MISSION COMPLETE

FOR ‘ROGUE NATION’
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18

SAVINGS TARGETS

GAMEPREP
TAKES 2ND

CALIFORNIA SAYS WATER USE FELL BY 27 PERCENT IN
JUNE
STATE PAGE 4

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • July 31, 2015 • Vol XV, Edition 299

The girls of summer
Generations of Girl Scouts work toward future, while getting back to nature
By Dave Newlands
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

A woman by the name of
“Jackrabbit” announced that it was
“time for drama” and a group of gradeschool girls flocked toward a roughhewn stage in the shade of an evergreen grove.
One girl strayed to a log bench with
a handful of treasures, confiding, “I’m
going to put these here so I don’t lose
them, OK?”

On the bench, she carefully placed a
half-finished macrame lanyard and a
piece of redwood bark sprouted with
bright green lichen.
It was a scene of childhood joy that
could only exist at camp, and it is a
scene that has played out innumerable
times this summer in Huddart Park
where the local Girl Scouts have been
hosting their annual camps, encouraging girls of all ages to explore nature,
enjoy the simple pleasures of arts and
crafts, make new friends, and learn to

become the leaders of tomorrow.
The Girl Scouts have been camping
at Huddart Park for decades, which,
incidentally, is beyond recorded history.
“This is my 37th year, so let me start
the year before that at 38,” said Camp
Director Genella Williamson, who
goes
by
the
nature
name
“Mockingbird” while on duty. “We
don’t have any records before that

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JO MITCHELL

Junior unit leaders Girl Scouts help a third-grade group with
See SCOUTS, Page 23 a barbecue lunch.

Election to
be by mail
Last county jurisdiction
agrees to pilot program
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Volunteers who helped remodel Safe Harbor Shelter in South San Francisco attended an open house Wednesday.

Homeless shelter gets makeover
Dozens of volunteers spruce up Safe Harbor Shelter in South San Francisco
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The Safe Harbor Shelter in South San
Francisco got a $100,000 makeover
thanks to the support of dozens of volunteers.
The shelter, operated by Samaritan
House, has new paint, new storage
space, new bicycle racks, a new kitchenette and a station where the shelter’s
clients can display and shop for
clothes.
Safe Harbor provides emergency
shelter for about 100 homeless individuals at a time. It serves about 400
individuals annually, some who are
sheltered for up to seven months as

they transition back into society.
The remodel was made possible by
the Housing Industry Foundation’s
Shelter Renovation Program.
“We wanted to make the shelter more
dignified for those who stay here,”
said Meta Townsley, HIF’s executive
director.
She thanked the many volunteers
who finished working on the project
Wednesday prior to an open house.
“You get your hands dirty and make a
difference,” Townsley said.
Many of the volunteers are employees of Wells Fargo, which presented
HIF with a $10,000 check at the open
house.
Although the price tag for the remod-

el was $100,000, Townsley said much
of the cost was offset by contributions
from companies such as Varsity
Painting,
BellaVista Landscape
Services and AquaTek Plumbing among
many others.
There was no cost to Samaritan
House.
Safe Harbor helps lift people out of
poverty and gives them a life of hope
and self reliance, said Bart Charlow,
executive director of Samaritan House.
The open house was attended by former assemblyman Gene Mullin, Pam
Frisella, a 25-year Samaritan House
volunteer and former Foster City

See SHELTER, Page 31

Voters in San Mateo County will primarily vote by mail
in this November’s general election under a pilot program
made possible by legislation drafted by Assemblyman
Kevin Mullin, D-South San Francisco.
The last jurisdiction in the county to vote on whether to
participate in the pilot program, the Jefferson Elementary
School District board, approved so Wednesday night.
It was the last of 40 jurisdictions in the county with
planned elections this fall to vote on participating. The
Redwood City Council voted to participate Monday night.
The program will hopefully increase voter turnout, produce faster results, reduce risk of error and decrease elections
costs, Mark Church, San Mateo County’s chief elections
officer and assessor-county clerk-recorder, said previously.

See MAIL, Page 23

Impacts of Crystal Springs
school on Belmont outlined
Private school proposal gets environmental
review and will be open for public comment
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A revived proposal to construct a private middle school in
Belmont is proceeding with an environmental review as
officials with the Crystal Springs Uplands School hope to
mitigate concerns previously raised by some residents.
CSUS has been eyeing the 6.5-acre Davis Drive property
for years and, despite a rocky start, opted to purchase the
site for $11 million in late 2013. Now, a draft environmental impact report covering the construction of an estimated

See CSUS, Page 31

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“The trouble with the
public is that there is too much of it.”
— Don Marquis, American journalist, poet and dramatist

This Day in History

1715

A fleet of Spanish ships carrying
gold, silver and jewelry sank during a
hurricane off the east Florida coast,
scattering most of their treasure along
the ocean floor. Of some 2,500 crew
members, more than 1,000 died.

In 1 7 7 7 , the Marquis de Lafayette, a 19-year-old French
nobleman, was made a major-general in the American
Continental Army.
In 1 8 7 5 , the 17th president of the United States, Andrew
Johnson, died in Carter County, Tennessee, at age 66.
In 1 9 1 9 , Germany’s Weimar Constitution was adopted by
the republic’s National Assembly.
In 1 9 3 0 , the radio character “The Shadow” made his debut
as narrator of the “Detective Story Hour” on CBS Radio.
In 1 9 3 3 , the radio series “Jack Armstrong, the AllAmerican Boy,” made its debut on CBS radio station WBBM
in Chicago.
In 1 9 4 2 , Oxfam International had its beginnings as the
Oxford Committee for Famine Relief was founded in
England.
In 1 9 5 4 , Pakistan’s K2 was conquered as two members of
an Italian expedition, Achille Compagnoni and Lino
Lacedelli, reached the summit.
In 1 9 6 4 , the American space probe Ranger 7 reached the
moon, transmitting pictures back to Earth before impacting
the lunar surface.
In 1 9 7 2 , Democratic vice-presidential candidate Thomas
Eagleton withdrew from the ticket with George McGovern
following disclosures that Eagleton had once undergone
psychiatric treatment.
In 1 9 7 3 , Delta Air Lines Flight 723, a DC-9, crashed while
trying to land at Boston’s Logan International Airport,
killing all 89 people on board.
In 1 9 8 9 , a pro-Iranian group in Lebanon released a grisly
videotape showing the body of American hostage William
R. Higgins, a Marine lieutenant-colonel, dangling from a
rope.

Birthdays

Entrepreneur Mark
Cuban is 57.

Actor, writer B.J.
Novak is 36.

Actor Wesley
Snipes is 53.

Actor Don Murray is 86. Jazz composer-musician Kenny
Burrell is 84. Actress France Nuyen is 76. Actress Susan
Flannery is 76. Singer Lobo is 72. Actress Geraldine Chaplin
is 71. Former movie studio executive Sherry Lansing is 71.
Singer Gary Lewis is 70. Actor Lane Davies is 65.
International Tennis Hall of Famer Evonne Goolagong
Cawley is 64. Actor Barry Van Dyke is 64. Actor Alan Autry is
63. Jazz composer-musician Michael Wolff is 63. Actor James
Read is 62. Actor Michael Biehn is 59. Former Massachusetts
Gov. Deval Patrick is 59. Rock singer-musician Daniel Ash
(Love and Rockets) is 58.

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Pastor Rolf Hansen with Community United Church of Christ in San Carlos leads a prayer for four families being evicted from
their San Mateo homes. The residents, at 1824 El Parque Court, have until Aug. 24 to move. Their building was recently sold
and the new owners evicted them for remodeling. The tenants want to stay in their homes or be given more time to find a
new place to live considering the area’s escalating rents. About 40 people attended the prayer vigil.

In other news ...
Five men arrested in $2 million
methamphetamine ring bust
LOS ANGELES — California
Attorney General Kamala Harris says
five men suspected of having connections to Mexico’s notorious Sinaloa
drug cartel have been arrested for
allegedly trafficking 55 pounds of
methamphetamine with a street value
of $2 million.
The arrests were announced Thursday.
Authorities say two of the five were
arrested in an Ontario parking lot earlier this month when they attempted to
deliver a partial shipment of the drug to
an undercover agent they thought was a
buyer.
The others were arrested during
another delivery attempt.
They were jailed in San Bernardino
County on $500,000 bail.
Authorities say deliveries were negotiated with cartel representatives in
Mexico and the United States.
Harris says California is the gateway
for 70 percent of the methamphetamine
trafficked to the United States from
Mexico.

Great white shark
thwarts marathon swim in Bay
SAN FRANCISCO — A great white
shark thwarted a Northern California
man’s quest to become the first person
to swim from the Golden Gate Bridge to
the Farallon Islands.

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

July 29 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

BULAM

CUPANK

4

22

27

28

52

35
Powerball

8

35

61

68

75

15
Mega number

July 29 Super Lotto Plus
13

15

33

35

36

3

32

35

36

39

7

0

1

Daily Four
8

Daily three midday
0

15

Monsoonal flow brings
thunderstorms to parts of state
LOS ANGELES — Scattered thunderstorms unleashed fierce downpours, and
showers hit elsewhere around Southern
California on Thursday as July began
wrapping up with another blast of the
unusually humid weather that has
marked the normally very dry month.
A significant surge of monsoon
moisture and atmospheric instability
set the stage for the dramatic thunderheads that boiled up over rugged mountain ranges amid otherwise sunny, blue
skies across the metropolitan regions.
Flash-flood warnings were issued for
northwestern Los Angeles County,
northwestern Ventura County, northcentral Santa Barbara County, and
southern San Bernardino County, the
National Weather Service said.
Doppler radar estimated as much as 2
1/2 inches of rain in parts of eastern
Santa Barbara County and nearly 2
inches in northern Ventura County.
Areas including Cuyama, western
Lockwood Valley and Ventucopa were
warned to expect flooding.
In the inland desert region east of Los
Angeles, a flash-flood warning was
issued as more than an inch of rain fell
near Joshua Tree. Warned communities
included Twentynine Palms and the
nearby Marine Corps base, Yucca
Valley and Landers.
Meteorologists warned drivers not to
attempt to cross flooded roads.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five

July 28 Mega Millions

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

CPRIH

Corte Madera marathon swimmer
Simon Dominguez was trying to swim
about 28 miles when his teen daughter,
in a support boat, spotted the great
white just 3 1/2 miles from his goal,
KPIX-TV reported Thursday.
After 18 hours in the frigid ocean, he
reluctantly climbed into his support
boat as the 12-to-15-foot shark circled
it.
Out of the water, the 49-year-old,
blood streaming down his chest from
chafed skin around his neck, said he
was disappointed that he didn’t finish
the swim.
“It was hard. But a shark is a shark,”
Dominguez said.
Four swimmers have swum from the
Farallon Islands to San Francisco, but
Dominguez would have been the first to
make the trip in the other direction.
The islands are a breeding ground for
great whites. But Dominguez said he
decided to make the attempt in the summer before breeding season normally
begins in the fall.
The 240-pound swimmer jumped into
the cold ocean and began the swim
under the Golden Gate Bridge Tuesday
night, wearing only a cap, goggles,
swimsuit and a thick coat of grease to
guard against jelly fish stings and keep
him a little warmer in the 50-degree
water.
After giving up the swim, he said his
only plans at the moment were to “go
straight to the pub, have a few beers
and decide what the next steps are.”

2

4

Daily three evening

Mega number

1

6

0

The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place; Gold Rush, No. 1, in second place;
and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:42.16.

Fri day : Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
upper 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday night...Mostly cloudy. Lows in
the upper 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 15
mph.
Saturday : Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in
the mid 60s to lower 70s. Southwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday ni g ht: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 50s. West winds 5 to
10 mph.
Sunday : Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 60s.
Sunday ni g ht thro ug h Tues day ni g ht: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 50s. Highs in the upper 60s.
Wednes day thro ug h Thurs day : Mostly clear.

PUEGAL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

-

Yesterday’s

-

Print your
answer here:

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: FLOWN
SLANT
EMBARK
COGNAC
Answer: The family loved their new kitten. Everyone
thought she was the — CAT’S MEOW

The San Mateo Daily Journal
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

San Bruno foundation probes project costs
Group developing spending strategy for PG&E explosion restitution fund
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

As San Bruno residents build a wish list
targeting how to spend the roughly $70
million in restitution funds granted by
Pacific Gas and Electric in the wake of the
2010 gas pipeline explosion, a vision of
how much money those projects might cost
is becoming more clear.
According to cost estimations presented
to the San Bruno Community Foundation
Board of Directors by architecture professionals Wednesday, July 29, the construction price of various capital projects desired
by residents exceeds the foundation’s budget.
The foundation, which is the group
charged with deciding how to best allocate
the $68.75 million granted after the tragedy
that killed eight people and injured 66, has
some hard decisions lying ahead as board
members consider crafting a spending strategy, said Executive Director Leslie
Hatamiya.
Residents have asked for projects which
could cost between $133 million and $166
million by 2019, or the time frame by
which they could realistically be built,
according to a projection by Anderson Brule
Architects, of San Jose.
During an extensive public outreach campaign, residents expressed interest in the
foundation fund being used to build a new
library, recreation center, indoor swimming
pool, fire station and improved park and
public spaces, among other projects.
“We are well above $70 million,” said
Hatamiya. “Some tough choice are going to
be have to be made.”
According to estimations by the firm, by
2019, it could cost between $37.2 million

and $47. 5 million to build a library;
between $30.5 million and $39.9 million
for a recreation center; between $8.3 million and $10 million for a swimming pool;
between $13 million and $15.9 million for
a fire station; and between $22 million and
$50 million for improvements to city parks
and sports fields.
The foundation made no decision whether
to pursue a certain project, but board members felt it was necessary to understand a
general estimation of what the construction
prices might be, said Hatamiya.
“As part of our planning process, we had
to get a better handle on how much these
projects cost,” she said.
Architect Pamela Anderson Brule said the
cost models her firm provided are general
estimations based on previously constructed projects which serve communities similar to San Bruno, and prices can be affected
by the size, quality and timing of the developments.
“This is a tool that will really help you
begin to frame things and understand them
better,” she said.
Board President Nancy Kraus emphasized
the prices of projects in Anderson Brule’s
presentation were only used to give board
members and the community a baseline for
estimating costs.
“This is extremely preliminary,” she said.
“It’s just a ballpark.”
Hatamiya said the foundation needs to
consider the projected building costs
against other potential investment strategies for the fund, which include possibly
establishing an endowment, or running
grant and scholarship programs.
Next month, the foundation is expecting
to receive a presentation from an investment strategist, to offer a detailed illustration of how to coordinate such programs,

and how much money might be required,
said Hatamiya.
A substantial investment to establish an
endowment could offer the foundation lasting benefits, but would have a profound
impact on how much money would be left
over for capital projects, said Hatamiya.
Time is of the essence though, stressed
Hatamiya, as construction costs are expected to increase in coming years, so the board
and community should work quickly in
charting a strategy for spending the fund.
After a few months of community outreach, board conversations, wish list building and cost identification, Hatamiya said
her role in leading the foundation is becoming more enthralling as officials are preparing to begin spending some of the fund.
“It’s really exciting, because we are now
starting to see what we really can do,” she
said. “It is getting to be more concrete.”
As the foundation looks to consider
potential capital projects, a close partnership with city officials and administrators
in the school district is necessary, since
those agencies would be responsible for
operating the new facilities, said Hatamiya.
Those agencies, and others, could also
partner with the foundation in further developing opportunities for grant writing,
which would address community needs in
San Bruno as well, she said.
Hatamiya said considering all contributing factors is necessary to develop a possible vision for spending the fund toward the
long-term benefit of San Bruno.
“This is all the framework for thinking
about a strategy,” she said.
The fund that the foundation controls is
distinct and separate from the $50 million
trust agreement to specifically benefit the
Crestmoor neighborhood, which suffered
the brunt of the blast.

City Council to rescind ordinances per citizens referendum, consider next steps
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

In the wake of a citizens referendum calling for Belmont’s controversial home
remodel amendments to be repealed or put
on a ballot, the City Council will host a
special meeting to discuss the next steps
after a lengthy meeting this month stirred
more concerns.
The council was required to rescind
changes to the city’s Zoning and Tree ordinances after the group Ask Belmont
Citizens gathered more than 2,200 signatures on two petitions outlining concerns
about the city’s process and tackling nearly
40 amendments at once.
Some councilmembers say they repealed
the ordinance while introducing a different
one at the July 14 meeting that lasted until
nearly 1:30 a.m. Opponents, however, have
grown concerned that their efforts were
being dismissed and the process they were
against was continuing.
Now, the City Council will meet Monday
to vote on separate ordinances that explicitly repeal the original changes and possibly
consider how to proceed with crafting new
amendments while balancing citizens’ concerns and needs.
“A lot of people in Belmont seem to feel
that they did not have the opportunity to
provide input. So we’re trying to make sure
everyone understands that they do have an
opportunity. We need to respect the fact that
2,000 people signed a petition that said
they would like to have more input, so now
we’re going to give them the opportunity to
have more input, ” Councilman Warren
Lieberman said.
Thus far, the council has agreed to issue a
citywide mailer with various meeting dates
as well as question and answer sessions for
the community to meet with staff. There will
also be public hearings before the Planning
and Parks and Recreation commissions, as
well as the council.
But some members of the citizens group
remain wary that the council’s former

process will continue and they seek a different approach. According to a letter sent to
the council, the group wants an advisory
committee that includes residents, a prioritization of needs after conducting an analysis
of
Belmont
property
data,
the
revisions to
be categorized by rele v a n c e
instead of as
one large
o r di n a n c e
and more
public outr e a c h
o p p o rt un i ties.
“My concern is that
the council
is way out
ahead of the
electorate, ”
said resident
D a n i e l
Pierce,
a
member of
the citizens
group who
helped gather
signatures. “Very
few people
want to see
ex t en s i v e
changes in
n ei g h b o rhood zoning. That’s
not to say
that there
aren’t some
issues that
need to be
updated and

3

Police reports
Still no reason to cry
A woman took someone’s milk and
threw it against the door on Broadway
in Redwood City before 11:28 p.m.
Tuesday, July 28.

FOSTER CITY
Sus pi ci o us v ehi cl e. A woman reported a
car circling her house for five minutes, however, it turned out to be a man delivering
newspapers on Port Royal Avenue before
4:52 a.m. Wednesday, July 29.
Burg l ary . A bag filled with sports equipment was stolen through a smashed window
of a car on East Hillsdale Boulevard before
11:24 a.m. Tuesday, July 28.
Petty theft. Someone stole a bag of laundry on Edgewater Boulevard before 6:13
p.m. Tuesday, July 28.
Wel fare check. After several calls to 911,
police made contact with a homeowner and
determined that a caretaker needed to assist
the homeowner in making a phone call on
Coronado Lane before 5:30 p.m. Sunday,
July 26.
Di s turbance. Two moving truck drivers
parked in front of an entrance of a court were
seen and heard yelling profanities to each
other all day at Bramble Court before 7:34
p.m. Sunday, July 26.

REDWOOD CITY

DUI. A gray sports car was swerving
through traffic and honking on El Camino
Real before 10:55 p.m. Tuesday, July 28.
Grand theft. A bike was stolen on El
Camino Real before 5:42 p.m. Tuesday, July
28.
Ac c i de n t . A pedestrian received minor
injuries after being hit by a car on El
Camino Real before 5:22 p.m. Tuesday, July
28.
Sus pi ci o us pers o n. Someone was fondled
by a random man on Bayfront before 9:26
a.m. Tuesday, July 28.
Arres t. A man was arrested for being on a
private property for more than an hour staring at bushes on Chestnut Street before 3:37
p.m. Monday, July 27.
Stray ani mal . A raccoon was stuck in a
addressed, but the fundamental process issue fence on Grand Street before 6:23 a.m.
is ‘why are they bundling all these things Sunday, July 26.
Grand theft. Money was stolen from an
together?’”
employee’s purse on El Camino Real before
See BELMONT, Page 31 11:01 a.m. Saturday, July 25.

Belmont to hold meeting on zoning amendments
By Samantha Weigel

Friday • July 31, 2015

4

STATE/NATION

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Rebound for U.S. economy
sets stage for Fed rate hike
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The U. S. economy
isn’t moving at warp speed, but it looks
like it will be strong enough to handle an
expected interest rate increase later this
year.
Fueled by solid consumer spending,
Thursday’s report on the gross domestic
product underscored the steady growth that
is likely to bolster the Federal Reserve’s
case that it will soon be time to make a
move, perhaps in September.
Th e eco n o my ’s t o t al o ut p ut o f g o o ds
an d s erv i ces reb o un ded t o a res p ect ab l e
an n ual rat e o f 2 . 3 p ercen t i n t h e Ap ri l J un e quart er, t h e b es t s h o wi n g s i n ce
l as t s ummer. Mo reo v er, t h e fi rs t quart er
man ag ed t o g ro w a s l i g h t 0 . 6 p ercen t ,
rev ers i n g an earl i er g o v ern men t es t i -

mat e o f a co n t ract i o n .
“The fact that the economy improved
meaningfully in the second quarter and is
likely to strengthen further in the current
quarter should keep a September rate hike
on the table,” said Sal Guatieri, senior
economist at BMO Capital Markets.
While the latest figures fall short of a
boom, the United States appears in better
shape than other major economics of the
world. China — the world’s secondbiggest economy — has seen a sharp drop
in stock prices recently. Meanwhile,
Europe has been consumed with resolving
a stubborn debt crisis in Greece.
The International Monetary Fund is forecasting that the 19 nations that use the
euro currency will grow a modest 1.5 percent this year. It expects China to expand
6.8 percent, which would be the slowest
growth rate for the country in 25 years.

