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It

Must Be Genetic!

Animal Adaptations in their habitat to ensure survival!



Title

Unit: It Must Be Genetic


Title: Animal Adaptations in their habitat to ensure survival!

Introduction

Real Science
Application

This introduction is going to focus on things that animals and humans have in common
in order to survive their habitats. It will include what the One Health Initiative is and
what its focused concerns are. The One Health program will be introduced through a
video, slide, and a summarization of a One Health Initiative project. The video will be
an introduction into talking about One Health as an organization, the Power Point slide
will talk about One Health being interdisciplinary, having a clear focus that they are
targeting, and their vision statement as a company. After the introduction into One
Health, the students will be introduced to what adaptations are, examples of insane
adaptations, and then doing an adaptation activity online. It is meant for the students
to explore and learn how a bird or a fish adapt to their environment. This activity
online will be interactive and will be graded based on participation in following the
instructions and fully completing the activity. The second day will focus on explaining
types of adaptations in more detail such as warm versus cold-blooded animals and
hibernation as well as using an IR Temperature Gun to do an activity on heat
exchange/transfer due to adaptations. The lesson will finish up on the final day with
the students doing a short research project and then presenting their information as a
poster in front of the classroom.
All of the different ecosystems in the world (terrestrial, forest, desert, grassland,
mountain, aquatic, marine, and fresh water) have a unique set of animals that live in
that system. However, due to intense and extreme temperature changes from time to
time, animals have evolved adaptations to help them survive in terrain that may not be
ideal. Students will realize how valuable these adaptations are and if they were no
longer present how many animals would suffer and die from harsh climate changes or
ecosystem destruction. One of the best examples to share with the students is about
the Ice Age that happened a long time ago. There were many animals that had to
travel into different terrains because of their homes becoming inhabitable. Interesting
Facts relating to the Ice age are at this link: http://listverse.com/2013/09/07/10-cool-
facts-about-the-ice-age/

It Must Be Genetic!


Curriculum
Alignment

Learning
Outcomes

Time
Required and
Location

Grade NC Essential Standards


Level

NGSS / Common Core Math

Science

MS-LS4-4:
Construct an explanation based on
evidence that describes how genetic
variations of traits in a population
increase some individuals
probability of surviving and
reproducing in a specific
environment.

7.L.2 - Understand the


relationship of the
mechanisms of cellular
reproduction, patterns of
inheritance and external
factors to potential
variation among offspring.

Students will be able to:


1. Identify the similarities that animals and humans have in common for survival.
2. List one important fact about One Health.
3. Explain how adaptations help animals survive in extreme environments.
4. Contrast warm versus cold-blood animals.
5. Identify the different types of animals that live in cold and hot ecosystems.
6. Operate the IR Thermal Gun Sensor.
7. Research an animal from a particular habitat that they choose.
8. Explain the physical and behavioral adaptations of the animal they choose.
9. Create a poster about their animal.
10. Give a presentation in front of the classroom on their animal with the poster.
This lesson will take approximately five 50-minute classroom periods to do. Please feel free
to modify it based on the time allotted per class period at your school. The location will be in
the classroom for all five days.

Day 1: Focusing on an introduction to One Health, Adaptations, and then concluding with an
Adaptation Activity Online.

Day 2: Focusing on quick review, warm vs. cold-blooded animals, and then introducing the IR
Temperature Sensor in an activity that will be done in the classroom.

Days 3-4: Focusing on Research Project. The students will do their research online with the
website provided, compile their information into an interactive notebook, and then create a
poster in order to present to the classroom with their group members.

Day 5: Focusing on presenting information on the posters in front of the classroom.







Content
Area

It Must Be Genetic!

Materials
Needed

Teacher List:

YouTube Videos:
1. One Health: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TG0pduAYESA
2. Insane Survival Adaptations: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNqiclBUxdY
Two Websites for the Adaptation Activity:
1. Bird adaptations:
http://www.glencoe.com/sites/common_assets/science/virtual_labs/LS16/LS16.html
2. Fish adaptations:
http://www.glencoe.com/sites/common_assets/science/virtual_labs/LS15/LS15.html
Four IR Temperature Sensors (1 per station)
a. Two gallon size zip-lock bags per station
b. Lard
c. Ice
d. Wool
e. Feathers
Research Lab Website: http://pbskids.org/wildkratts/

Interactive Notebook or a 3-ring binder with paper inside.


