You are on page 1of 16

1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 1

GCSE CITIZENSHIP
STUDIES

For AQA, EDEXCEL and OCR GCSE Citizenship Studies Specifications

SAMPLE MATERIAL
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 2

Welcome!
I am delighted to be able to offer you this sample section from Folens’ forthcoming new textbook, GCSE
Citizenship Studies. With the major exam boards developing new GCSE Short Course specifications for first
teaching in September this year, we at Folens are committed to offering you high-quality, stimulating and easy-
to-use materials with which you can deliver the course. I hope this sample gives you a good idea of our
approach, and that you will want to purchase the whole range of materials when published this summer.

Our author team believes that to help you make this new GCSE successful, our materials must be stimulating
and engaging for you to teach from, and for your students to use. With this in mind, GCSE Citizenship Studies
has the following key features that we are sure will appeal:

• material organised into 6 main themes that are central to all citizenship learning
• a case study approach, allowing students to develop citizenship skills and knowledge together, all in the
context of real issues and events
• a key question frames each case study
• clear aims for each case study, to ensure students know the issues and skills they will be developing
• a checklist to help students relate material in each case study to the examination assessment objectives
• a strong, colourful and engaging design to help keep students interested and focussed.

The author team has considerable experience of delivering citizenship in the classroom, and also includes
writers who bring experience from QCA and the Examination Board world. We are also pleased to
acknowledge the advice of The Citizenship Foundation in developing this textbook.

The result is a textbook that has a clear view of what citizenship means in schools and will help you deliver the
new Short Course. It has been written to allow use with any of the new GCSE Citizenship courses from the
main English Exam Boards. There is also an accompanying Teacher Resource File, Coursework Support Pack and
dedicated website available to combine with this textbook.

Peter Burton

Citizenship Publisher
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 3

Contents: GCSE Citizenship Studies

Contents
Theme 1: Belonging Theme 4: Making a Change
Introduction Introduction
Case Study 1: Community & Identity - What Case Study 1: How can you make a difference in
makes you a British Citizen? your local community?
Case Study 2: How successful is Multi-cultural Case Study 2: Animal rights – why do we need a
Britain? national campaign for change?
Case Study 3: What happens when communities Case Study 3: Global Eco-Warriors – are they
and identities conflict? successful?

Theme 2: Rights Theme 5: The Wider World


Introduction Introduction
Case Study 1: What rights do British people have Case Study 1: Why do people feel strongly about
as citizens? Britain’s relationship with Europe?
Case Study 2: How should asylum seekers be Case Study 2: Developing Countries – should
treated? richer nations help them?
Case Study 3: Is the Criminal Justice system Case Study 3: Why should British citizens be
tough enough? involved with world affairs?

Theme 3: A Stable Society Theme 6: The Media


Introduction Introduction
Case Study 1: Why bother to vote? Case Study 1: How powerful and influential is
the media?
Case Study 2: Politicians – what do they do and
how does it affect you? Case Study 2: What should the limits be on the
freedom of the press?
Case Study 3: How does the global economy
work? Case Study 3: How can we live in an information
society?

Glossary of key terms, words


and concepts

GCSE CITIZENSHIP STUDIES Contents • page 3


1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 4

Exam Matching Guide: GCSE Citizenship Studies

GCSE Citizenship Studies Exam Matching Guide


Our text has been written so that it supports any of the containing knowledge, skills & understanding in our case
GCSE Short Course specifications from AQA, OCR and studies and themes will help you deliver the content
EDEXCEL. This guide shows you how our approach of requirements of the Awarding Bodies’ specifications.