REUTERS

Workers install artificial turf in the yard of a home in Los Angeles.

California says water use
fell by 27 percent in June
By Fenit Nirappil
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Fire chief: More training
planned after dispatcher hung up
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — All Albuquerque
Fire Department employees in emergency
situations will undergo additional training
after a dispatcher told a 911 caller trying to
help a teenage shooting victim to “deal with
it yourself.”
The department will start giving crisis
intervention training to all firefighters and
dispatchers next week, Fire Chief David
Downey told reporters Wednesday. A department spokeswoman said she was not sure if

Around the nation
some employees had previously received
the training.
The dispatcher, Matthew Sanchez, should
not have hung up on the 17-year-old caller
in such a traumatic situation, Downey said.
“It was outlandish. Unforgivable,” he
said. “You cannot call 911 and be treated
like that. You can’t do it.”
In the recording made public this week,
caller Esperanza Quintero snaps at Sanchez
for repeatedly asking whether her friend
Jaydon Chavez-Silver, 17, is breathing.

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SACRAMENTO — California’s unprecedented system of mandatory conservation
imposed on cities got off to a strong start
with water use plunging 27 percent in June,
regulators said Thursday.
Data released by the State Water Resources
Control Board showed 265 of 411 local
agencies in California hit or nearly reached
savings targets.
The governor ordered cities to reduce water
use by 25 percent to prepare in case
California’s four-year drought persists.
The savings came during the hottest June
on record, which would normally lead to an
uptick in water use. Prior savings have
occurred during unusually wet months
“The June numbers tell a story of conscious conservation, and that’s what we
need and are applauding today,” said Felicia

Marcus, chairwoman of the water board. “We
need to save as much as possible. That is
water essentially in the bank for a future dry
year or more.”
The report confirmed figures previously
released by California’s largest cities,
including Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose
and San Francisco, showing strong water
conservation.
The agencies that met or came within 1
percent of their mandatory water conservation target serve 27 million Californians.
Under water board regulations for mandatory water savings, communities have nine
months to hit assigned conservation targets
as high as 36 percent. Water savings are
compared to 2013, the year before Brown
declared a drought emergency.
Some agencies opposed the targets, saying they were unfair and unrealistic and didn’t give enough credit for prior conservation efforts.

STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

Around the state
City mourns as teen charged Several
blazes thrust
with killing appears in court California into fire season
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

An oil sheen is pictured in the water off Goleta Beach, west of
Santa Barbara.

Scientist: Oil slick likely from
a natural seafloor seepage
By Christopher Weber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Coast Guard officials were still trying
to determine the source of a mysterious miles-long oil slick
off California’s Santa Barbara County shoreline, but a scientist said Thursday that it’s likely the result of naturally
occurring seepage from the sea floor.
Authorities said the 3-mile sheen was harmless to people
and beaches remained open — in contrast to the mass closure that occurred in May when a broken pipeline spilled
100,000 gallons of crude oil, fouling sands, seabirds and
fishing areas in the same general area.
The oil is floating in the Santa Barbara Channel above
the Coal Oil Point seep field, a region known for releasing
methane and also about 100 barrels of liquid petroleum per
day, said Jordan Clark, professor of earth science and environmental studies at University of California, Santa
Barbara.
It’s not uncommon for even larger amounts of oil to be
occasionally “burped” from the sea floor, he said, noting
that Spanish explorers first documented the natural seepage
centuries ago. It’s one of the largest seep fields in the
world, he said.
“If you fly in to Santa Barbara airport you can often see
slicks on the water out there. It’s reasonable for a slick this
size to be spotted in the seepage area” of Coal Oil Point,
Clark said. He called the size of the sheen “relatively
insignificant” and agreed with Coast Guard officials who
predicted it would likely dissipate in a day or two.
Coast Guard Petty Officer Andrea Anderson said samples
were sent to labs after the slick was reported by kayakers
Wednesday about 1,000 yards off the city of Goleta.
Officials were hoping to find out if the oil was from seepage, crude extraction operations or from another source.
There was no word when the results might come back.
“It’s going to be a waiting game,” she said. “We hope to
rule some things out, as far as the source goes. Is it natural,
is it not natural?”

SANTA CRUZ — A teenage boy
accused of raping and killing an 8-yearold neighbor appeared in court briefly
Thursday as flags around this small
California town flew at half-staff in
honor of the girl.
Adrian Jerry Gonzalez, his hands
shackled in front of him, did not enter a
plea. The 15-year-old’s arraignment
was postponed until Sept. 21, most
likely to give the defense more time to
build a case, said Santa Cruz District
Attorney
spokesman
Paul
Mangasarian.
Gonzalez is being tried as an adult on
murder, kidnapping and rape charges.
Larry Biggam of the Santa Cruz public defender’s office was appointed as
the teen’s lawyer. Biggam did not return
multiple calls for comment Thursday.
Police say on Sunday, the teen lured
Madyson Middleton into his family’s
apartment from a courtyard at an artists’

5

LOWER LAKE — Triple-digit temperatures
and gusty winds thrust
complex where they
both lived. Once Northern California into full-fledged
inside, he tied her wildfire season Thursday with several
up, sexually assault- new blazes flaring up, forcing huned and killed her, dreds of people from their homes.
according a chargCalifornia’s 14 large fires, mostly in
ing document.
the scorched northern half of the state,
Police
say are pushing 7,000 firefighters to their
Gonzalez then hid
limits as they battle flames amid
the girl’s body in a
Adrian
drought, said Daniel Berlant, a
recycling bin.
Gonzalez
Santa Cruz Mayor spokesman for the California
Don Lane, who ordered flags be flown at Department of Fire and Forestry
half-staff, said the reaction in the city Protection.
Dozens of fires started Wednesday,
of 62,000 is mixed and wrenching.
Both Gonzalez and Madyson were but Berlant said crews quickly corralled
well-known at Santa Cruz City all but five of them.
Schools, where she would have been a
“They only need a little wind to
fourth grader and he would have been a allow them to burn at an explosive
sophomore in high school.
rate,” Berlant said.
“Some people do go to a place of jusPeople are to blame for most wildtice— he is evil— and others go to a
fires,
but Berlant said California’s
place of, ‘I need to understand this,”’
Lane said. “Mostly, people are just hor- drought provides the fuel to get the
flames burning rapidly.
rified.”

6

LOCAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

School bond coming
before Redwood City voters

Local briefs

A bond taxing homeowners $30 per
$100,000 of assessed home value will be
floated to Redwood City residents in the
upcoming fall election.
The Redwood City Elementary School
District Board of Trustees unanimously
approved Wednesday, July 29, putting the
bond on the ballot.
The $193 million slated to be generated
by the tax will be spent toward renovating
and modernizing campuses throughout the
district, according to a district press release.
“I believe this measure is essential for our
students to help them prepare for success in
our competitive, 21st century world,” said
Superintendent John Baker.
To gain approval, 55 percent of district
voters would need to support it.
In addition to buying and installing new
technology, revenue from the bond would
be used to fix infrastructure such as roofs,
plumbing and heating systems and make
buildings more seismically sound.

Man who allegedly killed co-worker
in Burlingame appears in court
A man who allegedly stabbed a co-worker
to death outside a Burlingame office building earlier this month was charged with
murder Tuesday after being caught in
Sacramento last week.
He was in court Thursday to have a private
defender appointed to represent him and to
enter a plea but the case was continued until
Aug. 3, according to the San Mateo County
District Attorney’s Office.
Rodney O’Neil Williams, a 28-year-old
San Francisco man, was arrested by the U.S.
Marshals Service and Sacramento police at a
Sacramento residence Friday after a more
than two-week long investigation, according to Burlingame police.
His bail is set at $50 million.

Police said Williams
stabbed 28-year-old Neil
Lewis during a fight outside an office complex
on the 1800 block of
Gilbreth Road just before
6 p.m. July 7.
Williams and Lewis
worked together as “hikers,” or contractors who
Rodney
would move rental cars
Williams
from various lots for the
Hertz Rental Car company at the San
Francisco International Airport.
The men had apparently been dropped off
to pick up a rental car near Gilbreth Road
when they began to argue about Williams’
girlfriend. Although police don’t believe
Lewis and the woman were ever actually
involved, it appeared to have sparked the
fatal altercation, according to prosecutors.
Witnesses told police they saw two men
fighting on the sidewalk in front of the
building before one of them fell to the
ground and the other fled in a red sedan.
Lewis was found suffering multiple stab
wounds and was taken to San Francisco
General Hospital where he died about 40
minutes later, police said.

Citizen with cellphone
photo helps nab burglar
Redwood City police arrested a man suspected of residential burglary Wednesday
after using a cellphone photo a neighbor
took after the incident on the 900 block of
Fifth Avenue Monday.
At about noon Monday, alert neighbors
observed a car they did not recognize in
front of their neighbor’s home and saw a
man leave the car and walk down the driveway out of view. Another suspect left the
residence with a bag, which was put into the
trunk after the first man backed into the

Resources and services from all of San Mateo County–over 30 Exhibitors

Saturday, August 15
9 am – 1 pm

Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Little House, Roslyn G. Morris Activity Center
800 Middle Avenue, Menlo Park
Free services include:
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t)FBMUI4DSFFOJOHCZ.JMMT1FOJOTVMB)FBSU4NBSU1SPHSBN
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driveway. They then left
east on Fifth Avenue. The
neighbor used a cellphone
to take a photo of the men
and their car, including
the license plate, then
called police, according
to police.
The car was tracked to
Oakland
and police
Carlos Mayen
learned the car was recently sold and the previous owner did not have
information on the new owner. The
Department of Motor Vehicles also did not
have information on the sale, according to
police.
At about 11:57 p.m. Wednesday, another
citizen called the police department and
reported seeing a suspicious vehicle parked
in a parking lot on the 400 block of Seaport
Court. An officer responded to the area and
located a silver BMW parked in the parking
lot. The officer immediately recognized the
vehicle and the subject from the photographs the citizen took during the July 27
burglary. The suspect, identified as Carlos
Mayen, 19, male, of Redwood City, was
taken into custody without incident and
booked into the San Mateo County Jail for
residential burglary. The second suspect is
still outstanding and has not been identified, according to police. Anyone with
information regarding this suspect or this
burglary is encouraged to contact Detective
Roman Gomez at (650) 780-7681.

Two arrested for residential burglary
Two East Palo Alto women were arrested
for two Redwood City residential burglary
Thursday after East Palo Alto police located
the car seen at the two incidents in their
city,
according
to
police.
At about 10:55 a.m., Redwood City police
responded to a residential burglary on the
first block of Yarnall Place where a neighbor reported a suspicious red car in the area.
San Mateo County sheriff’s deputies

THE DAILY JOURNAL
responded to an interrupted residential burglary on the 700 block of Seventh Avenue
in unincorporated Redwood City and learned
that a small red Acura Integra was involved.
The East Palo Alto officer spotted the car on
the 1700 block of East Bayshore Road with
three people inside, according to police.
Deputies and Redwood City police were
notified and responded and found stolen
property. Three were arrested, and one juvenile was determined not to be involved in
the Redwood City burglary and was released
to her parents. The other two were identified
as Anna Gomes and Tatyana Spears, both 18
and of East Palo Alto, according to police.
Anyone with any information regarding
these suspects or this residential burglary is
asked to contact Detective Glenn Albin at
(650) 780-7141.

Court rejects San Francisco
lawsuit after gas line blast
A federal appeals court has rejected a lawsuit from San Francisco officials alleging
that a federal agency failed to ensure
enforcement of safety standards for gas
pipelines like the one that exploded in San
Bruno.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
Thursday upheld a lower court ruling dismissing San Francisco’s suit against the
Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety
Administration.
The lawsuit came in response to the fatal
2010 pipeline explosion in San Bruno. The
city accused the pipeline safety administration of arbitrarily approving a state commission’s pipeline safety certification and
failing to determine whether the commission was adequately enforcing federal
pipeline safety standards.
The city said it was worried about the
pipelines in its ground.
The 9th Circuit said the agency had wide
discretion over certification decisions.
A call to the San Francisco city attorney’s
office was not immediately returned.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Friday • July 31, 2015

7

Congress heading
on vacation and put
off messy decisions
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Congress is heading
out for a five-week summer recess in anything but a cheerful vacation mood, leaving
behind a pile of unfinished business that all
but guarantees a painful fall.
Not long after they return in September,
lawmakers must vote on President Barack
Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran, a brutally
divisive issue that many lawmakers expect
will dominate voter town halls during their
annual August break.
And, as more videos emerge showing disturbing fetal tissue collection practices,
Republicans are increasingly focused on
cutting off funding for Planned Parenthood,
raising the prospect that Congress will
spend September tied in knots over how to
avoid shutting down the government over
that issue.
Later in the fall or winter, Congress will

have to raise the federal debt limit, another
issue ripe for brinkmanship, especially
given the presence in the Senate of several
presidential candidates adamantly opposed
to an increase.
The House wrapped up its summer session
by approving only a three-month extension of highway and transit spending and
authority, kicking negotiations on that
into the fall, as well.
Add in deadlines to renew authorities for
the Federal Aviation Administration, child
nutrition standards and pipeline safety, and
it’s shaping up as a monster of a fall.
“If you take a look at all of the things on
the list, it’ll be a lot of traffic going
through one toll booth, ” Sen. John
Barrasso, R-Wyo., said Thursday.
Republican Rep. Mick Mulvaney of
South Carolina, who leads a group of 18
conservatives vowing to oppose any
spending bill that funds Planned
Parenthood, says, “This is one of those

REUTERS

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, right, flanked by Sen. Roger Wicker, left, Sen. John
Thune and Sen. John Barrasso, listens to a question from a reporter during a news conference.
line-in-the-sand-type of issues.”
“We have to figure out a way to fund the
government without giving any more
money to this institution.”
The effort could prevent leaders from
extending current spending levels come the
new budget year Oct. 1, since Planned

Parenthood now receives more than $500
million in government assistance. Yet if
Republicans try to use must-pass spending
legislation to kill off the organization’s
funding, they would have trouble getting
past Senate Democrats and the White
House.

Confederate flags left near Rev. Martin Luther King’s church
By Kate Brumback
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTA — Police worked Thursday to
identify two white males who were caught
on surveillance camera laying Confederate
battle flags neatly on the ground near the
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s church.
It was the latest provocative act involving the Civil War-era symbol since nine
black church members were gunned down
during Bible study in South Carolina, and it
happened in the heart of an area devoted to

the slain civil rights leader, near his birthplace, his crypt and a center devoted to preserving his legacy.
Atlanta police Chief George Turner said
his agency was working with federal authorities and they have not determined what
charges might be levied. Turner said they
have not ruled out a hate crime, though
Georgia has no state hate crimes law.
An officer from the Atlanta FBI’s joint
terrorism task force was on the scene “to
better determine if any specific threats were
received” and to provide support to Atlanta

police, FBI Special Agent Steve Emmett
said in an email. The Rev. Raphael
Warnock, senior pastor at Ebenezer Baptist
Church, called placing the flags on church
grounds a “terroristic threat.”

“This act by a cowardly and misguided
individual or individuals is provocative to
say the least. It ought to get the attention
not only of black people but of freedomloving people,” he said.

8

LOCAL/WORLD

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Reporters’ notebook

M

REUTERS

An Orthodox Jewish assailant, center, stabs participants at an annual gay pride parade, wounding six, in Jerusalem
on Thursday, police and witnesses said.

Man stabs several people at
Jerusalem gay pride parade
By Miriam Berger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JERUSALEM — Revelers dancing and singing through the
streets of Jerusalem during the
holy city’s annual gay pride parade
were left shrieking in pain and
panic Thursday night, as an antigay extremist lunged into a group
leading the march and stabbed six
people, Israeli police and witnesses said.
Police said the attacker, Yishai
Schlissel, who was arrested at the
scene for Thursday’s attack, had
been released from prison just

three weeks ago, after serving a
sentence for stabbing several people at the parade in 2005.
Six people were wounded in the
attack, two of them seriously, Eli
Bin of Israel’s emergency service
said.
The Gay Pride Parade was proceeding as planned with party
music, Israeli flags and rainbowclad marchers wending their way
through central Jerusalem’s barricaded streets, under a heavy police
presence.
An Associated Press photographer witnessed the attacker enter
the throng of people with his hand

in his coat and within seconds
raise a knife and begin stabbing
people in the back. Police
pounced on him and arrested him.
The crowd’s carefree cheers suddenly gave way to screams. Panic
ensued, and a bloody woman fell to
the ground, an Associated Press
photographer at the scene said.
A man with blood seeping from
his back wandered around with a
dazed look before collapsing.
Another man with his shirt off
also had blood dripping down his
back. Medics quickly surrounded
them both and applied pressure to
stop the bleeding.

ore than 100 backpacks full of rulers,
pencils, crayons,
markers, paper, glue, scissors and
erasers were donated to The
Chi l dren’s Fund o f San
Mateo Co unty by the
Co mmuni ty Outreach
Pro g ram o f So uth San
Franci s co .
Those interested in donating
can visit roonga.com/childrensfund to see what items are still
needed or drop off donations to
the Children’s Fund office at 1
Davis Drive, Belmont, CA.
***
Residents are invited to join the
Burl i ng ame Po l i ce
Department in celebrating
Nati o nal Ni g ht Out, an annual
community gathering which
works to garner strong neighborhood partnerships, and prevent
crime.
The event will take place 6 p.m.
and 9 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 4. Those
interested in hosting a block
party and having a police officer
join the celebration should contact Chri s Zwi ng l e at 7774100, or send an email to
zwingle@burlingamepolice.org
for more information.
The events, which frequently
feature barbecues, ice cream
socials and neighborhood gatherings, are designed to heighten
crime and drug prevention,
strengthen neighborhood spirit
and grow the bond between police
and the local community.
***
It’s that time of the year again.
New Mexico hatch chiles are in
season and local market Mo l l i e
Sto ne’s is hosting roasting

events in August and September.
The chili is only available for six
weeks and have a sweet, spicy
taste. The local roasting events
will be 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on three
separate days. They are Saturday,
Aug. 29, in San Bruno, 22 Bayhill
Shopping Center; Sunday, Sept.
13, in Burlingame, 1477 Chapin
Ave.; and Saturday, Sept. 19, in
San Mateo, 49 W. 42nd Ave.
***
Juni pero Serra Co unty
Park in San Bruno will be closed
for at least two weeks due to damages caused by a major water
pipeline break on Monday night,
according to county park officials.
The park entrance, main road
and ranger gatehouse were significantly affected by the amount of
water that flowed through the park
and under the road. A thorough
assessment of the park was conducted Thursday. The pipeline is a
54-inch regional transmission
line that serves three Peninsula
water agencies and the cities of
San Bruno and Pacifica, according
to park officials.
***
In partnership with the
Redwo o d Ci ty Parks and Arts
Fo undati o n, the Parks and
Recreati o n Department was
able to hire a chain saw artist to
create some playful animal pieces
and benches out of a few of the
large remnants of fallen oak trees
at Stul s aft Park. Five pieces
were made and will be placed
along the trails within the park.
he Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It
appears in the Friday edition.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

Letters to the editor
Ban on public marijuana use
Editor,
I’m a healthy looking 34-year-old male.
I have narcolepsy with cataplexy. I fell
asleep while biking and now I have a traumatic brain injury and epilepsy too.
I smoke medical marijuana so I don’t
fall asleep again while biking and it prevents the cataplexy which paralyzes me
whenever I laugh. THC effectively prevents the seizures I get from drinking coffee to help stay awake. It also restores my
sense of balance, which hasn’t been the
same since the accident.
My symptoms are worst right before I
smoke marijuana. I often appear drunk or
on drugs, and I’m most likely to have a
“professional” encounter with the police
when I am using marijuana to relieve
these symptoms. If I’m in San Mateo, I
can now risk death by not using marijuana, or I can risk death by cop who will
consider my use of medical marijuana to
be a crime and my serious medical symptoms to be “non-compliance.”
I live in fear of being killed by the
police for having a seizure, a cataplexy
attack or a sleep attack.
The editorial in the July 22 edition of
the Daily Journal stated there was “no reason for anyone to smoke marijuana —
medical or recreational — in public,”
which is a bold-faced lie you are telling
yourselves so you can justify the persecution of seriously ill patients in the name
of “public health and safety.”
Best of luck sleeping with yourselves at
night. Perhaps some government
endorsed alcohol will help, or since you
likely have the luxury of owing your own
home, maybe you can enjoy a nice big fat
joint to help you forget what you’ve
done.

Paul O’Day
Cupertino

Old guard just saying ‘no’ — again
Editor,
Reading the comments posted about the
July 29 guest opinion from Belmont
Councilman Warren Lieberman, I see that
the many members of the Old Guard in
Belmont politics have emerged to “justsay-no” — again.
Why can’t they understand that they
were voted out at the last election for
Belmont to finally say “yes” to progressive change?
Why can’t they accept that growing
families need to be able to make modest
improvements to their homes in order to
remain in Belmont and contribute to the
community?
I suppose that their bullying and bellicose tactics have served them so well in
the past that they just keep going back to
their comfort zone of preventing any and
all change, including good change, unless
they allow it, being once all-powerful Old
Guard.