Pen
IR Temperature Activity Sheet (1 per student)
IR Temperature Activity Reflection Sheet (1 per student)
Research Lab Instruction Sheet (1 per student)
Animal Adaptation Poster Grading Rubric (1 per student)
Animal Adaptation Presentation Grading Rubric (1 per student)
Laptops for group activity (1 per group) or tablets or I-pad cart


Student List:

Safety

1. Make sure to properly operate the IR Thermal Sensor by following instructions given by
the teacher.
2. Do not hit anyone with the sensor or smack it across a table.
3. Properly use the zip-lock bags for the purpose of the activity and not to create holes in
them for foul play.

Student Prior
Knowledge

Teacher
Preparations

In 6th grade, the students should have learned about the flow of energy through ecosystems
and the responses of populations to the biotic and abiotic factors in their environment. This
lesson is meant to build upon those concepts and discuss how animals not only live in the
ecosystems but how they adapt in order to ensure their survival.
The teacher should be familiar with:
1. One Health Initiative: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com
2. The reasons for animals having adaptations.
3. The types of adaptations.
4. The adaptation activity with the bird and the fish. Walk through the activity with yourself
in order to make sure you know it well enough to answer questions that students may ask.
5. Warm-blooded versus Cold-blood Animals.
6. How the IR Thermal Temperature Sensor Works.
7. The Wildkratts website: http://pbskids.org/wildkratts/ for the Research Project. Go onto it
and play around with different parts in order to help your students know how to navigate it.

It Must Be Genetic!

8. Be familiar with the poster and presentation rubrics.
Note: The teacher should physically prepare the items for the IR Temperature Sensor
Activity. Instructions will be given in the Activities section of this lesson plan.
Activities






5 minutes






8 minutes

























Teacher Notes: This lesson plan will take approximately five 50-minute class periods to
complete it. Feel free to modify it according to classroom time periods being different. This
lesson is using the 5-E Model. The teacher will need to pull up the power point at this time.
This lesson is closely tied to the power point attached to this lesson. At this time the teacher
will need to refer to the power point for lead on what he/she should say or do. The students
should have access to a tablet or computer for the end of the lesson activity.
Essential Question: How do animals adapt in order to ensure survival in their habitats?

Day One:
Engage: What do animals and humans have in common that they need for survival?
o Ask students to write their answer down in their notebook.
o Then, students should talk in groups on their response.
o The teacher should be walking around getting a response from each group.
Teacher Notes: Some possible ideas are food, water, shelter (protection from the environment), and
other animals of the same type.

Explore: What is One Health? (video: 2:34 minutes)
o
o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TG0pduAYESA
One Health Background (http://www.onehealthinitiative.com)
o Interdisciplinary: health care for humans, animals, and the environment.
o Focus: individual, population, and ecosystem health.
o Vision Statement: One Health (formerly called One Medicine) is dedicated to improving
the lives of all specieshuman and animalthrough the integration of human medicine,
veterinary medicine and environmental science.
Example of One Health Project at NC State. For teachers talking about this part, there is a
scaled down version of this project that is included in the Power Point and also here:
o Focus: Creating a Wearable Device for a medium-sized dog that would help to better
monitor their health and stress levels.
o Why are stress levels a concern for a dog? It is widely known that dogs will continue
working or running far past the point where their health is in danger.
o Criteria:
o Must be wearable (comfortable) and durable
o Must fit tightly enough to accurately measure pulse and breathing.
o Pulse Sensor measures heart rate
o Flex Sensor measures chest expansion for breathing rate
o Battery included as the source of energy.
o Arduino Lily Pad circuit where the wires are plugged into and all of the information is
stored as an output.

It Must Be Genetic!



37 minutes

































5 minutes









Explain: What are Adaptations?


