth tucked in that script for you. Notice  his joy over his broken banister, his impending jail  sentence, his drafty house, even the attack of his  enemies. Discover as Stewart did that grand epic  adventures can only be seen through the eyes of a  clear conscience. You too can have this worldview.  Make today a day when you’re willing to find your  freedom.     August 31    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Samuel 23 and 24      David repeated his harming ways until the day he  died. I wonder what difference it would have made if  he had worked through a 12‐step model? In point of  fact, he did work through steps one, two, three,  four, and even five; we can find evidence in scripture  for those steps.     What I can’t find (which doesn’t mean he didn’t do  it, it just means it isn’t recorded) is attempts on  David’s part to healthily deal with the harm he did to  his family and others.    It’s my prayer that today you will be inspired by  David’s inaction and take action in your own life to  avert the repetition of harming ways. I hope today  will be a day when you are both willing and able to  make your list of harms done.    Thought for today: “Dear friends, since God so loved  us, we also ought to love one another. No one has  ever seen God; but if we love one another, God lives  in us and his love is made complete in us.” 1 John  4:11‐12 NIV   
172

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for tomorrow: Until we can figure out how  to love one another, we are clouding others’ views  of God. We were created to be a light that shines,  not a storm cloud dumping destruction on those we  were created to love. May we all learn what it means  to receive God’s love so that we can love each other.  May God’s love live in us and be made complete.                                                                                         STEP 9 We made direct amends to such people  wherever possible, except when to do so would  injure them or others.    September 1    Scripture Reading for today: Lamentations 1 and 2;  1 Kings 1      I know a secret. I know how you can get rich quick.  It won’t cost you a penny of investment capital, nor  does it require travel. You don’t have to concern  yourself with an IRS audit, nor will anyone force you  to do anything illegal, immoral, or fattening.    All you have to do is deal with the issue of  forgiveness. Whether the offender or the offended,  both parties must agree to deal with the issue of  forgiveness. In my experience, remorseful offenders  tell me their greatest desire is to be forgiven. The  offended share that they would love to know that  those who have hurt them really “get it.” The one  thing offended people say to me most often is that  they desire with all their hearts to know that the  harmer truly understands the extent to which their  offense has hurt them.     Before you rush off and send a text message  intended to clear up the unsettled feeling of wrongs  that haven’t been addressed, you should pause to  prepare. The only thing worse than unforgiveness  sitting awkwardly between two parties is an amends  gone bad.    Thought for today: “Fools mock at making amends  for sin, but goodwill is found among the upright.”  Proverbs 14:9 NIV     Thought for tomorrow: Who among us doesn’t  desire to be “upright?” In order to have that  description fit our profile, we need to know four  things when it comes to forgiveness: 1. Know when  we’ve done wrong, 2. Acknowledge when we’ve  been wrong, 3. Know how to make amends, and 4.  know how to forgive appropriately.    We’ll be covering all these topics in this month’s  devotional series.         
173

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
September 2    Scripture Reading for today: Lamentations 3 and 4;  1 Kings 2      “Are you kidding me? You expect me to forgive?”     “No, I am not asking you to forgive; I’m asking you  to study the process. After you’ve considered all the  information about the concept of forgiveness, you  can make your own decision about what to do next.”     “OK, I can do that. But there is nothing you can tell  me that will convince me I should forgive that lousy,  no‐good, you‐know‐who!”     I get this; truly, I do. If I were free to share the  story of abuse, neglect, and broken trust that hides  behind my friend’s question, you’d get it too. The  concept of forgiveness is a lot easier to preach if one  doesn’t have the concrete particulars surrounding  some stories of human cruelty. So consider this idea:  forgiveness, at its core, is transferring the offensive  case at hand to a higher court.     There’s a particular traffic light in my community  that people run with annoying frequency. Since it  lies between my house and my son’s school, I watch  these traffic‐light runners daily, and I fume every  time.   I’ve been tempted to make a citizen’s arrest. I sit in  my turn lane and watch numerous cars bust through  the red light, forcing me to wait while I have a green  light! I fantasize during these times about jumping  out of my car into the lane and yelling, “Citizen’s  arrest! Citizen’s arrest!” I don’t follow through on  this big dream, because I believe that anyone who’ll  run a red light will not hesitate to run over a middle‐ aged lady with a strong southern drawl.     A far better option will be when our local police  force sets up a sting operation and hauls these  evildoers before our local judges—whom I trust will  throw the book at these bad guys (and gals).     As much as I would like to make these bad drivers  pay, I haven’t got the power to do so. Someone  does; it just isn’t me.     And that’s my point. None of us has the power,  resources, wisdom, or discernment to carry out  justice as effectively as Holy God. Forgiveness is  acknowledging that reality and saying, “Hey, I’m  going to accept the fact that I am not the ultimate  judge here, but I know who is—God. I’m going to    forgive, and in so doing, transfer this case to a higher  court.”     Thought for today: “Dear friends, never take  revenge. Leave that to the righteous anger of God.  For the Scriptures say, ‘I will take revenge; I will pay  them back,’ says the Lord.” Romans 12:19 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: God knows everything. He  knows the back story. He knows the motives of the  heart (both offender’s and the offended’s hearts).  He has all the information. He holds all the cards.  He’s got the power. He’s the ultimate judge. If we  really want justice dispensed, who’s better  equipped—us or God?     September 3    Scripture Reading for today: Lamentations 5; 1 Kings  3       “Do you expect me to just pretend nothing  happened? Is that what you’re saying?’     “No!”     One time someone harmed me to such a degree  that denial of wrongdoing was impossible for both of  us. Both the offended (me) and the offender (not me  in this one incident) were clear that harm had been  done. Since I make a lot of mistakes, 99% of the time  when an issue of offense arises in my life, I can  usually find at least 51% of my part in the story. In  this rare instance, neither of us could rationalize the  harm done by saying I deserved it.     Amends were made. Forgiveness was offered and  accepted.     A few months passed, and the forgiven offender  took me out to lunch and let me have it with both  barrels. It seems my friend was aggravated that I  hadn’t been forgiving enough. As I asked questions  for clarification, I soon realized that my friend  thought that forgiveness meant “Never mind! Just  forget about it.”     That’s not how forgiveness works. Sometimes we  wrestle through the forgiveness process and our  relationships are strengthened—and that’s  awesome! But that’s not always the case.     Although I truly believe I forgave my friend, I must  admit the entire situation changed the nature of our  relationship. When I forgave, I was acknowledging 
174

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
that I was transferring this case of offensiveness to a  higher court: the holy court of God. In essence, I  chose to take myself out of the role of jury OR judge,  and I asked God to have His way with the entire  mess.     But in the process, I learned a lot about my friend’s  values, judgment, and sense of fair play. That  information caused me to re‐evaluate the kind of  relationship we truly had. I thought we had an  intimate, trusting, safe bond. What I learned is that  we had a social, cordial friendship. Truly, I don’t  believe our relationship changed so much as I  changed my perspective on the relationship. That  changed perspective resulted in a change in my  behavior towards my friend, and that’s what my  friend found offensive.     Forgiving someone is not the same thing as:  “never mind,” forgetting, or saying that everything is  “just fine.” Forgiveness, as I said earlier, is  transferring the whole sorry mess to God for His  judgment. That said, we are expected to make sound  judgments. Sometimes that requires us to detach  with love from people who we have good reason to  believe do not have our best interests at heart. This  is a hard truth.     Thought for today: “The perverse stir up dissension,  and gossips separate close friends. The violent entice  their neighbors and lead them down a path that is  not good. Those who wink with their eyes are  plotting perversity; those who purse their lips are  bent on evil.” Proverbs 16:28‐30 NIV     Thought for tomorrow: Don’t confuse the need to  choose friends wisely with the issue of forgiveness.  These are two separate issues.     September 4    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 4 and 5; Ezekiel  1      I was so mad I could spit nails. A friend, whom I  dearly love, had really messed up and done  something terribly hurtful to me. Since I had no prior  knowledge of his offending behavior, it was not his  offense that had me seeing red for rage. However,  his completely clueless attempt at the amends  process put me in a terrible position, and that’s why    I was so darn mad!  Why was his sincere effort to ask  for forgiveness causing such a vitriolic reaction? He  violated every basic principle of the amends process.  Here’s what went wrong (from my perspective).    • He attempted to initiate an amends process in a  public place, at an inconvenient time, and in the  presence of others who were not connected to  the event.    • He said he was sorry, not wrong. I got the  distinct impression that he could not articulate  his wrongdoing (although it was easy for me to  name it as I listened to the story). In response to  my question, “What do you think you did wrong  in this situation?” his response was, “I feel  terrible.” That is so annoying.  • He said he felt bad, not that he had behaved  badly. He seemed far more concerned with how  he felt than how his actions might make me feel.  • He offered no plan for restitution. Amends is  both apology and restitution. An effective  amends covers both contingencies. A brilliant  amends allows the offended to have input into  the restitution process.  • He violated the “injure clause” of the ninth step.  Since I was unaware of his offending ways, his  confession came as quite a shock to me. I’m of  the opinion that he confessed to relieve his own  conscience—not to right a wrong. I think this  unexpected and embarrassing confession was  more harmful to me than if he had made an  indirect amends (more on that later).     What comes next? I desire to offer forgiveness  when needed, but I haven’t actually been asked for  forgiveness. I was asked to make someone feel  better! I can’t control anyone’s emotions; I don’t  have that kind of power. So now I have a friend who  needs the gift of forgiveness, my hands are full of a  beautifully wrapped gift of forgiveness, and the two  of us stand in an awkward moment of time—two  people wanting what God wants for us ‐ wondering  what to do about all our humanity that keeps getting  in the way.    Thought for today: “When a man or woman wrongs  another in any way and so is unfaithful to the LORD,  that person is guilty and must confess the sin he has  committed. He must make full restitution for his  wrong, add one fifth to it and give it all to the person  he has wronged.” Numbers 5:6‐7 NIV 
175