Theme & Case Study EDEXCEL GCSE Citizenship AQA GCSE Citizenship OCR GCSE Citizenship Studies
Studies Studies
Belonging 1 Community & Theme 1 Communities & Topic 1 School, Work and the Theme 1 Origins & implications of
Identity – What makes you a Identities Local Community diverse groups in the UK
British Citizen? (c) Local community Theme 1 Democracy & the Electoral
Process
Belonging 2 How successful is Theme 1 Communities & Topic 1 School, Work and the Theme 1 Origins & implications of
Multi-cultural Britain? Identities Local Community diverse groups in the UK
(c) Local community
Belonging 3 What happens when Theme 1 Communities & Topic 3 Global Citizenship Theme 1
communities and identites conflict? Identities (a) International Relations Origins & implications of
diverse groups in the UK
Rights 1 What rights do British Theme 1 Roles, Rights & Topic 2 National and European Theme 1 Rights & responsibilities
people have as citizens? Responsibilities Citizenship within the legal & justice system
(b) Criminal and Civil Law Theme 1 Rights & responsibilities of
consumers, employers & employees
Rights 2 How should asylum Theme 1 Roles, Rights & Topic 3 Global Citizenship Theme 1 Rights & responsibilities
seekers be treated? Responsibilities (a) International Relations within the legal & justice system
Origins & implications of
diverse groups in the UK
Rights 3 Is the criminal justice Theme 1 Criminal & Civil Topic 2 National and European Theme 1 Rights & responsibilities
system tough enough? Justice Citizenship within the legal & justice system
Theme 2 Power & Politics (b) Criminal and Civil Law Theme 2 Making & shaping the Law

Change 1 How can you make a Theme 2 Power & Politics Topic 1 School, Work and the Theme 2 Democracy & the electoral
difference? Local Community process
(c) Local community Theme 3 Opportunities for
individuals and groups to be involved
Change 2 Animal Rights – why Theme 3 Environmental Issues Topic 1 School, Work and the Theme 3 Opportunities for
do we need a national campaign The UK place in the World Local Community individuals and groups to be involved
for change? (c) Local community The Global Community
Change 3 Global eco-warriors: Theme 3 Global Business Topic 3 Global Citizenship Theme 3 The Global Community
are they successful? (b) World Trade and Overseas Aid International Issues & individual
action

page 4 • Exam matching guide GCSE CITIZENSHIP STUDIES


1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 5

Exam Matching Guide: GCSE Citizenship Studies

Theme & Case Study EDEXCEL GCSE AQA GCSE Citizenship OCR GCSE Citizenship Studies
Citizenship Studies Studies
Stable Society 1 Why bother Theme 2 Power & Topic 2 National and European Theme 2 Democracy & the electoral process
to vote? Politics Citizenship
(a) National and European
Government
Stable Society 2 What do Theme 2 Power & Topic 2 National and European Theme 2 Making & shaping the law
politicians do & how does it Politics Citizenship Theme 2 Government, decision-making &
affect us? (a) National and European the economy
Government
Stable Society 3 How does the Theme 3 Global Topic 1 School, Work and the Theme 2 Government, decision-making &
global economy work? Business Local Community the economy
(b) Work Theme 3 The global community
Topic 2 National and European
Citizenship
(a) National and European
Government
Wider World 1 Britain & her Theme 3 The UK place Topic 3 Global Citizenship Theme 2 UK relationship with the EU
relationship with Europe in the world (a) International Relations
Wider World 2 Why should Theme 3 The UK place Topic 3 Global Citizenship Theme 3 International Issues & individual
richer nations help the in the world (b) World Trade and Overseas Aid action
Developing World?
Wider World 3 Why should Theme 3 The UK place Topic 3 Global Citizenship Theme 2 UK relationship with the UN
Britain be involved in world in the world (a) International Relations Theme 3 International Issues & individual
affairs? (b) World Trade and Overseas Aid action
Media 1 How powerful is the Theme 2 The Media Topic 2 National and European Theme 1 Rights within the legal system
media? Citizenship Implications of diverse social groups in the UK
(c) The Media Theme 2 Democracy & the electoral process
Government & decision-making
Theme 3 The Global community
International Issues & individual action
Media 2 What limits should Theme 2 The Media Topic 2 National and European Theme 1 Rights & responsibilities within the
there be on press freedom? Citizenship legal system
(c) The Media Theme 2 Implications of diverse groups in the UK
Media 3 How can we live in an Theme 2 The Media N/A Theme 1 Rights & responsibilities within the
information society? legal system
Theme 2 Democracy & the electoral process
Theme 3 International Issues