Teacher Note: The information provided below is from this website: http://www.science-
class.net/archive/science-class/PowerPoints/adaptations_files/frame.htm
A change or the process of change by which an organism or species becomes better suited to
its environment.
o Reasons:
! To better suit their habitat
! Protection for them.
! Attack
! Feeding
! Movement
o Types
Structural external characteristics
! Behavioral different ways of reacting to the environment
! Physiological physiological
o Insane Survival Adaptations (video: 5:32 minutes)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNqiclBUxdY
o Adaptation Activity (25 minutes)
* Teacher Notes: This activity should take about 25 minutes and it is meant to be an individual
activity. If for some reason there is not enough technology to accommodate it being individual,
then split the students up into groups to complete the activity. Recommendation would be no
more than three per group if possible.
* Instructions for activity:
1. Pick one of the activities bird or fish.
2. Go to the website.
3. Read the background information on the left hand side.
4. The right hand side is the activity.
* Teacher Notes: Below are the two activities with the links for reference. The links are also
displayed in the Power Point on slide 11 for this activity.
o Bird Adaptations:
http://www.glencoe.com/sites/common_assets/science/virtual_labs/LS16/LS16.html
o Fish Adaptations:
http://www.glencoe.com/sites/common_assets/science/virtual_labs/LS15/LS15.html

o

Day Two:
Teacher Notes: begin the second day with opening up the Power Point to slides 12-13 that
are a quick overview on what was previously touched on from the first day before beginning
new material. Review these concepts with students and then mention the type of sensor
listed as the last part of the quick review. It will lead into the activity that will be done
towards the end of class today. Below are the notes that are on slides 12-13 in the Power
Point.
o The One Health Initiative focuses on the interconnectedness of the health of humans, animals,
and the ecosystem.
o This lesson is going to focus on just animals and how they can adapt in order to survive.

It Must Be Genetic!






10 minutes









































o Type of Adaptation: Structural and Behavioral


o Reason for Adaptation: to ensure survival in their habitat.
o Type of Sensor: Infrared Thermometer Heat Sensor

Engage: Warm versus Cold Blooded Animals Discussion


Teacher Notes: In this section the teacher will lead a discussion on the differences between
warm and cold-blooded animals. The teacher should draw two columns on the white board
with one saying Warm-blooded Animals and the other column being Cold-blood Animals.
As the students respond to the questions asked by the teacher, make sure as the teacher to
write their responses on the white board. The teacher will begin by asking these
questions:
1. What do you already know about warm-blooded and cold-blood animals?
2. What are some characteristics of each one?
3. How do they survive in their climates?
4. What are some examples of warm-blooded and cold-blooded animals?
5. Where are these animals located on the globe? For example, which type would you see
more if you went further north?
*Note: Feel free to add extra questions if the ones above do not provide a good enough
discussion. The information below on warm versus cold-blooded animals is only for the teachers
information to help give background knowledge for a teacher that may not be as familiar with the
topic. Here is the link where the information was obtained:

http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/resources/highschool/chemmatters/past-
issues/archive-2013-2014/animal-survival-in-extreme-temperatures.html
o Warm-Blooded Animals Info:
o Examples: Mammals and birds
o Require a lot of energy to maintain a constant body temperature.
o Heat lost is proportional to surface area of their body.
o Heat gained is proportional to their mass.
o Larger warm-blooded animals generate more heat then they lose and can keep
their body temperature more stable.
o Smaller warm-blooded animals lose heat more quickly.
o Energy produced -> comes from food (stored chemical energy).
o They are present in a wide variety of environments and for longer throughout the
year than cold-blooded animals.
o Hibernate during the winter if they dont migrate. They have fat reserves that keep
them alive during hibernation.
o Interesting fact: a black bear loses 15%-30% of its weight while hibernating.
o Rely on insulation to prevent heat loss.
o Cold-Blooded Animals Info:
! Examples: Turtles, Reptiles,
! Require less energy to survive because much of their energy comes from their
surroundings and not from food.
! Interesting fact: Some reptiles, such as the python, can go a year without eating,
because they do not use food to produce body heat.

It Must Be Genetic!









35-40
minutes





































! Disadvantage: when the temperature is lowered, all chemical reactions slow down
quicker in cold-blooded animals. If their metabolism reaches a certain temperature
then it just wont work.
! The farther north you go, the more rare these animals are.
! They can hibernate as well but they dont need to store as much fat because they
require less energy.

