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Manual- Training Activities

H.R.Y.O Human Rights Youth Organization


Via Saladino 5, Palermo
info@hryo.eu
+39 3485644084
http://www.hryo.eu

Introduction
In the world of Non- Formal education and Projects in the framework of European programs we are
confronted with several manuals that will describe good activities for the right purpose.
I started my internship with the Human Rights Youth Organization- H.R.Y.O as a trainer in the project: No
Gender- No rights. This was an exciting experience because I could use all the Non-formal education tools I
gained studying Cultural and Social Education, at the University of Applied Science in Rotterdam.
During the project I found myself missing a tangible tool such as an activity manual. I would have loved to
use an easy and inspiring manual from which I could have picked some last minute activities.
This manual is created to provide the trainer with a collection of the best activities that are implemented
and tested to be successful by other trainers.
It will be a helpful tool when you choose your activities in the preparation phase, as a last minute solution
when changes need to be made, or when you need an extra energizer.
In this manual will also be room to describe tips, tricks and the elements that made the activity so successful.
Because the activities provided in this manual has been implemented before, the trainer will have a clear
idea on which goal it serves in the process of the training.
The manual is easy and simple to use, in How to use the manual you will find all the steps you need to take
to add a new activity to the collection. The other chapters are divided according to the following type of
activities: Group Building, Energizers, Non-Formal education and Evaluation activities. The final chapter is
dedicated to Materials, here we collect materials that are needed during the implementation of an activity.
The manual will not be fully equipped at the beginning. We need your input, time and dedication to make
the manual successful and fully functional. I highly encourage you to add activities after every project that
has been implemented.
May all these activities contribute in the movement towards Peace, Non-violence and the fulfillment of the
Human Rights!

Inge Arends

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Content :

How to use the manual? .......................................................................................................................................

Chapters:
1. Group building activities ....................................................................................................................................
2. Energizers: .........................................................................................................................................................
3. Educational activities: ........................................................................................................................................
4.Evaluation actvities:............................................................................................................................................
5. Materials:...........................................................................................................................................................

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

How to use the manual?


To make this manual a successful tool, it is important to understand how to use it correctly.
Answering the questions in the template will help you to describe your successful activity. It is important to
describe the activity short and clear so that the reader can understand the activity quickly. Adding a
representative photo of the activity can help the reader to understand it better.

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Type of Activity:
Objectives:
Focus:

Time:
Material needed:

What is the name of the activity?


In which training/project was this activity used?
Who was executing the activity?
What was the theme of the project?
Group Building /Energizer/Training activity/
Evaluation
What are the goals and objectives with regards to this
activity?
What aspects of the activity need the focus of the
trainer?
How much time is needed to complete the activity?
What materials are needed to be able to execute
the activity?

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:
Tips and Tricks:
Variations:
Photo:
Source:

Direct each step in the process of executing the


activity.
Are there tips and tricks towards making this
activity extra successful?
Are there any variations (additions/adjustments)
for this activity?
If available, add a photo of the activity that is
representative of its essence.
Is there a source (book, website, article etc.) where
the trainer can find more information on this
activity?

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

1. Group building activities

Team building: the process of turning a group of individuals into a


cohesive team, a group of people organized to work together interdependently and
cooperatively to meet the needs of their customers by ac complishing a purpose and
goals.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Type of Activity:
Objectives:

Focus:

Welcome space
Women in Europe
Senem Kalafat
Women rights
Group Building
The aim is to develop a fruitful work atmosphere.
The objectives are:
To set the framework for the training
To make the specific aspects of the training
clear right at the beginning
To reflect on the work program, objectives,
expectations & fears towards the training
To create an environment that supports the
participants to feel comfortable with each
other
To build positive group dynamics
Members of the training team needs to be present
at each zone to facilitate the activity. Zone1
(aims&objectives), Zone3 (expectations&fears),
Zone7 (learning space/youthpass) are especially
important to be facilitated by a trainer as they are
about specific aspects of the training.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Time:
Material needed:

Description:

45-60 min
Tables and chairs
Titles and instructions for each zone
Colorful post-its and pens
A3 papers, entitled with the key words of the
project.
A5 papers, written I will contribute this
week... on them.
Printed aims and objectives of the TC
Program to present (if possible drawn)
The Welcome Space is divided into a number of zones, each zone
represents an aspect of the training course.
Participants are asked to explore the Welcome Space, while visiting
every zone. It is possible to re-visit the zones as many times as they
like, there is also no time limit during the visitation of the zones.
Zone 1 Aims and objectives of the training:
This zone is a facilitated discussion zone, a copy of the aims and
objectives are prepared for each participant. This zone should be
set up with a few chairs placed in a circle to facilitate a face to
face discussion.
Zone 2 Program:
This zone pictures the whole program as a journey, there has to
be a copy of the time and activity table available.
Zone 3 Expectations & Fears:
Participants can communicate their Expectations and Fears
regarding the program by writing them on a post it and placing
them in spot relevant to the program (presented on a
wall/zone2).
Color code: expectations blue, fears yellow