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for tomorrow: Here’s the deal. God is  mysterious in many ways. We know His ways are  higher than ours, and there’s a lot about God and His  ways that we will never understand on planet earth.  But He is crystal clear when it comes to forgiveness.  We are created to be loving, gracious, merciful, and  forgiving. I want to be the woman God created me  to be, and so if on the rare occasion I find myself in  the position of the offended (as opposed to the  offender, a role that seems to come naturally to me),  I WANT TO FORGIVE! I understand the harmful  effects of unforgiveness, bitterness, and festering  anger, and I want not part of them. If I’m going to do  something that isn’t healthy for my body, I want it  coated in chocolate and slathered with peanut  butter! I refuse to waste my mental, physical,  spiritual, and emotional well being by being a person  who harbors resentment.  That said, forgiveness can  be a messy undertaking!  I am so relieved to know  that God is working in us to make us both willing and  able to do His good, pleasing, and perfect will,  because we sure can act like goofs sometimes!    September 5    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 6 and 7; Ezekiel  2      In yesterday’s devotional I discussed an amends  attempt that got messy. So let’s take a few days and  break down the process of amends. Perhaps we can  keep from making our own messy amends and  causing a bad situation to get worse.    The best amends is face to face. Sometimes a  letter or a phone call is the next best thing. Ask God  to give you the discernment necessary to decide  how to approach the person you have harmed.  However you choose to initiate an amends, please  think about the other person’s perspective. This isn’t  about you.     Tip: Don’t startle them. In yesterday’s example of  amends gone wrong, I was startled. My friend came  up to me in a very public setting and told me about  something he had done to harm me, which took me  completely by surprise. I had no knowledge of this  offense. People were standing around while he  spilled his guts. It was embarrassing.       I would have preferred for my friend to come up to  me and say, “Teresa, I realize you don’t know this,  but I need to make an amends to you. When would  it be convenient for us to meet and talk about this?”  At that moment I could have chosen to ask  questions, schedule an appointment, or suggest that  we chat further in a more private setting simply to  provide me with more information.     I actually tried to interrupt my friend’s “spewing,”  but he would have none of that. He wanted this off  his chest before he left to go on vacation. That  violates a second point of amicable amends‐making:  accommodate the offended. Make it as easy as  possible for them to hear your amends. Choose a  place that is convenient for them, comfortable for  them, and considerate of them. Even how we  approach the process can be the beginning of  restitution.    Thought for today: “Above all, love each other  deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.”  1 Peter 4:8 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Making amends is hard on  both the offender and the offended. Let’s make sure  we do everything possible to increase the odds that  the outcome of this experience will be positive for  everyone.    September 6    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 8; Ezekiel 3 and  4       Once in a while it is not possible to make a direct  amends. Other times a direct amends would cause  more injury. An indirect amend is appropriate for  someone who is deceased or otherwise inaccessible.  Letters written and not mailed, prayers to God, or  changes in behavior are all acceptable ways to make  an indirect amend. I recall a friend who felt terrible  about how he had behaved with a young woman  sexually. He prayed and prayed about how to make  amends. Eventually, he decided that a direct amend  might cause more harm, and so he opted for the  indirect approach. Although he didn’t feel it was in  her best interest to approach her, he made a  decision to relate differently to all women in the  future as a silent and very private amends to this 
176

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
unnamed woman. He also confessed his wrongdoing  to a trusted accountability team and submitted to  their suggestions for restitution. This man regularly  makes generous donations to organizations that aid  sexually abused women.     Now as a father with a daughter of his own, he  models in attitude, word, and deed a deep and  profound respect for women. He speaks up if  someone treats a woman like an object. He regularly  shares his own past failure when it seems helpful for  another man in a similar situation to hear the story.    This guy has made his life a living amends. That’s  pretty cool.     Thought for today: “Yes, each of us will have to give  a personal account to God. So don’t condemn each  other anymore. Decide instead to live in such a way  that you will not put an obstacle in another  Christian’s path. May God, who gives this patience  and encouragement, help you life in complete  harmony with each other—each with the attitude of  Christ Jesus toward the other. Then all of you can join  together with one voice giving praise and glory to  God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. So accept  each other just as Christ has accepted you; then God  will be glorified.” Romans 14:12‐13, 15:5‐7NIV    Thought for tomorrow: This is a tricky step; it’s easy  to be more concerned about self‐preservation than  about reconciliation and restitution. I hope before  you trust in your own wisdom you’ll seek wise  counsel, if you have an amends to make that has any  potential to injure others.    September 7    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 9 and 10;  Ezekiel 5      In Power to Choose, Mike O’Neil describes the  amends process in two steps: apology and  restitution.    Apology = “I was wrong when I  _____________.”    We sometimes express apology with “I am sorry.”  That’s ambiguous. What are we saying when we say  sorry? Are we sorry we got caught? Are we feeling  like sorry, no‐good louses? Are we sorry that  someone is mad at us? Are we sorry we have to deal  with this issue?      Sometimes in our “sorriness” we wail and gnash  our teeth in distress. More drama doesn’t make for a  better apology! In our shame‐based “I’m sorry”  place, sometimes we fall all over ourselves and  confess anything and everything for the sake of  placating the person we have harmed. Making an  effective apology isn’t about confessing that which is  not true.     Humans make mistakes, and some of them are  whoppers. Admitting a mistake is good. But that is  not the same as saying, “Hey, I am a sorry person.” A  heartfelt apology will include a deeply remorseful  expression of regret. That’s humbling, but it doesn’t  require groveling.    It takes more character and integrity to go to a  person and tell them the exact nature of the wrong  done than to grovel with an expression of regret that  is ill‐defined.    Be specific. Name the wrong, and accept specific  responsibility.    Thought for today: “Because the Sovereign Lord  helps me, I will not be disgraced. Therefore have I set  my face like flint, and I know I will not be put to  shame. He who vindicates me is near.” Isaiah 50:7  NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Let’s not complicate the  amends process by trying to deal with all our deep‐ seated issues of shame at the same time. Make the  amends. Realize that our fear of shame and  condemnation is a separate issue best dealt with in a  different venue. If shame and condemnation stalk  you relentlessly, get some guidance from God and  others. But don’t let the desire to avoid those  misguided feelings keep you from doing the next  right thing.    September 8    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 11; Ezekiel 6  and 7      The second part of the amends process, according  to Mike O’Neill in Power To Choose, is restitution.   Restitution = “What can I do to make this right?”  Just saying sorry isn’t enough, nor is it enough to  decide for yourself how to make it right. An apology  without restitution is not an amends. Sometimes 
177

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
restitution takes place before the amends. O’Neill  illustrates this beautifully in his workbook, Power To  Choose. For example, if you know you’ve wronged  your children and ex‐spouse by not providing child  support, pay up. If you can’t pay it all, pay as much  as you can every month. Get rid of all‐or‐nothing  thinking; do what you can. And here’s a suggestion:  Get real about what you can really afford. I wouldn’t  expect you to be able to afford big boy or girl toys  for yourself if you owe child support. I wouldn’t think  you’d be eating out when you haven’t paid so that  your kid can eat at all.    You may need to earn the right to apologize  through the path of good‐faith restitution.    Sometimes you can make the apology and then  make restitution. Listen to what the offended has to  say about restitution. This isn’t about what you think  is appropriate, but what they think is meaningful. (If  the offended suggests that you do anything illegal,  immoral, or fattening, then you know you’ve got an  offended party who needs some guidance. Don’t be  a fool. If their suggestion strikes you as  inappropriate, seek wise counsel before proceeding.)    Thought for today: “When a man or woman wrongs  another in any way and so is unfaithful to the LORD,  that person is guilty and must confess the sin he has  committed. He must make full restitution for his  wrong, add one fifth to it and give it all to the person  he has wronged.” Numbers 5:6‐7 NIV     Thought for tomorrow: How awesome would it be if  all of us were busy about doing the work of  reconciliation?     September 9    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 12 and 13;  Ezekiel 8      A few days ago I told a story about someone who  attempted and failed to make an amends to me.  Don’t get me wrong; this guy sincerely tried. He told  me how he had prayed long and hard before  approaching me. I believe him. But there was a  serious disconnect, because he did indeed cause  more injury—even though I know it was not his  intent.      I think it is helpful to pause to prepare and really  consider our motivation before proceeding with a  ninth step. The only acceptable reason for making  amends is to right previous wrongs—your previous  wrongs.     Once Pete and I had a disagreement over  something small that escalated into harming. Pete is  an excellent amends‐maker; me, not so much. But  this time I set aside my pouty ways and approached  my husband with both apology and the offer of  restitution. He accepted and my step nine was  done…almost.    “Is there anything YOU want to say?” I asked.    “Nope.” He replied.    Boy was I mad. I wanted an apology back! It’s no  wonder I’ve come to understand my limited amends‐ making skills! My mad response revealed that I had  made amends but with the wrong motive. I wanted  something back. If you are hoping to get anything  back from this process, hold up the amends.     The only thing a step nine is supposed to  accomplish is taking personal responsibility and  going to any appropriate lengths possible to right a  previous wrong.    Don’t let this beautiful step become an  opportunity to have our resentments squirting out  and causing further injury. Both my friend and I got  our mixed motives into the middle of our amends‐ making and made a big old mess of things. I’m glad  we both have a God who is merciful and gracious.    Thought for today: “You have heard that it was said,  ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’  But I tell  you: Love your enemies and pray for those who  persecute you.” Matthew 5:43‐44 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: I pray that as we practice  making and receiving amends that we will be  gracious to each other, loving each other in spite of  our limitations. It’s process not perfection. But for  heaven’s sake, let’s keep progressing!    September 10    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 14; Ezekiel 9  and 10      Yesterday I recommended that part of the “pause  to prepare” process of amends‐making involves a 
178