Explore: IR Temperature Activity


Teacher Notes: In this section the teacher will go over the background information with
students. Then they will receive an intro. The link is below. Afterwards the students will take
part in an activity. The activity sheet is listed below.
Background Information
! Cold itself doesnt exist it is simply the absence of heat.
! Animals without hair use fat tissue to help insulate their body temperature.
! Air is one of the best insulators.
! Cold-blooded animals do not need insulation because it would slow down the
heat transfer into their bodies.
o Introduction to the IR Thermometer Heat Sensor.
http://www.thermoworks.com/blog/2012/03/infrared-thermometry/. Review this
website link and explain how to use the sensor to the students.
o

Teacher Preparation Notes: The teacher should prepare this activity before the students come into
class. Here are the following instructions:
1. Take eight-gallon size zip-lock bags and place two of the bags at each station.
2. Make signs that say: Station 1: Ice, Station 2: Feathers, Station 3: Lard, and Station 4: Wool.
3. Place all four signs at the different stations and then place the materials needed at each station.
4. Station 1: take ice and place it in one of the zip-lock bags and then take the other zip-lock bag and
turn it inside out. The bag that is inside out should be placed inside of the bag with ice to make the
appearance of a glove. Zip together the two sides of bags in order to finalize the glove appearance.
5. Station 2: Take some feathers and place them into the bottom of the first zip-lock bag and then
repeat the process of turning the second bag inside out and zipping the sides.
6. Station 3: Take some lard and place it into the bottom of the first zip-lock bag and then repeat same
process from the other stations.
7. Station 4: Take some wool and place it into the bottom of the first zip-lock bag and then repeat
same process from the other stations.
8. Once all the bags are in place at the correct stations take the IR Temperature Sensors and place one
at each station.
9. Pull up an online timer and set it for 10 minutes. Each station will take no longer than 10 minutes to
complete and then the teacher will be in charge of letting the students know when to move on to the
next station and which direction to go in. If it looks like the students are completing the activity

It Must Be Genetic!







































10 minutes


quicker than 10 minutes then just at the discretion of the teacher tell them when to switch.

Instructions for activity:

There are four stations set up in the classroom: Ice, Wool, Feathers, and Lard.
There should be no more than 7-8 people at each station at a time.
Each station will take 10 minutes to complete.
Determine which task each group member will have:
o Holding the Sensor (this person can change at each station)
o Recording the Temperature values (everyone should record their own)
o Time Keeper (have one person be in charge of this task)
o Reporter (this person will tell the temperature values to each person as he/she sees
it on the sensor)
o Everyone else should make sure to stay on task.
The Sensor Holder should turn the IR Temperature Sensor on.
Point the IR Temperature Sensor at the students hand before he/she puts it into the bag.
Record that value.
Have the same student place his/her hand into the prepared glove zip-lock bag for a few
seconds. Take the Sensor and point it directly at the bag inside to record the changing
temperature. Record Final Temperature.
Each person should record their change in temperature data.
After your group has been to all four stations, go back to your tables and INDIVIDUALLY
answer the reflection questions.

*Note to Teacher: this is the data sheet that the students will be recording their own data onto:
Item

Initial Temperature

Final
Temperature

Change in Temperature
(Final-Initial)

Ice in a bag
Wool in a bag
Feathers in a bag
Lard in a bag

Day Three:
Engage:

Teacher Notes: Have the students begin the third day by completing the reflection questions
from the IR Sensor Activity in only ten minutes. Some students might have already started
answering the questions, but the majority of them have probably not had a chance yet to
begin answering them. The reflection questions below are included in the second page of
their activity sheet:

Reflection Questions:
1. Name an animal that would live in a cold ecosystem. Explain why they would live there.
___________________________________________________________________________________

It Must Be Genetic!


















40 minutes




























__________________________________________________________________________________.
2. Name an animal that would live in a hot/dry ecosystem. Explain why they would live there.
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________.
3. Name an animal that has a layer of fat tissue. ___________________________________________
4. Based upon the different items in the above chart, which one is the best insulator? Why?
__________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________.
th
5. Lets see if you can remember your knowledge from 6 grade! Which ecosystem contains the
majority of animals that dont sweat? ________________________.
6. This activity was meant to show you how your skin would have felt in different environments
without adapting to keep your internal body temperature the same. Pick one environment from the
bags above and talk about what type of adaptation you would need in order to keep your bodys
internal temperature the same. _______________________________________________________.

