Cross-references for Deities and Man

– Joannes Richter This documentation lists a number of available cross-references between the most important preChristian deities with respect to selected parameters: • • • • androgyny, duality, multiple-faced permanent or temporary fetters, immobility horns or antlers references to time- and calendar-keeping

Most of the ancient deities have been bifrons (bi-faced), trifrons (3-faced) or quadrifrons (4-faced). A number of these deities has been identified as androgynous as well. Germanic bi-sexual gods preferred to hide their androgyny and quickly altered their gender. Roman historians have misinterpreted bi-faced structures as “Hermes”-like characters, which did lead to Tuisco as a god for traders and tricksters. Hermes (Mercury) however seems to have been a minor deity. A number of these bi-faced deities (Janus, Saturn, Cercunnos) may be referring to the time-keeping and calendar-keeping, opening the dates and years. Some Deities may temporarily have carried fetters (Saturn) or have been enclosed behind doors (Janus). In Janus' temple the priests closed the doors at wartime. The Saturnalia were to be held at the New Year's event. Fetters may have prevented an escape (in wars) or may have signalled a “liberty”-period (in the Saturnalia). Many Greek deities (Zeus, Dionysos, Hermes, Artemis, Karyatis) and others (Brahma, Heimdallr) possess the attributes of immobile trees (Germanische Religionsgeschichte). A number of deities (Cercunnos) has been identified to carry horns or antlers. Some deities have been reported to have parental relations.

First Generation Hebrew Deity Egyptian Deity Persian Deity Greek Deities Indian Deities Cyprian Deity Roman Deities Celtic Deities Germanic & Viking Deities Slavic Deities Polynesian Deities Toltec & Aztec Deities Jehovah Atum, Neret Zervan Chronos, Phanes Ardhanari, Ardhanarishvara Aphrodite, Aphroditus Janus, Saturn Cercunnos Tuisco, Odin, Wodan Zbruch Idol, Svantevit Ta'aroa Ometeotl

Second Generation

Zeus

Jupiter

Table 1: Dominant pre-Christian Deities

Jehovah
• • • • • • • In the Qabbalah, Jehovah is regarded as hermaphrodite → Jehovah Reference Jehovah to Yaho, Iao →
The Jewish IHVH was but the ancient Hebrew form of the deity equally recognized, although with far less reverence, by other ancient nations of the Near East, called Yaho among the Phoenicians, Iao among the Gnostics, etc. → Jehovah

Jehovah was an androgynous deity, recognized as existing in nature → Jehovah Jehovah is mystically having an intimate magnetic connection with the planet Saturn. →
Jehovah

Jehovah Nissi is the androgyne of Nissi. → The Jews worshipped under this name Bacchus-Osiris, DioNysos, and the multiform Joves of Nyssa, the Sinai of Moses. → Jehovah

The compound name of Jehovah, or Jah-Hovah, meaning male life and female life -- first androgynous, then
separated into sexes -- is used in this sense in Genesis from ch. v. onwards. → The Secret Doctrine, H.P. Blavatsky "The two words of which Jehovah is composed make up the original idea of male-female, as the birth originators"; for the Hebrew letter Jod was the membrum virile and Hovah was Eve, the mother of all living, or the procreatrix, Earth and Nature. → Quotation of the author of "The Source of Measures" (p. 159) → The Secret Doctrine, H.P. Blavatsky

• •

The third character "V" in YHVH must be read as "W" or placeholder for "O"/"U" vowel (see mater lectionis).
Most commonly in applying this rule of the Matres Lectionis, the Yod ‫ י‬indicates I or E, while Vav ‫ ו‬indicates O or U. → Figure in the entry “Tetragrammaton” in the Wikipedia.

The Tetragrammaton is one with Nature or Isis, and is the exoteric series of androgyne gods such as OsirisIsis, Jove-Juno, Brahma-Vach, or the Kabalistic Jah-hovah; all male-females. Every anthropomorphic god, in old nations, as Marcelinus Vicinus well observed. → The Secret Doctrine, H.P. Blavatsky

Adam
• • • • • “Adam the first (man) had a dual face,
as it is written [Psalms cxxxix. 5]: "Behind and before hast thou hedged me in, and thou placest upon me thy hand." → Jeremiah ben Elazar, a Palestinian scholar of the 2nd century.