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
motive checkup. This seems to be a very, very  difficult proposition. So here are a few questions to  meditate over:  • Do I have a loving and forgiving attitude in this  process?  • Can I make this amends without blaming the other  person in any way?  • Am I focused only on my part?  • Am I willing to take full responsibility for my part?  • Have I given up any expectation of a specific  response from this person?  • Have I put my trust in God that He will guide me  through this process, no matter what the  outcome?  • Do I need to delay this process and redo step four  due to continued resentment or fear?    Thought for today: We love because he first loved  us. If anyone says, “I love God,” yet hates his brother,  he is a liar. For anyone who does not love his brother,  whom he has seen, cannot love God, whom he has  not seen. 1 John 4:19‐21 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Step nine is not designed to  make us feel better; it is placed in the recovery  process to help us live better. We may or may not  get a warm, fuzzy reception when we make our  amends. So what? We’re stepping as God speaks. I  pray knowing that is enough.     September 11    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 15 and 16;  Ezekiel 11       By all outward appearances, she was on a roll. She  was poking fun at people who lead “conventional  lives.” I asked her what she meant by conventional.    “You know, ‘do gooders.’ People who waste their  life following society’s rules.”     “You think ‘do gooders’ are naïve—easy marks?”    “Yeah, I guess.” She snickers. “You know it. Hey,  you do it—with your talk of God and taking the next  right step. There’s no next right step; you  conventional types think there is, but that’s not true.  Feeling bad for living life on your own terms is for  suckers. You do what you gotta do.” Her eyes met  mine with a steady, challenging stare.      “So tell me how it feels to take advantage of me,  from your perspective?”     Gulp. I don’t think she was expecting someone so  naïve to get the connection. She stops laughing and  averts her gaze.    When we do wrong, we are guilty; that is how it  works. Sometimes our guilt feelings are delayed, but  that doesn’t matter. What does matter is that we  are guilty when we injure another. God gave us an  internal system to help us understand our  wrongdoing:  the feeling of guilt in our gut.  My  companion has ignored, medicated, disguised, and  run from her guilt for many years. She’s gone so far  as to assume that anyone who pays attention to  “guilt” is silly. Of course, that makes her very foolish.  The absence of guilt is not an indicator of an  unconventional lifestyle; it’s a characteristic that  experts attribute to sociopaths.    Thought for today: Fools make fun of guilt, but the  godly acknowledge it and seek reconciliation.  Proverbs 14:9 NLT     Thought for tomorrow: Why do I make this point in  the middle of a monthly devotional series on  amends? Because I think we hate feeling guilty too. I  know I don’t like that sinking feeling in my  stomach—the jittery sense of unease that comes  with the awareness of wrongdoing. But this is  crucial: the fact that we can feel guilt is a blessing.  It’s a good thing and a God thing. People who care  when they get it wrong have at least a fighting  chance of learning how to get it right. If you’re  feeling guilty about something, thank God! You’re  one of the fortunate ones!  September 12  Recommended reading: 1 Kings 17 and 18   A few days ago I concluded our devotional reading  with this comment: “Step nine is not designed to  make us feel better, it is placed in the recovery  process to help us live better. We may or may not  get a warm, fuzzy reception when we make our  amends.”   Although I believe that statement is true, I’m not  sure it’s complete. It is true that step nine isn’t about 
179

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
us – it’s about us making a wrong as right as  humanly possible. That’s the point. However, an  amends properly done and graciously received  MAKES US FEEL AWESOME! And in spite of that  awesome feeling totally NOT being the point – it is a  blessing ‐ undeserved? You bet! Nevertheless,  sometimes an effective step nine results in us feeling  like the weight of the world has been lifted off our  shoulders.  Never under estimate the benefits that come from  living life on God’s terms.  Thought for today: …if he gives what he took in  pledge for a loan, returns what he has stolen, follows  the decrees that give life, and does no evil, he will  surely life; he will not die. None of the sins he has  committed will be remembered against him. He has  done what is just and right; he will surely live. Ezekiel  33:15‐16 NIV   Thought for tomorrow: Take a few moments to  pray, asking the Holy Spirit to guide you. Ask for the  good sense and discernment to truly get a picture of  how unresolved offenses are weighing you down.  Picture each unmade amends as a five pound weight  placed firmly on your back. Imagine what it will be  like to have each weight lifted gently from your  shoulders by the loving hands of God. Dream of  what might be – a day when you have gone to any  lengths to clean up your side of the street. Consider  how much easier standing straight and lifting your  head is going to feel without all those heavy weights  dragging you down. Thank God that you are at a  place in your life where you have all that you need to  equip you to do the next right thing.  September 13  Recommended reading: 1 Kings 19 and 20  Recently on a flight home from a weekend of fun  with my daughter, I watched the drama unfold as an  airline coped with the dilemma of “over‐booking.”  Although our airplane sat on the tarmac ready and  willing to be boarded, no one was allowed to take  their seat until three people agreed to get  “bumped.” Promised a free round trip ticket, several    hopped up and took the bait. What happened next  was the big surprise.   Once we boarded, the steward came on the speaker  and announced with great cheer that we could not  take off until someone agreed to deplane and take  another flight. It seems the plane was “too heavy.” I  fretted when a petite young woman gallantly gave  up her seat for the good of the group. I would have  preferred that the really large man taking up his seat  and half of mine exit – that would have really  reduced the weight on the plane! No sooner had this  teeny tiny girl departed then on walked a pilot for  this airline – AND HE TOOK HER PLACE! The man in  front of me said what we all were thinking, “He looks  a lot heavier than the young lady you just kicked  off!”   What injustice (I thought)! Someone should  complain about this on behalf of the young women  who was tricked into giving up her seat! This plane  wasn’t too heavy – they needed the seat. Personally,  I would have preferred a more honest approach –  they could have just come clean and told us they had  a pilot to get to another airport. But as we headed  toward home, another thought took shape.  The young woman who gave up her seat so that the  rest of us could get home, hug our loved ones and  sleep in our own beds benefits from her decision in  ways we can’t imagine. Her spiritual muscles got a  hefty workout as she made a weighty decision –  giving up her right to a seat she could have clung to.  I don’t know what led her to make this decision nor  do I know her spiritual condition. This I know.  Whether she understands it or not, on this day, she  laid down her life for others. She acted unselfishly  while the rest of us tightened our seatbelts and  practically dared anyone to try to oust us from our  seats.  Thought for today: Who is going to harm you if you  are eager to do good? But even if you should suffer  for what is right, you are blessed. 1 Peter 3:13 NIV   Thought for tomorrow: Perceived injustice can  ignite our self‐righteous indignation AND diminish  our capacity to do the next right thing. In my rush to  judgment, it was easy to overlook my own tight grip 
180