Teacher Note: If there is a few minutes left then discuss with the students some of their answers by
picking a few of them to share or just have them share with the people at their table.

Explore: Research Project

Teacher Preparation Notes: the teacher will need to have a copy for each student of the
instructions for the project, rubric for poster, and rubric for presentation stapled together. It
should be three pages total stapled together for each student when they come into class. A
recommendation is to pick two helpers to hand out the project to each student.
Teacher Notes: pull up slide 17 on the Power Point and talk about the research project. It
may be useful to go ahead and have the wild kratts website pulled up on the computer in
case a few students have a hard time getting to it. Students should have access to a
computer, tablet, or an I-pad to share. Below is the information on slide 17.
o

Animals change over time as inherited traits are passed from parents to offspring.

Groups: 2 people per group

Go to: http://pbskids.org/wildkratts/

Click on Habitats and explore many different kinds.

After exploring all of the habitats, pick one with your partner and review the
animals from that habitat.

Teacher Notes: when it appears that all of the students are on the right website for their
research, then click onto slide 18 and begin to talk about the expectations for the rest of the
project. Explain to them that the goal is to get all of the questions answered and in their
scientific notebooks today. If they take longer to get the research and complete it, then it
may need to be homework for some of them. Below is the information for slide 18.
o

Once you and your partner have found an animal that interests you both, write down and
answer the following information in your interactive notebooks individually:

It Must Be Genetic!













50 minutes














50 minutes

! Explain two different ways that the animal is physically adapting to its environment.
! Explain two different ways that the animal is behaviorally adapting to its environment.
! Note: Both of you need to write down the info into your notebooks. You cannot copy each
others answers. It must be in your own words the different ways (physically and
behaviorally) that the animal adapted to its environment.

Note: Both of you need to write down the info into your notebooks.

Day Four: Poster Creation!


Explain/Elaborate:
Teacher Notes: if any students did not finish answering the questions in their interactive
notebooks, they will need to take a few minutes and finish that part. For everyone else, they
will be creating a poster to present to the class about their animal. Tell the students that the
rubric for the poster is attached to their project booklet that they got the day before. If they
were absent on the previous day, then make sure that there are a few copies accessible to
give to those students. Note: If the students finish early on creating their poster, then have
them practice their presentation with their partner. Some things to remind them about is
that they are only going to have between 2-4 minutes to present and so it would be good to
figure out which person is going to say which part of the information. Remind the students
that the rubric for the presentation is also included in their lab booklet.

Day Five: Presentation Day


Explain/Elaborate:
Teacher Notes: Give the students a few minutes to get their thoughts together for their
presentation today. Each group of two students will take turns presenting in front of the
classroom their posters and information. Each student will have been given the rubrics ahead
of time that state that their group time limit is between 2 4 minutes.
Recommendation: Grade their presentations at the same time they are giving them because
the content will be fresher in the teachers mind at that moment. It is also a huge time saver.

Assessment

There will be formative assessments given throughout this five-day lesson plan.
1. The reflection questions from the IR Thermal Sensor Activity.
2. The Adaptation Research Lab Poster and Presentation Rubrics.

Modifications 1. Special Education Modifications:


a. For the reflection section of the IR Thermal Sensor Activity, the students could
be given fewer questions.
b. For the research lab on adaptations, the students can be less detailed ordescriptive in

It Must Be Genetic!

their responses.
c. Different poster requirements and shorter time on presentation.
2. ESL Modifications:
a. For the reflection section of the IR Thermal Sensor Activity, the students could
be given fewer questions.
b. For the research lab on adaptations, the students could be more creative with
their responses and not as detailed or descriptive in the wording.
c. Different poster assignment and shorter time on presentation.
Alternative
Assessments

1. Special Education Alternative Assessments:


a. For the reflection section of the IR Thermal Sensor Activity, the students could
pick three out of the six questions available.
b. For the research lab on adaptations, the students could only have to list one way
that it physically adapts and one way that it behaviorally adapts to its particular
environment.
c. Create a poster with the animal present in its environment with only including
the two facts about its physical and behavioral adaptations present. Their talking
time could be 1 -2 minutes.