God created the human being. One being which was both male and female
subsequently divided into two beings, God created them. → Rashi's and Rashbam's Genesis

and which was 84 According to

He created him with two faces at first, and afterwards He divided him. →
Midrash Aggadah → bereishis - rashi commentary - Rashi's Genesis (1040-1105)

God included the woman in the man and separated them later. → Rashbams Genesis Adam The first man, Adam, was a man on his right side, a woman on his left; but God split him in two halves →Patterns in Comparative Religion, by Mircea Eliade, Rosemary Sheed, John C. Holt, 1958 p. 423 →
Bereshit Rabbah I, 1, fol. 6 col. 2, etc. for further texts see A. Krappe “The Birth of Eve”, Occident and Orient, Gaster Anniversary Volume, London, 1936, pp. 312-22 "The two words of which Jehovah is composed make up the original idea of male-female, as the birth originators"; for the Hebrew letter Jod was the membrum virile and Hovah was Eve, the mother of all living, or the procreatrix, Earth and Nature. → quoting the author of "The Source of Measures" (p. 159) → The Secret Doctrine, H.P. Blavatsky

Adam was created as a man-woman (androgynos), explaining (Gen. i. 27) as "male and female" instead of
"man and woman," and that the separation of the sexes arose from the subsequent operation upon Adam's body, as related in the Scripture. This explains Philo's statement that the original man was neither man nor woman. → Theory from the Pharisees in explaining the various views concerning Eve's creation ('Er. 18a, Gen. R. viii.). → Adam Kadmon in the Jewish Encyclopdia.

Neret
• • Male & female deity of origins, creating Re → Mythology Neret as a Vulture goddess of strength, fear, and theft. Egypt → Lots And Lots Of Gods

Atum and other Hermaphroditic gods of Egypt

List of the Egyptian hermaphroditic gods ... → What is Gender? Atum Creator sun and earth god. At one point the most important god. Hapi God of the Nile Tatenen God of Earth and Vegetation Neith Goddess of weaving and war Ra/Aten Sun god / solar disc Wadj Wer Masculine hermaphrodite god of fertility and pregnancy

• •

Tatenen, the primal earth god of Egypt is often seen as hermaphroditic. He (most ancient
androgynous gods were referred to in the masculine) was sometimes fused with Ptah into Ptah-Tatenen, and in some legends, Ptah fashioned the world on his own, and therefore would be androgynous in nature. → What is Gender?

The serpent APEP has been fettered by Seb, Mest, Hapi, Tuamutef, and Qebhsennuf, who were represented by
five gods, but here the figures of the gods are wanting, and it is only the legend "Children of Horus," that tells us the chains represent the gods. → the gate of am-netu-f

Zervan
• Zervan, the Iranian God of limitless time, was also androgynous → Patterns in Comparative Religion, by Mircea Eliade, Rosemary Sheed, John C. Holt, 1958 p. 422 → Benveniste, The Persian Religion According
to the Chief Greek Texts, Paris, 1929, pp. 113 ff.

Ardhanari
• • Ardhanari or Ardhanarishvara, is an androgynous deity composed of Shiva and his consort Shakti,
representing the synthesis of masculine and feminine energies. → What is Gender?

In Hinduism, Ardhanari or Ardhanarishvara is an androgynous deity composed of Shiva and his consort
Shakti, representing the synthesis of masculine and feminine energies. → Ardhanari

Ta'aroa → What is Gender?
• Ta'aroa, the androgynous creator god of the Polynesian universe, of whom Hina, in one of her
manifestations, was the spouse. Ta'aroa is the supreme creator god in the mythology of French Polynesia.

Ometeotl → What is Gender?
• Ometeotl is the name of the dual god Ometecutli/Omecihuatl in Aztec mythology. The origin of
this god is from Toltec origin, and possibly could be traced to Teotihuacan. In the Nahua/Aztec tradition, Ometeolt/Omecihualt is a dual god, male and female, who was the creator of Cemanahuatl. Ometeotl's male aspect is Ometecutli, his/her female aspect is Omecihuatl.