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
on the arm rests. Who was the greater offender?  The steward doing her job, or me, refusing to  sacrifice my early flight home for the sake of  another? I wonder if you have examples in your life  where you can quickly point fingers and condemn  bad behaving – legitimate bad behaving – and in  doing so, miss an opportunity to see yourself  accurately. My prayer is that we refocus our  attention on our own harming ways and not  distracted by the foibles of others. We have been  given clear instructions: if we do harm – make  amends, quickly. Let’s get busy.  September 14  Recommended reading: 1 Kings 21 and 22  “I don’t see how that applies to me.”   Over the years, I’ve been tempted to make a bumper  sticker with that phrase emblazoned on it. Lots and  lots of us believe that rules are made for other  people. We like it when people are polite and wait  patiently in line – behind us. But sometimes our busy  schedules crowd out our sense of fair play and we  wait in line tapping our feet and sighing profusely.  We believe that all people should be treated with  respect; kindness, gentleness and self‐control are all  hallmarks of desperately devoted followers of Christ.  But let that waiter mess up our order and see how  respectful, kind, gentle and self‐controlled a  response we make when the hapless guy shows up  with all the wrong stuff!   “Look, I’m through with all that performance stuff. I  know God loves me unconditionally. I don’t have to  follow a set of rules to earn God’s love.” True, all  true! But think of it like this. We shouldn’t be  presumptuous! God’s unconditional love is his gift to  us; how we obey His commands are a reflection of  our love for him.  Followers of Christ are supposed to FOLLOW!!!! So  as we read what scripture has to say about how we  are to behave – IT ALL APPLIES TO US!!!!   And when we take the attitude that it does not  apply, we are putting ourselves in jeopardy of  needing to make amends. On those occasions when    we need to make amends and instead presume this  instruction doesn’t apply, we’re moving into the  category of foolishness. Not only does it matter how  we behave, it matters how we treat others. God said  this. We must deal with whether we choose to  follow or not.  Thought for today: Live wisely among those who are  not Christians, and make the most of every  opportunity. Let your conversation be gracious and  effective so that you will have the right answer for  everyone. Colossians 4:5‐6 NIV   Thought for tomorrow: Making amends is what  desperately devoted followers of Christ do. Why?  Because we follow where Christ leads. In your prayer  time today, I ask you to think about how many  excuses Christ could have used to avoid the Cross.  Instead, he entrusted himself to God. Maybe you  think making an amends to someone who owes you  a few amends back is crazy. Perhaps every fiber of  your being rejects the idea. I don’t care. Do it. Get  wise counsel, pause to prepare, plan thoroughly –  but do it.    September 15    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 17 and 18;  Ezekiel 12    A few days ago I concluded our devotional reading  with this comment: “Step nine is not designed to  make us feel better, it is placed in the recovery  process to help us live better. We may or may not  get a warm, fuzzy reception when we make our  amends.”    Although I believe that statement is true, I’m not  sure it’s complete. It is true that step nine isn’t about  us; it’s about us making a wrong as right as humanly  possible. That’s the point. However, an amends  properly done and graciously received makes us feel  awesome! And in spite of that awesome feeling  totally NOT being the point—it is a blessing. Is it  undeserved? You bet! Nevertheless, sometimes an  effective step nine results in us feeling like the  weight of the world has been lifted off our  shoulders.    Never underestimate the benefits that come from  living life on God’s terms.   
181

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today: …if he gives what he took in  pledge for a loan, returns what he has stolen, follows  the decrees that give life, and does no evil, he will  surely live; he will not die. None of the sins he has  committed will be remembered against him. He has  done what is just and right; he will surely live. Ezekiel  33:15‐16 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Take a few moments to pray  and ask the Holy Spirit to guide you. Ask for the good  sense and discernment to truly get a picture of how  unresolved offenses are weighing you down. Picture  each unmade amends as a five‐pound weight placed  firmly on your back. Imagine what it will be like to  have each weight lifted gently from your shoulders  by the loving hands of God. Dream of what might be:  a day when you have gone to any lengths to clean up  your side of the street. Consider how much easier  standing straight and lifting your head is going to  feel without all those heavy weights dragging you  down. Thank God that you are at a place in your life  where you have all that you need to equip you to do  the next right thing.    September 16    Scripture Reading for today: 1 Kings 19 ‐ 22      In a previous devotional I told a story about an  encounter I had with a very grumpy, arrogant, and  lonely man on a plane. This guy was sad. Perhaps the  listener who wasn’t paying attention would hear the  story and think that this was a workaholic with a  dysfunctional family, and that could be the point of  his life story. But what I heard was the voice of a  man disconnected from his God.    My new acquaintance would disagree with me.  Included in his storytelling was a paragraph on his  family’s church involvement and generous giving to  good causes. But I know from personal experience  that church attendance and sacrificial giving don’t  accurately measure one’s relationship with God.  Church attendance and giving measure how we  spend our Sundays and what we do with a portion of  that money.     Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar  and there remember that your brother has  something against you, leave your gift there in  front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to your    brother; then come and offer your gift. Matthew  5:23‐24 NIV    Wow. Can you believe that? Folks who feel hurt by  “the church” tell me that they believe that God (and  his church by proxy) only want them for their  money. That’s not what Matthew 5 reports. Clearly,  God cares more about how we love each other than  he does about how many alms we toss on His altar.  The guy on the plane doesn’t understand why he’s  lonely; he believes his “alms” tossed on altars, at his  wife and five kids, and flashed in front of business  associates, should give him all that he wants. Sadly,  he’s wrong.     God tells us that one key to acquiring all that we  perceive we lack is learning how to play well with  others. This involves having a plan (and executing it)  when inevitably a relationship hits a bump in the  road. Translation: You gotta know how to make  amends when you mess up.    Thought for today: This is how I want you to conduct  yourself in these matters. If you enter your place of  worship and, about to make an offering, you  suddenly remember a grudge a friend has against  you, abandon your offering, leave immediately, go to  this friend and make things right. Then and only  then, come back and work things out with God.  Matthew 5:23‐24 The Message     Thought for tomorrow: Abandon your  offering…leave immediately…go to this friend…make  things right…then and only then, come back and  work things out with God. Pray on this. Think about  this. Take time to process God’s deep desire and  commitment to amends‐making. He prefers that to  our offerings and to our worship attendance. Think  about the implications of such a huge desire….As you  can imagine, my seat buddy was quite startled when  I shared these implications with him!    September 17    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 1 ‐ 3      Continuing the story from yesterday’s devotional…    As the pilots began our descent into Dallas, my  seatmate rallied with one final comment in response  to my soliloquy on the amends process. “I see your  point, and I think you’re right—to a point. But the 
182

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
timing isn’t right for me to talk about the past with  my wife. She’s been to a lawyer; can you believe it? I  could put myself in a vulnerable position. Maybe I  can deal with this stuff later.”    I hope so. I’m just wondering about what might  happen while he’s waiting around to feel less  “vulnerable.” What conclusions might his wife and  children be drawing from his inaction? What bitter  seeds of resentment are being sown into the hearts  of his family? Will anyone’s faith be shattered or  shaken as a result of this bitter but regular‐church‐ attending man’s confusing inconsistencies—a man  who has a form of religion but denies its basic tenet  (make amends when necessary)?    This is serious stuff. As I lugged my bright green  luggage, computer bag, and trendy purse through  DFW airport, I had larger concerns. I was wondering  if there were any examples of unmade amends in my  own life that might leave another shattered, shaken,  or otherwise harmed.    Thought for today: . . . Here’s what you need to be  concerned about: that you don’t get in the way of  someone else, making life more difficult than it  already is. Romans 14:13 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: I just got off the phone with  a very distraught child. He wants to know why his  dad can be a pastor and continue to visit porn Web  sites multiple times a day. This kid wants answers.  But you know what really bugs this kid? His dad has  demonstrated no remorse, no regret, no  acknowledgement of wrongdoing. I tried to tell this  young man that one doesn’t rush to amends but  must aggressively step through the first eight steps  before making amends. I gave him a couple of  examples of amends gone wrong because someone  rushed to do step nine without appropriate  preparing. Now the kid is irritated with me. So I hung  up the phone and prayed for this family the very  thing I pray for my own (and for yours), “Lord,  increase our faith. Move our feet through the  process as fast as our faith can handle. Help us, Lord,  to do no more harm. And Father, protect those  we’ve harmed. Grant us the gift of a second  chance—for our sakes and for those we love.”          September 18    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 4 ‐ 6      I didn’t grow up knowing the word of God, so I’ve  spent my adulthood playing “catch up” when it  comes to the study of scripture. It’s been a grand  adventure with a number of miscues of  interpretation and application as I’ve learned.    But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend  to them without expecting to get anything back.  Then your reward will be great, and you will be sons  of the Most High, because he is kind to the  ungrateful and wicked. Luke 6:35 NIV    The first dozen or so times I ran into this passage, I  was amazed that God would expect me to be kind to  the ungrateful and wicked—an apt description for  anyone I considered an enemy. I used this as an  excuse NOT to make amends to anyone whom I  considered a foe. I figured God would be kind to  them, and maybe when I was really old, I’d mature  spiritually and follow suit. It was a few years before I  realized that the ungrateful and wicked person  referred to in this passage was me.    Thought for today: Then Peter came to Jesus and  asked, “Lord, how many times shall I forgive my  brother when he sins against me? Up to seven  times?” Jesus answered, “I tell you, not seven times,  but seventy‐seven times. Therefore, the kingdom of  heaven is like a king who wanted to settle accounts  with his servants. As he began the settlement, a man  who owed him ten thousand talents (a ton of money)  was brought to him. Since he was not able to pay,  the master ordered that he and his wife and his  children and all that he had be sold to repay the  debt. The servant fell on his knees before him. ‘Be  patient with me,’ he begged, ‘and I will pay back  everything.’  The servant’s master took pity on him,  cancelled the debt and let him go. But when that  servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants  who owed him a hundred denarii (not nearly as  much money as ten thousand talents)…‘Pay back  what you owe me!’ he demanded. His fellow servant  fell to his knees and begged him. ‘Be patient with  me, and I will pay you back.’ But he refused. Instead,  he went off and had the man thrown into prison until  he could pay the debt. Matthew 18:21‐30 NIV   
183