GCSE CITIZENSHIP STUDIES Exam matching guide • page 5


1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 8

Asylum seekers
how should they be treated?
Aim
You will often read or see stories relating to Asylum seeker?
‘asylum seekers’ or ‘refugees’ and it is easy
to be confused with these two terms. A Refugee? IDP?
refugee can be described as ‘a person who An asylum seeker is a refugee
has fled some danger or problem’. As you who is trying to get permission
work through this Case Study, you will to move to a new country. To be
discover that there can be many reasons for granted asylum, they must
being a refugee such as: prove that they are likely to be
• civil unrest • political persecution imprisoned or killed if they
• war • famine and drought return home. People who are
• forced relocation. looking for a better life are
classed as ‘economic refugees’.
This is not usually a reason to
be granted asylum.
A further term is Internally
gSource B Displaced Persons (IDPs). These i Source A
Map showing routes of world refugee people have been forced to flee The growing refugee problem
movements. Many refugees come from war zones their homes, but have not reached
such as Palestine/Israel, Rwanda, Burundi, Eritrea, a neighbouring country. Therefore,
Sudan, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Iraq, Somalia, Sierra
Leone, China, Kosovo, Angola, Congo, Indonesia, unlike refugees or asylum seekers, they are not protected by
Columbia and Sri Lanka. international law or eligible to receive many types of aid.

More people than ever


before are fleeing from war,
persecution or disaster.
Worldwide, over 20 million
people are refugees and a
further 25 million are IDPs.
When people flee their
own country and apply to
another country for
‘asylum’, they are hoping
to be recognised as
genuine refugees. This will
also give them legal
protection and help with
food, clothing and shelter.

page 8 • RIGHTS
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 9

Case Study 2: Asylum seekers – how should they be treated?

The work of the United Nations High


Commission for Refugees (UNHCR)
The largest refugee organisation in the world is the United Nations High
Commission for Refugees. It was set up in 1951. Its headquarters are in
Geneva, Switzerland, and it has offices in more than 120 countries. Its
main purpose, often working with other agencies such as Oxfam and
asylum seeker is:
Case Study
The UNHCR definition of an
2
‘persons who are outside their country and
cannot return owing to a well-founded fear of
The Refugee Council, is to protect refugees and try to find permanent persecution because of their race, religion,
solutions to their problems. nationality, political opinion or membership of
a particular social group.’
UNHCR has four different jobs:
• To make sure that refugees are not sent back to places where their Most countries are members of the United
lives would be in danger. Nations, which was set up shortly after the end
• To see that all governments treat refugees fairly. of the Second World War. Its aim is to promote
• To work with other organisations to make sure that aid reaches peace, justice and a better life for all the
refugees. people of the world. In 1948 it produced the
• To solve refugees’ long-term problems. Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The
right to seek refuge from persecution or war is
UNHCR tries to help people return home if it becomes safe for them to
one of the clear articles of the Declaration.
do so. If this is impossible, it helps them to settle in a new country.
With international travel having been made
The UNHCR helps provide protection and assistance not only to
easier and therefore more people seeking
refugees, but also to other types of displaced or needy persons. These
asylum, some countries have toughened their
include asylum seekers, refugees who have returned home but still need
asylum procedures. In Britain, asylum seekers
help in rebuilding their lives, local communities that are directly affected
can only get residency if they can prove that
by the movements of refugees and, perhaps most importantly, growing
they meet the conditions for asylum as laid
numbers of internally displaced persons (IDPs).
down by the UNHCR.

TA S K S
1 In your opinion, what is the basic
difference between an ‘asylum
seeker’ and a ‘refugee’? What is
an IDP?
iSource C gSource D 2 Describe in your own words what
Annual totals worldwide of Origin of major refugee populations the UNHCR is and what it does.
persons of concern to UNHCR in 2000 3 Study the information set out in C
Country of origin Main countries of asylum Refugees & D. You have to write an article
Afghanistan Pakistan, Iran 3 580 400 for a magazine’s ‘In My Opinion’
Burundi Tanzania 568 000 column, examining why the
Iraq Iran 512 800 number of refugees seeking asylum
Sudan Uganda, Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Chad 490 400 in European countries is small in
Bosnia-Herzegovina Yugoslavia, Croatia, USA, comparison with the numbers of
Sweden, Netherlands, Denmark 478 300 refugees that have to be dealt with
Somalia Kenya, Ethiopia, Yemen, Djibouti 447 800 in other parts of the world.
Angola Zambia, Congo, Namibia 432 700
What do you think the more
Sierra Leone Guinea, Liberia 400 800
developed countries should be doing
Eritrea Sudan 376 400
to help them?
Vietnam China, USA 370 300

RIGHTS • page 9
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 10

Case Study 2: Asylum seekers – how should they be treated?