Aphrodite
• • Hermaphroditus (also known as Aphroditus) was conceived after the union of Hermes and Aphrodite was a
androgynous (having the characteristics of both sexes) deity, depicted as either a handsome young man but with female breasts, or as Aphrodite with male genitals. → Hermes

Aphrodite has been fettered. → Pausanias tells us there was a temple of Aphrodite, and the only such one known
to him, which had two storeys, the lower consecrated to the armed goddess; the upper to Aphrodite-Morpho who was sitting veiled with her feet bound. Pausanias thought the fetters showed the attachment of women to their husbands. The tie symbol denotes the gestator, the bearing mother. → the natural genesis by gerald massey

Dido
• • Dido was queen of Carthage, who fell in love with Æneas, driven by a storm to her shores. After abiding awhile
at Carthage, he was compelled by Mercury to leave the hospitable queen. Dido, in grief, burnt herself to death on a funeral pile. → Pantheon

Dido, who at Carthage was portrayed with a beard

like the standing image of Aphrodite at Paphos, had a

second character in Anna. → the natural genesis by gerald massey - These two divine sisters, the bonia coelestis and inferna coelestis were worshipped, the one, Dido, with dark bloody rites; the other, Anna, the charming one, with cheerful ceremonies. They divided into the good goddess of the upper heaven and the evil one of the lower. → the natural genesis by gerald massey

Ares
• The fettered Ares has been unfettered only once a year
→ Farnell 1909:407 → page 87 in Dictionary of deities and demons in the Bible by K. van der Toorn,Bob Becking,Pieter Willem van der Horst

Enyalius (the War God) at Sparta
• • Opposite the temple of Hipposthenes is an old image of Enyalius in fetters. The idea the
Lacedaemonians express by this image is that Enyalius will never run away from them, being bound in the fetters. → Ares

There was a fettered image of Enyalius (the War God) at Sparta, and at Athens the image of Victory
had no wings, lest she might fly away. → Classic Enxcyclopdia

Phanes → What is Gender
• • • Phanes was the Protogenos (primeval god) of procreation in the Orphic cosmogony. He was the primal generator of life, the driving force behind reproduction in the early cosmos. Phanes was portrayed as a beautiful golden-winged hermaphroditic deity wrapped in a serpent's coils. Phanes was the first king of the universe, and very important place in Greek cosmology. He was a beautiful golden winged hermaphrodite deity, often equated with the ancient Eros.

Hermes / Mercury
• • • • References to Aphrodite: Hermes is often housed in the same body as Aphrodite. → Gods Mercury, called the 'male-female' was an androgyne → The New Age Movement Hermes is an androgynous trickster God, often housed in the same body as Aphrodite. Hermes can be
compared to the Roman Mercury, as well as to the Teutonic Gods Teutatis and Woden. → Gods

It was Hermes who liberated Io, the lover of Zeus, from the hundred-eyed giant Argus, who had been ordered by
Hera, the jealous wife of Zeus, to watch over her. Hermes cut off Argo's head and released Io. → Hermes

Fig. 1: Hermes (left) kills a bi-faced Argos Panoptes (all seeing, middle) in releasing Io (right side)

Janus
• • • • Originally Janus was the god of gods (→ Dictionary of Symbols, Jean Chevalier & Alain Gheerbrant). Janus has two faces, one on each side of the head. Numa also introduced the Ianus geminus (also Janus Bifrons, Janus Quirinus or Portae Belli) , a passage
ritually opened at times of war, and shut again when Roman arms rested. → Janus

Christ in the form of an androgynous Janus (→ fifteen century manuscript found at Luchon) → Symbols of
Sacred Science (Von René Guénon, Henry Fohr)

Fig. 2: Christ in the form of an androgynous Janus • • • • • The symbolic image of Janus/Jana is androgynous → hermetic - mystical philosophies Some authors regard Jana as Diana/Artemis → Symbols of Sacred Science (Von René Guénon, Henry Fohr) "On Roman monuments, Janus is shown crowned as in the cartouche of Luchon,” → wrote Charbonneau-Lassay → Symbols of Sacred Science (Von René Guénon, Henry Fohr) The third face of Janus corresponds to the frontal eye of Shiva and to the triple time (future / present /
past → Symbols of Sacred Science (Von René Guénon, Henry Fohr)

Janus as a Saturn / Kronos →

A Lydian named Joannes identified Janus as a planet when he wrote: "Our own Philadelphia still preserves a trace of the ancient belief. On the first day of the month there goes in procession no less a personage than Janus himself, dressed up in a two-faced mask, and people call him Saturnus, identifying him with Kronos."

Jupiter
• • Jupiter named “Father and mother of the gods” → City of God by Saint Augustine (Bishop of Hippo.),
Henry Bettenson

Ianus Pater, still used in Classical times, was often invoked together with Iuppiter (Jupiter).
→ Janus

Saturn
• • Saturn had been fettered. → The woolen bonds which fettered the feet of the ivory cult statue within were loosened on that day (Saturnalia) to symbolize the liberation of the god. (→ Macrobius: The Saturnalia ) Janus as a Saturn / Kronos →
A Lydian named Joannes identified Janus as a planet when he wrote: "Our own Philadelphia still preserves a trace of the ancient belief. On the first day of the month there goes in procession no less a personage than Janus himself, dressed up in a two-faced mask, and people call him Saturnus, identifying him with Kronos."