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Zone 5 Contribution:
Pieces of paper with I will contribute this week... are placed on
a table. Participants write down what their expected contribution
to the TC will be.
Zone 4 Get to Know Me (self-organized):
A table and chairs are set up with a sign saying ask me
something! Participants arrive, sit and ask each other questions.
Zone 6 Opinions (self-organized):
Papers are placed around the room with key words of the TC,
participants write the first thing that comes to their mind when
they see the word (e.g. Human Rights, Women Rights, Gender
Based Discrimination, Violence Against Women, Harassment)
Zone 7 Learning Space:
Short discussion on the following questions to reflect on the
conditions needed to create a safe learning space around the
(sensitive) topics of the TC:
What does the group need for an efficient working
environment?
What conditions will insure a safe learning space?
What do I need to do to contribute to have a safe learning
space?
When was the last time you spoke openly, freely and
honestly?
What conditions are needed to speak openly, freely and
honestly again?

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Tips and
Tricks:

It is good to have this activity right after the official opening,


name game(s) and program presentation of the day. It would be
best to have the welcome space setup in another room so that
the participants can immediately start the activity.

Variations:

- The Zone7 can be dedicated to the introduction of


Youthpass Certificate instead of the learning space if
necessary.
- This activity can also be used as an evaluation activity. So, our
Welcome space can be turned into an Evaluation space with
some small changes reflecting on all the separate aspects of the
TC.

Photo:

Source:

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:
Type of Activity:

Ankle Walk
Women in Europe
Inge Arends
Position of Women
To deepen skills in teamwork and communication
Group Building

Time:
Material needed:
Tips and Tricks:

45-75 min
With a big group it is important to execute this
activity outside!
This tool originates from the field of adventure-based
learning activities. For more, see Project Adventure's
material in Quicksilver: Adventure Games, Initiative
Problems, Trust Activities and a Guide to Effective
Leadership, by Karl Rohnke and Steve Butter
(Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, reprint 1996).
-

Source:

Comments/Suggestions:

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

In this adventure-based learning activity the challenge is


fairly simple: to walk as a group from one place to
another. The twist: the group must walk all in one line
together with their feet touching their neighbours feet
the whole time.
- Explain the set-up for participants, where people
need to start and where people need to end up.
Also tell them that if their feet do not stay together
the whole time, they need to return to the start then have them go for it!
- During the running of the exercise, you may
choose to be very strict in implementing the rule
about returning to the beginning or you may be
very relaxed: it depends on the state of the group
and how much challenge it can handle.
- You can debrief this activity for problem-solving,
communication and group decision-making. (For
example, there is no rule that participants cannot
get in a circle to discuss strategy, but participants
may instead stay in a line. How did participants
handle that challenge?)
- It is great to connect their current experience with
past experiences. What patterns are developing?
What lessons that were learned are working?
What additional lessons does the group need to
learn?

Focus:
Variations:

Stimulate the group to work together during the activity


by encouraging communication!
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Photo:

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:
Type of Activity:

The interview
Women in Europe
Inge Arends
Oppression of Women
Getting to know each other
Group Building

Time:
Material needed:
Tips and Tricks:
Source:
Comments/Suggestions:

45 min
Before to get to the part of presenting, give the
group the opportunity to communicate with
different people.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

Focus:

Variations:
Photo:

1. Ask all the participants to put chairs and


tables aside.
2. Ask the participants to walk across the room.
When you shout stop! they turn to closest
person and introduce themselves with their
name, then you tell them to walk again .
3. After a few times you ask them to stop and
turn to the closest person in the room.
4. Give the participants 5/10 min to interview
each other and get as much information as
possible about the other person.
5. Then ask the group to gather in a circle again.
Each individual will present the person they
interviewed before the group, after introducing
the name and country, participants will present
the 3 most interesting aspects of the other
person.
- Participants can be shy presenting the other,
sometimes it is good to quickly repeat what
has been said.
- As activity leader it is good to give an
example with the explanation of the
presenting part. You could do this by
presenting a colleague in a funny way to
break the ice.
You could ask the participants to ask specific
information if it is important for the project!
If available, add a photo of the activity that is
representative of its essence.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

