d’AUBIGNY

1. ROGER m. AMICE Issue2I. WILLIAM- m. MAUD BIGOT  II. Nigel2I. WILLIAM d'AUBIGNY of Buckenham Castle (ROGER 1) m. MAUD BIGOT- d. of Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk d. 1139 bur. Wymondham Priory, Norfolk William was the Pincerna or Master Butler for the Royal household. Issue 3I. WILLIAM- b.c.1109, m. ADELIZA de LOUVAIN (m.1. King Henry I), d. 25 Sept. 1176 3I. WILLIAM (ROGER 1, WILLIAM 2) b.c.1109 m. ADELIZA de LOUVAIN (m.1. King Henry I) d. 25 Sept. 1176 The younger William was an important member of Henry I of England's household. After Henry's death he married the widow Queen consort Adeliza in 1138, and became Lord of Arundel in her right. He was loyal to Stephen of England, who made him first Earl of Lincoln and then Earl of Arundel (more precisely, Earl of Sussex). Although her husband was a staunch supporter of Stephen during the AngloNorman civil war, Adeliza's own personal inclination may have been toward the cause of her stepdaughter Empress Matilda. When the Empress sailed for England in 1139, it was to her stepmother that she appealed for shelter, and she landed near Arundel and was received as a guest of the former Queen. In 1143 as Earl of Lincoln he made two charters confirming a donation of land around Arundel in Sussex to the abbey of Affligem in Brabant (representing his wife Adeliza of Louvain), with William's brother Olivier present. He fought loyally for King Stephen, but in 1153 helped arrange the truce between Stephen and Henry Plantagenet, known as the Treaty of Wallingford, which brought an end to The Anarchy. When the latter ascended the throne as Henry II, he confirmed William's Earldom and gave him direct possession of Arundel Castle (instead of the possession in right of his wife he had previously had). She had died in 1151. He remained loyal to the king during the 1173 revolt of Henry the Young King, and helped defeat the rebellion. Adeliza married Henry I of England on 2 February 1121, when she is thought to have been somewhere between fifteen and eighteen years of age, whilst Henry was fifty-three. It is believed that Henry's only reason for marrying again was his desire for a male heir. Despite holding the record for the largest number of illegitimate children of any British monarch, Henry had only one legitimate male heir, William Adelin, who had predeceased his father on 25 November 1120 in the White Ship disaster. Adeliza was reputedly

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quite pretty and her father was Duke of Lower Lotharingia. These were the likely reasons she was chosen. However, no children were born during the almost fifteen years of the marriage. Adeliza, unlike the other Anglo-Norman queens, played little part in the public life of the realm during her tenure as queen consort. Whether this is because of personal inclination, or because Henry preferred to keep her nearby in hopes of her conceiving, is unknown and probably unknowable. She did, however, leave a mark as a patron of literature and several works, including a bestiary by Philip de Thaon, were dedicated to her. She is said to have commissioned a verse biography of King Henry; if she did it is no longer extant. When Henry died on 1 December 1135, Adeliza retired for a while to the monastery of Wilton, near Salisbury. She was present at the dedication of Henry's tomb at Reading Abbey on the first anniversary of his death. Adeliza spent her final years in the abbey of Affligem (landgraviat of Brabant), which she richly rewarded with landed estates (three English villages called Ideswordam, Westmerendonam and Aldeswurda, probably near to Arundel). She died in the abbey and was buried in the abbey church next to her father, duke Godfrey I of Leuven (d.1139). The abbey necrology situates her tombstone next to the clockwork. An 18th century floor plan of the church shows her tombstone located halfway up the left nave. Her grave was demolished however during the French Revolution (abt. 1798). Her bones had been found and she was reburied in the cloister of the re-erected Affligem abbey. Issue 4I. WILLIAM- b. before 1150, m. MATILDA St. HILARY, d. 24 Dec. 1193  II. Reynor III. Henry IV. Geoffrey V. Alice- m.1. Jean d'Eu, 2. Alvred de St. Martin, d. 1188  VI. Olivia- d.s.p., bur. Boxgrove Priory, Lewes, Sussex  VII. Agatha- d.s.p., bur. Boxgrove Priory, Lewes, Sussex Ref: The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, Gloucester- Vol. I, p. 233 Dictionary of National Biography- H.C.G. Matthew, Ed., Oxford University Press, 1995 Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy- Aqlison Weir, The Bodley Head, London, 1999- pp. 47-8

4I. WILLIAM (ROGER 1, WILLIAM 2, WILLIAM 3) b. before 1150 m. MATILDA St. HILARY- d. of James de St. Hilaire and Aveline bur. Wymondham Priory, Norfolk William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel succeeded to the title of Earl of Sussex in 1176/77. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Arundel on 27 June 1190. He held the office of Custos Rotulorum of Windsor Castle in 1191. He was one of the receivers for the money raised for the King's raised in 1194. Issue 5I. WILLIAM b. before 1180, m. MABEL of CHESTER (b.c.1173), d. 1 Feb. 1221  II. Matilda- m. William de Warenne, Earl of Surrey

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Ref: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 - Frederick Lewis Weis Buckenham Castles, 1066 to 1649- P.M. Remfry The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, Gloucester- Vol. I, p. 233, 236 Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy- Aqlison Weir, The Bodley Head, London, 1999- p. 48 Plantagenet Ancestry- Douglas Richardson, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 2004- p. 748

5I. WILLIAM (ROGER 1, WILLIAM 2, WILLIAM 3, WILLIAM 4) b. before 1180 m. MABEL of CHESTER (b.c.1173), d. of Hugh de Kevelioc, Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort d'Evreux d. 1 Feb. 1221 William was a favorite of King John. He witnessed King John's concession of the kingdom to the Pope on 15 May 1213. On 14 June 1216 he joined Prince Louis (later Louis VIII of France) after King John abandoned Winchester. He returned to the allegiance of the King Henry III after the Royalist victory at Lincoln, on 14 July 1217. He joined in the Fifth Crusade (1217-1221), in 1218. He died on his journey home, in Caneill, Italy, near Rome, on 1 February 1221. News of his death reached England on 30 March 1221. He was brought home and buried at Wymondham Abbey. His title was held by his son William, until he died, childless, in 1224, when it was passed to William's youngest son Hugh. Hugh also died without issue and the title of Earl of Arundel was inherited by his nephew John FitzAlan. Issue I. Maud II. Cicely III. Colette IV. William- d.s.p.1224  V. Hugh- m. Isabel de Warenne, d.s.p. 7 May 1243  6VI. ISABEL- m. JOHN FitzALAN (b.c.1200, d. 1240)  VII. Nicole- m. Roger de Somery Ref: The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant- G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, Gloucester, 1910-1959- Vol. I, pp. 236-8 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 - Frederick Lewis Weis Buckenham Castles, 1066 to 1649- P.M. Remfry

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