Victory
• Victory was fettered by the absence of wings. “The Athenians think that Victory, having no wings, will always remain where she is.” → Pausanias, 3.15.7. → Ares

Buri
• In Norse religion where the All-Father is born as Buri, an androgynous entity,
Bor. → In the beginning who gave life to

Brünhilde
• Bruennhilde, valkyrie and the androgynous daughter of Wotan, king of the gods, has been worshipped
by the Vikings -> Myk's Wanderings...

Cercunnos → Cernunnos
• • • • The name "Cernunnos" is only found once associated with an image in one inscription, on a block found
under Notre Dame in Paris

The full meaning of the name would thus be "The god with antlers" Looks both ways (three heads) God of the in-between, of bi-directionality, of the reconciliation of opposites

Hermes of Roquepertuse
• bi-faced image (Wikipedia)

Fig. 3: Hermes of Roquepertuse (from Wikipedia)

This may be a bi-faced, horned deity → In Calendario (Province Salamanca) they found a horned bi-faced,
which may be compared to Hermes of Roquepertuse. → Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire by Hildegard Temporini,Wolfgang Haase

Fig. 4: Bifaced sculpture from Calendario

Odin, Odhin
• An ancient wooden carving of the bisexual Viking god Odin
has been linked to a prehistoric timber circle monument excavated in Britain (→ Holme beach in Norfolk, England), according to U.K. archaeologists. The Viking god Odin could change sex at will, and lost the use of his left eye so that he could see into the future. the idol was recently radiocarbon dated to 2,250 B.C. → Bisexual Viking idol marks ancient circle

Major Gods in Scandinavian mythology always preserved traces of androgyne: Odhin, Loki, Tuisco, Nerthus, etc. → Patterns in Comparative Religion, by Mircea Eliade, Rosemary Sheed, John C. Holt, 1958
p. 422 → Cf. e.g. De Vries, Handbuch der germanischen Religionsgeschichte, vol. ii, p. 306; id. The Problem of Loki, FFC, no. 110, Helsinki, 1933, pp. 220 ff.

• •

The Supreme, invisible Creator of all things was called All-Father. His regent in Nature was Odin, the one-eyed god. → The Ancient Mysteries and Secret Societies Reference to Odin as Mercury for the reason that, like Mercury, Odin was regarded as Psychopompos, "the
leader of souls". The Roman historian Tacitus refers→ Odin

Loki → What is Gender
• Loki or Loke - In Norse mythology, a trickster who was able to change his shape and sex.

Lusty Man (→ Boa Island (Dreenan), county Fermanagh)
• • • androgynous sculpture, Male and female persons fettered back-to-back around the waist. reference to Badhbha or Divine Hag, who latterly became the Caillech Bhéarra like the Norse sky-god Odin, who was blind in the left eye.

Tuisco
• Major Gods in Scandinavian mythology always preserved traces of androgyne: Odhin, Loki, Tuisco, Nerthus, etc. → Patterns in Comparative Religion, by Mircea Eliade, Rosemary Sheed, John C. Holt, 1958
p. 422 → Cf. e.g. De Vries, Handbuch der germanischen Religionsgeschichte, vol. ii, p. 306; id. The Problem of Loki, FFC, no. 110, Helsinki, 1933, pp. 220 ff.

Wackernagel retains Tuisco = duplex and explains it as Zwitter, two-sexed → Teutonic
Mythology, Jacob Grimm

Zbruch Idol / Sviatovyt
• • • Statue of a pre-Christian Slavic god (commonly believed to be Sviatovyt, the god of war) → Encyclopedia of
Ukraine

four sides of the top tier represent four different Slavic gods, two female and two male, with
their corresponding middle-tier entities always of the opposite gender. → ZBruch idol

At the top of the structure are four facial images set in each cardinal direction and wearing a single noblestyle Rus’ hat. → Encyclopedia of Ukraine

Fenrir
• Fenrir had to be chained by 3 fetters: The first, made of iron, was called Leyding and a second fetter, twice as
strong, was named Dromi. They were broken, but Fenrir has been held by the silken fetter Gleipnir. → Fenrir

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