2. ESL Alternative Assessments:
a. For the reflection section of the IR Thermal Sensor Activity, the students could
pick two out of the six questions available.
b. For the research lab on adaptations, the students could draw a picture with the
animal in its habitat and then just list a few ways that it adapts to its
environment off to the side in bulleted format.
c. Instead of creating a poster on the facts, they could draw a bigger picture of the
animal in its habitat and just talk in front of the classroom on some adaptations
the animal would have. Their talking time could be between 1 -2 minutes.

References

1. One Health Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TG0pduAYESA


2. One Health Background: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com
3. Adaptations: http://www.science-class.net/archive/science-
class/PowerPoints/adaptations_files/frame.htm
4. Standards: cmapp.wcpss.net
5. Insane Survival Adaptations Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNqiclBUxdY
6. Bird Adaptations Video:

It Must Be Genetic!

References

1. One Health Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TG0pduAYESA


2. One Health Background: http://www.onehealthinitiative.com
3. Adaptations: http://www.science-class.net/archive/science-
class/PowerPoints/adaptations_files/frame.htm
4. Standards: cmapp.wcpss.net
5. Insane Survival Adaptations Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNqiclBUxdY
6. Bird Adaptations Video:
http://www.glencoe.com/sites/common_assets/science/virtual_labs/LS16/LS16.html
7. Fish Adaptations Video:
http://www.glencoe.com/sites/common_assets/science/virtual_labs/LS15/LS15.html
8. Warm versus Cold Blood Animals Information:
http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/resources/highschool/chemmatters/past-
issues/archive-2013-2014/animal-survival-in-extreme-temperatures.html
9. Misconceptions on Infrared Thermometers:
http://www.thermoworks.com/blog/2012/03/infrared-thermometry/
10. Adaptation Research Project Link: http://pbskids.org/wildkratts/

Comments

Author
Information

This lesson plan was written with the intent of doing it for five 50-minute class periods.
However, some ways that you could shorten the lesson plan would be to have the students
create a poster but not present. Another way would be to leave out some of the interactive
activities such as the bird or fish adaptations. The teacher lengthen this lesson if they were to
have them do another research project about an animal that lives in North Carolina and how
it adapts to its environment. It could be made more personal and interactive but it is not
necessary. It just depends on what the teachers end goal is with the lesson.
My name is Crystal Pennypacker and I teach at Carroll Magnet Leadership in Technology
Magnet Middle School in Raleigh, NC. I will be starting my third year of teaching 7th grade
Science in the fall. I graduated from North Carolina State University with a degree in Middle
School Science Education.
This lesson was created as part of a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) at NC States
ASSIST center alongside Dr. Jesse Jur and Dr. Elena Veety. The ASSIST center focuses on
creating wearable sensor technology that is self-powered. Dr. Jesse Jur, Assistant Professor in
the College of Textiles, and Dr. Elena Veety, Education Director for the ASSIST Center have
provided many strategies to create lesson plans that are engaging, dynamic, and innovative
in using the Engineering and Design Process. It is a great program that has challenged me to
become a better, more effective teacher in the classroom by utilizing the latest
nanotechnology and energy harvesting concepts into my lessons.
If you have any questions about the lesson or implementing it in any way please contact
me at cpennypacker@wcpss.net.

It Must Be Genetic!