Source E
Journey from Liberia – Map tracing 5

Marlboro’s story Marlboro’s route

(Adapted from the BBC News World Road to Refuge)


Marlboro was a university graduate with a good job and his whole
life ahead of him when civil war broke out in Liberia. There was chaos
as people were killed or tried to flee to neighbouring countries.
He escaped to the Ivory Coast by foot, and then made his way to 4
3
Lebanon. By this time, he learned that his mother and brother were
dead. In Lebanon, he walked for three days across the mountains to
2
Syria, where he met up with some men who, for £3500, agreed to
1
smuggle him to Germany.
Marlboro knew little about the people who drove him and three
other Africans to Europe with false papers. He never arrived in 1 Liberia
Germany. Instead, the smugglers abandoned the four men in 2 Ivory Coast
Slovakia. By the time they realised they were not in Germany, the 3 Lebanon
smugglers had disappeared – along with their passports. 4 Syria
5 Slovakia
Marlboro took a philosophical attitude to his experience of
smuggling, which he likened to a business deal. “They took my
money, but I got to the promised land,” he said. “I was lucky. Others,
If the law gave him freedom of movement in
they take their money, but they don’t go anywhere.”
Western Europe, he could be more usefully
In Slovakia, he obtained refugee status. His salary of £130 a month, employed. But, despite the terrible
however, was not enough to live on. In trying to fund a return trip to problems, he escaped from in Liberia, he has
Africa, he moved again – this time to an EU country. As he had been forced into an underground world. As
already been given asylum in Slovakia, he was forced to enter as an for his future, every day he lives in fear of
illegal immigrant. The only job he could find was washing dishes. being caught and possibly imprisoned.

Life as a refugee
The richer nations of Europe and North America are increasingly
reluctant to take in refugees. Even countries like Tanzania, traditionally
helpful towards refugees, are overwhelmed by the number of refugees
coming to them. Most of them are women and children and they are
fleeing from war zones or natural disasters (see F). The cost of
supporting so many refugees is high, since land, shelter, food and water
all have to be found.
Life in many of the refugee camps in these countries is grim. The
refugees live in slum areas. Very few of them have passports and almost
none of them have ID cards, without which they are often forbidden to
work. What work they do find pays very poorly.
Even officially-recognised refugees sometimes do not receive adequate
protection and assistance. IDPs are in a worse situation because they do Source F
Refugees fleeing to Tanzania

page 10 • RIGHTS
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 11

Case Study 2: Asylum seekers – how should they be treated?

Source G
Refugees can be any age
Case Study
2
well-organised camps to for asylum in the UK. In 2000,
receive IDPs. Basic services 10 000 asylum seekers were given
may have been destroyed, refugee status in the UK but over
and fighting may make it 40 000 people applied for asylum.
difficult for aid Almost every week, stories
organisations to provide relief. concerning asylum seekers appear in
the press, often revealing the
The reality is that the poor countries
desperate lengths some refugees go
not even get the same rights as of the world provide protection to
to in the hope of starting a new life
refugees. In a country where there is most refugees. Only a small
in another country.
a civil war, there may not be any percentage of ‘displaced’ people ask

Asylum in the UK
The 1999 Immigration and Asylum Many human rights organisations Media coverage on asylum seekers can
Act covers issues believe that the Government’s new often be ill-informed and can be used
such as: system for dealing with applications to turn public opinion against them.
• entry into the UK may be faster but is unlikely to be Certain racist groups like the BNP and
• the detention of asylum seekers fairer. One argument for this is that, if the National Front are quick to use
and their dispersal around an application comes from a country media reports for their own purposes.
the country the UK describes as ‘safe’, it will They want to stir up hatred against
• provision of financial support automatically be refused. ethnic minority groups, as you will see
• handling of their cases in the Myths & Realities section.