2. Energizers

Energizer :an activity that can be run to warm up the team and promote
group interaction

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:
Type of Activity:

Never have I ever


No Gender No Rights in Europe
Inge Arends
Gender differences
Ice Breaking regaining and maintain energy in
the group
Energizer

Time:
Material needed:
Tips and Tricks:
Source:
Comments/Suggestions:

20/ 30 min
Chairs
Introduce the activity with an example!
Theatre of the Oppressed ( Augusto Boal)
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

Focus:
Variations:
Photo:

1. ask all the participants to sit down in a circle


with their chairs.
2. Pick one person to be the first to go. ( If the
game has not been played before, the activity
leader could use this opportunity to present the
activity.)
3. Have that person stand in the middle of the
circle and have the rest of the players sit in
the seats.
4. The person in the middle will now say "I've
never" and will then say something that
he/she has never done.
5. Everyone who HAS done what the person in
the middle has not done must get up and find
a new seat. The person in the middle will also
take a seat. One person will be left without a
seat, and that person will now say what they
have never done.
6. Repeat the previous steps until the group
found their energy again.
You could change the focus towards different
statements and topics.
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:

Type of Activity:
Time:
Material needed:
Tips and Tricks:
Source:
Comments/Suggestions:

Back to Back
No Gender No Rights
Inge Arends
Gender differences
Back to back is a fun energetic activity with a
strong and simple message about collaborative
work.
Energizer
10-20 min
Introduce the activity with an example.
-

This activity is really fun. People will laugh.


Typically a few pairs will be able to stand up fast
while others have a hard time. Consider not
running this activity if you feel some participant is
not capable of standing up, or they will feel bad by
sitting on the floor.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

Focus:
Variations:
Photo:

1. Instruct the participants to find a pair of


similar size and weight
2. Ask everyone to sit on the floor, back to back
with their partner.
3. Ask the pairs to hold their arms while
keeping their backs together
4. Tell everyone their goal is to stand up, while
keeping the arms and backs together
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

3. Training Activity (Non- Formal Education)

Non- formal education: any organized educational activity


outside the established formal system whether operating separately or as an
important feature of some broader activity that is intended to serve identifiable
learning clienteles and learning objectives.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Type of Activity:
Objectives:

Focus:

Time:
Material needed:

Image Theatre
No Gender- No Rights
Inge Arends
LGTB Gender difference and equality
Training activity
Opening a dialogue through our bodies.
In Image Theatre the participants explore issues of
oppression by using nonverbal expression and
sculpting their own and other participants bodies
into static physical images that can depict anything
concrete or abstract, such as a feeling, issue, or
moment or realistic situation. Spectators/other
participants are asked to observe these images and
reflect on what they witness.
As a Joker/activity leader you are guiding the
process. The audience should never be confronted
with the jokers own personal interpretations of
events. The Joker is the midwife, assisting in the
birth of all ideas of all actions.
+/- 1.5 hour
There are no extra materials needed

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

1. Form a Circle: Invite your group (whether students or


adults) to form a circle in the centre of the gallery, standing
around the space that will become their theatre.
2. Identify Actors: Ask for 2 volunteers to become actors
enter the theatre space in the centre.
3. Construct an Image: Quickly work with these actors to
move into a pose that you construct (something as simple
as a handshake works well, or you can ask the actors to
quickly create a pose). Ask the actors to freeze their pose,
creating an image or snapshot.
4. Describe & Imagine: The group participants standing
around the outside of the circle can now take some time to
look closely at the image in front of them, and the facilitator
invites group members to begin describing what they see,
using their imagination to construct stories, narratives, and
relationships based on the visual and physical evidence
they have before them (body pose, gestures, facial
expression, clothing, etc.). Begin to delve into questions of
power who has it? who doesnt? what evidence indicates
that?
5. Thought Bubble: After you interview the groups
imagination and develop several stories about the image
created by the 2 actors bodies, you can also use a paper or
cardboard thought bubble to ask participants what they
think the characters might be thinking, probing their
internal thoughts and emotions.
6. Shift & Re-Examine: Now, have the actors make a simple
change to their pose that will flip the dynamic between
their characters sometimes as simple as having one of
the actors kneel down, sit, or take a different physical
position. Re-interview the group participants about the
new image, and what is different. Has the power
relationship changed? Why? What else might be going on
here? You can use the thought bubble again to probe the

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

internal thoughts of the characters.