Name: _________________

Date: ______________

IR Temperature Activity
Purpose: To better understand how animals adapt to different environments by specifically looking at
heat transfer.
Background Information:
Cold itself doesnt exist it is simply the absence of heat.
Animals without hair use fat tissue to help insulate their bodys temperature.
Air is one of the best insulators.
Cold-blooded animals do not need insulation because it would slow down the heat transfer into
their bodies.
Instructions:

There are four stations set up in the classroom: Ice, Wool, Feathers, and Lard.
There should be no more than 7-8 people at each station at a time.
Each station will take about 10 minutes to complete.
Determine which task each group member will have:
o Holding the Sensor (this person can change at each station)
o Recording the Temperature values (everyone should record their own)
o Time Keeper (have one person be in charge of this task)
o Reporter (this person will tell the temperature values to each person as he/she sees it
on the sensor)
o Everyone else should make sure to stay on task.
The Sensor Holder should turn the IR Temperature Sensor on.
Point the IR Temperature Sensor at the students hand before he/she puts it into the bag.
Record that value.
Have the same student place his/her hand into the prepared glove zip-lock bag for a few
seconds. Take the Sensor and point it directly at the bag inside to record the changing
temperature. Record Final Temperature.
Each person should record their change in temperature data.
After your group has been to all four stations, go back to your tables and INDIVIDUALLY answer
the reflection questions.

Item
Ice in a bag
Wool in a bag

Feathers in a bag
Lard in a bag

Initial Temperature

Final Temperature

Change in Temperature
(Final-Initial)

It Must Be Genetic!

Reflection Questions:
1. Name an animal that would live in a cold ecosystem. Explain why they would live there.
___________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________.
2. Name an animal that would live in a hot/dry ecosystem. Explain why they would live there.
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________.
3. Name an animal that has a layer of fat tissue. ___________________________________________
4. Based upon the different items in the above chart, which one is the best insulator? Why?
__________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________.
5. Lets see if you can remember your knowledge from 6th grade! Which ecosystem contains the majority
of animals that dont sweat? ________________________.
6. This activity was meant to show you how your skin would have felt in different environments without
adapting to keep your internal body temperature the same. Pick one environment from the bags above
and talk about what type of adaptation you would need in order to keep your bodys internal
temperature the same. __________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________.

It Must Be Genetic!

Name: ___________

Date: ______

Research Lab: Animal Adaptations


Purpose: To conduct research on how animals adapt in their habitat in order to ensure survival.
Background Information:

Animals change over time as inherited traits are passed from parents to offspring.
Some animals can adapt in several different types of habitats

Instructions:
1. No more than 2 people per group.
2. Go to: http://pbskids.org/wildkratts/
3. Click on Habitats and explore many different kinds.
4. After exploring all of the habitats, pick one with your partner and review the animals from that
habitat.
5. Once you and your partner have found an animal that interests you both, individually write down and
answer the following information in your interactive notebook:
! Explain two different ways that the animal is physically adapted to its environment.
! Explain two different ways that the animal is behaviorally adapted to its environment.
! Note: Both of you need to write down the info into your notebooks. You cannot copy each others
answers. It must be in your own words the different ways (physically and behaviorally) that they
adapt to their environment.
6. Finally, create a poster with your partner to present to the class. You both will be given a rubric for
the poster and presentation piece. Since you both are writing down your answers in your own words, if
your reasons are different in how they adapt physically and behaviorally then just pick two for each to
include in your poster.
7. Focus on talking at least 2 minutes but not any longer than 4 minutes.

It Must Be Genetic!

Animal Adaptation Poster Grading Rubric

Poster Component
Group work

Use of time: between 2-4 minutes

Possible
Score
5

Working with partner

5
10

Creative and clear graphics


(drawings and pictures)

Description of the animal habitat (3-5


sentences)
Explanation of 2 different ways your
animal is physically adapted to its
environment
Explanation of 2 different ways your
animal is behaviorally adapted to its
environment
Graphics(s) representing the key
features of the habitat/environment

20

Overall effect of the poster

Graphic(s) of your animal


demonstrating the 4 ways (both
physically and behaviorally) it is
adapted to its environment
Neat and attractive

Organization

Titles and labels

Flow of material

Correct punctuation, spelling, and


word usage

Content

Grammar

Total Points: _____ / 100

Grade:

Comments:

15
10
10

10

Your
Score

It Must Be Genetic!

Animal Adaptation Presentation Grading Rubric

Presentation Component

Possible
Score
10

Volume
Eye Contact

10

Clear Speech

10

Complete sentences and effective word choice

10

Enthusiasm

10

Preparedness

15

Explanations of the content and graphics of the


poster
Listens to other presentations

20

Total Points: _____ / 100

Grade:

Comments:

15

Your Score