Source H
July 2001 saw the city of Bradford torn apart by
racial and religious protest. Trouble began after a
National Front protest march against ‘attacks on
whites by immigrants’ was allowed to proceed.

TA S K S
1 Role-play a scene where a journalist interviews a person living in a
refugee camp. Before you begin, draw up a list of questions for the
journalist to ask. For example, What is life like in the camp? What are
their hopes for the future?
2 ‘In cases where people are economic refugees rather than refugees
from political or religious persecution, it is right to return them to
their own country.’
Do you agree? Justify your answer.

RIGHTS • page 11
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 12

Case Study 2: Asylum seekers – how should they be treated?

Myths and realities Only a tiny proportion


of refugees are genuine
and the rest are ‘bogus’.
Britain is a soft
touch and takes
more than its
fair share of The UK has to ensure that no one is forcibly
refugees. returned to any country where their life or
freedom may be in danger. Official figures show that around half of all
asylum seekers need protection and are granted refugee status. Some,
however, appear to be rejected unfairly: they may be turned down for
It is mainly the world’s entering the UK with false papers, despite the fact that this may have
poorest countries such been the only way to escape persecution in their home country.
as Iran, Pakistan and Tanzania that bear the
greatest ‘asylum strain’. The vast majority of
refugees go to neighbouring countries. If you
compare numbers of refugees with the host
Asylum seekers
country’s national wealth (GDP), the UK ranks
get massive state
seventy-eighth in the world, and only eighth in
handouts.
Europe. Very restrictive immigration and
asylum policies make it almost impossible for
refugees to enter the UK legally, so many are
The UK gives asylum seekers less financial
forced into the hands of criminal traffickers.
support than other European countries. The
1999 Act replaced cash benefits with a
voucher scheme which was worth between
70–80% of income support levels. After
much criticism, in October 2001, the Home Secretary announced that
Most asylum this scheme would be phased out. Asylum seekers are amongst the
seekers come poorest and most vulnerable groups in the UK.
from safe
countries.
Council tax is
going up to fund
The majority of asylum seekers.
refugees come from
countries where there have been serious
conflicts and/or abuse of human rights. Some The costs of looking after asylum
supposedly ‘safe’ European countries may not seekers are met by central
be as safe as we think because they all have government and not through
different interpretations of who should be council tax. Some local authorities
given refugee status. For example, France has a with large numbers of asylum
record of returning many Algerians home and seekers argue that the extra costs of health, education and social
Germany has returned Tamils to Sri Lanka. care are not fully met by government. A major reason why support
for asylum seekers is proving expensive is because cases take so
long to process. In 2002, there was a backlog of 60 000 cases
waiting for appeal decisions.

page 12 • RIGHTS
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 13

Case Study 2: Asylum seekers – how should they be treated?

Refugees are
begging
aggressively and
turning to crime.
The press are
simply reporting
Case Study
2
the facts.

Begging has increased over the last On several occasions,


few years but this is not because of refugees. Some turn to begging the Press Complaints
because of the low level of state support and the lack of job Commission has
opportunities. A report recently confirmed that there is no evidence that warned newspaper
refugees/asylum seekers are responsible for the increase in crime rates. editors about ‘the
In fact, they are often the victims of crime: there have been numerous danger that
attacks on asylum seekers around Britain. inaccurate and misleading reporting may
generate an atmosphere of fear and hostility
Asylum seekers are taking which is not borne out by the facts’.
our housing and UK jobs.
TA S K S
Asylum seekers are often housed in ‘hard to let’ Unfortunately, not all of the daily
accommodation that people on council waiting lists media coverage is balanced or
do not want. Evidence is growing that asylum truthful.
seekers are also being exploited by private landlords.
Read the following claims A–C and
Refugees are legally unable to work for the first six months while then look carefully at the
awaiting the outcome of their applications. Even when they can work, it information given to you on these
is difficult for them to find anything suitable, due to language problems, pages. Under the title ‘Nailing press
lack of training, and no transport. myths about refugees’ set out your
responses to each headline.
Claim A “ We resent the scroungers,
Asylum seekers should all be beggars and crooks who are
locked up and sent back home. prepared to cross every country in
Europe to reach our generous
benefits system.” (From The Sun,
Britain has signed the 1951 UN Convention on 7/3/01)
Refugees, which means that anyone has the legal Claim B “Many will have
right to come here and claim asylum. The undoubtedly been hoping to end
majority of asylum seekers are granted temporary up in Britain, the number one
admission pending an outcome of their claim. destination for asylum-seekers.”
The fact that asylum seekers are held in a network of centres appears to (From The Daily Telegraph,
be a breach of international human rights law. In addition, since January 19/2/01)
2002, all new asylum seekers were issued with ID cards, which includes Claim C “Thousands have already
photograph and fingerprint data. Initial applicants are placed in [come to Britain], bringing terror
induction centres near Heathrow and Croydon. Some will then be and violence to the streets of
placed in accommodation centres. Those dispersed or who continue to many English towns.” (From The
live in London will be required to go regularly to a reporting centre so Sunday People, 4/3/01)
that the authorities can keep track of them.