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

I sincerely hope that the members of
this new council, and any councilmembers who we elect in the future, have the
courage to stand up to these anchor
chains that have been pulling down our
community for so long to say “yes” to
bringing Belmont into the 21st-century
by revising outdated, overly-restrictive
zoning codes, investing in upgrading our
infrastructure, and making Belmont a family-friendly community once again.

Andrew Blum
Belmont

Kudos to Nagel
Editor,
Jon Mays’ column in the July 28 edition of the Daily Journal commending
outgoing mayor Terry Nagel hit the right
notes. For 12 years, Terry has served the
city of Burlingame with loving care and
attention to the bigger picture, most
importantly bringing people together,
listening to all sides and attempting to
resolve issues. In my opinion, Terry continues to be a voice for all of Burlingame.
When the book on mediation is written,
Terry deserves several chapters.    

Richard Aptekar
Burlingame

Tribute to Nagel well-deserved
Editor,
Jon Mays’ tribute to Burlingame Mayor
Terry Nagel (column in the July 24 edition of the Daily Journal) is timely and
well-deserved. For years, Mrs. Nagel has
epitomized everything good about being
a responsible citizen and a community
leader. As a longtime Burlingame resident, I am truly grateful for Terry Nagel
and very appreciative of her ongoing
service. 

Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not

Her happiness was my major goal.    
Her many health issues did not curb her
glee,
I wondered how such joy could really
be.    
Therapy pup for a child at just 15 weeks,
The group that may be proud of her is
called Autism Speaks.
She liked to make nursing home residents smile,
She wagged her way into their hearts all
the while.    
The two of us became a ‘we,’
But now she’s gone, how can this be?    
Her gracious soul I held so dear,
It was my bliss to have her near.    
Those who knew her with me do grieve,
She touched their lives, I do believe.    
I think of her both day and night,
She showered my life with such
delight.    
It was an honor and pure true bliss,
To have cared for this girl I do truly
miss.    
My grief is so intensely deep,
And as I write, I still do weep.    
I need to go, I must now mourn.
I am so grateful my dog was born.        

Barbara LaRaia
San Bruno

Anniversary of Medicare
Editor,
This Thursday marked the anniversary of
one of America’s greatest laws. That act
was the creation of Medicare, providing
health coverage for millions of seniors
and disabled persons. Without that act created by President Lyndon Johnson, there
would be untold numbers of people with
no medical coverage at all. Today, instead
of paying premiums to private carriers
with limited coverage, why don’t we pay
that money into a single payer system
with complete coverage for every
American? After all, health care is not an
entitlement, it is a human right.

Patrick Field
Palo Alto

Dakota LaRaia

Drinking water

Editor,
As I lay her down to sleep,
I made my mind up not to weep.    
Her comfort was my only care,
Her lovely soul was oh, so rare.    
Softly speaking last words she’d hear,
My love for her was made so clear.    
Gently stroking her as I spoke,
My goal was her solace to evoke.    
This little lady of just nine years,
Often inspired such joyful tears.    
Her tail and body wagged as one,
This thoughtful dog was so much fun.    
For the last eight years she could not
see,
Yet the one it bothered was really me.    
To love and care for this tender soul,

Editor,
As a child growing up in Lima, Perú, I
enjoyed good drinking water off the tap.
But when spending summer vacations on
the country’s southern coast, we would be
required to boil our drinking water. What a
nuisance!
Visitors from other countries, particularly the ones from the United States would
often comment about our outdated infrastructure.
So now, 65 years later, here is Los
Altos, having to boil its drinking water.

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

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Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.

Other voices

Michael Traynor
Burlingame

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Joe Rudino

be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number where
we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred: letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are

9

Oscar López-Guerra
San Mateo

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Regulating lawns
The San Bernardino Sun

L

a w n s are magic: Cool underfoot
on a bare-toed summer day. An
outdoor carpet for all animal life,
especially babies and dogs. No wonder
the world fell in love with the green.
But California has properly announced
regulations limiting lawns to 25 percent
of a residential lot for new construction,
because that’s what our part of the world
can sustain.
In Devon, England and Darien,
Connecticut, even with climate change,
vast public and private lawns are likely to
be sustainable during our time, at least.
Plenty of rain for natural irrigation —
unlike here.
Here in the West, in our fourth year of
severe drought, with an unsure water
future even if we get one winter of El
Nino-fueled rains, the California lawn
will never again be punching above its
weight.
Lawns are not a bad thing, a poison.
But poison is dependent upon dosage. It’s
not lawns that are bad for California. It’s
vast lawns that are.
We can’t afford them. Never could, really, but we pretended over the last centuryplus, as suburbia rolled out from the central cities of San Diego and Los Angeles
and San Francisco, that we inevitably
belonged to the American lawn club as
well.
That pretending is over, most of us
know. Our Mediterranean climate can’t
sustain so much ornamental lawn — not
millions of them. And yet, almost unbelievably, when new homes are built in our
neighborhoods, especially in the teardown/mansionize mania that is afflicting
Southern California, new owners are still
demanding that their houses be surrounded
by lawns seemingly big as a Wimbledon
court. So they roll out the sod, much of
which around Southern California is never
played on, picnicked on, even walked on.
That should be part of the new way for
Californians to view turf landscaping —
if it’s not walked on by someone, if it’s
not used every day, it doesn’t belong
here.
In a better world, all Californians would
understand large lawns are wrong in this
drought, in which we are using water —
whether it’s from wells or the Colorado
River — we don’t really have, stealing
from the future as we suck the aquifers dry.
But many Californians don’t understand
the issue, six months after Gov. Jerry
Brown declared a drought emergency. So
while we wouldn’t ordinarily support state
regulations on how much of any plant
material a property should have, hoping
common sense would prevail, that hasn’t
worked. So the state Department of Water
Resources was right last week to institute
new restrictions that allow lawns to take
up just 25 percent of a residential lot for
new construction rather than the 33 percent allowed now.
Lawns aren’t forbidden, by any means.
And yet some Californians are reacting as
if big government is telling them they’ll
never stroll the St. Augustine again, relegated to sharp pebbles and ugly mulch.
Small lawns can still play a part in the
California residential landscape — just
make sure you and your family use them,
that they are on flat areas of the yard
rather than unwalkable hillsides.
Drought-tolerant landscaping is easy to
find out about and install.
Strictly ornamental lawns are not in our
future. But efficient watering of different
kinds of greenery still will be. Our tree
canopy must be protected to cool our vast
urban and suburban heat islands. Deepwater those shading, cooling trees with
what you’ve saved from your lawn, and
we’ll continue to hit the 25-plus-percent
conservation targets the state has set, and
live within our means.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks eke out tiny gains after erasing early loss
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,745.98
Nasdaq 5,128.79
S&P 500 2,108.63

-5.41
+17.05
+0.06

10-Yr Bond 2.27 -0.01
Oil (per barrel) 48.44
Gold
1,087.90

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Nokia Corp., up 44 cents to $7.03
The networking technology company reported better-than-expected
second-quarter profit on higher demand in mobile broadband.
Wynn Resorts Ltd., up $8.09 to $104.12
The casino operator reported worse-than-expected second-quarter
profit and revenue, but remained upbeat on its Macau operations.
The Procter & Gamble Co., down $3.23 to $77.39
The consumer products company’s quarterly results were weighed down
by softer sales volume and unfavorable currency exchange rates.
T-Mobile US Inc., up $1.82 cents to $38.86
The wireless carrier reported better-than-expected second-quarter results
and raised its subscriber growth outlook.
Nasdaq
Whole Foods Market Inc., down $4.74 to $36.08
The grocery store operator reported worse-than-expected third-quarter
profit and revenue and cut its outlook for the year.
Hologic Inc., up $2.72 to $40.75
The medical device maker reported better-than-expected fiscal thirdquarter numbers and boosted its full-year outlook.
Western Digital Corp., up $7.69 to $86.44
The maker of hard drives for businesses and personal computers reported
better-than-expected fiscal-fourth quarter profit.
NutriSystem Inc., up $5.53 to $30.74
The weight-loss company reported better-than-expected second-quarter
profit and revenue and gave an upbeat outlook.

Facebook ready to test
giant drone for Internet service
MENLO PARK — Facebook says it will
begin test flights later this year for a solarpowered drone with a wingspan as big as a
Boeing 737, in the next stage of its campaign to deliver Internet connectivity to
remote parts of the world.
Engineers at the giant social network say
they’ve built a drone with a 140-foot
wingspan that weighs less than 1,000
pounds. Designed to fly at high altitudes for
up to three months, it will use lasers to send
Internet signals to stations on the ground.
Though Facebook is better known for
online software that lets people share news
with friends, watch viral videos — and view
commercial advertising — engineers in a
unit called the Connectivity Lab are working
on a different set of problems.
For one thing, they are designing a laser
communications system they hope will be
accurate enough to hit a target the size of a
dime at a distance of 11 miles, said Yael

NEW YORK — Stocks ended the day
mostly flat on Thursday, recovering
from broad losses earlier in the day.
Investors continue to focus on corporate earnings, and Thursday’s batch
brought mostly disappointing results
from Procter & Gamble, Facebook and
others.
The Dow Jones industrial average
lost 5.41 points, less than 0.1 percent, to end at 17,745.98. The index
had been down 110 points at the
beginning of the day.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
closed effectively unchanged, up 0.06
of a point at 2,108.63. The Nasdaq
composite rose 17.05 points, or 0.3
percent, to 5,128.78.
Several companies made big moves
after reporting their quarterly results.
This is the busiest week for corporate
earnings, with 174 members of the
S&P 500 reporting.
Consumer products giant Procter &
Gamble fell $3.23, or 4 percent, to
$77.39. The maker of Tide detergent
and Gillette razors reported softer sales
than Wall Street analysts had expected.
The company, like many others, has
been negatively affected by the strong
dollar, which makes U. S. products
more expensive abroad.
Whole Foods plunged $4.74, or 12

Business briefs
Maguire, director of the unit, which is
responsible for drones, satellites and other
high-tech communications projects.
“There’s a lot of moving parts here that
have to work in concert,” said Maguire, during a press briefing at the company’s headquarters.
The project is part of a broader Facebook
effort that also contemplates using satellites
and other high-tech gear to deliver Internet
service to hundreds of millions of people
living in regions too remote for conventional broadband networks.

LinkedIn 2Q caps rough
week for social media stocks
NEW YORK — It hasn’t been a good week
for social media companies, not even for the
usually reliable professional networking
service LinkedIn Corp.
The company’s second-quarter results
announced Thursday beat Wall Street’s

percent, to $36. 08. The company
reported a sharp slowdown in sales
growth last quarter, partially hurt by
the recent news that some Whole
Foods locations in New York City were
overcharging customers.
Facebook fell $1.78, or 1.8 percent,
to $95.21 after the company’s results,
while positive overall, included a
sharp 82 percent jump in expenses as
the company invested in growth.
Facebook’s stock hit an all-time high
on July 21.
Many U.S. companies reporting second-quarter earnings have struggled to
increase sales despite modest growth
in the U.S. and elsewhere. That was
evident Thursday in the results reported by P&G and Whole Foods.
FactSet estimates that revenue at
companies in the S&P 500 has
decreased 4 percent from a year ago,
largely due to weakness in the energy
sector. Even when energy is excluded,
revenue is still up only 1.8 percent
from the same period a year earlier.
“It’s really a reflection of how lackluster this economic growth has
been,” said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank in
Chicago. “Profits can be manipulated
by cutting costs, buying back shares,
but your top line is your top line and if
you aren’t growing sales, it’s very hard
to mask that.”
Investors had one batch of economic

expectations on all fronts, just as
Facebook’s did on Wednesday and Twitter’s
on Tuesday. But it’s the signs behind the
headline numbers that seem to be worrying
investors, enough for shares of all three
companies to fall this week.
LinkedIn “did great this quarter,” said
Gartner analyst Brian Blau, while noting
that there is “some variability on their
efforts quarter to quarter as they are in a very
competitive market that is constantly innovating and changing.”

Virgin America’s 2Q profit
beats Wall Street forecasts
Virgin America’s second-quarter profit
beat Wall Street expectations on cheaper
fuel, and the airline plans to grow at a double-digit rate next year after it starts flying
to Hawaii.
Its shares, which have slumped this year,
rose more than 7 percent in afternoon trading.
Virgin America Inc. expects to boost passenger-carrying capacity by 2 to 3 percent

data to work through. The U.S. economy grew at a 2.3 percent annual rate in
the April-June quarter, rebounding
from a harsh winter. Leading the
growth was a surge in consumer spending, the backbone of the U.S. economy, and a recovery in foreign trade.
While positive, the data looks at the
U.S. economy three months ago and
did little to boost stocks.
In other markets, the price of oil
resumed its slide after two days of
gains. Benchmark U.S. crude fell 27
cents to close at $48.52 a barrel in
New York. Crude is down nearly $11 a
barrel, or 18 percent, for the month.
Brent crude, a benchmark for international oils used by many U.S. refineries, fell 7 cents to close at $53.31 a
barrel in London.
In other futures trading on the
NYMEX, wholesale gasoline rose 0.6
cents to close at $1.828 a gallon.
Heating oil closed unchanged at
$1.598 a gallon. Natural gas fell 11.8
cents to close at $2.768 per 1,000
cubic feet.
The dollar rose 0. 4 percent to
124.34 yen and the euro edged down
0.6 percent to $1.0903.
Precious and industrial metals futures
ended mostly lower. Gold lost $4.60 to
settle at $1,088.70 an ounce, silver
gave up five cents to settle at $14.70
an ounce and copper fell three cents to
$2.38 a pound.

in the third quarter, 9 to 10 percent in the
fourth, and 13 to 15 percent in 2016. That
kind of growth might be expected to rattle
airline investors, who are worried that carriers are cheapening their tickets by adding
too many flights. Virgin’s average fare fell 4
percent in the second quarter, when the airline didn’t expand its capacity.

Electronic Arts falls as new
2016 outlook disappoints
REDWOOD CITY — Shares of Electronic
Arts slipped in aftermarket trading Thursday
after the video game maker’s new forecast
fell short of Wall Street estimates.
The company’s fiscal first-quarter results
were stronger than expected and Electronic
Arts raised its profit and revenue guidance
for the rest of the fiscal year. However
investors already had higher estimates for
the company.
The stock, which has more than doubled in
value over the last 12 months, lost $3.30,
or 4.6 percent, to $69 in aftermarket trading.

SICKENING: THE WATERS IN RIO DE JANEIRO, SITE OF THE 2016 OLYMPICS, ARE SEVERELY POLLUTED >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 13, Pablo Sandoval’s
weight becoming an issue in Boston
Friday • July 31, 2015

GamePrep second in 80-team tourney
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Anthony Granato started the GamePrep
Baseball Academy four years ago as a way to
provide youth baseball players a chance to
improve their skills and give them exposure
to college and professional scouts.
“I wanted a program that would provide
development and good, quality coaching for
players who are serious about baseball,”
Granato said.
This summer marks the second year of
high-school aged squads: a freshmen team
made up of players who will graduate in
2018 (U15), a sophomore team (2017, U16)
and a junior team (2016, U17).

Seems the program’s focus is paying off
as the U16 team finished second in the 80team
Under
Armour
Southwest
Championships tournament in Southern
California, falling to the Chico Aces 15 in
the championship game Tuesday at
University of La Verne.
“It was great. It was a great a tournament.
It was really well run. It was really professional. There were a lot of collegiate scouts
so it was good for exposure,” said Granato,
who managed the Sacred Heart Prep baseball
team to its first-ever Central Coast Section
championship in May.
“I was really impressed and happy with
the way our guys played.”
Given the grind of the tournament,

Granato was especially satisfied to see his
team make such a strong showing.
GamePrep Baseball Academy played eight
games in four days, including three games
in one day and five games in two.
“I’ve always felt and said that baseball is
not meant to be played three games in one
day, with 15-20 minute rest between games.
It’s tough to do. You have to have a lot of
pitching, a lot of stamina,” Granato said.
“We were short. We were playing with only
13 guys. They sucked it up big time.”
While making it to the championship
game is impressive enough, the road
GamePrep took to get there was just as
amazing. The 80-team tournament started
with 20, four-team pools. Only pool win-

ners advanced to the knockout bracket portion of the tournament. GamePrep won its
pool on a tiebreaker — least number of runs
allowed.
GamePrep and Romero Baseball Academy
were each 1-1 going into the final day of
pool play, with GamePrep facing 2-0 So Cal
Bombers Red in its pool-play finale.
Not only did GamePrep have to beat So
Cal Bombers, it had to do so by winning by
six runs or more and not giving up more
than two.
GamePrep won the game — and the pool
— with a 7-1 decision.
“We (the coaching staff) knew what we

See GAMEPREP, Page 14

Cooper key to Raiders’ upgrade Stanford renews
commitment to
team concepts

By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NAPA — Oakland Raiders’ rookie wide
receiver Amari Cooper arrived for the start
of training camp looking to make up for
lost time.
The fourth overall pick in the draft,
Cooper didn’t get much practice time with
second-year quarterback Derek Carr in the
offseason because of a finger injury that
prevented Carr from throwing much.
Both players did spend a few days outside
of the minicamps and OTAs playing catch.
But Cooper did not attend an extended voluntary workout when Carr invited the rest
of Oakland’s wide receivers and tight ends
to practice together away from the team’s
facilities.
Now that training camp is starting,
Cooper says getting a better rhythm with
his quarterback is a critical step as the
Raiders try to get back into the postseason
for the first time since 2002.
“We’re just going to take it day by day
and try to build each day,” Cooper said
Thursday after checking in at the team hotel
near the heart of the wine country. “I’m just
going to take it day by day, try to get better
each day and take advantage of every
moment while I’m out there on the field.”
The Raiders had just one wide receiver,
James Jones, catch more than 47 passes in
2014. Jones was released in May, two days
before Cooper inked a $22.6 million, fouryear contract.
General manager Reggie McKenzie and
new coach Jack Del Rio made it an emphasis to upgrade the unit in the offseason.
In addition to drafting Cooper, Oakland
signed free agent Michael Crabtree to a
one-year contract. The Raiders should also
benefit from the return of Rod Streater after
he missed most of last season with a foot
injury.
Cooper, however, is expected to be the
centerpiece of the receiving corps.
Projected to be Oakland’s No. 1 receiver
from the moment he was drafted, the former
Alabama star went home after the Raiders’

KIRBY LEE/USA TODAY SPORTS

BURBANK — It was a Sunday, one day
after Stanford lost to Utah in double overtime to fall to 5-5 last November, when
Cardinal players finally decided to clear the
air.
The locker room had become so divided
that linebacker Blake Martinez described the
tense atmosphere as if the defense was “our
own team,” openly talking about needing to
hold teams under 10
points and return takeaways for touchdowns to
win in spite of their sputtering offense.
“They would go out
there, do their job, and we
would
be
like,
‘Whatever,”’ Martinez
recalled Thursday at PacBlake Martinez 12 media days. “‘If they
didn’t get it done, we’re
going to get it done.’ It wasn’t like, ‘Hey, we
got your back.”’
But after that meeting, Stanford rallied.
The Cardinal smashed rival California,
demolished No. 9 UCLA and routed Maryland
in the Foster Farms Bowl, and they’re looking to build on that success this fall by
reclaiming the Pac-12 North title.
It starts up front with the offensive line,
which Stanford coach David Shaw expects to
benefit from improved depth. That group
struggled with missed assignments and mental mistakes until that late-season surge,
when the offense averaged 45 carries for 204
yards rushing over the final three games.
“It’s just our mentality,” Shaw said. “We’re
a physical team. That time also coincided
with us jelling as an offensive line and being
a more efficient and explosive running
game.”

See RAIDERS, Page 16

Amari Cooper, the Raiders’ first-round draft pick out of Alabama, is expected to immediately
shore up a receiving corps that had only one player have more than 47 catches last season.