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for tomorrow: Loving my enemies (enough  to make amends to them when appropriate) is  impossible so long as I hold to the viewpoint that I’m  an innocent victim being asked to be loving and good  (with no expectations) to one who is ungrateful and  wicked. But Matthew 18 clarifies the situation. Think  of the servant’s master as God and yourself as the  servant with the humongous debt. The “fellow  servant” in this story could be any old garden‐variety  enemy. Who in this story is ungrateful, wicked and  forgiven by the master (God)? The first servant. Now  is the picture crystal clear? Because God is kind to  the ungrateful and wicked (us), shouldn’t that  change our perspective on willingness to make  amends? Think about it. The offensive party in this  story is the first servant, who was forgiven a huge  debt and then proceeded to bear a grudge against a  fellow servant who owed him a small debt. Maybe  you’ve been reluctant to pursue the amends process  with an enemy. You might have a million excuses for  why you shouldn’t have to humble yourself and  acknowledge your part in the wrongdoing. If you go  to Matthew 18 and read the rest of the story, you’ll  discover that the unforgiving servant ends up in big,  big trouble with the master. If you’ve been like me  and made excuses for offenses perpetrated against  an enemy, I hope you’ll rethink your position.    September 19    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 7 ‐ 9;       One surefire way to blow a perfectly decent  amends opportunity is to approach the task with  fear. I’m not suggesting that you rush to denial and  pretend amends‐making is easy. I am suggesting that  unless and until fear is not your primary motivation,  you should pause to prepare. For the next couple of  devotionals, I want to talk about a biblical example  of bad amends‐making.    Do you remember the story of Joseph? He’s the  guy who was his daddy’s favorite, got a cool coat as  a gift from his dad, had a dream he’d rule over his  brothers, was stupid enough to relay the dream to  his brothers—who promptly threw him in a well,  sold him into slavery, and then staged a death scene  as a cover up for all this bad behaving.    Over time, more stuff happens to Joseph, and  eventually his brothers come to Egypt seeking food    and find Joseph is ruling the roost AND the food  supply in Egypt. For a while they exist in apparent  harmony, absent any form of amends. But then dear  old dad dies, and the brothers become afraid. They  worry what Joseph is going to do next. It seems they  believe (falsely) that Joseph is as conniving as they  are, and they expect retribution.    Thought for today: So they sent this message to  Joseph: “Before your father died, he instructed us to  say to you: ‘Please forgive your brothers for the great  wrong they did to you—for their sin in treating you  so cruelly.’  So we, the servants of the God of your  father, beg you to forgive our sin.” When Joseph  received the message, he broke down and wept.  Genesis 50:16‐17 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Knowing all that you know  about the amends process, why do you believe  Joseph cried?    September 20    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 10 and 11;  Ezekiel 13      After burying Jacob, Joseph returned to Egypt with  his brothers and all who had accompanied him to his  father’s burial. But now that their father was dead,  Joseph’s brothers became fearful. “Now Joseph will  show his anger and pay us back for all the wrong we  did to him,” they said.    So they sent this message to Joseph: “Before your  father died, he instructed us to say to you: ‘Please  forgive your brothers for the great wrong they did to  you – for their sin in treating you so cruelly.’  So we,  the servants of the God of your father, beg you to  forgive our sin.” When Joseph received the message,  he broke down and wept. Genesis 50:14‐17 NLT    This is speculation, but I want to suggest one  possible reason Joseph “broke down and wept.”    Those brothers shamelessly invoked the name of  their dead father as a shield against Joseph’s anger.  That’s a cheap shot. We take cheap shots in the  amends process when we, motivated by fear, try to  manipulate our “offended” to have pity on us.    Forgiveness is not about an expression of pity. It’s  about getting it. It’s about understanding the nature  of the offense; it was huge. It’s about knowing that 
184

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
the offender had only his or her interests at heart  and was both willing and able to hurt someone else  in the process.    When we try to elicit a pitying declaration of  forgiveness, we’re not only taking a cheap shot,  we’re underestimating the power of God to work in  and through another person. These goofballs should  have given their brother a chance to forgive them  straight up. All would have been blessed in the  process.     Thought for today: “Joseph broke down and wept.”    Thought for tomorrow: An effective step nine  causes no harm. These brothers failed to understand  this concept. How about you? Do you get it?     September 21    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 12 and 13;  Ezekiel 14      After burying Jacob, Joseph returned to Egypt with  his brothers and all who had accompanied him to his  father’s burial. But now that their father was dead,  Joseph’s brothers became fearful. “Now Joseph will  show his anger and pay us back for all the wrong we  did to him,” they said.    So they sent this message to Joseph: “Before your  father died, he instructed us to say to you: ‘Please  forgive your brothers for the great wrong they did to  you – for their sin in treating you so cruelly.’  So we,  the servants of the God of your father, beg you to  forgive our sin.” When Joseph received the message,  he broke down and wept. Genesis 50:14‐17 NLT    I wonder if Joseph wept over all the lost years  wasted on hidden agendas, suspicious paranoia, and  superficial, faux relationships. Joseph was a godly  man who survived many trying times and thrived in  spite of them. This man had discernment; he was  clever; he stepped as God spoke. Surely as soon as  his brothers presented him with this speech that  obviously was a clumsy attempt to avoid retribution,  Joseph understood the implications. He understood:  • that all those years of making nice were a sham  • that his brothers thought him capable of  harboring resentments  • that his brothers expected him to respond in  vengeance (as opposed to forgiveness)    and perhaps saddest of all: his brothers didn’t  know him at all.    I wonder if Joseph shared this viewpoint, and it  grieved him.     Thought for today: “I pray that your love for each  other will overflow more and more, and that you will  keep on growing in your knowledge and  understanding. For I want you to understand what  really matters, so that you may live pure and blames  lives until Christ returns.” Philippians 1:9‐10 NLT     Thought for tomorrow: Joseph’s brothers were big  goofs, stunted in their growth and limited in their  understanding. Unfortunately, that happens to us  when we refuse to step as God speaks. Joseph,  separated from family, friends, and his religious  heritage, continued to grow in knowledge and  understanding in spite of the atrocities perpetrated  against him. So as you’re considering whether or not  to extend or ask for forgiveness, I urge you to keep  these siblings in your thoughts. I believe that even  the best families, coolest friends, and greatest  church communities cannot provide immunity from  foolishness—if in our inner selves, we know we’re  living independently of God. However, even with  unfortunate circumstances and limited resources,  when we make the decision to step as God speaks,  we can grow in knowledge and understanding. This  is something to consider…    September 22    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 14 and 15;  Ezekiel 15      “All I wanted to do was make it right!” He laments  after a disastrous attempt to complete his step‐nine  assignment. (Let me be clear: his sponsor did not  give this assignment. He took it upon himself to  tackle this step out of order.)    “Are you surprised by the response you received?”  I asked.    “Absolutely! I’m trying to get it right! This didn’t go  right at all.”    “Why did you choose today to make amends to  your daughter?”    “Well, it just felt right.” 
185

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  “Tell me more.” And after a lengthy conversation,  it turned out that this dad simply couldn’t stand the  thought that his daughter was disappointed in him  and angry with him, for one more minute. He just  wanted things to be right between them.    I admire his sentiment; I really do. But this man  had been sober for about 30 days (he was on step  three with his sponsor). To him, those thirty days  were amazingly significant, and that is an awesome  achievement. His kid, however, has another figure in  her mind. Prior to these 30 days, she had spent thirty  years knowing him only as a father figure who drinks  too much, cares too little, and always seems to  embarrass her at big events and family functions.    Thought for today: For God did not give us a spirit of  timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self‐ discipline. 2 Timothy 1:7 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Sometimes it takes more  power and strength to be still than it does to make a  move. This dad thought that God had given him a  spirit of power, of love, and of self‐discipline, and  chose to believe that this meant he could rush right  in and make amends. I wasn’t there; I don’t know  what he did or did not say that ultimately resulted in  his daughter getting a restraining order against him.  I hope we can all learn from this well‐intentioned  father. Early in the recovery process, just because  something “feels right” doesn’t mean it is right!  Judgment is a funny thing. Sometimes we so  desperately desire something to be true, that we  allow our desire to color our good judgment. As we  continue to ponder the complexities of step nine, it’s  my prayer that we’ll all utilize the gift of self‐ discipline—or as other translations say “a sound  mind”—so that our desires won’t run ahead of our  abilities. Seek guidance; ask for feedback. Invite  others to weigh in on the wisdom of that thing that  just “feels right” to you. I’ve discovered that if  something truly is “right” today, it will also be “right”  tomorrow.     September 23    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 16 and 17;  Ezekiel 16        Yesterday I told the story of a father who rushed  to his daughter and made amends too soon in his  recovery process. He was so aggressive in his  approach, so self‐focused in his delivery, and so  without an ounce of “other‐awareness,”—that she  ended up taking out a restraining order against him.     For years, he continued on his road to recovery  without any contact with his daughter. During this  process, his sponsor coached him about the value of  an indirect amends. Humbled after several eager‐ but‐false starts with the 12‐step model, this time the  gentleman heeded the advice of his sponsor, made  an indirect amends, and learned a lot about  acceptance and patience in the process.     Even after all these years, this dad still thinks  about his daughter and longs for a relationship with  her. Perhaps the greatest testimony to his healing  and transformation is that in spite of his own  personal desires—more than his own wish for  reconciliation—above all that: he doesn’t want to  inflict further injury. And so he waits. He’s done his  part, as best he can. Now he waits patiently to see  what the future may hold.    Thought for today: “Therefore, encourage one  another and build each other up…” 1 Thessalonians  5:11 NIV    Thought for tomorrow: What a messy story! Don’t  we all want happy endings? For those of us who  have experienced happy endings, rejoice!  Reconciliation is an awesome miracle. But let’s not  discount the miracle of this messy story. This man  has maintained sobriety AND continued his recovery  journey without getting his way in all matters! He’s  continued to allow God to have His way with him,  even when God’s ways haven’t resulted in the  meeting of his personal desires! I call that  miraculous! He made a mess of things with his kids,  and he doesn’t deny it. But neither has he allowed  that mess to define him. Part of the amends he  made indirectly to his daughter included going to  any lengths to learn how not to harm anyone at any  time ever again. That’s awesome. I appreciate how  he lets me tell his story if I think it might help  someone. But he doesn’t go around marinating in  self‐pity about this lost child. Instead, he uses his  continual longing for her to remind him of the value  of every relationship and the need to treat others 
186