RIGHTS • page 13
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 14

Case Study 2: Asylum seekers – how should they be treated?

New British laws are designed to block the The man who fell
arrival of desperate asylum seekers. Estimates to earth
of the number of ‘illegal immigrants’ are The woman who first found him assumed he
difficult to establish but, almost certainly, the was a drunk who had tumbled over the railings
and fallen asleep while staggering home. As
figures have shown a steady rise – up from she edged over for a closer look, she noticed
14 000 in 1997 to over 25 000 today. that his limbs were grotesquely misshapen,
and the pool of lumpy liquid in which he was
Despite the fact that those allowed to remain lying was not vomit, but the man’s brains.

receive very limited state handouts and few The area was quickly screened off and police
launched an immediate murder investigation. It
comforts, some refugees are now taking great soon emerged that a witness had seen the
dead man a few minutes before his body was
risks to enter a country illegally.
found. A workman at nearby Heathrow airport
had glanced upwards to see him falling from
the sky like a stone. The police soon pieced
together the details of Mohammed Ayaz’s
long journey from a remote village in
Northwest Pakistan to his final, sorry end
in the car park of a DIY superstore in
Richmond.
The day before, at Bahrain airport, the 21 year
old had broken through a security cordon and
climbed into the wheelbay of a Boeing 777.
The undercarriage compartment had no
oxygen, no heating, no pressure and no way
out. Ten minutes after take-off the wheelbay
temperature was freezing. At 18 000 feet he
would have begun to hallucinate from lack of
oxygen. At 30 000 feet, the temperature was
minus 56 degrees.
Ayaz was as good as dead from the moment
his feet left the runway. As the plane
approached Heathrow, the wheels were
lowered, and the frozen body was tipped out
into the early morning sky.

Source I
Stowaway Ayaz thought he was safe in the wheelbay of
the jet, but it was probably only when the wheels left the
ground that he realised how much trouble he was in.

page 14 • RIGHTS
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 15

Case Study 2: Asylum seekers – how should they be treated?

This sad story reflects the extraordinary efforts of one person to escape
the problems he was facing in his home country. Often we read stories
of similar acts of desperation:
• a young Kosovan asylum seeker drowned after throwing himself
from a cross-Channel ferry to avoid being sent back to Europe
Case Study
2
• people caught hiding underneath the carriages of the Channel
Tunnel trains
• in June 2000, the dead bodies of 58 Chinese asylum seekers were
found by shocked Customs officials in the back of a truck arriving
by cross-Channel ferry at Dover.
• In another incident in 2001, hundreds of illegal immigrants tried to
break out of an asylum centre at Sangatte, France, to board
Channel Tunnel trains into Britain.
In 2001, as Europe’s refugee crisis became more unmanageable, the
British Home Secretary promised tougher controls at Channel ports and
fresh international efforts to curb asylum seekers.
Despite the truth, UK media coverage of asylum seekers often paints a
picture of ‘scroungers’ coming to live on benefits and beg on the
streets. The reality is that people are forced to leave their homes and
families in fear for their lives, travelling to the UK in search of safety and
dignity. What they often find on arrival is punishment for their
misfortune, through government policy and media prejudice.
TA S K S
1 Do you agree with tougher
controls for all asylum seekers?
Should asylum seekers always be
entitled to the right of appeal if
their application to live in a
country is turned down? Give
reasons for your views.
2 Should asylum seekers be allowed
to work as soon as they arrive in
the UK, or should they wait until
their cases are heard? Give reasons
for your views.
3 Study the information in this unit.
What do you learn about:
a why people become refugees?
b what life is like for refugees?
4 a What problems do you think a
refugee would have to face in
Britain?
b Why do you think over 80% of
refugees are women and
Source J children?
The lorrry in which Customs Officers found 58 dead Chinese asylum seekers,
hidden behind a cargo of tomatoes.