See STANFORD, Page 16

By Dan Greenspan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

12

SPORTS

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Olympic teams to swim, boat in Rio’s filth
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RIO DE JANEIRO — Athletes in
next year’s Summer Olympics here
will be swimming and boating in
waters so contaminated with human
feces that they risk becoming violently ill and unable to compete in
the games, an Associated Press
investigation has found.
An AP analysis of water quality
revealed dangerously high levels of
viruses and bacteria from human
sewage in Olympic and Paralympic
venues — results that alarmed international experts and dismayed competitors training in Rio, some of
whom have already fallen ill with
fevers, vomiting and diarrhea.
It is the first independent comprehensive testing for both viruses and
bacteria at the Olympic sites.
Brazilian officials have assured
that the water will be safe for the
Olympic athletes and the medical
director of the International Olympic
Committee said all was on track for
providing safe competing venues.
But neither the government nor the
IOC tests for viruses, relying on bacteria testing only.
Extreme water pollution is common in Brazil, where the majority of
sewage is not treated. Raw waste runs
through open-air ditches to streams
and rivers that feed the Olympic water
sites.
As a result, Olympic athletes are
almost certain to come into contact
with disease-causing viruses that in
some tests measured up to 1.7 million times the level of what would be
considered hazardous on a Southern
California beach.
Despite decades of official pledges

to clean up the mess, the stench of
raw sewage still greets travelers
touching down at Rio’s international
airport. Prime beaches are deserted
because the surf is thick with putrid
sludge, and periodic die-offs leave the
Olympic lake, Rodrigo de Freitas, littered with rotting fish.
“What you have there is basically
raw sewage,” said John Griffith, a
marine biologist at the Southern
California Coastal Water Research
Project. Griffith examined the protocols, methodology and results of the
AP tests.
“It’s all the water from the toilets
and the showers and whatever people
put down their sinks, all mixed up,
and it’s going out into the beach
waters. Those kinds of things would
be shut down immediately if found
here,” he said, referring to the U.S.
Vera Oliveira, head of water monitoring for Rio’s municipal environmental secretariat, said officials are
not testing viral levels at the
Olympic lake, the water quality of
which is the city’s responsibility.
The other Olympic water venues
are under the control of Rio state’s
environmental agency.
Leonardo Daemon, coordinator of
water quality monitoring for the
state’s environmental agency, said
officials are strictly following
Brazilian regulations on water quality, which are all based on bacteria
levels, as are those of almost all
nations.
“What would be the standard that
should be followed for the quantity of
virus? Because the presence or
absence of virus in the water ... needs
to have a standard, a limit,” he said.
“You don’t have a standard for the

REUTERS

Trash is strewn along Fundo beach on the banks of the Guanabara Bay, site
of the 2016 Olympic sailing competition. All of the sites for Olympic water
sports are reportedly severely polluted.
quantity of virus in relation to human
health when it comes to contact with
water.”
Olympic hopefuls will be diving
into Copacabana’s surf this Sunday
during a triathlon Olympic qualifier
event, while rowers take to the lake’s
water beginning Wednesday for the
2015 World Rowing Junior
Championships. Test events for sailing and marathon swimming take
place later in August.
More than 10,000 athletes from
205 nations are expected to compete
in next year’s Olympics. Nearly
1,400 of them will be sailing in the
waters near Marina da Gloria in
Guanabara Bay, swimming off
Copacabana beach, and canoeing and
rowing on the brackish waters of the
Rodrigo de Freitas Lake.
The AP commissioned four rounds
of testing in each of those three
Olympic water venues, and also in

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the surf off Ipanema Beach, which is
popular with tourists but where no
events will be held. Thirty-seven
samples were checked for three types
of human adenovirus, as well as
rotavirus, enterovirus and fecal coliforms.
The AP viral testing, which will
continue in the coming year, found
not one water venue safe for swimming or boating, according to global water experts.
Instead, the test results found high
counts of active and infectious
human adenoviruses, which multiply
in the intestinal and respiratory
tracts of people. These are viruses
that are known to cause respiratory
and digestive illnesses, including
explosive diarrhea and vomiting, but
can also lead to more serious heart,
brain and other diseases.
The concentrations of the viruses
in all tests were roughly equivalent to

that seen in raw sewage — even at
one of the least-polluted areas tested,
the Copacabana Beach, where
marathon and triathlon swimming
will take place and where many of the
expected 350,000 foreign tourists
may take a dip.
“Everybody runs the risk of infection in these polluted waters,” said
Dr. Carlos Terra, a hepatologist and
head of a Rio-based association of
doctors specializing in the research
and treatment of liver diseases.
Kristina Mena, a U.S. expert in
risk assessment for waterborne viruses, examined the AP data and estimated that international athletes at all
water venues would have a 99 percent
chance of infection if they ingested
just three teaspoons of water —
though whether a person will fall ill
depends on immunity and other factors.
The Rodrigo de Freitas Lake, which
was largely cleaned up in recent
years, was thought be safe for rowers
and canoers. Yet AP tests found its
waters to be among the most polluted
for Olympic sites, with results ranging from 14 million adenoviruses per
liter on the low end to 1.7 billion per
liter at the high end.
By comparison, water quality
experts who monitor beaches in
Southern California become alarmed
if they see viral counts reaching
1,000 per liter.
“If I were going to be in the
Olympics,” said Griffith, the
California water expert, “I would
probably go early and get exposed
and build up my immunity system to
these viruses before I had to compete,
because I don’t see how they’re going
to solve this sewage problem.”

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

13

Carrasco shuts down A’s Giants acquire Leake
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Carlos Carrasco threw a twohitter, Carlos Santana hit a two-run homer and
the Cleveland Indians beat the Oakland
Athletics 3-1 on Thursday night.
Francisco Lindor had two hits for the
Indians, who won their second straight following a six-game losing streak.
Josh Reddick doubled in a first-inning run for
the A’s, who have lost six of their last seven.
Carrasco (11-8) did not allow a hit after
Reddick’s double, facing one over the minimum from that point. He walked one and
struck out seven. He was coming off his worst
start of the season in which he allowed six
runs in four innings.
Chris Bassitt (0-4) gave up three runs, his
season high, on six hits. He walked one and
struck out a season-best six.
The first four Indians hitters reached base
against Bassitt and three scored. Jason
Kipnis singled on the game’s second pitch

but slipped trying to get back to first on a
pick-off throw and was caught.
Lindor followed with a single and scored on
Michael Brantley’s double and fielding error
on Sam Fuld. Santana then hit his 12th home
run of the year.
The A’s got a run back in their half of the
first when Reddick doubled home Billy Burns,
who had singled.
Bassitt allowed two hits after Santana’s
home run, retiring 18 of the final 21 batters
he faced.

Trainer’s room
Left-hander Sean Doolittle was encouraged
by his bullpen session before the game. He
said it was the best he’s felt and indicated he
intended to pitch before the season ended.

Up next
Right-hander Kendall Graveman (6-7,
4.13) is 0-3 with an ERA over 10 in his last
three starts. He was 3-2 with a 1.26 ERA in
his previous six starts.

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With prized ace left-handers Cole Hamels
and David Price off the market, the Giants
pulled the trigger on a deal with the Reds
Thursday night for veteran right-hander
Mike Leake. In exchange for Leake, the
Giants traded minor-leaguers Adam Duvall
and Keury Mella to Cincinnati. The deal was
made official at approximately 9:40 p.m.
Leake owns a 9-5 record with a 3.56 ERA
on the season. He has been dazzling as of
late, posting a 4-1 record with a 1.25 ERA
through five July starts.
“I look at five of his last eight outings, he’s
been pitching deep into games,” Giants general manager Bobby Evans said. “It’s just a good
fit for us in terms of getting a control guy.”
Evans also noted Leake’s impressive
resume on the road this season. Pitching at
hitter-friendly Great American Ballpark, he
is 4-3 with a 4.93 ERA. In road games, however, he is 5-2 with a 2.28 ERA.
“It gives me hope as to how it will impact

him to be in our division
and our ballpark,” Evans
said.
Duvall was a mainstay
in the cleanup spot for the
Sacramento
Rivercats
this season. A Pacific
Coast League All-Star, the
corner infielder leads the
league with 26 home
Mike Leake
runs. He saw time on the
big-league roster in 2014, hitting .192 with
three home runs in 73 at-bats.
“I’m excited to see what will happen for
Chris, moving to another team,” Evans said.
“He deserves an opportunity. I hope he gets
it in Cincinnati.”
Mella, a right-handed pitcher, was 5-3 with a
3.31 ERA through 16 starts at High-A San Jose
this season. He was one of two Giants, along
with Double-A right-hander Tyler Beede, to
play in the 2015 Futures Game in Cincinnati.
Leake — who will be a free agent at the end
of the year — is tabbed to replace Tim Hudson
in the starting rotation, according to Evans.

Struggling Sandoval insists weight not a problem
Mike Cranston
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — In the midst of a season-long
slump during his first season with the
Boston Red Sox, Pablo Sandoval insisted
Thursday he weighs the same as he did last
season with San Francisco.
Sandoval was back in the lineup at third
base against the Chicago White Sox on
Thursday, a day after he was thrown out trying to score from first base on a ball that
rolled to the wall. He exited the game on a
hot, humid night with what the team called
dehydration.
Sandoval entered Thursday hitting a
career-worst .262 with 34 RBIs after leav-

MLB briefs
Blue Jays come out on top
in David Price sweepstakes
DETROIT — Toronto has acquired All-Star
left-hander David Price from the Detroit Tigers,
the second major move in less than a week by
the Blue Jays as they chase their first postseason appearance since 1993.
After acquiring slugging shortstop Troy
Tulowitzki from Colorado earlier in the week,

ing the World Series
champion Giants to sign
a $95 million, five-year
deal
contract
with
Boston. The 5-foot-11
Sandoval,
nicknamed
Kung Fu Panda, is listed
at 255 pounds.
“I’m still the same
Pablo Sandoval weight that I was last
year, the weight that I
finished my season,” Sandoval said. “I
don’t get complaints about it. Do I have to
keep working hard? Yes, I do.”
Manager John Farrell said the team has
discussed weight, conditioning and diet
with Sandoval, a two-time All-Star who
turns 29 next month.

“The one thing we do know is there is a
wide range in which (his weight) will fluctuate, and that’s been consistent year to year
with Pablo,” Farrell said. “His work ethic in
the weight room, his work ethic on the field
is consistent. It has been since the first day
he got on the field with us here. ... And yet
there have been challenges that we’ve
become aware of over the course of his
career, that you’re trying to align a number
of things. That’s the consistency to the
work routine as well as the nutritional side
of things.”
Farrell acknowledged the Red Sox
thought they were getting an average fielder. Instead, Sandoval has had trouble coming up with balls hit near the line. He’s
committed 12 errors in 89 games after mak-

ing 11 errors in 151 games a year ago.
Farrell said they’d like Sandoval to play
deeper.
“The closer he is to home plate, the less
reaction time. But there’s been some footwork that’s been addressed, particularly in
his pre-pitch setup,” Farrell said. “There’s
been some detection that his first move is
to come up instead of laterally. We’ve sat
with him on video and reviewed it, and he
continues to work on it in his pregame routine. Yet there’s still times where it does not
play out on the field.”
Sandoval shrugged off a question about
his conditioning and said he feels comfortable at the plate.
“I don’t care what people say,” Sandoval
said, “I feel great.”

the Blue Jays tried to shore
up their rotation by adding
the top remaining starting
pitcher on the market.
Johnny Cueto was traded
from Cincinnati to Kansas
City, and Cole Hamels went
from Philadelphia to Texas.
The Blue Jays sent lefthanders Daniel Norris,
David Price
Matt Boyd and Jairo
Labourt to the Tigers in the deal, which was
announced by both teams Thursday. Price can

become a free agent after this season.

to Triple-A to make room for right-hander
Jean Machi, who was claimed off waivers
from San Francisco this week.
Nava was a key contributor on Boston’s
2013 World Series title team, hitting .303.
But his numbers and playing time diminished the past two seasons. Hampered by a
thumb injury, the 32-year-old Nava hit .152
in 29 games this season.
Aro has a 2.95 ERA in 25 minor league
appearances this season.
Layne has a 3.51 ERA in 40 relief appearances with Boston in 2015.

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Red Sox outfielder Nava
designated for assignment
BOSTON — The Boston Red Sox have
designated outfielder Daniel Nava for
assignment in a move to add pitching
depth.
The Red Sox recalled right-handed reliever Jonathan Aro from Triple-A Pawtucket on
Thursday to take Nava’s place. Boston also
optioned left-handed reliever Tommy Layne

14

SPORTS

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cycling spotlight finally
shining on North America
By Dave Skretta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Tour de France dominates the landscape
of professional cycling, a three-week behemoth that draws the attention of fans worldwide.
Now that it’s over, the spotlight is shifting
to North America.
The Tour of Utah starts Monday and kicks off
an unprecedented run of races that include the
Tour of Alberta and the USA Pro Challenge in
Colorado. It ends in September with the return
of the world championships to the United
States for the first time since 1986.
“I don’t know, outside of the cycling community, that people understand the magnitude of
the fact that the world championships are
going to be on American soil. That’s a big
deal,” said Jenn Andrs, executive director of the
Tour of Utah. “It’s really a testament to the
interest and popularity we’re seeing of
cycling.”
The Tour of Utah once attracted only cyclists
based in the U.S. Now some of the top teams on
the WorldTour head to what is billed as
“America’s Toughest Stage Race,” where they
are greeted by crowds approaching 300,000
over the course of the weeklong event.
The USA Pro Challenge in Colorado, which
begins Aug. 17, has attracted past Tour de
France winners such as Cadel Evans for seven
stages through the Rocky Mountains. The Tour
of Alberta has attracted such stars as Rohan
Dennis and Peter Sagan in its short history.
“It shows how far the sport has come, and
how attractive it is, both from participation as
well as for host communities and sponsors,”
said Chris Aronhalt, a managing partner for
Medalist Sports, the company that helps stage
nearly all major races in North America. “Not
since, boy, even the last world championships

in the U.S. in 1986 in Colorado Springs have
all the eyes swung from the Tour de France to
the United States.”
One of the big reasons high-level races have
struggled to take root in the U.S. — the Coors
Classic, Tour of Missouri and Tour DuPont have
all expired over the years — is the challenge in
attracting top riders from Europe. It’s an expensive and labor-intensive proposition for teams,
often on shaky financial footing, to bring their
entire operations to another continent.
But the string of North American races on tap
helps make it a worthwhile endeavor. Rather
than cross the pond for one race, they can
establish a temporary base and compete in two
or three — or more — as well as get their riders
ready for the world championships.
While the worlds, taking place in Richmond,
Virginia, are mostly for national teams, there is
an element of prestige for teams having their
riders compete. And there is the team time trial,
which involves trade teams such as Team Sky or
BMC Racing Team.
The Tour of Alberta has included a team trial
in its event this year specifically to act as a
tuneup for those teams competing in
Richmond.
“The important thing is the audience in
America has gotten much bigger and more educated,” said Jim Ochowicz, who runs the BMC
team. “I think the fact they understand the sport
a little better now, the turnout for all these
events is going to be massive.”
Officials from the Richmond organizing
committee expect 450,000 onsite spectators
over the course of the nine-day event, many of
them traveling from other nations.
The Tour of Utah will be carried live on the
Fox Sports family of networks this year, and
the USA Pro Challenge will be back on NBC
Sports. Its sister station, Universal Sports,
will carry the world championships.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ALYESE TOGNOTTI

The GamePrep U16 tournament team finished runnerup in the 80-team Under Armour
Southwest Championships tournament in Southern California.

GAMEPREP
Continued from page 11
had to do, but we didn’t tell our players. We
didn’t tell them what the exact math was,”
Granato said. “They played great and they
ended up doing exactly what we needed them
to do.”
That was just the beginning of a whirlwind of baseball, however. Once the teams
for the knockout round were decided, each of
the 20 teams was ranked, with the bottom
five having to play what essentially
amounted to a play-in game. GamePrep was
seeded 19th. GamePrep beat Trosky 16
White 8-0 to advance to the main draw of the
tournament.
That was just the first of three games
Monday. GamePrep faced Saddleback
Cowboys Black in the first round, winning
15-7. It then downed NorCal Young Guns 64 to advance to the semifinals.
Granato said the game against the Young
Guns ended at about 10:30 p. m. and
GamePrep’s semifinal game was scheduled
for 8 a.m. Tuesday.
“(Tuesday morning) we could see they
were low on energy,” Granato said. “We had
a little chat … just give everything they
had. I don’t know where the energy came
from, but they won.”
GamePrep beat Chico Aces 16 8-1 to
advance to the championship game — also
on Tuesday — against Chico Aces 15.
At that point, GamePrep simply had no
more to give. It held a 6-5 lead in the third
inning before the wheels fell off and Chico
went on to post a 13-7 victory.
“At that point, I didn’t really have anyone
left (to pitch). … We just ran out of arms,”
Granato said. We were winning that game …

then we ran out of gas. We committed nine
errors. You could see our guys were just
drained.”
The loss in the championship game didn’t
dampen any of GamePrep’s accomplishments. It outscored its opponents 64-32 in
eight games, with Dominic Tognotti leading the way on the mound.
“Our pitching was tremendous,” Granato
said.
Tognotti, a junior-to-be at St. Ignatius,
threw two complete games, allowing just
three hits. Cole Spina, who plays at Sacred
Heart Prep, picked up the win in GamePrep’s
7-1 victory over So Cal Bombers Red that
sent it to the knockout round. Spina threw a
complete game, two hitter.
Jack Petersen, out of Serra, may have been
the team’s most versatile player. Not only
did he pitch the semifinal win, allowing one
unearned run, he also played one game at
catcher, one game at third base, one game at
shortstop and one game at second base.
“He did it all,” Granato said.
Jordan Brandenburg, who will be entering
his sophomore season at Carlmont, is one
to keep an eye on in the coming years. As
one of the youngest members of the team,
Granato inserted him in the cleanup spot in
the batting order and Brandenburg responded. Granato said he didn’t have
Brandenburg’s complete tournament stats,
but said at one point Brandenburg, “was,
like, 16 for 24, with six doubles and 13
RBIs.”
“He was tremendous at the plate,” Granato
said.
The tournament signaled the end of the
summer season for the U16 team, a season
in which Granato said he saw the team
improve every tournament.
“We’re really proud with how the boys
have developed and what they did this summer,” Granato said. “It’s been a good ride.”

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Rousey’s plan for Correia? Pain
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GLENDALE — Ronda Rousey is
in charge now. The unbeaten bantamweight champion is the
biggest star in the UFC, and she
could have staged her next title
defense anywhere in the world
before she moves on to her next
acting job or book tour stop or
red-carpet appearance.
Rousey decided to fight
Brazilian challenger Bethe Correia
in a raucous arena at UFC 190 in
Rio de Janeiro on Saturday night.
Challenges don’t scare Rousey.
They’re what keep her rocketing
along this wild path.
“When I don’t have the homecourt advantage, that’s another
thing that really keeps me motivated,” said Rousey, who hasn’t
fought outside Las Vegas or her
native Southern California in
three years. “I want the fans to
know that even though I’m doing a
lot of things, I want to be the most
active champion out there as
well.”
Rousey’s journey to Rio is a
multifaceted decision designed to
reach her goals — just like nearly
everything she does.
After traveling the world during
her Olympic judo career, she was
eager to fight in front of Brazil’s
famously intense fans. And after
the trash-talking Correia infuriated her with a flippant comment
apparently referencing Rousey’s
father’s suicide, Rousey decided to
beat Correia in the most painful,
humiliating way possible, which
meant fighting in Correia’s home.
“I think everything up until the
suicide comment could have been
understandable from a marketing
point of view,” Rousey said. “But
when she said that is when it really crossed the line and became
truly personal for me.”
So Rousey (11-0) spent several
weeks plotting the best way to
embarrass Correia (9-0), perhaps

toying with the
bulky Brazilian
on the feet
before
dropping her with a
judo throw and
dispatching her
with a signature
armbar. After
Ronda Rousey winning her
previous three
title defenses in
a combined 96
s e c o n ds ,
Rousey wanted
something
longer and more
painful to befall
Correia.
Like
Babe
Bethe Correia Ruth pointing
his bat at the
fence, Rousey is confident she
could call her shot.
The only problem is that
Rousey’s mother disapproves.
“She chewed me out,” Rousey
said. “She wants me to end it as
quick as possible still. I promised
her that I’m going to be fine. I’m
not going to take any damage.”
So Rousey hasn’t decided exactly what she’ll do when the cage
door closes, but there aren’t many
people left who doubt she can do
whatever she wants. Rousey is an
overwhelming favorite against
Correia, whose best chance seems
to be one big punch and a prayer.
Rousey doesn’t shy away from
the role of favorite. With an
upcoming role in a Mark Wahlberg
film and a soaring international
popularity, she welcomes the
spotlight with confidence.
“Here’s pretty much the plan:
I’m going to beat up Bethe, ”
Rousey said. “Then I’m going to
take a couple of weeks to rest. And
then I’m going to go beat up
Miesha (Tate, her likely next
opponent). And then I’m going to
go to Thailand, or wherever we
decide to film. I’m going to prep
for a month and start filming for

eight to 10 weeks, and then go
beat up the next chick. That’s pretty much my plan.”
Correia has kept up her tough
talk in recent weeks, although the
words sometimes feel like a negotiation. She has publicly asked
Rousey to stick to a stand-up fight
instead of using her peerless judo
skills, insisting Rousey should
“really fight a straight MMA
fight.”
But Rousey has been redefining
her sport ever since she stepped
into an MMA cage. She is the reason the UFC began promoting
women’s fights three years ago,
and she has been the company’s
most dominant champion during
her reign.
Along with her list of new
goals, Rousey is driven by the
chance to accomplish novel feats.
Even in her acting career, she creates goals for herself: She came up
with the idea that she could be the
first actor to do “a fight scene, a
car chase and a high jump in one
long shot with no stunt double.”
For her next accomplishment,
Rousey started training earlier
than usual, isolated in a mountain
camp 8 1/2 weeks before this
fight. When she returned to civilization, she eliminated many
extra interviews and public
appearances — aside from her
memorable trip to the ESPYs.
Rousey’s fire has been rekindled, and she insists her focus is
honed. It’s all bad news for
Correia.
“It was actually really refreshing
in a way,” Rousey said. “I felt rejuvenated by that. It really reaffirmed the fact that my hunger to
fight is still there, and it’s still the
thing that I have the most passion
for. More than anything.”