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
with respect. Have you allowed past messes to  define you or to refine you? I pray that you won’t get  side‐tracked from doing the next right thing simply  because sometimes it doesn’t get you the thing you  desperately desire.     September 24    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 18 and 19;  Ezekiel 17      I’m in the middle of reading a book by a fabulous  spiritual guru of our day. He’s telling us that we can  achieve anything as long as we work hard and do  everything with excellence. He quotes one of my  favorite scriptures, “I can do all things through Christ  who strengthens me.”     This is a conundrum: I think this guy is awesome,  and I believe God’s word is truth. But I’m struggling  with his interpretation and application of that  particular passage. I too believe that we can do all  things through Christ as long as those things are in  keeping with God’s will, and we’ve properly  prepared for battle. I’d love to run a marathon and  win! But that’s not going to happen. Why? Well, it  could be that God’s plans for me don’t include  training and winning a marathon. Perhaps my  reticence to change my schedule to accommodate  the training necessary to break records and gain  glory on the running field is my soul’s way of  agreeing with God in these matters.      It could be that God would love to see me break  the tape at the finish line, but I’m not willing to  invest the time to prepare. Perhaps if I would  commit to the educational process, the training  schedule, and the marathon process, God might do  something supernatural through me and grant me  victory! This would mean He’d have to overcome my  heart defect—and He’s God—so I believe he could  miraculously intervene. God could decide to prove  through me that age is no definer of one’s ability,  and by some miraculous intervention I could take my  middle‐aged body out to the course and defeat  those young, lean, mean fighting machine bodies  half my age. It could happen; if God so chose, and if I  agreed to participate in His big dream for me.    And unless and until God sends me a fax  confirming which of these two theories might be  true, I simply don’t know if my failure to enter, train    for, and try to win a marathon is because it is not in  God’s plan for my life or because I am not willing to  submit to God’s plans for me.     So I believe that through Christ I can do all things  that are in keeping with His will for me. But life is  messy, and sometimes hard work and a commitment  to excellence do NOT lead to success—at least not  success in the way we might define it.     Thought for today: Please read Genesis 33:1‐11, the  story of Jacob’s amends to Esau.    Thought for tomorrow: The story of Jacob and Esau  is one of those messy accounts that makes me  scratch my head. Jacob, a tricky trickster, cheats his  brother and then has to flee for his life. Esau may be  slow witted when it comes to family intrigue, but  he’s a hunter who is perfectly capable of making  mincemeat out of Jacob ‐ years pass. Jacob  continues to be a tricky trickster and finds himself  being tricked (good story if you haven’t read it) by  his father‐in‐law. He also has an intense personal  experience with God. Eventually Jacob must leave  his father‐in‐law’s land, mainly because of broken  relationships and mutual manipulations. Then and  only then does he decide to try to make things right  with his brother (is this self‐serving?). Note too that  his brother is eager to forgive him (even though  Jacob hasn’t really made amends). As you read,  don’t miss the fact that Jacob sends his family into  the potential line of fire from Esau, putting those he  least values at the front of the line and those he  loves the most toward the end of the line.  Hmmmm…. that Jacob is always thinking. If you read  this account you think, Wow, what a great ending to  a long ‐ standing feud. But read on, because this is  really an uneasy amends, and conflict remains  between these two branches of the family for  generations. So as we proceed through step nine, I  urge you to remember that the 12‐step process is  not a simple, easy, magical way to resolve all life’s  messiness. It is a way to guide us in doing the next  right thing. I love the idea of success. I’d love to win  a marathon and take home the grand prize. I believe  that I can do all things through Christ who  strengthens me. But scripture and my life experience  teach me that the way you and I define success and  God’s way of defining success are sometimes  antithetical. We love the outward appearance of 
187

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
things—the trappings of success. We like neat and  tidy answers and solutions that leave us feeling  satisfied with ourselves. I read scripture and think  that God’s got more going on—more complexity  being woven in the grand tapestry of his prevailing  purposes—than we can know. Sometimes it isn’t all  about us.    September 25    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 20 and 21;  Ezekiel 18      I used to be the kind of person who believed that  perfection was the golden rule. Strive, achieve, win:  succeed. Until I grew up. As I’ve aged, I’ve not only  acquired more aches, pains, and wrinkles, but I’ve  also gained a different perspective.     Today I’m a big fan of acknowledging the  messiness of life—sometimes in spite of our  attempts to strive, achieve, win, succeed—and  sometimes because of these desires. As a child, I  heard the stories of David (you remember him: a  young shepherd boy who killed giant Goliath with a  slingshot and ultimately became a king) and thought  he was the epitome of striving, achieving, winning,  and succeeding. Then I heard the rest of the story.  (David had a very messy life including depression,  adultery, and conspiracy to commit murder, while  still being “a man after God’s own heart”). Life was a  lot easier when I thought you could distinguish the  good guys from the bad by the color of their cowboy  hats.    Depending on what part of David’s life I choose to  examine, David is either a hero or a goat. In truth,  he’s both—capable of great devotion to God AND  living independently of God. Just like us!    Thought for today: “One day David asked, ‘Is anyone  in Saul’s family still alive—anyone to whom I can  show kindness for Jonathan’s sake?’ ” 2 Samuel 9:1  NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Jonathan was Saul’s (the  king before David who lost God’s blessing because of  his crazy ways) son and David’s best friend. David  had made a promise to Jonathan, and then he forgot  to fulfill it. Mephibosheth, Jonathan’s only living son,  was the unwitting victim of David’s forgetfulness. In    2 Samuel 9, David remembers his promise and  makes amends for his neglect. David was a  complicated man. But in this story, he remembered.  Once he remembered, he followed through. He did  not wallow in self‐pity at his forgetfulness; he simply  took the next right step. I believe that sometimes we  stumble on step nine because we prefer to wallow in  our own messiness rather than take the next right  step. I want to encourage you today to push through  and take that next step. If God brings to your mind a  remembrance of a wrong in need of restitution,  heed his still, quiet voice. Stepping as God speaks is  the epitome of successful living.    September 26    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 22 and 23;  Ezekiel 19      One of my girlfriends told me the most interesting  story this week. I’ll mess it up if I try to repeat it, but  this is the condensed version: she found a way to  weave and bob around God’s principles of  forgiveness until God convicted her of the error of  her ways—while she was vacuuming. (That’s what  she gets for getting out a vacuum cleaner!)    I am privileged to have a lot of deeply devoted  followers of Christ as friends, but this particular  friend takes the cake. She is one of my spiritual  heroes. Her story reminded me that if a desperately  devoted follower of Christ could find a way to get  turned around and confused in the midst of an  offensive relationship, we are all vulnerable!    Thoughts for today: Son of man, give the people of  Israel this message: You are saying, “Our sins are  heavy upon us; we are wasting away! How can we  survive?” As surely as I live, says the Sovereign Lord, I  take no pleasure in the death of wicked people. I only  want them to turn from their wicked ways so they  can live. Ezekiel 33:10‐11 NLT      Son of man, give your people this message: The  righteous behavior of righteous people will not save  them if they turn to sin, nor will the wicked behavior  of wicked people destroy them if they repent and  turn from their sins. When I tell righteous people that  they will live, but then they sin, expecting their past  righteousness to save them, then none of their 
188