RIGHTS • page 15
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 16

F R E E S A M P L E M A T E R I A L

GCSE
Citizenship Studies
Student Text Book

Dear Head of PSHE,


Welcome
I am delighted to be able to offer you this sample section from Folens forthcoming
new textbook, GCSE Citizenship Studies. With the major exam boards
developing new GCSE Short Course specifications for first teaching in September
this year, we at Folens are committed to offering you high quality, stimulating and
easy-to-use materials with which you can deliver the course.
As you would expect, Folens have put together an author team of considerable
experience to produce this essential resource.

I hope this sample gives you a good idea of our approach, and that you will want
to purchase the whole range of materials when published this summer.

Yours Faithfully,

Peter Burton
Citizenship Publisher Covers AQA,
Edexcel & OCR
GCSE exam
boards

INCLUDED IN THIS SAMPLE


• How Folens GCSE Citizenship Studies course works

• A complete case study from the book

• GCSE Citizenship Studies Exam Matching Guide


1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 17

O AL
ER
ST ECI
M

FAX THIS FORM TO 0870 609 1236 or ATTACH TO YOUR OFFICAL ORDER
CU SP

GCSE
Citizenship Studies
Student Text Book
Visit
our
P R I O R I T Y O R D E R webs free
www. ite:
folen
s.com
FOLENS GCSE CITIZENSHIP STUDIES

Text Book £00.00 Teacher File £00.00 each

Please send me the following:


Qty

FC 2872 GCSE Citizenship Studies Text Book (Buy 30+ Text Books – 10% Discount / Buy 60+ Text Books – 15% Discount)

FC 2872 GCSE Citizenship Studies Text Book

FC 2880 GCSE Citizenship Studies Teacher File

FC 2899 GCSE Citizenship Studies Coursework Support Pack

Please ask you representative to contact me

Name Position Signature

School Delivery Address

Postcode Telephone

I am paying by Requisition number Folens Publishers Ltd


FREEPOST LOL 1907
Cheque (Payable to Folens Ltd) Boscombe Road
Dunstable, Beds
Credit Card (ACCESS/VISA) No LU5 4RN
Signature Expiry Date Phone 0870 609 1235
Fax 0870 609 1236
Order code 209 Prices valid to 31/12/02
www.folens.com
1010_pupils flyer in pro 13/11/02 2:09 pm Page 18

For AQA, EDEXCEL and OCR GCSE Citizenship Studies Specifications

Our author team believes that to help you make this new GCSE successful, our materials
must be stimulating and engaging for you to teach from, and for your students to use.
With this in mind, GCSE Citizenship Studies has the following key features that we are
sure will appeal:

• material organised into 6 main themes that are central to all citizenship learning
• a case study approach, allowing students to develop citizenship skills and
knowledge together, all in the context of real issues and events
• a key question frames each case study
• clear aims for each case study, to ensure students know the issues and skills they
will be developing
• checklist to help students relate material in each case study to the examination
assessment objectives
• a strong, colourful and engaging design to help keep students interested and
focussed.

The author team has considerable experience of delivering citizenship in the classroom,
and also includes writers who bring experience from QCA and the Examination Board
world. We are also pleased to acknowledge the advice of The Citizenship Foundation in
developing this textbook.

The result is a textbook that has a clear of what citizenship means in schools and will
help you deliver the new Short Course. It has been written to allow use with any of the
new GCSE Citizenship courses from the main English Exam Boards. There is also an
accompanying Teacher Resource File, Coursework Support Pack and dedicated website
available to combine with this textbook.

page 18 • Case study 2 RIGHTS