Friday • July 31, 2015

AL GLANCE

NL GLANCE

East Division
W
New York
57
Baltimore
51
Toronto
52
Tampa Bay 51
Boston
45
Central Division
W
Kansas City 61
Minnesota 53
Detroit
50
Chicago
49
Cleveland
47
West Division
W
Houston
58
Los Angeles 55
Texas
49
Seattle
46
A’s
45

15

East Division
L
44
50
51
52
58

Pct
.564
.505
.505
.495
.437

GB

6
6
7
13

L
40
48
52
51
54

Pct
.604
.525
.490
.490
.465

GB

8
11 1/2
11 1/2
14

L
45
46
52
57
58

Pct
.563
.545
.485
.447
.437

GB

2
8
12
13

Thursday’s Games
Detroit 9, Baltimore 8
Toronto 5, Kansas City 2
Boston 8, Chicago White Sox 2
Texas 7, N.Y. Yankees 6
Houston 3, L.A. Angels 0
Minnesota 9, Seattle 5
Cleveland 3, Oakland 1
Friday’s Games
Detroit (Farmer 0-2) at Baltimore (W.Chen 5-6), 4:05
p.m.
Kansas City (Cueto 0-0) at Toronto (Hutchison 9-2),
4:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (E.Ramirez 8-4) at Boston (E.Rodriguez
6-3), 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 11-5) at Texas (N.Martinez 5-6), 5:05 p.m.
Arizona (R.De La Rosa 8-5) at Houston (Feldman 45), 5:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Eovaldi 10-2) at Chicago White Sox
(Rodon 4-3), 5:10 p.m.
Seattle (T.Walker 7-7) at Minnesota (Milone 5-2),
5:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Salazar 8-6) at Oakland (Graveman 67), 6:35 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Santiago 7-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw
8-6), 7:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Kansas City at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 10:35 a.m.
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Houston, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 4:10 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 6:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Kansas City at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 10:35 a.m.
Arizona at Houston, 11:10 a.m.

W
Washington 54
New York
52
Atlanta
46
Miami
42
Philadelphia 39
Central Division
W
St. Louis
65
Pittsburgh 59
Chicago
54
Cincinnati
46
Milwaukee 44
West Division
W
Los Angeles 57
Giants
56
Arizona
49
San Diego 49
Colorado
43

L
46
50
56
60
64

Pct
.540
.510
.451
.412
.379

GB

3
9
13
16 1/2

L
37
42
47
54
59

Pct
.637
.584
.535
.460
.427

GB

5 1/2
10 1/2
18
21 1/2

L
45
45
51
53
57

Pct
.559
.554
.490
.480
.430

GB

1/2
7
8
13

Thursday’s Games
San Diego 8, N.Y. Mets 7
Washington 1, Miami 0
Philadelphia 4, Atlanta 1
Cincinnati 15, Pittsburgh 5
St. Louis 9, Colorado 8
Chicago Cubs 5, Milwaukee 2
Friday’s Games
Atlanta (W.Perez 4-0) at Philadelphia (Hamels 6-7),
4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 5-6) at Cincinnati (Lorenzen 3-5),
4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Kennedy 6-9) at Miami (Phelps 4-7), 7:10
p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 8-4) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 97), 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 11-5) at Texas (N.Martinez
5-6), 5:05 p.m.
Arizona (R.De La Rosa 8-5) at Houston (Feldman 45), 5:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Hammel 5-5) at Milwaukee (Jungmann 5-2), 5:10 p.m.
Colorado (K.Kendrick 4-11) at St. Louis (Wacha 114), 5:15 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Santiago 7-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw
8-6), 7:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Houston, 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m.
San Diego at Miami, 10:10 a.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m.
Arizona at Houston, 11:10 a.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 11:15 a.m.
San Francisco at Texas, 12:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 5:08 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS
NFL
ATLANTA FALCONS — Placed OT Lamar Holmes
on the PUP list.
BUFFALO BILLS — Placed DE Mario Williams, K
Dan Carpenter and CB Leodis McKelvin on the active/non-football injury list and TE Chris Manhertz
and CB Cam Thomas on the PUP list.
CAROLINA PANTHERS — Signed WR Avius Capers and P Matt Wile.Waived CB Gary Peters. Placed
De’Andre Presley and TE Brandon Williams on the
PUP list and OT Jonathan Martin on the reserve/did
not report list.

CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed WRs Desmond
Lawrence and Greg Little. Waived WR Cobi Hamilton. Placed LB Ray Maualuga on the
active/non-football injury list.
CLEVELAND BROWNS — Placed LB Darius Eubanks, WR Marlon Moore and RB Glenn Winston
on the active/non-football injury list.
DALLAS COWBOYS — Placed RB Darren McFadden and LB Rolando McClain on the PUP list and OL
Chaz Green, LB Mark Nzeocha and C Shane McDermott on the active/non-football injury list.
Announced the retirement of LB Keith Rivers.

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16

SPORTS

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

USC picked to win Diddy’s son still with UCLA
Pac-12 football title
By Abbey Mastracco

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BURBANK

Southern
California was picked to win its
first Pac-12 football title since
2008 in a preseason media poll
Thursday.
The Trojans received 21 of 45
votes for the title, edging defending champion Oregon. The Ducks
got 17 votes for the top spot and
were picked to win the North division, while USC is favored to win
the South.
Oregon has won four of the last
six league titles, reaching the
national championship game last
season. Stanford, which won the
crown in 2012 and 2013, was
picked to finish second in the
North
division
ahead
of
California.
“You know everybody is going
to be better than they were a year
ago,” said Stanford coach David
Shaw, who has quarterback Kevin
Hogan back for another year. “It’s
going to be an insane year in our
conference with the teams we have
and the players we have.”

While USC has 16 returning
starters from coach Steve
Sarkisian’s debut team last season, quarterback Cody Kessler
likely is the biggest factor in the
selection. The prolific passer is
back for his third season as the
Trojans’ starter, while Oregon
must replace Heisman winner
Marcus Mariota.
“USC will be one of the better
teams
in
the
country, ”
Washington coach Chris Petersen
said.
USC was hardly a consensus
choice: Five teams received votes
as the conference champion.
USC hadn’t been picked to win
the league since 2012, when the
Trojans were the preseason No. 1.
They finished 7-6 and unranked,
and coach Lane Kiffin was fired
less than a year later.
Arizona State was picked second
in the loaded South division. The
Sun Devils are just ahead of UCLA,
which has beaten crosstown rival
USC three straight times.
Arizona, which won the South
last year, is picked fourth in the
division.

STANFORD
Continued from page 11
“Toward the end of the year, we just decided to try and ball out. You saw the results on
the field,” said Kyle Murphy, who is moving
from right tackle to left tackle. “We plan on
picking up where we left off last year and
doing even greater things.”
Sophomore running back Christian

RAIDERS
Continued from page 11
final minicamp and worked out with several
of former teammates and coaches.
While there, Cooper picked up a few
words of advice from Crimson Tide coach
Nick Saban.

BURBANK — After a tumultuous
offseason at UCLA, coach Jim
Mora and the Bruins are eager to
get back to football.
The Bruins were in the news for
all the wrong reasons in recent
months, from the suspension and
reinstatement of offensive line
coach Adrian Klemm to the arrest
of incoming freshman Soso
Jamabo in Texas.
But for sheer weirdness and the
accompanying media spotlight,
nothing compared to hip-hop
mogul Sean “Diddy” Combs’ arrest
for an alleged fight with assistant
strength coach Sal Alosi in the
weight room last month. Diddy,
the father of defensive back Justin
Combs, is still waiting to hear
whether he’ll face misdemeanor
charges.
At the first day of the Pac-12’s
football media summit Thursday at
Warner Bros. Studios, Mora provided no revelations about the
incident. While declining several
invitations to discuss the dust-up,
Mora confirmed Justin Combs is
still on the team heading into his
junior year, saying the Bruins
“have had no changes to our roster.”
“Well, really nothing has

changed,” center
Jake
Brendel. “It’s
just been business as usual,
really. We got a
new lock on the
weight room,
but that’s it.”
With the new
Justin Combs
season just five
weeks away, the Bruins insist they
haven’t been distracted by those
offseason occurrences. The focus is
on football, not the media attention that can surround a school
next door to Hollywood.
“Things are going to come up
that might set the team back publicly, but you can’t let that affect
your 3-foot world, your 3-foot
space,” Brendel said. “I feel like in
these times, if you just focus on
yourself and the team’s goals, then
you shouldn’t have a problem.”
The Bruins are getting accustomed the potential pitfalls posed
by TMZ, tabloids and paparazzi.
“I think it’s just a result of being
where we are,” Brendel said. “If we
were in the middle of nowhere, that
doesn’t always happen. The media
is centralized around our city and
around our campus, so there’s a lot
more eyes on us than there is other
places.”
UCLA’s on-field story lines this

season include a quarterback competition and a new defensive coordinator.
With Brett Hundley now in the
NFL, freshman quarterback Josh
Rosen will compete with redshirt
juniors Jerry Neuheisel and Mike
Fafaul. Mora expects to make a
decision following the team’s
training camp, which will again be
held in San Bernardino.
“With regards to the quarterback
situation, I think the one thing
that gives me comfort is the fact
that we’ve got a pretty veteran
group around (Rosen),” Mora said.
“It’s very unlike Brett’s situation
from a few years ago when he had
to step in and do a lot. Whoever is
taking snaps from Jake can depend
on those around him maybe a little
bit more than Brett was able to do.
So that gives me a little bit of comfort.”
Bradley brings a wealth of experience after spending more than 30
years on the sidelines at Penn State
under late head coach Joe Paterno.
“It’s the emphasis on the small
things and how wise he is,” linebacker Deon Hollins said. “I
wouldn’t even call him smart,
because everyone in Division I is
smart. All of the coaches are smart.
But in terms of how he applies
things, I think he’s one of the best
in the business.”

McCaffrey is expected to be the beneficiary
of that development. As a true freshman, the
son of 13-year NFL receiver Ed McCaffrey
had 796 all-purpose yards and scored two
touchdowns lining up at tailback, wide
receiver and as a return specialist.
McCaffrey now weighs over 200 pounds,
Shaw said, and is capable of picking up
blitzes in pass protection, running between
the tackles and doing everything required of
a feature back.
“We needed him to get stronger before we
asked him to do much more than we asked

him to do last year,” Shaw said. “He’s bigger. He’s stronger. He’s more physical.
There is not a lot limiting what he can do.”
Shaw also praised the development of
Remound Wright and Barry Sanders Jr.,
which will allow McCaffrey to continue to
line up all over the field. The Stanford
offense will also have a healthy Devon
Cajuste at wide receiver when fall camp
opens, as the redshirt senior did not require
surgery for a high ankle injury.
Just as vital is a renewed focus on conditioning, as Stanford lost four games by

seven points or less last season. Martinez
said each offseason workout is being treated
like a game, and the only way to win the
fourth quarter is for everyone to finish, from
starters to scout team.
That emphasis on the entire team is the
result of hard-learned lessons.
“Even if something were to happen where
the offense or defense is terrible, we’re still
going to be all together as a unit no matter
what happens,” Martinez said. “We’re never
going to go back to where we were 5-5 and
blaming each other about things.”

“I talked to him a little bit,” Cooper said.
“He was telling how different the NFL is
from college football. He was just telling
me to stay the same player and same person
I am.”

Cooper was among a handful of players
who arrived early in the morning. Players
were put through a conditioning test, with
the first full workout scheduled for Friday
morning.
TJ Carrie, expected to push for one of the
two open starting cornerback jobs, showed
up on a charter bus and sounded anxious for
the practices to begin.
A seventh-round draft pick a year ago,
Carrie sounded optimistic when talking

about Oakland’s prospects, but said it’s
imperative that the team’s younger players
make a big impact.
“The expectation for them is just as high
as the veterans,” Carrie said. “The past draft
classes have become more mature in their
roles. The veterans are only going to continue to help us, and we definitely lean on
them with their knowledge and expertise. It
takes all of us as a whole to accomplish the
goal that we want to accomplish.”

Asked about expectations that come with
being a first-round pick, Cooper simply
smiled.
“I don’t really feel any pressure to deliver
at all,” he said.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Friday • July 31, 2015

17

Afghanistan Taliban
confirm Mullah Omar’s
death, choose successor
By Lynne O’Donnell and Kathy Gannon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban confirmed the death
of longtime leader Mullah Mohammad Omar and appointed
his successor Thursday, as a new round of
peace talks was indefinitely postponed
amid concerns over how committed the
new leadership is to ending the militant
group’s 14-year insurgency.
The Afghan Taliban Shura, or Supreme
Council, chose Mullah Omar’s deputy,
Mullah Akhtar Mansoor, as its new
leader, two Taliban figures told the
Mullah Omar Associated Press, saying the sevenmember council had met in the Pakistani
city of Quetta.
Mansoor is considered close to
Pakistani authorities who hosted peace
talks earlier this month, and his election
could widen an internal split between
fighters who favor negotiations with the
Afghan government and those who want
to continue an insurgency that has
gained speed following the end of the
international combat mission last year.
Mullah
Mansoor has effectively commanded
Mansoor
the movement for the three years since
Mullah Omar’s previous deputy and co-founder of the movement, Mullah Abdul Baradar, was arrested by Pakistani
authorities. Observers say he has the respect of battlefield
commanders and is behind the intensification of the war in
recent months as a means of strengthening the Taliban’s
hand as it enters into a formal dialogue with Kabul.
The peace process was plunged into uncertainty earlier
Thursday when the Taliban indicated they were pulling out
of the negotiations and Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry
announced the talks, which were to have been hosted by
Islamabad beginning Friday, had been postponed.
The Taliban ruled Afghanistan from 1996 until they were
overthrown in a U.S-led invasion in 2001. It is widely
believed that Mullah Omar fled over the border to Pakistan,
where he lived under Pakistani protection until his death.
Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has sought Pakistan’s
help in bringing the Taliban to the negotiations since
Islamabad is believed to wield influence over the group.
A diplomat based in Kabul who is familiar with the peace
process told the AP that since Ghani assumed power last
year the government’s position has been that “the real
negotiation is between Afghanistan and Pakistan.”

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REUTERS

A resident walks past a crater caused by a Turkish air strike against Kurdistan Workers Party camps.

Turkey onslaught on Kurds,
after IS attack, fuels anger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DIYARBAKIR, Turkey — Just when
it seemed Turkey was getting serious
about the fight against IS, it has
turned its military focus to pounding
its old foe: the Kurdish rebels.
In Turkey’s Kurdish heartland, the
government’s
renewed military
onslaught against the rebels has left
many people crying treachery — with
suspicions rife that Turkey used a brief
offensive against IS as a cover to
launch a broad attack against the
Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK.
Many Kurds also are venting frustra-

tion against the United States, accusing Washington of turning a blind eye
to Turkish attacks on the Kurds in
exchange for logistical support on IS.
“We are used to this. Kurds have witnessed betrayal for centuries” said
Axin Bro, a musician. “National powers use us for their own ends.”
The U.S. had welcomed Turkey’s air
assault last week on the Islamic State
group, along with its decision to open
air bases for American sorties, as a
sign that Turkey had dropped its reluctance to fight the extremist group.
Since then, Turkish jets taking off
from this city in Kurdish-dominated

lands have been hitting PKK targets in
northern Iraq and southeastern Turkey,
as the militant group has targeted military and police in Turkey.
Turkish jets again pounded PKK targets in northern Iraq in an operation
Thursday that lasted two and a half
hours, a government official said. He
said the latest airstrikes were in retaliation for an attack on troops stationed
near the border with Iraq earlier in the
day that killed three soldiers. He
spoke on condition of anonymity in
line with government rules requiring
prior authorization to speak to journalists.

Mission accomplished
for Cruise in new movie
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

There’s some interesting talk in the cleverly
satisfying script of “Mission: Impossible —
Rogue Nation” about the element of luck. As
in: How much is luck a factor in the success of
Ethan Hunt and his IMF cohorts? After all, in
the last movie they merely saved us from a
nuclear holocaust. Was it talent, work, or dumb
luck?

Whatever you decide about that, let’s be clear
about this: When it comes to Tom Cruise and his
durability as an action hero, luck has little to do
with it. The guy’s an action star extraordinaire,
and it’s not luck or chance but work and smarts
and yes, some swashbuckling derring-do that get
him there. Whatever you may think of Cruise and
his complex off-screen persona, let’s give him
this: At age 53, he and his Ethan Hunt are, if anything, getting more fun to watch. And they make
See ROGUE, Page 20

Orbiting secrets, fandom with Pegg
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Simon Pegg has too many
state secrets to keep track of, and most of that is
J.J. Abrams’ fault.
Ever since the prolific director saw Pegg in
Edgar Wright’s zombie comedy “Shaun of the
Dead,” the British actor has become tethered to

Simon
Pegg

some of film’s biggest franchises.
First it was “Mission: Impossible III,”
as Benji, the tech turned field agent,
then came “Star Trek,” and “Star
Wars: The Force Awakens,” which
Abrams casually asked him to be part
of over dinner.
Pegg is now on his third film in both
See PEGG, Page 20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

19

Music@Menlo
highlights the
great Schubert
By David Bratman
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

The Music@Menlo chamber music festival, which
enlivens the Menlo School and Menlo-Atherton High
School campuses for three weeks every summer, is focusing
this year on the music of Franz Schubert. Schubert was
insanely prolific in a short life of only 31 years, and wrote
enough great chamber music easily to fill a festival like
this one.
Last Sunday’s concert, at the Stent Family Hall on the
Menlo School campus, for instance, focused on Schubert’s
music from just one year, 1824. That was the year of the
Octet for strings and winds, an enormous piece over an hour
long for an unusually large chamber ensemble. It received a
genially rustic performance, rough and hearty, from a distinguished set of players.
Schubert wrote the piece on commission from a clarinetist, so he knew to make the clarinet the most prominent. That part was played by the Israeli-American clarinetist Alexander Fiterstein with a firm rather than supple
line. He frequently traded material with first violinist Sean
Lee, who played in light, sweet tones.
The other instruments all had much to say as well, but
most eyes were on the cello. The scheduled cellist had
injured his hand and was unable to play this performance.
So Menlo’s co-artistic director, David Finckel, a veteran
cellist of great renown, hastily but securely stepped in to
the vacant place. Thus it was he who emitted those terrifying rumbles that feature so strongly in the cello part of the
Octet’s finale.
Another epic work of Schubert’s from 1824, not quite so
long but even more exhausting, is the “Wanderer” Fantasy
for piano. This is so complex a work that Schubert himself,
though a competent pianist, couldn’t play his own composition. On Sunday it was tackled by the Finnish pianist
Juho Pohjonen, a slight-looking man with great reserves of
power. No matter how fierce the music or how full it was of
complicating cascades, he always kept the chords clean and
separated, and the melodic line smooth and clear. Charm is
outside this grandiose work’s vocabulary, yet this performance was, at least, tuneful and captivating.
Pohjonen also provided the accompaniment for a pair of
Schubert songs, sung evenly and with character by the baritone Nikolay Borchev, and for a far lesser-known 1824
Schubert masterpiece, a sonata for arpeggione and piano.
The arpeggione, a kind of bowed guitar that was played like
a cello, was then newly invented, and this sonata is the
only major work ever written for it. Arpeggiones, and their
players, being in short supply these days, its place was
taken by a viola played by Paul Neubauer, which seemed
well-suited for the gentle, lyrically song-like music.
Fine evening concerts like this are hardly the only reason
to visit Menlo. Most such concerts are preceded by smaller
“prelude performances” by the young professionals of

See MUSIC, Page 22

CARLIN MA

From left, Paul Neubauer, viola and Juho Pohjonen, piano.

20

Friday • July 31, 2015

PEGG
Continued from page 18
the “Mission: Impossible” series (“Rogue
Nation,” in theaters this weekend), and
2016’s “Star Trek Beyond,” which he’s cowriting.
With his deft comic timing and expressive
eyes, whether as franchise sidekick or leading
man, Pegg enlivens every frame. He’s also
become a singular cultural force via his website, thoughtfully examining fandom, internet culture and how films fit into the world.
Pegg spoke to the Associated Press over
Skype from New York about this moment in
his career.
The remarks have been edited for clarity and
brevity.
AP: Is there a ty pe o f fi l m y o u prefer?
Peg g : I’m not one of those people who do
one for me and one for them. I love doing the
big films — it’s a thrill ride to be in a movie
with Tom Cruise — and to do my films with

ROGUE
Continued from page 18
“Rogue Nation” not merely a serviceable
summer flick, but an entertainment well
worth your inflated ticket price.
Let’s give kudos to a few other folks, too,
starting with director-writer Christopher
McQuarrie, who, like each director in the
franchise, puts his own stamp on the proceedings. McQuarrie (“The Usual Suspects”)
does this with both a wry script that often
makes fun of what’s happening, and some
seriously entertaining action pieces,
including a complicated assassination
sequence set in Vienna’s glittering opera
house during a lavish production of
Puccini’s “Turandot. ” (Parents: here’s a
chance to get some opera into your kids’

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Edgar. It’s just a question of getting to fit
them in.
AP: What’s i t l i ke kno wi ng Crui s e
pers o nal l y and s eei ng the medi a
s cruti ny aro und hi m?
Peg g : It annoys me when I hear someone
say something about him that’s just utterly
unfounded...I’ll find myself saying, “no he’s
just a regular guy,” but he’s not a regular guy.
He’s exceptional. He lives an exceptional
life, but he is aware of that fact. He knows
what he sacrificed, what he forgoes to be who
he is. But he’s still essentially a human
being at the heart of it. He’s not some spaced
out guy who has no concept of reality — he
does and he’s quite philosophical about it...
(His Scientology beliefs have) never come
up. We’ve never spoken about that in 10
years. I’m an atheist so I think all religion is
a bit crazy. Whether it’s Xenu or Jesus it all
sounds a bit daft to me.
AP: What are y o u ho pi ng to bri ng
to “Star Trek Bey o nd?”
Peg g : It’s going to be spectacular, but
we’re going to underpin that with some genuine 50th Anniversary ideas about what’s
happening in our world and the “Star Trek”

world and try to make it a bit thoughtful too.
Cake and eat it.
AP: Is i t di ffi cul t to be i nv o l v ed i n
s o many s ecreti v e pro jects ?
Peg g : It is difficult because you want to
sing it to the world. I’ve had a picture on my
phone of me hugging Chewbacca that I’d
been holding on to for months that I haven’t
been able to show anybody. But these days
there’s a culture of spoiler-ism that exists
because people want to get their websites
traffic...it’s a little selfish.
AP: Ho w s o ?
Peg g : You’re essentially destroying that
very thing by increments. That’s always
been J.J.’s thing — protect the film. If
you’re going to go see “Star Wars,” don’t
watch the trailers. Just wait. Be patient. Sit
in that movie house and let it all be a surprise. That’s the best way to watch a movie.
AP: Can y o u s ay ho w l o ng y o u were
o n the “Star Wars ” s et?
Peg g : I was there even when I wasn’t
working. I was just happy to go and watch it
all happen.
AP: Were y o u there when Harri s o n
Fo rd g o t hurt?