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
righteous acts will be remembered. Ezekiel 33:12‐13  NLT    Thought for tomorrow: Ezekiel reminds us of two  potential vulnerabilities: 1. Thinking our bad is bigger  than God’s grace, and 2. Believing that a good deed  of the past can cancel out a misdeed in the present.  Larger than either of those points is this: God desires  to extend grace and mercy and forgiveness to us  when we repent. End of story—almost. Repentance  isn’t the same thing as saying we’re sorry or feelings  of remorse. Repentance literally means: turning  around, standing at a crossroad, and choosing to  take a different path. Repentance is both apology— acknowledgement of wrong and restitution—taking  a new path. I pray today you will attack any  vulnerable areas in your thinking that are holding  you back from repenting.     September 27    Scripture Reading for today: 2 Kings 24 and 25;  Ezekiel 20      In yesterday’s devotional, I mentioned a friend  who had a God moment while vacuuming. God  reminded her of the high value He places on  restored relationships. The truth of God’s  perspective and the clarity of His voice struck her  with such force that she was compelled to respond  in obedience. (Of course, that’s why she’s one of my  heroes!)    Not all of us are ready to relinquish our weaving  and bobbing. You know what I’m talking about! We  have these mental ping pong matches; we try to  rationalize and justify why God’s principles for living  apply to others but not ourselves.     While all this mental jousting is taking place, our  bodies, minds, and spirits are in a state of dis‐ease. If  we continue these silent gymnastics long enough,  we will actually begin to experience disease(s).  When God designed the human body, His intent was  for us to live at peace. Can you believe that? Our  bodies run most efficiently if we are living in right  relationship with God, self, and others. We weren’t  created to run on the heavy fuel of unforgiveness,  bitterness, resentment, guilt, or shame. Whether the  offender or the offended, a failure to heed God’s  warning to live at peace with others—to the extent    that we can without going codependent or violating  healthy boundaries—can make us sick.    Thought for today: Then Jesus said, “Come to me, all  of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I  will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you. Let me  teach you, because I am humble and gentle at heart,  and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is  easy to bear, and the burden I give you is light.”  Matthew 11: 28‐30 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: A few weeks ago my  daughter and I spent the weekend in New York  playing. On my plane ride home I had the privilege of  getting to know a rheumatologist.  Recognizing a  captive audience (and a very kind person) when I  saw one, I plied her with questions. I asked her what  she thought about the spirit/body connection and  the effects our spiritual condition has on the body.  Here’s a quote that I’m trying not to butcher, “…One  of the most frustrating things for me as a physician  who works with chronically ill patients is those who  refuse to acknowledge that there’s more going on  with them than the illness I’m treating.” Chronic  pain, depression, sleeplessness, compulsions,  anxiety, bursts of anger at inappropriate times,  loneliness, isolation, and a host of other issues that  cause us discomfort can be linked to states of dis‐ ease that have far more to do with our spiritual  condition than our actual physical or mental state.  God created you to live at rest. He wants to teach  you how to live with a peaceful soul. Part of that  lesson involves learning how to resolve conflict. My  prayer for you today is that if God chooses to bring  to your mind a broken relationship in need of  attention, you will listen and respond. Your health  may depend on it.     September 28    Scripture Reading for today: Matthew 1 and 2;  Ezekiel 21      Everyone has heard the phrase, “It is more blessed  to give than to receive.” And what about the ever‐ popular, “God loves a cheerful giver.” Who can  forget their childhood memories of parental  instruction? “I said: share that with your brother!” I  love the current commercial that shows two young 
189

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
brothers at snack time with only one slice of bread.  Slathered with peanut butter (yum), both boys are  concerned about who might get the “bigger” half. So  TV‐mom comes up with the perfect solution, one  cuts the bread and the other brother chooses the  first slice! Suffering from an obsession with all things  peanut butter, I pay close attention when the  choosing brother chooses his piece, and I am sure he  gets a slightly larger portion!    In spite of biblical entreaties and parental  instructions, most of us have a natural inclination  that prefers receiving to giving! And although God  loves a cheerful giver, an honest person must admit  that most of us are at our most cheerful when we’re  receiving something we really, really adore!    Until we have a supernatural encounter.     In Luke 19, there’s a guy named Zacchaeus who  has acquired great wealth by colluding with his  enemies (the Romans) and cheating his fellow  citizens by dishonestly collecting taxes. Zacchaeus  would have been hated by his community for this act  of treason. I wonder if receiving all that loot eased  his pain.    Evidently it did not. Because when Jesus entered  Jericho, Zacchaeus went to great lengths just to get a  look at him. Jesus responded by inviting himself to  dinner at the home of Zacchaeus. Scripture reports  that Zacchaeus was filled with excitement and great  joy. Then he did an amazing thing. He made an  amends—one that included generous restitution for  all that he had taken.    Thought for today: Jesus responded, “Salvation has  come to this home today, for this man has shown  himself to be a true son of Abraham. For the Son of  Man came to seek and save those who are lost.”  Luke 19:9‐10 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: I know that every inclination  of your heart is a desire to receive. Frankly, I believe  that many of our efforts to give are tainted with an  expectation of receiving something in return. I know  this because scripture teaches this, and I’ve  experienced the sting of its truth personally. Don’t  let that discourage you. Instead, run hard, climb a  tree, go to any lengths to get a peek at Jesus.  Zacchaeus didn’t decide to make amends and then  have Jesus choose to be his friend. First, Zacchaeus  sought the face of Christ, and Christ turned to him.    Christ loved him, accepted him for the greedy little  man that he was, and gave him the strength to rise  above his natural inclinations. I can hear the soft  voice of Jesus calling to us, but not in condemnation  or even correction. I hear His invitation, “Come to  me, all of you who are weary (with your life of trying  to make up for all that you lack) and carry heavy  burdens (of all the things you’ve acquired at the  expense of others), and I will give you rest. Matthew  11:28 NLT    September 29    Scripture Reading for today: Philemon; Ezekiel 22    In scripture, the Apostle Paul was a guy who didn’t  mind ruffling feathers. Before his conversion  experience, he was a zealous Jew who persecuted  Christians because he sincerely believed that it was  the right thing to do. Post‐conversion he was just as  passionate in his preaching of the gospel. He was the  kind of guy that you could imagine would not let the  laws of man stand in his way when he believed that  those laws were in contradiction to God’s intentions.    So it comes as quite a surprise in the tiny New  Testament book of Philemon that Paul, who has  befriended and led to Christ a young slave runaway  by the name of Onesimus, sends Onesimus back to  his owner. Sending Onesimus back means that, by  law, this runaway can be put to death for his crime.    A quick read of Paul’s letter to the “owners” of  Onesimus clearly communicates Paul’s intentions:  accept Onesimus back, and allow me (Paul) to make  restitution for any debt Onesimus owes. One  assumes that these friends of Paul, also believers,  will hear and respond to the amends of Onesimus.  It’s not clear from this letter the outcome of this  amends.    Amends‐making is risky business. The outcome is  uncertain. From our perspective, Onesimus  shouldn’t have been a slave at all. It would be easy  for us to support Paul’s decision NOT to return  Onesimus, and instead offer him refuge. But Paul  held to the letter of the law of the land at that time.     I can only imagine how difficult it was for this  fighter of the good fight to humble himself before  Philemon and to take a risk that could cost a man his  life. Sometimes doing the next right thing requires  courage. 
190

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
  Thought for today: “These are the ones I look on  with favor: those who are humble and contrite in  spirit, and who tremble at my word.” Isaiah 66:2b  Today’s NIV    Thought for tomorrow: Sometimes it’s easy to get  on our high horses and feel as if we can circumvent  the rules of man for a “higher call.” Paul could have  made this argument here. He chose otherwise. We  must make past mistakes right—so long as to do so  does not injure the offended or others. If you’re  wrestling with the question of what to do in the risky  business of amends, please pause to prepare. Seek  wise counsel. But don’t just assume that because  there is some risk involved that you’re off the hook.     September 30    Scripture Reading for today: Ezekiel 23; Matthew 3  and 4      My husband used to say that Philippians was his  favorite book of the Bible—until he studied it!  Sometimes I think we romance the idea of making  amends, hoping for a great outcome—until we truly  understand the process.    I want to close this devotional series on step nine  with one final word of warning: Do this, expecting  nothing in return.    Thought for today: For God is pleased with you when  you do what you know is right and patiently endure  unfair treatment. Of course, you get no credit for  being patient if you are beaten for doing wrong. But  if you suffer for doing good and endure it patiently,  God is pleased with you. For God called you to do  good, even if it means suffering, just as Christ  suffered for you. He is your example, and you must  follow in his steps. 1 Peter 2:19‐21 NLT    Thought for tomorrow: The call to desperately  devoted following of Christ is a conundrum. He  promises us rest for our soul while fully  acknowledging that this might require suffering in  the body. People in recovery understand what Jesus  is teaching. Sometimes in order to find peace, one  must be willing to walk through the valley of the  shadow of suffering. Oh, how we long to skip the    suffering and rush to the springs of living waters! But  it doesn’t work that way. This journey we’ve  undertaken promises freedom, but it is costly. It’s  easy to say that Jesus paid it all, because it’s true.  Without His sacrifice, we wouldn’t have a prayer of  achieving God’s big dreams for us. But it’s foolish  and simplistic to assume that His sacrifice means  that we are merely receivers—never expected to  give in return. I know we love the good stuff: the  promise of rest, the light burdens, the freedom. But  let’s not forget that part of the really great stuff is  the equipping. God provides for us all that we need  not only to rest, carry light burdens, and enjoy the  fruits of freedom. He also gives us the ability to  share in the carrying of heavy loads, the courage to  suffer without experiencing defeat, the strength to  withstand temptation, and the wherewithal to do  the next right thing. The allure of a pampered prince  or princess life is strong, but the promise of an  adventurous life of a prince or princess warrior is  AWESOME! May God grant you all that you need to  make step nine a reality, so that you may be  unencumbered as we run the race toward the goal:  becoming more and more a reflection of our God‐ created identity.    STEP 10 We continued to take personal inventory,  and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.    October 1    Scripture Reading for today: Ezekiel 24 and 25;  Matthew 5      When my children were small, my mom loved to  tell them I was a “bookworm.” Bookworm was a new  word; it did not make sense to their literal, little  minds. I forget which child changed it, but in an  effort to make sense of a word that seemed  nonsensical, they created a new and improved word.  Anytime one of them would find me reading, they’d  say, “Mom is a bookword!” My children were  completely unwilling to be guided in this area. They  simply liked their word better. Step ten is all about  guidance. One simply can’t take an accurate  personal inventory without guidance, particularly in  the area of admitting wrongdoing.    
191