Peg g : The day before. Everything had
been going so well. The first day that
Harrison came out in costume and Chewie
was there, I’ve never seen so many people
around the monitors watching. It was just a
joyous time and then this setback hit. The
guy has the recovery of Wolverine. It’s
insane. For a man who’s 73, he is so
resilient.
AP: And then the pl ane cras h.
Peg g : I kept in touch with J.J. throughout
Harrison’s convalescence. He landed that
plane like an expert. He is a hero in life and
in fantasy.
AP: Ho w do y o u eng ag e wi th fans
no w?
Peg g : I was on Twitter for a long time and
I thought it was time to back away. I felt too
available. As an actor you need a degree of
mystique and have to stay a little bit
removed. But if people are willing to go
through the rigmarole of sending a little
stamp addressed envelope and a little note,
I’ll always get back to them. I try to keep
that empathy — knowing what it’s like to be
a fan and hoping to treat them the way I’d
expect to be treated.

summer — sort of like hiding the broccoli
in the brownie mix.)
Also invaluable is returning “MI” vet
Simon Pegg as Benji, the wise-cracking
(and safe-cracking) computer whiz who provides a crucial dose not only of humor but
also of humanity here. Welcome newcomers
include Alec Baldwin, as a pompous CIA
boss with deliciously dry delivery, and
Rebecca Ferguson, making the most and
then some of the obligatory female role.
Ferguson is — get this — Swedish-born,
named Ilsa here, and, yes, shows up in
Casablanca, too.
“Rogue Nation” doesn’t start slowly. In
fact, it begins with the scene you’re most
likely to have heard about, because it
involves Cruise’s own stunt work, in which
the actor actually places himself on the
wing of an airborne jet, and then — why
not? — lets his legs slip, hanging on by
only his hands as the landscape beneath

gets tinier and tinier.
Why is Hunt on the wing? Well, that’s
what can happen, annoyingly, when you try
to board a plane AFTER takeoff. He manages
to successfully remove a case of nerve gas
canisters, but we’re just getting started.
We soon learn that the IMF is being disbanded, and the timing is terrible. Hunt is
onto something really bad: the Syndicate, a
nefarious group of former spies led by a
vague, sinister leader (Sean Harris). That the
Syndicate is not attached to one particular
nation — it is the “Rogue Nation” of the
title — has eerie resonance in today’s world.
Hunt soon finds himself chained to a ceiling in a London dungeon. Enter Ilsa
(Ferguson) who obviously has some attraction to Hunt, and a tendency to save his life,
but also is clearly not working with him,
either.
The two meet again in Vienna, and eventually in Morocco, where Hunt and his friends

take on a mission that involves, for one
thing, Hunt holding his breath underwater
for an impossibly long time while fighting
an impossibly strong water current and
many other things.
It shouldn’t surprise you by now to hear
that Cruise apparently flirted with on-set
danger here, too. And it’s impossible to
deny that this knowledge adds to the fun.
Early on, when Hunt was hanging off that
plane, my 12-year-old companion — who’s
grown up in the age of computer-generated
wizardry — confidently whispered: “Ha,
that’s totally a green screen.” And I was
happy to be able to whisper back:
“Nope. That’s just Tom Cruise.”
“Mission: Impossible — Rogue Nation,”
a Paramount release, is rated PG-13 by the
Motion Picture Association of America for
“sequences of intense action and violence.”
Running time: 131 minutes. Three stars out
of four.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

21

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

THROUGH A GLASS B RIGHTLY:
LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY AT THE
CHARLES HOSMER MORSE MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART IN WINTER
PARK, FLORIDA. Jewel-like leaded glass
lamps and radiant stained glass windows.
Famed American artist and designer Louis
Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) is identified
in the public mind primarily with these creations. But at the Charles Hosmer Morse
Museum of American Art in Winter Park, the
full range of Tiffany’s innovative and versatile aesthetic vision can be appreciated. The
42,000-square-foot Morse Museum houses
the world’s most comprehensive collection
of works by Tiffany, including not only his
leaded-glass lamps and windows, but jewelry, pottery, paintings, art glass and, on a
grander scale, both his chapel interior from
the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in
Chicago and art and architectural objects
from his Long Island country estate,
Laurelton Hall. The Museum’s collections
were assembled over a half-century by
Jeannette Genius McKean (1909-1989) and
her husband, Hugh F. McKean (1908-1995),
the Museum’s director until his death. The
Museum was founded by Mrs. McKean in
1942 and named for her grandfather,
Chicago industrialist and Winter Park philanthropist Charles Hosmer Morse.
RESCUING THE TIFFANY CHAPEL.
From May 1 to Oct. 31, 1893, 27 million
visitors came to the World’s Columbian
Exposition in Chicago — nearly one-quarter of the population of the United States at
the time. To demonstrate its artistry and
craftsmanship in producing ecclesiastical
goods, the Tiffany Glass and Decorating
Company installed a chapel interior in the
Exposition’s Manufactures and Liberal Arts
Building, to serve as a holistic display of
the firm’s mosaics and leaded-glass windows. The chapel interior included six
ornately carved plaster arches, 16 mosaic
columns and a 1,000-pound, 10-by-8-foot
electrified chandelier in the shape of a
cross. After the exposition closed, the
chapel was taken apart and over the ensuing
decades was moved from place to place,
eventually being installed in a free-standing building at Louis Comfort Tiffany’s

Long Island country estate, Laurelton Hall.
After his death, the chapel was sold off piece
by piece. The McKeans tracked down and
bought all the pieces of the chapel and had it
reassembled within the museum. Catherine
Hinman, the museum’s director of public
affairs and publications, said: “A highlight
of a visit [to the Morse Museum] is always
the Byzantine-Romanesque chapel interior
Tiffany designed for exhibition at the 1893
world’s fair in Chicago, which literally
brought fair-goers to their knees in 1893
and continues to mesmerize our visitors
today.”
LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY’S LAURELTON HALL. Tiffany built his 84-room
Long Island home, Laurelton Hall, between
1902 and 1905. The fixtures, furnishings
and architectural details were all executed at
his exacting direction. After the hall was
destroyed by fire in 1957, the McKeans rescued what could be salvaged. In 2011, the
museum opened a 12,000-square-foot addition, the centerpiece of which is Laurelton
Hall’s 18-by-32-foot Daffodil Terrace,
pieced together from more than 600 distinct
fragments and installed in a glass-enclosed
gallery. The Daffodil Terrace includes eight
11-foot marble columns topped with bouquets of glass daffodils and features a skylight covered by six large panels of iridescent-glass tiles in a pear-tree motif. Steve
Langston, director of design for RLF architects, designers of the Museum’s Laurelton
Hall expansion, said: “In regards to the
most recent addition, the challenge was to
re-create the feeling of the original house
using the saved and restored pieces in a
museum setting without replicating the
original house. For RLF, the biggest problem of displaying Tiffany glass is obviously getting the correct type and position of
light so that the pieces can be seen properly and understood in regards to how they
were used. Some were individual pieces
within a house and others were integrated
into the architecture of a structure, so some
were conceived of by the artist to use artificial light where others were to be seen filtering natural light into various living
spaces. [Morse] museum director Larry
Ruggiero and RLF lighting consultant
George Sexton made this monumental task
seem easy.” Galleries adjoining the Daffodil
Terrace display hundreds of Tiffany objects
from or related to Laurelton Hall, including

COURTESY OF CHARLES HOSMER MORSE MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

This chapel interior created by Louis Comfort Tiffany for the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition
in Chicago is now installed at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art in Winter
Park, Florida. The Museum houses the world’s most comprehensive collection of Tiffany’s
works, including jewelry, art glass and leaded-glass lamps and windows.
a
13.5-foot-high, mosaic-decorated marble
mantelpiece; a domed leaded-glass chandelier 6.5 feet in diameter; six leaded-glass
Wisteria transoms; and a 4-foot-high fountain vase.
MUS EUM
PARTICULARS . The
Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American

Art is located at 445 N. Park Ave., Winter
Park, FL 32789. More information, along
with a PDF copy of the Museum Visitor’s
Guide,
is
available
at
www.morsemuseum.org.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.

22

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stewart signing off ‘Daily Show’ fake newscast for real

know.”
Meanwhile, the illuminative mockery of
Stewart’s “fake news” might be defined as
“What those in power don’t want you to
think.”
Always questioning authority — whether
politicians, corporate titans, media barons
or, of course, puffed-up journalists —
Stewart did what satirists have done for centuries: He seized on the absurdity embedded
in accepted truth.
But as “The Daily Show” aped the bombast and blizzard of graphics employed,
without irony, by “legitimate” newscasts,
Stewart never copped to grandiose claims
for what he was up to.
“Our meeting every morning is an explicit discussion of what’s going on in the
world,” he declared in a 2004 interview with
the Associated Press. “But then the rest of

the day is spent trying to hide that under
layers of fart jokes.”
While Stewart is undeniably left-leaning,
his show, he said, “doesn’t honor the distinction between left wing and right wing,
or liberal and conservative, or in some
respects between Democrat and Republican.
“We only honor the distinction between
real and absurdly fake, ” he said, then
grinned. “And WE are absurdly fake.”
“The Daily Show” under Stewart thus
made a credible argument that, for both journalism and public affairs, bogus is the new
real, leaving fact and fantasy interchangeable. “The Daily Show” prevailed as a bit of
daylight in between, a privileged space that
granted Stewart almost limitless freedom to
make fun of things, even as he exercised due
diligence in making sense of them in the
process.
Some (even Stewart) would say “The
Daily Show” is a half-hour of silliness
meant to call out politicians and other
power brokers with no higher purpose than
amusing its audience.
Still, he was sharply attuned to America’s
many wrong turns, how its leadership and
media routinely let the country down. In
2010, he and fellow Comedy Central fakenews host Stephen Colbert even organized
a rollicking “Rally to Restore Sanity and/or

Fear” that drew tens of thousands to
Washington’s National Mall.
Americans, said Stewart in one of the telecast’s more serious moments, do “impossible things every day that are only made possible through the little, reasonable compromises we all make.”
But reasonable compromises are what
elected officials are loath to make in the
present day; what news media dismiss in
favor of spotlighting the more watchable
bad behavior and conflict.
Americans do work together to get things
done, insisted Stewart.
“The only place we don’t is here,” he said,
pointing behind him at the Capitol, “or on
cable TV.”
There has been little sign of sanity
restored.
“Wouldn’t it be nice if people who jumped
to conclusions and peddled a false, divisive,
anger-stoking narrative had to apologize
for misleading America?” mused Stewart
last March in reference to a certain cablenews network.
On Aug. 6, Stewart, now 52, will step
aside, making way for Trevor Noah, a 31year-old stand-up comic from South Africa,
to manage this nightly reality check as the
nation dives headlong into the 2016 presidential election cycle.

lent quality. Sunday’s featured a gracious
performance of Mozart’s K. 493 piano quartet and a stirring one of Brahms’ thicker Op.
87 piano trio. The “preludes” are free, and
seating may be secured by visiting the
Menlo website at 9 a.m. on the day of the
performance.
There’s more to Menlo. Each week there’s

a marathon performance by the Institute’s
Young Performers, impressively accomplished students ranging in age from 11 to
18. Those are also free. There are master
classes, where the seasoned professionals
of the evening programs tutor the younger
ones of the International Program before an
audience, also free. There are lectures and

talks, some free and some ticketed. Wander
around the Menlo campus during the day and
you may hear the students rehearsing outside on the lawn.
Menlo runs through Aug. 8, and tickets
for some events are still available.
Information is at the website, musicatmenlo.org.

By Frazier Moore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — After more than 16 years
and nearly 2,600 telecasts, Jon Stewart can
feel proud of his scads of Emmys and his
pair of Peabody Awards, his cultural gravitas
(he hung with the Prez, both on and off the
air!), even his reprobate status at Fox News.
Who could blame him for wanting to
depart “The Daily Show” on this high note?
Besides, maybe it had gotten too easy. By
June, when Donald Trump jumped into the
presidential race, a giddy Stewart framed
this jest-alluring candidacy as Trump’s
going-away gift to him, “putting me in
some sort of comedy hospice where all I’m
getting is straight morphine.”
Or maybe it had gotten too hard.
When he took over “The Daily Show” in
January 1999, Stewart’s simple mission
was to host a program that would lampoon
“real” newscasts and newsmakers they
enabled.
“I like keeping up with the news,” he told
the Associated Press at the time, “even
though I think it’s gotten so out of control.
But that’s what I like about ‘The Daily
Show’: It’s like checks and balances.”
But in an interview a few months ago,
Stewart put a bit more dismally the task of

MUSIC
Continued from page 19
Menlo’s
Chamber
Music
Institute
International Program. These are of excel-

Jon Stewart

finding the funny in the
news.
“I think of us as turd
miners,” he said. “I put
on my helmet, I go and
mine turds. Hopefully I
don’t get turd lung disease.”
A famous definition of
news: “What those in
power don’t want you to

It’s Like
Asking For
A Clown
And Getting
A Circus

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WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
FRIDAY, JULY 31
Makerspace Friday. 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. South San Francisco Main
Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South
San Francisco. All ages welcome. For
more information, call 829-3860.

Party. 7 p.m. 38th Floor, 38 E. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. Tickets are $30 for
speed dating and dancing and $20
for dancing. For more information
visit thepartyhotline.com or call
(415) 507-9962.

Music in the Park. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Burton Park, San Carlos. For more
information call 802-4382.

Jesus Christ Superstar. 8 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Tickets
range from $27 to $45. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 569-3266 or visit coastalrep.com.

Music on the Square: Journey
Revisited. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free.
Art of the Frame reception. 6 p.m.
The Studio Shop, 244 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. The Studio Shop will be
highlighting two picture frame
artists, Mike Lang and Micah Paul.
Exhibit will be showing July 15
through Aug. 4. For more information
visit
http://www.thestudioshop.com/exhibit/art-of-frame2015.
‘The Corner Laughers’ perform. 7
p.m. Devil’s Canyon Brewery, 935
Washington St., San Carlos. Free and
for all ages.
Jesus Christ Superstar. 8 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Tickets
range from $27 to $45. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call 569-3266 or visit coastalrep.com.
HeartMoves — Rhythm of
Awakening Through Drumming
and Dance. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Arts Unity Movement, 149 South
Blvd. San Mateo. $20 to $25. Reserve
your space at http://artsunitymovement.com/class/heartmoves/rnrnFa
cilitated.
Free Family Movies in the Park.
Sunset.
Washington
Park,
Burlingame. ‘Into the Woods’ will be
playing. Bring blankets, picnic baskets and warm coats. There will be
cotton candy and popcorn provided
by the Sacred Church to benefit the
Youth Scholarship Fund. For more
information call 558-7300.
SATURDAY, AUG. 1
Water Conservation Seminar. 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. South San Francisco
Farmers’ Market at Orange Memorial
Park. Learn important facts and
updates on recent water restrictions,
ways to check and control your own
home water usage and how to take
advantage of rebate and resource
opportunities.
Free skin cancer screening. 9 a.m.
to noon. San Carlos Center, PAMF,
301 Industrial Road, San Carlos.
Opportunity to get your skin
checked by a dermatologist; no
treatment will be given; details of
screening will be given to each person. No appointments. First come,
first served basis. Up to 200 attendees will be screened. For more
information call 596-4160.

Music by Rick Mixter, Lainey
Sainte Marie, Brick Spieth and Ken
Voorhees. 300 Main St., Half Moon
Bay. For more info visit coastalartsenterprises.com/paying-it-forward.
SUNDAY, AUG. 2
2015 San Mateo County Parks
Foundation Tour de Peninsula
Presented by Whole Foods
Market. 7 a.m. Eucalyptus Picnic
Area, Coyote Point Park, San Mateo,
California. Proceeds benefit San
Mateo County Parks Foundation and
Bicycle Sunday — car free biking on
Cañada Road. Free for children 11
and under, $20 for children 12-17,
$45 for adults; prices rise on July 1.
For more information call 321-1638.
Register
on
http://supportparks.org/tdp/registration.html by July 30.
Lyme Prevention Race. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Huddart Park, 1100 Kings
Mountain Road, Woodside. Features
a family-friendly 1k, 5k, 10k and half
marathon. 100 percent of all money
raised goes toward research in finding a cure for Lyme disease. For more
information and to register call 5302684.
Summer at the Movies. 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Open Door Church, 4150
Piccadilly Lane, San Mateo.
Exploration of how stories told in
movies connect to the greatest story
ever told. Free.
Summer Sermon Series ‘Holy
Hollywood.’ 10:30 a.m. 225 Tilton
Ave., San Mateo. The ‘Lord of the
Rings’ and noted ‘Phantom of the
Opera’ singer Franc D' Ambrosio will
be special guests.
Blood Drive at the Bay Area Aloha
Festival. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo
County Event Center, 1346 Saratoga
Drive, San Mateo. For more information email lmagana@stanford.edu.
Free Events Courtesy of the San
Mateo Arboretum Society. 11:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. San Mateo
Arboretum
Society,
Kohl
Pumphouse (located in Central
Park), 101 Ninth Ave., San Mateo.
Master Gardener Plant Clinic at
11:30 a.m. and ‘Laundry to
Landscape Graywater’ at 1 p.m.
Learn how you can simply and safely
reuse water from sinks, showers and
washing machines to irrigate plants.
For more information call 579-0536.

SAT Practice Test. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Borel Place, San Mateo. Full length
SAT practice Test. Receive scores in
critical reading, math and writing.
Sponsored by Marble Arch Test Prep
and Tutoring, a non-profit organization. Register online at www.marblearch.us/events.

Burlingame Walking Tour Option
A. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Burlingame
Avenue Train Station, 290 California
Drive, Burlingame. Learn about the
3-decade growth of Burlingame
Avenue, from wealthy equestrian
playground in 1895 to a bustling
suburb. Free. For more information
call 340-9960.

Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. Red
Morton Community Park, 1120
Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. Free
program of the San Mateo County
Medical Association’s Community
Service Foundation that encourages
physical activity. For more information and to sign up visit
smcma.org/walkwithadoc or call
312-1663.

Burlingame Walking Tour Option
B. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Wells Fargo building, 1145 Broadway, Burlingame.
Explore the growth of the old Town
of
Easton, addressing
why
Burlingame has two main business
streets, why Broadway has an arch
and other interesting tidbits. Free.
For more information call 340-9960.