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today: The Lord is my shepherd, I shall  not be in want. He makes me lie down in green  pastures, he leads me beside quiet waters, he  restores my soul. He guides me in paths of  righteousness for his name’s sake. Even though I  walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will  fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your  staff, they comfort me. You prepare a table before  me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my  head with oil; my cup overflows. Surely goodness and  love will follow me all the days of my life, and I will  dwell in the house of the Lord forever. Psalm 23 NIV    God, my shepherd! I don’t need a thing. You have  bedded me down in lush meadows, you find me quiet  pools to drink from. True to your word, you let me  catch my breath and send me in the right direction.  Even when the way goes through Death Valley, I’m  not afraid when you walk at my side. Your trusty  shepherd’s crook makes me feel secure. You serve  me a six‐course dinner right in front of my enemies.  You revive my drooping head; my cup brims with  blessings. Your beauty and love chase after me every  day of my life. I’m back home in the house of God for  the rest of my life. Psalm 23, The Message    Thought for tomorrow: Sometimes I’m like my  children were with this word confusion. I have areas  in my life where I am completely unwilling to be  guided. Certain beliefs, thoughts, feelings, opinions,  decisions, and choices simply make so much sense to  me that I block out any information that would  confuse my certainty. Can you relate? Spend some  time today asking yourself what you’re certain  about, and see what makes the list. (Hint: It may  help to think about conversations you’ve had with  people you love who’ve tried to present a different  perspective.)  Then spend a few moments  meditating on this question: Lord, is there any area  in my life that I’m so certain in the way I’m living that  I have become unwilling to be guided by you?  Making up a new word is fun, creative, and pretty  harmless. But when we are desperately devoted  followers of Christ, we’re on a grand adventure.  We’re being led by the good shepherd who meets all  our needs according to his riches in glory, who  provides spiritual nourishment through rest and  proper feeding, and who restores our very souls! Can  we afford to be so certain?      October 2    Scripture Reading for today: Ezekiel 26; Matthew 6  and 7      In a very old book titled A Shepherd Looks at Psalm  23, Phillip Keller draws from his experiences growing  up in East Africa, “surrounded by simple native  herders whose customs closely resembled those of  their counterparts in the Middle East.” He reports  that he was also a sheep owner and rancher as a  young man. Using his experiences as a foundation,  Keller wrote a simple and direct work in the twenty  third Psalm.   One of the many new facts about sheep that I  learned from this modern day shepherd is that  sheep are famous for being creatures of habit. In  fact, this is such a problem for sheep that if left un‐ shepherded, they will stay on the same paths until  they turn the paths into ruts—this will lead to  erosion that can destroy the entire farm. They’ll  eat the grass until they damage the root systems.  This causes more erosion problems and large  patches of barren land. Their unwillingness to  move from one area to the next results in polluting  the pasture with their waste—ultimately causing  them to be diseased and parasitic. If sheep are not  properly managed, their grasslands will become  wastelands, they will become diseased, and any  hope for the shepherd to make a living will be lost.  Utter desolation is the only outcome for sheep  without a shepherd. A wise shepherd takes all  these factors into consideration. Simply by keeping  the sheep on the move—a shepherd can keep his  land healthy, his sheep well, and end up with a  very productive sheep farm that will stay that way  for many years. In short, a shepherd needs a good  plan and must be willing to execute it.   The truth about sheep is this: they are certain at  any given moment that they are in the perfect  pasture for them; it’s their destiny! They are  content. They see no reason to move on. The  shepherd knows better and plans accordingly.  Fortunately, sheep usually choose to follow. We  have the ultimate shepherd who happens to have a  pretty amazing plan for our lives. Is our sheep‐like  certainty of our own destiny standing in the way of a  really terrific God moment?   
192

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
Thought for today: True to your word, you let me  catch my breath and send me in the right direction.  Psalm 23:3 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: If you’ve been following  along and practicing the principles found in the  twelve‐step model, you’ve been working it! You’ve  come to accept that there is a higher power, and you  didn’t get the job! You’ve asked God to have His way  with you. You’ve already taken one thorough moral  inventory and used subsequent steps to make peace  with your discoveries—allowing God to guide you  along the way. Now is not the time to rest on your  laurels (whatever that means). We’re moving into  the true fruit‐bearing steps; we’re getting to the  good stuff! Let’s use this month to prepare to be  wowed by God.    October 3    Scripture Reading for today: Ezekiel 27; Matthew 8  and 9      When the writers of the twelve steps allowed for  two steps dealing with inventory, those folks really  knew what they were doing. My experience with  step ten was quite different from my first trip  through step four. This time, I was prepared to go a  little deeper; having dealt with a lot of the “big” stuff  in step four, step ten required a little more muscle to  ferret out my wrongs. I came to realize that  sometimes a “wrong” was truly the absence of a  bigger “right.” One issue that my spiritual mentor  asked me to consider was my lack of contentment— in any and all circumstances. This principle is found  in scripture, “I am not saying this because I am in  need, for I have learned to be content whatever the  circumstances.” (Philippians 4:11 NIV) This verse  confirmed for me the soundness of my guide’s  counsel. It made me think of Psalm 23:1—coming to  know that I shall not be in want. When I think of  contentment, I think of fuzzy slippers, a warm cozy  fire, and a good book. I think of peace, calm, and  definitely no drama.     But as I thought back to the contented sheep, I  found myself confused.  Their contentment (as we  learned in yesterday’s devotional), left unabated,  will get them in big trouble. So how do I reconcile  these two thoughts: (1) learning contentment in all    things, but (2) not being so complacent that I end  up in a wasteland plagued by parasites and  diseases? When I find two thoughts that seem to be  oppositional in God’s word, my experience has  taught me that this usually means there is something  I am missing in my understanding. One of the most  effective tools that God has used to guide me during  times of confusion is His word.     …There’s nothing like the written Word of God for  showing you the way to salvation through faith in  Christ Jesus. Every part of Scripture is God‐breathed  and useful one way or another – showing us truth,  exposing our rebellion, correcting our mistakes,  training us to live God’s way. Through the Word we  are put together and shaped up for the tasks God  has for us. 2 Timothy 3: 15‐17 The Message    There’s a reason that I’ve often heard scholars of  scripture referred to as “students” of God’s word.   Knowing scripture, understanding scripture, and  applying it are lifelong ambitions and are not for the  faint of heart. God’s word is living, breathing, alive,  and sometimes tricky to apply.  In this instance, I  think the fog of my confusion clears when I  understand another neat fact about the nature of  sheep.     Wise shepherds keep their sheep on the move,  and we know why. But what we haven’t discussed is  how the sheep respond to this constant guidance. As  the sheep move from one pasture to the next, they  get excited! Even the older sheep will kick up their  heels and leap for joy at the prospect of a fresh  green pasture. These sheep, so prone to complacent  contentment, have their wild side too. They are  passionate when forced to face a new pasture. True,  it requires guiding, but once led, these sheep know  how to boogie!     Thought for today: True to your word, you let me  catch my breath and send me in the right direction.  Psalm 23:3 The Message    Thought for tomorrow: As I wrestle with these two  confusing (to me) concepts, a glimmer of light leads  me toward a new thought. If I am like a sheep, then  maybe contentment is a good thing. But it should  never be a goal‐thing. My mentor didn’t necessarily  mean that I should strive for contentment (as  defined by me) as the ultimate goal for one who  finds their way back to God. Contentment, true 
193

Finding Our Way Back to God – a Daily Recovery Devotional 
contentment, is a by‐product of a willing heart that  eagerly seeks to be guided by the good shepherd.  Ah…my heart sings. In my limited (and often  ridiculously certain) perspective, can contentment  and unrequited passion co‐exist? Absolutely. Ask the  sheep. Now, go and ask God to lead you to those  new, green pastures that you’d never visit on your  own. When He takes you, they’ll cause you to boogie  for joy!    October 4    Scripture Reading for today: Ezekiel 28; Matthew 10  and 11      Several devotionals ago, I told you how when my  children were little they called me a “bookword”  because “bookworm” made no sense to them. Well,  I am still a “bookword” and that may be why I see  nothing strange or boring with continuing through  this devotional series to harp on Psalm 23. I love  how the words flow in this psalm. The writer guides  us on a journey of blessing upon blessing by building  an image, word upon word. It will be hard to fully  appreciate the phrase that I’m obsessing over this  week without having David’s carefully crafted image  firmly planted in our minds.     First, David reminds us that God is the ultimate  provider of all our needs. As I mature, I am learning  how to anticipate, expect, and look out for God’s  blessings in my daily life experiences. I haven’t  matured past the point of having personal desires  and expectations for what I hope that will look like,  but I am in the process of coming to believe that  truly, with the Lord as my shepherd, I shall not be in  want.     I used to think that contentment came from  getting everything I need and some of what I want.  I’m practicing the fine art of believing when I realize  that true contentment comes from the wellspring of  belief that I shall not be in want. When I can  recognize t