American Cancer Society Relay for
Life. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fitzgerald
Field in Central Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave.,
San Mateo. A fundraiser celebrating
cancer survivors and caregivers.
Includes live bands, yoga, zumba,
games and lunch fundraiser. Free.
For more information and to register
visit http://relayforlife.org/sanmateoca.
Author Talk: Mike Cheung. 11 a.m.
South San Francisco Main Library.
Join us for a discussion of sustainable living and local indicators for
the long-term health of our community. Participate in the discussion
and shape the future of your region.
Blood Drive at the Bay Area Aloha
Festival. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. For more
information email lmagana@stanford.edu.
Pacifica Walking Tour. 7 p.m. to 8
p.m. Montecito and Beach boulevards. During a tour of historic
buildings of the central Sharp Park
area, view the historic ‘castle,’ walk
past the Little Brown Church and
stroll along the promenade. The
tour will conclude at sunset with a
view from the Pacifica Pier. Free. For
more information call 738-2332.
Music at Coastal Arts Enterprises
presents Paying it Forward: The
Light Within. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CAL
Museum (at Zaballa Square)
Speed Dating and Singles Dance

The Society of Western Artists
65th Annual Show. Reception. 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. SWA Fine Art Center,
527 San Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Art
pieces include oil paintings, watercolors and pastel/mixed media. For
more information call 737-6084.
Line Dance with Tina Beare and
Jeanette Feinberg. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. $5.
For more information call 616-7150.
Jesus Christ Superstar. 2 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. Tickets
range from $27 to $45. For more
information and to purchase tickets
call
569-3266
or
visit
coastalrep.com.
C.J. Box Reads from Badlands. 3
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. C.J. Box is the
bestselling author of ‘The Highway,
Back of Beyond,’ and 18 other novels, including the award-winning Joe
Pickett series. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
MONDAY, AUG. 3
Teen Trivia. 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. An afternoon of pop
culture, film and book-related trivia
questions. Prizes will be awarded to
top contestants. Free and designed
for ages 12 to 18. For more information call 522-7818.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

SCOUTS
Continued from page 1
because it actually used to be at
Searsville Lake in the really old days.
So I can say, very comfortably, it’s
been going over 40 years.”
Each summer, two camp sessions —
Peninsula and Diamond Crest — each
serve certain cities on the Peninsula,
ultimately covering most of San
Mateo County. Diamond Crest Day
Camp — the second, and larger, of the
two sessions — came to a close
Thursday, and hosted an estimated 900
scouts from first-grade and up, and any
Scout that wants to participate is welcomed.
“We have been very cognizant of
doing whatever we can to accommodate
special
needs
children, ”
Williamson said. “We sometimes have
special medical needs, we sometimes
have special behavior needs, and we do
anything we can to accommodate that.
We’ve never turned a camper away for
that.”
The younger campers spend their
days working toward earning badges
and enjoying camp activities like
painting birdhouses, hiking, learning
camping skills, singing and preparing
cookouts. Older campers step up to
activities like horseback riding at
Webb Ranch and archery classes, and
they eventually have the chance to
become the camp leaders of the future.
“One of the things we have here is a
progression,” Williamson said. “The
girls who are going into seventh-grade
are aides in training, then the eighth-,
ninth- and 10th-graders are aides, and

MAIL
Continued from page 1
Yolo and San Mateo counties are participating in the pilot, which was
approved by state lawmakers last year
with the passage of Mullin’s Assembly
Bill 2028.
It gives San Mateo County the
authority to conduct up to three all-mail
ballot elections until the end of 2017.
Presidential elections, however, are
excluded from the pilot.
Under AB 2028, every voter gets a
ballot in the mail; return envelopes are
postage paid; voters can still vote in
person; and the county provides a
report to the state on the outcome.
There will be a limited number of
polling places open on Election Day
for those who prefer to vote in person.
Church has said the trend in the county is that more residents are choosing
to vote by mail.
In the November 2103 general election, 78 percent of San Carlos residents

Friday • July 31, 2015

23

10th-, 11th- and 12th-graders have the
option of being junior unit leaders.
They take on the full responsibility
and all the planning for their unit.
“These are teenagers who are giving
up two weeks of their summer to come
and work. They pay, because they are
campers, but they are literally here to
be the helpers, and to me that’s somehow important. Every year I see over a
hundred teenagers who give up their
summer to be here at camp and they’re
wonderful.”
One of the last big events of the
camp is the graduation of the aides in
training, at which the new aides are
bequeathed with their coveted “nature
names” which will become their exclusive handle during camp season. The
nature name is so precious that real
names will rarely be uttered at camp
and even then, only in whispers at
some distance from the uninitiated.
The freshly minted leaders then spend
the night under the stars, literally.
There are no cabins or tents here, just
tarps and sleeping bags on the ground.
“It’s in the outdoors,” said Junior
Unit Leader Madison “Noodles”
Hubbel. “It’s not at a school. There’s
no cement. We’re surrounded by trees
and bugs.”
This is not glamping. This is the
real deal.
While Scout membership is noboys-allowed, the camp is not run
exclusively by girls or scouts.
“We do certainly take volunteers of
any sex,” Williamson said. “We don’t
often get a lot of fathers who want to
volunteer, but when we do we are
thrilled to have them.”
It’s not just fathers breaking the
gender barrier, either. Ironically, one

of the first sights to greet camp visitors is a group of rowdy boys — children of parents who take advantage of
the camp’s day care service to volunteer.
“Meanwhile, down in civilization,
we have an army of people back home
doing things to keep the camp running,” on-site manager Jo “Shadow”
Mitchell said of the huge amount of
food prep, supply runs and organization that go on behind the scenes to
make the camps run smoothly up on
the hill.
“A lot of the people involved plan
their lives around it,” Mitchell said.
“Parents, grandparents, everyone,
they wouldn’t miss a year.”
Junior Unit Leader Danielle
“Peppermint” Hamer attributes this to
the quirkiness of camp traditions.
“There’s a lot of unique traditions
that you can’t tell people about without them thinking it’s outlandish,”
Hamer said. “But to me they make
sense because I’ve been at camp so
long.”
When the flames went out on
Thursday night’s campfire, the Girl
Scouts ended another summer of sharing those unique traditions with girls
from all over the Peninsula, giving
them new experiences, new friends and
new skills that they can take into the
future, and likely give back in years to
come.
“We have girls who are in college
and come back to be our leaders,”
Williamson said. “We have a grandmother — me — whose two daughters
and grandchildren come. Many of our
people who have been here at camp as
children are coming back. Somehow
that always makes my heart feel
happy.”

cast their ballots by mail, one of the
highest rates in the county.
San Carlos could save $17,000 by
going all mail in November.
In the June 2014 primary election,
more than 77 percent of the ballots in
San Mateo County were cast by mail.
The Elections Office plans to reach
out to voters who don’t usually vote by
mail and has a media campaign plan
that includes radio, digital, print and
social media.
Cost reductions under the proposal
will come from fewer election officers,
fewer voting machines and fewer
polling places.
With an all-mail ballot election, the
county is estimating a cost savings of
anywhere between one-third to one-half
the cost of a traditional election,
according to the Elections Office.
“Election reform and boosting voter
turnout have been legislative priorities
for me since I arrived in Sacramento and
I am excited that all of San Mateo
County has signed on to participate in
this pilot project. It should increase
voter turnout and save taxpayer dollars

by making our election system as effective, efficient and accessible as possible. I appreciate the support of San
Mateo County Chief Elections Officer
Mark Church and his office throughout
this process and look forward to seeing
the results,” Mullin wrote in a statement Thursday.
In addition to measuring voter turnout
in general, the vote-by mail pilot program will also review turnout among
different demographic groups, such as
permanent vote-by-mail status, age,
gender, ethnicity, disability and political party affiliation.
Although there are no remaining
jurisdictions that do not have a scheduled election in November one may still
request a special election on a measure
and have until Aug. 7 to do so, according to Church’s office. That jurisdiction
would then also have to vote on
whether to participate in an all-mail
election, according to Church’s office.

bill@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

24

COMICS/GAMES

Friday • July 31, 2015

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL
CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Greeted the crowd
6 2012 Pixar film
11 Wrinkle-free
13 Trumpeted
14 Fire-starting material
15 Postal meter units
16 Health resort
17 Repeatedly
18 Diamond stat
21 Tower over
23 U-turn from ESE
26 Charged particle
27 Pandora’s boxful
28 German industrial region
29 Polish
31 Small drum
32 Twinkle
33 Adjust the tires
35 Gives permission
36 Black hole, once
37 Not pos.
38 Previous
39 Rodeo prop
40 Mdse.

GET FUZZY®

41
42
44
47
51
52
53
54

D.C. figure
Med. specialty
Hibernated
Kind of gas
Zoo building
Rock layers
Cheerful
Four-door model

DOWN
1 Humorous one
2 Jackie’s second
3 Max — Sydow
4 Finales
5 Type of pie
6 Cliff
7 Tirade
8 Rainbow
9 Notch’s shape
10 MS polishers
12 Prolongs the vowels
13 Louts
18 Thumb through
19 Water heater
20 Natural

22
23
24
25
28
30
31
34
36
39
41
43
44
45
46
48
49
50

Puts on guard
Dwindling
Harped on
Injurious acts
Note before la
Dangerous curve
They rank above knights
Atelier items
Like the Sahara Desert
Somewhat suspicious
Ginger cookie
Deli-scale word
Lah-di- —
Actress Mendes
Pinch off
June honoree
Flight board info
— Aykroyd of films

7-31-15

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



FRIDAY, JULY 31, 2015
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Before you take on
someone else’s responsibilities, make sure you are
reading the situation clearly. Don’t step in and take
over unless you are prepared to go the distance.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Practicality and a
straightforward attitude will help you get ahead. A
detailed project will give you the opportunity to highlight
your skills and show your dedication and loyalty.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You have nothing
to lose and plenty to gain if you are open to new
philosophies and ideas. Search for a novel approach
to a troubling situation.

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2015 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — An overactive
imagination will lead to problems. Deal with matters
as they are, not as they seem. An unrealistic
viewpoint or false assumptions will lead to conflict.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Your power
of persuasion will work in your favor. People will
be happy to help you get what you want. Others
will be inspired by your words and motivated by
your actions.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Your colleagues
will be surprised by your innovative problemsolving techniques. Change will be necessary if
you aren’t satisfied with your current position. Go
after your dreams.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Personal affairs

7-31-15
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and romantic opportunities will confuse you. Work
on your relationships with others. More give-andtake and a focus on equality will help tame any
problem you face.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Don’t spend time
with people you can’t trust. Trying to sort out what is
and isn’t true will be taxing. Opt to spend time with
people who love and understand you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You will gain
popularity and status by participating in a cause
you believe in. The people you meet will help you
advance personally and professionally. Romance is
in the stars.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Consider letting go
of projects and people that are dragging you down.

Take the direction that suits you best instead of what
others want you to do.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Your desire for
mental and physical stimulation will warrant trying
something you’ve never done before. You should air
serious concerns with family and close friends in
order to get some answers.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Deception is
apparent. Listen, learn and observe before signing
a deal that requires cash up front. Protect your
possessions and your assets, and don’t lend or
borrow money.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

104 Training

110 Employment

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

CAREGIVER NEEDED-ELDERLY carehome looking for Experienced Caregivers but willing to train. No criminal record. (650) 348-5585

CAREGIVERS

110 Employment

CAREGIVER -

Looking for compassionate team
member for Assisted Living in Burlingame. 650-692-0600.

CAREGIVER
WANTED

Senior Living Facility
San Carlos
(650)596-3489
Ask for Violet
DUMP TRUCK DRIVER, SM, good pay,
benefits. (650)343-5946 M-F, 8-5.

110 Employment

110 Employment

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.

2 years experience
required.

We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.

Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
COMPUTER Course Hero, Inc. in Redwood City, CA
seeks Engineering Manager to manage
coordination, integration of technical activities in technical architecture or engineering projects. MS in Comp Sci or
Comp Eng + 2 years of exp. recruiting
and managing engineering staff, web developing using PHP, TDD and SCRUM
practices, conducting code review.
Send cover letter and resume
to: VChoi@Coursehero.com
No Calls/EOE

GOT JOBS?

110 Employment

25

College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

NEED MORE MONEY OR MORE
TIME? FINALLY STOP CHASING MONEY! Control Your Working Hours! No
Selling & You get 100%! Extra $1000
Monthly. For Short Overview:
(888) 812-1214

PROGRAM COORDINATOR: Nan Hai
(USA) Co. Inc. in Millbrae, CA. Coordinate language studies programs’ curriculum and procedure. Master’s with 2 yrs
exp. Mail resume to 510 Broadway Suite
301, Millbrae, CA 94030 or email
may@nanhai.com

Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

DRIVERS
WANTED
San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Routes

Early mornings, six days per week,
Monday through Saturday
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m.
and 4:30 a.m. 2 to 4 hour routes
available from South SF to Palo Alto and the Coast.
Pay dependent on route size.
Apply in person 800 S. Claremont
Street #210 in San Mateo

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015
124 Caregivers

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

CASE# CIV 534506
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Rambo Sze Chai Ho
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Rambo Sze Chai Ho filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Rambo Sze Chai Ho
Proposed Name: Ronald Sze Chai Ho
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 26,
2015 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 7/16/15
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 7/10/15
(Published 07/24/2015, 07/31/2015,
08/07/2015, 08/14/2015)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265341
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Authorized Franchisee for Snap
On Tool, 1357 San Mateo Ave, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. 2) Srilac,
same address. Registered Owner: Rizvi
Sally, 448 Green Hills Dr., Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s//Rizvi Sally/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/06/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/15, 07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265734
The following person is doing business
as: CGRN, 551 Pilgrim Dr, Suite B, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404. Registered Owner: Caregiver Referral Network Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on June 3,
2015
/s//S. Joe Khoei/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/19/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/15, 07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265863
The following person is doing business
as: Shinemore, 512 E. 3rd Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner:
Ping Lee, 1537 Fir Ave., San Leandro,
CA 94578. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Ping Lee /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/30/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/15, 07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15)

868 Cowan Road - Burlingame, CA

NOW HIRING!
DRIVERS - CLASS A and B
DRIVER HELPER
COOK - HALAL & ARABIC FOODS and WESTERN
FOOD PREPARER
ASSEMBLY - BEVERAGE & EQUIPMENT
UTILITY WORKER/PORTER

RETENTION BONUS AVAILABLE!
Contact Info: Phone: 650-259-3100 Fax: 650-692-2318
Email: stephane.ako@lsgskychefs.com

Exciting Opportunities at

Candy Maker Training Program
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MCTGSFRVFOUMZ
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Positions located at 210 El Camino Real, South San Francisco
If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at (650) 827-3210 between
8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE. &NQMPZFFTBSFNFNCFSTPG-PDBM

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265806
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Millbrae Valero, 491 El Camino
Real, MILLBRAE, CA 94030. 2)MIllbrae
Gas and Food, same address. Registered Owner: Neopursuit, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on June 3, 2015
/s//Kimberly Lam/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 06/25/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/10/15, 07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266161
The following person is doing business
as: Fish Window Cleaning, 225 E. Poplar
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner(s): Yuhua Enterprises Incorporated, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/Galen Underwood/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 7/22/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15, 08/14/15)

PETITION TO DECLARE MINOR
FREE FROM PARENTAL CUSTODY
AND CONTROL
Case Number A16318
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR
THE COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
In the matter of the Adoption Petition of
JESSICA BENAVIDES, of MYLEE ISABEL PEREZ, a minor

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265979
The following person is doing business
as: EPA/ EMP Original Good, 1396 Camellia Drive, PALO ALTO, CA 94303. Registered Owners: 1) Robert Hamel, 2280
Latham St., MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA
94040. 2) William Bailey, 2041 Harbor
View Ave, SAN JOSE, CA 95122. 3)
Lavell Pennington, 792 Ferndale Court,
SAN JOSE, CA 95133. 4) Roosevelt Jordan, 919 Mowry Ave #52, FREMONT,
CA 94536. The business is conducted by
A General Partnershipl. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Lavell Pennington/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 07/07/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265892
The following person is doing business
as: Suckle and Buckle, 318 Chesterton
Ave, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered
Owner(s): Kelly Anne Ryan, same as
above. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Kelly Ryan/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 7/01/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15, 08/14/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #265801
The following person is doing business
as: Blue Orchid, 211 Elm Street #204,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owners: Nina Kirilova, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Nina Kirilova/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 6/25/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266086
The following person is doing business
as: Out Now Bail Bonds, 333 Bradford
St. #150, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063.
Registered Owners: Maselli Bail Bonds
Incorporated, CA.. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on Jan 1, 2015
/s/ Corrin Rankin/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 7/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266092
The following person is doing business
as: Tsuki Owl, 2901 Sunset Terrace,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered
Owners: 1) Sara Xing-Chang Fong 2)
Christopher J. Fong, same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Sara Fong/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 7/15/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/17/15, 07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266085
The following person is doing business
as: Heieck Supply, 1025 Varian ST, SAN
CARLOS,
CA
94070.
Registered
Owner(s): Hajoca Corporation, ME. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 7/12/2005
/s/Christopher Pappo/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 7/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15, 08/14/15)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266091
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mather Enterprises, 2) Mather
Roofing, 412 HURLINGAME AVE, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 Registered
Owner(s): Kim Mather, P O BOX 5424,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. The business is conducted by an individual. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Kim Mather/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 7/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/24/15, 07/31/15, 08/07/15, 08/14/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #266151
The following person is doing business
as: Mobile Millennial Marketing, 2713 S.
Norfolk St, #305, SAN MATEO, CA
94403. Registered Owner(s): Lee F. Cameron, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/Lee F. Cameron/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 7/21/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/31/15, 08/07/15, 08/14/15, 08/21/15)
NOTICE OF HEARING--DECEDENT'S
ESTATE OR TRUST
CASE NUMBER 125808
IN THE MATTER OF: THE JENNINGS
TRUST CREATED JUNE 4, 2009,
TRUST
1. NOTICE is given that: ERNEST JENNINGS, CO-TRUSTEE
has filed A PETITION FOR THE REMOVAL OF CO-TRUSTEE, FOR AN
ACCOUNT, AND FOR AN ORDER ESTABLISHING A RESULTING TRUST
FOR REAL PROPERTY.
2. You may refer to the filed documents
for more information. (Some documents
filed with the court are confidential.)
3. A HEARING on the matter will be held
as follows: Aug 4, 2015, 9:00 a.m.
Dept.: PROBATE
Address of the court: SUPERIOR
COURT OF CALIFORNIA, County of
San
Mateo, 400 County Center, Redwood
City Ca 94063
Attorney for Petitioner: Timothy S.
O'Hara, SBN 083893, Tel: 650-2121800,
1611 Borel Place #6, San Mateo CA
94402
Filed: June 22, 2015
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on 7/17/2015, 7/24/2015, 7/31/2015,
8/07/2015

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA
IN AND FOR THE
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
NOTICE OF VERIFIED PETITION TO
ESTABLISH STANDING FOR THE SAN
MATEO DAILY JOURNAL AS A NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCULATION
FOR ALL OF SAN MATEO COUNTY
[GOVERNMENT CODE §§ 6020, 6000
ET SEQ., AND 6008]
Case No. CLJ534826
In the Matter of the Petition of Jerry Lee,
Publisher for the San Mateo Daily Journal to establish standing for the San Mateo Daily Journal as a newspaper of general circulation.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on August 26, 2015 at 9 AM or soon thereafter
as the matter may be heard in Dept. LM
(Law and Motion) Department of this
Court, located at 400 County Center,
Redwood City, CA 94063. Petitioner intends to apply for an order declaring the
newspaper known as the San Mateo Daily Journal to be a newspaper of general
circulation for all of San Mateo County.
Petitioner /s/ JERRY LEE /
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, July 31, August 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10,
11, 2015.

No. A16318
CITATION TO PARENT, [Family Code
Sections 7881 and 8604(a)].
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA
TO: Michelle Mackey Aleman Perez:
By this citation, you are hereby advised that you may appear in Department
5 of this court on August 13, 2015 at
9:00a.m., then and there to show cause,
if any you have, why MYLEE ISABEL
PEREZ should not be declared free from
your custody and control for the purpose
of freeing her from placement for stepparent adoption, on the grounds that you
have abandoned that child. The above
referenced Adoption alleges that, for a
period of one year after January, 2014,
you willfully failed to communicate with,
and to pay for the care, support, and education of, the above-named child, although able to do so.
The following information concerns
the rights and procedures that relate to
this proceeding for the termination of
custody and control of MYLEE ISABEL
PEREZ as set forth in Family Code Sections 7860 through 7864:
1. At the beginning of the proceeding
the Court will consider whether or not the
interests of MYLEE ISABEL PEREZ require the appointment of counsel. If the
Court finds that her interests do require
protection, the Court will appoint counsel
to represent her, whether or not she is
able to afford counsel. MYLEE ISABEL
PEREZ will not be present in court unless she so requests or the Court so orders.
2. If you appear without counsel and
you are unable to afford counsel, the
Court must appoint counsel for you, unless you knowingly and intelligently
waive the right to be represented by
counsel. The Court will not appoint the
same counsel to represent both you and
your child, MYLEE ISABEL PEREZ.
3. If the Court appoints counsel for y
ou, at the end of the proceeding, the
Court will hold a hearing to determine the
amount, if any, that you will be required
to reimburse the county for the services
of your appointed counsel.
4. The Court may continue the proceeding for not more than 30 days as
necessary to appoint counsel and to enable counsel to be acquainted with the
case.
Dated: JUN 24, 2015
JOHN C. FITTON, Clerk of the Superior
Court
BARBARA J. KUEHN, ESQ.
LAW & MEDIATION OFFICES OF
BARBARA J. KUEHN, APC
969-G Edgewater blvd., #785
Foster City, CA 94404-3760
(650) 401-2320
(650) 401-2321 fax
Attorney for Petitioner,
JESSICA BENAVIDES
Endorsed Filed San Mateo County
JUNE 24, 2015
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/10/15, 07/17/15, 07/24/15,
07/31/15 .

210 Lost & Found
FOUND-LARGE SIZED Diamond Ring in
San Carlos Bank Parking Lot on 5/21.
(650)888-2662.
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012
LOST DOG, 14 year old Bichon, white
and Fluffy. Reward $500 cash. Her name
is Pumpkin. Lost in Redwood City.
(650) 281-4331.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

27

210 Lost & Found

Books

297 Bicycles

300 Toys

304 Furniture

306 Housewares

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595

BRIDGESTONE MOUNTAIN Bike. $95.
27" tires. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER $95. (650)
283-6997.

FLATWARE - Stanley Roberts stainless
flatware service for 8, plus assorted
pieces. $65 obo (650)591-6842

NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

5 RARE purple card Star Wars figures
mint unopened. $75. Steve, 650-5186614.

LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

LANDRIDER
AUTO-SHIFT.
Never
Used. Paid $320. Asking $75.(650)4588280

298 Collectibles

COMPLETE 1999 UD1&2 set of 525
baseball cards - mint. $50. Steve, 650518-6614.

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061

295 Art
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

296 Appliances
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208
FAN, WHITE 3-speed, 3 blade 18", pedestal type $9 650-595-3933
JACK LALANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.
KENMORE MICROWAVE quick touch
medium in perfect condition and clean.
$35.[510]684-0187
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
CHERISHED TEDDIES Figurines. Over
90 figurines, 1992-1999 (mostly '93-'95).
Mint in Boxes. $99. (408) 506-7691
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858
MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260

WHIRLPOOL
REFRIGERATOR/
FREEZER, side by side. Excellent condition; 2010 model. $300 (650) 342-7957

TRANSFORMERS SDCC Shockwave
Lab Beast Hunters, $75 OBO Dan 650303-3568 lv msg

MARTHA STEWART decorating books.
Two oldies, but goodies. Both for $10.
San Bruno. 650-794-0839.

297 Bicycles
2 KIDS Bikes for $60. 310-889-4850.
Text Only. Will send pictures upon request.

299 Computers
DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260
HP DESKTOP computer upgrade vista
Intel processor perfect condition tower
only $99 (650) 520-7045

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Blesses
4 Star Wars, initially
7 Go fishing
12 *Ring punch
16 IQ test pioneer
17 Start of the line
before “Liberty!
Freedom!
Tyranny is dead!”
18 Bluebloods
19 *Manhattan
neighborhood
21 1965 Sophia
Loren comedy
24 Gas sign in green
letters
25 Line of work:
Abbr.
28 Year in Mexico
29 Talladega unit
31 Result of a 1955
merger
34 Postseason game
36 Pull in
39 Treating poorly
40 Like the answers
to eight starred
clues ... and a
hint as to how to
fill them in
43 Role for Dustin
44 “The Bridge on
the River __”
45 Marquis de __
46 Chooses the
window instead
of the aisle?
48 Fraud watchdog
org.
50 For each
51 Shade provider
52 Ness, for one
55 Castro and
others
57 *Liberia locale
61 Don Diego de la
Vega, familiarly
63 Frankness
67 The Bradford
kids of ’70s-’80s
TV, e.g.
68 *Ring punch
69 Milo of
“Barbarella”
70 Long time
71 Major
DOWN
1 Natural resource
2 Young beaver
3 Pepper, for one:
Abbr.

4 *Animated TV
series set in the
Rockies
5 Words before
dances
6 Some furniture
stores
7 Biblical brother
8 Juba’s “White”
river
9 *Promising
10 Betray, with
“down”
11 Juillet’s season
13 One of three
cartoon
nephews
14 Little League
precursor
15 Little League
belts: Abbr.
20 Soweto’s home:
Abbr.
21 Toiled
22 Rule exception
23 *Level-headed
26 Stronghold
27 Beach party
staples
30 Brest friend
32 Govt. group that
began in 1908
33 Where kip are
spent

35 Sylvester’s
problem
37 London’s __
Gardens
38 *Challenge to
Eiger climbers
41 Fawn’s mom
42 Tiny songbird
47 Canon offering,
briefly
49 Dimin.’s
opposite
53 Handy

54 Playground retort
56 Mad as __ hen
58 Algonquian
language
59 Bit
60 Sun. message
61 Animal house
62 It turns out lts.
64 Nats’ former
stadium
65 Symbol of peace
66 Eastern Nevada
city

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

303 Electronics
27 INCH Sony TV (not flat screen) Excellent condition $75.00. 650-347-6875.
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BASUKA BASS tube speakers/ amplifier 20" x 10" auto boat never used $100.
(650)992-4544

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
HOME MADE Banquet/Picnic Table 3' X
8' $8. (650)368-0748

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
COMPACT- DVD Video/CD music Player never used in Box $45. (650)9924544

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE 36" COLOR TV (not a flat
screen). Great condition. Ph. 650 6302329.
KENWOOD STEREO Receiver/ equalizer, with CD deck music player 2 Spkrs+.
$50. (650)992-4544
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063
RECORD PLAYER - BIC Model #940.
Excellent Cond. $30. (650) 368-7537.
SONY CD/DVD PLAYER model dvpn5575p brand new silver in the box. $50.
[510]684-0187
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

304 Furniture
ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414

OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OFFICE DESK $95. Good Condition.
(650) 283-6997.

SCALE. 25 lb. capacity counter top model. Very good condition. $15. San Bruno.
650-794-0839
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260

307 Jewelry & Clothing
NEW IN box, quarts wristwatch stainless
case/strap $19 650-595-3933
VAN GOGH “Vase of White Roses”
wood and glass frame. 24” x 30”. $70.
(650)298-8546. p.m. only please
WOMEN/GIRLS CASUAL fashion quartz
watch, New $10 650-595-3933

308 Tools
12 FOOT Heavy Duty Jumper Cables
$8 (650)368-0748
14 FT Extension Ladder. Extends to 26
FT. $125. Good Cond. (650)368-7537
4 WHEEL movers dolly cost $40 asking
$25 obo 650 591 6842
AIR COMPRESSOR - All trade. 125psi.
25 gallon. $99. (650)591-8062
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CONCRETE FINISHING tools, bull flout.
jitter bug and trowels etc. $95.00 firm.
650-341-0282
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 2 HP 7-1/4 inch circular
saw, Diablo 24-tooth thin kerf carbide
blade. $40. 650-465-2344
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
POLE, LAWN/EDGER
0748

$3. (650)368-

PORTER CABLE Model 352VS Belt
sander. Lightly used $70. 650-465-2344

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

POWER INVERTER - STATPOWER
PROWATT 2500. modified, Sine wave
phase corrected. $245.
650-591-8062

OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461

PULLEYS- FOUR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

ROUTER TABLE 25481 and Craftsman
1 & 1 2hp Router- $65. leave message
6505958855

PATIO tables, 48” round, detachable
legs; $30. (650) 697-8481
PATIO tables, Oblong green plastic 3’x5’
detachable legs. $30. (650) 697-8481
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
SINGLE BED with 3 drawer wood
frame,exc condition $99. 650-756-9516
Daly City.
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
SOLID WOOD stackable tables, Set of 3
$25. (650)996-0026
STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42"x21"x17" exc cond $30.
(650)756-9516
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
THOMASVILLE 9-DRAWER dresser
with full hardwood drawers and walnut
veneer in excellent condition. $75.
650-465-2344.

SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
SKILL SAW 7/1/4" CRAFTMAN profesional unused $ 45. (650)992-4544
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.
WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

309 Office Equipment
STAND WITH shelves, 29" high. Can be
used for TV, computer, printer. $10. Pacifica (650)355-0266
STAND WITH shelves, 29" high. Can be
used for TV, computer, printer. $10. Pacifica (650)355-0266

310 Misc. For Sale
10 VIDEOTAPES (3 unused) - $3
each/$20 all. Call 574-3229 after 10 am.

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

TV STAND in great condition. 3'x 20"x
18", light grey. $20. (650)366-8168

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

TWIN SIZED mattress like new with
frame & headboard $45. (650)580-6324

INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037

BEDROOM SET. Amoire, Dresser, Bed.
$95. (650) 283-6997.

TWIN SIZED mattress like new with
frame & headboard $45. (650)580-6324

BRASS / METAL ETAGERE 6.5 ft tall.
Four shelf. $200. (650) 343-0631

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280

LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10 "x
10", cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858

CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184

PATTERN- MAKING KIT with 5 curved
plastic rulers. $60. Call 574-3229 after
10 am.

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

PROCRASTINATION CURE - 6 audiocassette course by Nightingale- Conant.
$30. Call 574-3229 after 10 am

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
DECORATIVE MIRRORS, set of 4, $40
(650)996-0026
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DRESSER, OLD four drawer, painted
wod cottage pine chest of drawers. 40” x
35.5” x 17.5” . $65. (207)329-2853.

07/31/15

MIRROR, OAK frame oval on top approx 39" high x 27" Wide. (650)996-0026

NEW SET of 4 TV trays with stand. Really nice wood. $50. (650)952-3063.

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

07/31/15

MIRROR RECTANGULAR with silver
frame approx 50" high x 20 " wide $25
(650)996-0026

MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.

PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266

xwordeditor@aol.com

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

Very

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

PHILIPS 20-INCH color tube TV with remote. Great picture. $20. Pacifica (650)
355-0266

By Kurt Krauss
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483

Books

JANET EVANOVICH Hardback Books
3 @ $3.00 each - (650341-1861

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

FULL SIZED mattress with metal type
frame $35. (650)580-6324

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

$12.,

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

FREE 2 piece china cabinet. Pecan finish. Located in SSF. I'll email picture.
650-243-1461

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

WHIRLPOOL REAR tub assembly for a
front
loading
washing
machine,
$200/obo. (650)591-2227

WW1

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

RING FOUND, 6 years ago, large 14 carat gold, in San Carlos. Eaton Ave.
(650)445-8827

BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

SHARP MICROWAVE CAROUSEL II
oven small in perfect condition and clean
$ 35. [510] 684-0187

WHIRLPOOL shock absorber for front
loading washing machine, $30/obo.
(650)591-2227

STAR WARS Battle Droid figures mint
unopened. 4 for $40. Steve, 650-5186614.

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260

LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502

PLAY KITCHEN Step 2, accessories,
sink, shelves, oven, fridge, extendable,
perfect , $50. 650-878-9511

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOODEN PLATFORM bed with 6 draws
$92. (650)996-2316

306 Housewares
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
FAN. LASKO Cooling fan. 21” x 20” x 41/2”. Like new. $15. San Bruno. 650794-0839.
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393
TRIPOD : Oak and brass construction.
Used in 1930"s Hollywood In RC $90
OBO (650)363-0360
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015
310 Misc. For Sale

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
WROUGHT IRON Plant/Curio stand, 5
platforms, 5’ high x 1.5’ wide. Beautiful
designer style, good condition. $25.
(650)588-1946. San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments
388 TASCAM recorder. Fair condition.
‘74 Fender Twin Reverb Amp. Fair Condition. ** SOLD **
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296

315 Wanted to Buy

318 Sports Equipment

WE BUY

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

WEIDER PRO 9645 home gym-like new
$95. (650)996-2316

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

316 Clothes
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
XXL HARLEY Davidson Racing Team
Shirt. $90. 310-889-4850. Text Only. Will
send pictures upon request.

32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955

HOHNER MELODICA Piano 27 w/soft
case $100. (650)367-8146

COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Motor Driven. $1,350. (650) 3336275.

KIMBALL MAHOGANY Baby Grand
Piano, Bench and Sheet Music $1100
(650)341-2271

COMMERCIAL PADDLE CONCRETE
MIXER, Electric Driven. $875. (650) 3336275.

TRUMPET - made in Germany. Mint
condition. Original owner. The best.
$1000. (650)756-3900.
UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
FREE, 3 interior solid core paneled doors
with hardware. Reply
tmckay1@sbcglobal.net
INTERIOR DOORS, 8, free.
call 573-7381.

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

312 Pets & Animals
ADOPTION IS THE ONLY OPTION

PETS IN NEED
We offer adoptions 7 days a week
noon - 6 PM
871 5th Ave. Redwood City

650.367.1405

www.petsineed.org
Proudly saving lives for 50 years.
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

318 Sports Equipment
"DAISY POWERLINE, model 881, pump
bb or pellet gun, excellent condition, $40,
650-591-9769 San Carlos
AB CIRCLE machine. $55. 310-8894850. Text Only. Will send pictures upon
request.
BB GUN. $29 (650)678-5133
GOLF SET for $95. 310-889-4850. Text
Only. Will send pictures upon request.
HJC MOTORCYCLE helmet, black, DOT
certified, size L/XL, $29, 650-595-3933

FRENCH BULLDOG puppies. Many
colors.
AKC Registration. Call
(415)596-0538.

IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066

NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

TOTAL GYM. Good Condition. All Accessories. $95. (650) 283-6997.

PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

Asphalt/Paving

Cleaning

NORTHWEST
ASPHALT PAVING

Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimates
(650)213-2648
Lic #935122

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

321 Hunting/Fishing
HUNTING
CLUB
Membership
$2,600.Camanche Hills Hunting Preserve, Ione CA. Pheasants, Ducks, Chukar and sporting clay range. Excludes
annual dues and bird card. Call 209-3041975.

335 Rugs

317 Building Materials

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

LEXICON LAMDA desktop recording
studio used, open box $75. Call
(650)367-8146

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505
CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

335 Garden Equipment
GREAT STATES brand push lawn mower, 14" blade, good condition, $20,
(650)591-9769 San Carlos

345 Medical Equipment
AUDLT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149
PATIENT LIFT - People Lift $400.00
(650)364-8960

Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.

Garage Sales

379 Open Houses

BOY SCOUT
Troop 44
Rummage Sale
Fundraiser

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

Saturday, August 1st
8 AM to 3 PM
2801 Alameda
de las Pulgas
(28th Ave & Alameda)
San Mateo

Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

Huge 30+ Family Rummage
Sale to benefit
Troop 44 Scouts
Lots of great stuff,
plus coffee and bake sale!

Call (650)344-5200

Clothes - Kids, Men &
Women
Tools and Electronics
Outdoor Gear
Toys, Games,
Books & DVDs
Household Items,
Office Chairs,
New Carpet Tiles and more!

435 Rental Needed
WANTED: 1 BR apt, desire dining area,
willing to paint / carpet. Prefer N. Peninsla, DC, SSF, SB, Millbr. $1,500 or less.
(415)441-4331

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

620 Automobiles

RUMMAGE
SALE
AUG 1, 2015
SATURDAY
9am - 3pm

El Camino Real
by 9th Ave
San Mateo
Follow posted
signs to the sale
San Mateo ProLife

1978 CLASSIC Mercedes Benz, 240D,
136k miles, 2nd owner, all scheduled
maintenance & records available. Good
condition. All original. Always garaged.
New tires. 4 speed manual. Runs &
drives great. Sunroof. Clean interior.
Good leather and carpets. AM/FM radio.
$4500. Call (650)375-1929

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

630 Trucks & SUV’s
CADILLAC ‘07 ESCALADE, black on
black, excellent condition. 1 owner, always garaged, have all service records.
122K miles. 4 new tires, and all the
amenities. Runs and drives great, clean
interior, good leather & carpets, amazing
sound system. $19,995. (650)619-0370
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
DUCATI ‘01 750 Monster, 15K miles,
very clean. $4,500. (650)455-1699
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

670 Auto Parts
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

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ALL ELECTRICAL
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Friday • July 31, 2015

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Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

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remodeling

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Plumbing

29

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30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
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1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
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Dental Services

Financial

Health & Medical

Marketing

Massage Therapy

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

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San Mateo , Redwood City,
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

CSUS
Continued from page 1
more than $40 million campus is up for public review through the end of August, said Jill
Grossman, a member of the CSUS Board of
Trustees.
“I really feel like this is a thoughtful and
responsive plan that we’re proposing and a
really good use of the land for Belmont. And
we’re very hopeful that they see the care to
which we’ve gone about using the space
appropriately and addressing citizens’ concerns,” Grossman said.
The private sixth- through 12th-grade
school currently maintains a Hillsborough
campus but seeks to expand into a separate
Belmont middle school that would allow it to
offer more programs to more students,
Grossman said.
The environmental report covers the demolition of the existing 84,500 square feet of
commercial office space and construction of
about 60,000 square feet of school facilities
comprised of a main academic building, a
gymnasium, an outdoor synthetic athletic
field, an indoor pool and 53 parking spaces.
CSUS’ proposal is similar to what it originally proposed in 2012 — plans that were
submitted prior to purchasing the site and
which were dropped after receiving mixed
reviews from the City Council.

SHELTER
Continued from page 1
mayor, and Marc Hershman, district director
for state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo.
Many of the shelter’s inhabitants have

BELMONT
Continued from page 3
Changes to the city’s Zoning and Tree
ordinances included a range of adjustments
like easing parking requirements, changing
the definition of protected trees, increasing
the maximum home size for larger lots and
creating a tiered review system with modest
additions approved by staff while larger
projects and new homes would have been
considered by the Planning Commission.
Councilman Charles Stone, who served
on the council subcommittee with Vice
Mayor Eric Reed to help develop the ordinances, said he has several recommendations he hopes will tend to concerns while
allowing the process to continue.

LOCAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

31

Now, CSUS has returned seeking input on
its proposed mitigation measures to address a
range of impacts that primarily revolve
around traffic and noise.
The property at 6-8 and 10 Davis Drive sits
along the busy Ralston Avenue and is anticipated to increase traffic. But CSUS hopes a
strict traffic demand management, or TDM,
plan that includes at least 70 percent of students carpooling or taking public transportation, while also paying for improvements
along Ralston Avenue, will significantly mitigate the impacts of approximately 240 students and 40 faculty, Grossman said.
The review also coincides with some of the
city’s efforts to improve mobility for all
users through its Ralston Avenue Corridor
Study. As part of its contribution, CSUS will
pay for a new signalized intersection at
Ralston Avenue and South Road, as well as
other improvements at the Davis Drive intersection.
Councilman Warren Lieberman said he’s
looking forward to discussing how CSUS
could contribute, however, he noted Ralston
Avenue remains congested even when the
various schools near the corridor are out of
session.
“I would like to understand what resources
they are going to offer to help us address our
traffic problem. But the traffic problem that
we have in Belmont today is not a cause of
Crystal Springs. But if Crystal Springs could
help us improve it, that would be a very good
thing,” Lieberman said. “Traffic is getting

worse and the fact is we have traffic now,
even when the schools are not in session. So
I’m looking for opportunities that may provide us with ways to address the traffic problems we’re experiencing.”
The report outlines about eight intersections currently operating below the city’s
standards and which the CSUS campus could
affect. However, school officials feel it would
be more beneficial to fully fund the South
Road intersection rather than pay a smaller
“fair share” contribution for each intersection — particularly as those improvements
could be delayed until the city secures the
remaining funds required.
“We chose to do that because we wanted
something substantial to happen,”
Grossman said. “We want to do what helps
improve traffic on Ralston and this is an
identified project.”
Grossman said parents would also be
required to sign a contract agreeing to the
school’s TDM program that includes a variety of shuttles, promoting mass transportation and carpooling. The city may initially
have a bi-monthly, then less frequent, review
of the TDM to ensure it’s effective, according
to the report.
Other concerns raised during the school’s
initial proposal were noise from both construction and a proposed pool that may be
built at a later phase. CSUS would construct a
sound barrier during the 17-month demolition and construction period and has agreed
to build an indoor pool instead.

The school has also offered a one-time $1
million payment to the city’s general fund,
an annual $250,000 payment in lieu of property taxes and another $30,000 annual contribution to the Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District, Grossman said.
Through an arrangement with the city’s
Parks and Recreation Department, the
school’s synthetic field and pool may also be
available for public use during certain days or
seasons, Grossman said.
The public has until Aug. 29 to comment
on the draft environmental impact report
before the city-chosen consultant finalizes
the report. It will also be open for public
comment during a Planning Commission and
City Council review.
Councilman Charles Stone, who first
became interested in running for office after
seeing the council debate the school’s original proposal, said he’s hopeful school officials will be mindful of the community’s
interests.
“I am looking forward to reviewing the
project when it’s in front of us. … Whatever
the outcome is, it has to be something that
works for Belmont,” Stone said. “I think that
the thorough EIR shows that they’re very
serious about taking into account any effects
that their project might have on the town.”

jobs but cannot afford to live in the area,
Frisella said.
“Your idea of homeless people changes
dramatically if you visit. These are good
people who are down on their luck,” she
said.
Mullin and Hill helped secure the permits
required when the shelter moved from San

Mateo to its new home in South San
Francisco.
“It’s hard to believe you spent only
$100,000 because the place looks like a
million bucks,” Hershman said about the
makeover.
Through collaboration with emergency
service organizations such as Samaritan

House, HIF also funds emergency housing
grants of up to $2,500 that provide the
immediate bridge necessary to keep individuals and families in their homes.
Samaritan House’s free services include
shelter; free medical and dental clinics;
clothes for children; and personalized case
management.

Stone suggests expanding the subcommittee into an ad hoc committee that
includes members of the community, staff,
as well as representatives from the Planning
and Parks and Recreation commissions.
Stone said he’d agree to lengthen the
process by taking up the amendments in
four or five organized sections.
Still, Lieberman and Stone said they don’t
want to lose sight of those who support the
amendments and are seeking to remodel
their homes.
“It gives us further opportunity to discuss
the issues surrounding these amendments
and hopefully alleviate some of the concerns people have,” Stone said. “But I don’t
want an open-ended process. I think we owe
it to the community members who need
some relief to try and move through this.”
The council, subcommittee, staff and
Planning Commission spent more than a

year developing the ordinances that were
open for public comment at 10 meetings.
However, some remain skeptical about a
lack of transparency.
The citizens group makes a point that it
cannot represent the variety of opinions
amongst those who signed the referendum
petitions; instead, breaking down the ordinances into more “digestible pieces” would
allow people more time to comment and
provide input, according to the letter.
Pierce said while he’s hesitant to hold out
hope the council will address the concerns
Ask Belmont Citizens raised, everyone

should strive to craft a thoughtful solution
to fact-based problems.
“No one’s asking for extensive changes
in Belmont’s neighborhoods, and that’s
what they’re trying to give us and that’s the
root of the problem,” Pierce said. “But they
could absolutely switch gears. The opportunity is there for them to say ‘OK, we recognize … that we need to do this in a way that
the public understands and supports.”

Visit belmont.gov /city -hall/community dev elopment/major-projects to rev iew the
Draft Env ironmental Impact Report for the
Cry stal Springs Uplands School.

The Belmont City Council meets 5:45
p.m. Monday, Aug. 3, at City Hall, One
Twin Pines Lane.

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • July 31, 2015

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