7. Reflect: Wrap-up the exercise by inviting the entire group
(including the actors) to reflect on what just happened?
What did they notice about this exercise? Emphasize how
this exercise may have heightened their observation skills
and brought out complexity from a series of simple body
poses.
8. Move to an Artwork:
- Divide the group in subgroups of 6-8 people.
- An oppression is agreed on by the group.
- An individual creates an image of the oppression,
sculpting spect-actors into a group image. This may
then be discussed with the audience to agree upon
the Real Image of this oppression.
- The joker/activity leader then askes the spect-actors
within the image to change in order to represent an
Ideal Image whereby the oppression is no longer
there (try not to be too magical in this presentation)
- Re-showing the original Real Image the joker then
asks the spect-actors to move in a slow motion from
the Real Image to the Ideal Image- this is the
Image of possible transition. This may be modified
by audience members to make the transition as
realistic as possible.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Tips and
Tricks:

Variations:

- Before dividing the group to create an image, it is a good idea


to start the exercise by asking participants to walk across the
room while you ask them to express an emotion in a
countdown. This will warm up the group and get them familiar
with expressing emotions true their body postures.
- Before presenting the group Image, I often ask them to
work in complete silence, this will help to address the
exercise more serious.
When you interview the group, you can ask them what
contribution they (in real life) can make towards creating the
Ideal Image. In this way the group starts discussing new
possible solutions and approaches towards the situation.

Photo:

Source:

Book: Theatre of the Oppressed Augusto Boal

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:

Type of Activity:

Time:
Material needed:
Tips and Tricks:
Source:

Comments/Suggestions:

Mime Game
Women in Europe
Senem Kalafat
Non formal Education
To explore the concept of education and learning
and the different methodologies that will be used
during the week
Training Activity: Interactive exploration of the
different forms of education and learning
30 min
1 notebook, 1 pen/pencil, 2 glasses, some water
This tool has been created by Nik Paddison, from
the Salto Trainers Pool. As far as I know, it has not
been published yet.
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

Focus:
Variations:
Photo:

In this exercise, there need to be three facilitators: two of


them (A and B) will be miming and the other one will be
facilitating the activity.
Series of mimes:
Sharing A and B sharing and talking (miming!)
Inputs A explains about a glass of water, B listens and
takes notes
Experiential A drinks the water, explains how good it is, B
tries it for himself
Creativity Use the glass to do something else, B sits on the
glass
Reflection A and B sit and look at the glass of water
contemplatively
Self-Directed A holds glass away from B, B cant reach so
goes and gets his own and drinks
Evaluation Glass of water on the floor, A and B hold up a
score card each
Stimulate the brainstorming on formal, informal, non formal
learning!
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:

Type of Activity:

Gender in a box
Women in Europe
Senem Kalafat
Gender roles
To help participants gain insight into:
the socially-constructed nature of gender
roles
the mechanisms and agents of gender
socialization
their personal history of gender
socialization
the connections between gender
socialization and gender-based violence
Training Activity

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Time:
Material needed:

Tips and Tricks:

Source:

Comments/
Suggestions:

60-90 min
Youth magazines
Advertising clippings
Flipchart with paper
Scissors
Glue sticks
Red, blue, green and black markers for the flipchart
The strength of this activity is that it brings the issue of
gender roles and gender socialization close to participants.
Usually these issues are dealt with only in theoretical
discussions. Therefore, it is important to introduce this
exercise with some sort of real-life experience participants
have. If you are working with a heterogeneous group
coming together for a one-off training activity, it is best to
create the experience right there in the room in the
form of a role-play (e.g. boy and girl playing in a kindergarten
or playground, and an adult instructing them to act like a boy
and a girl), or a video showing boys and girls or women and
men in typical or atypical gender roles, such as interviews with
people having jobs that usually people of the other sex do. If the
group meets often over a longer period of time, you can think of
some recent or typical common experience, for example, that in
camp, boys are usually called upon to look for wood and build
the fire, whereas girls do the kitchen duties.
Council of Europe publication Gender Matters Manual on
gender based violence affecting young people (pages 100105). The manual can be downloaded on:
http://eycb.coe.int/gendermatters/
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

- Form sub-groups. Present the magazines or clippings


and the flipchart papers with MEN and WOMEN as
headings.
- Introduce the exercise by asking the whole group to
give a few examples about messages that young people
receive about how real men and real women are
supposed to be like from the video / role-play /
experience they have in common.
- After receiving a few answers, explain that the group
will now work in two sub-groups, one brainstorming
on men, the other on women. If you have decided to
use single-sex sub-groups, the male group works on
the male roles and the female group should work on
the female roles. They should look through the
magazines and clippings and use them as illustrations
wherever possible. Also tell participants that they
should not limit themselves to what they have found in
the magazines, but think of their own childhood,
school years or adolescence and contribute with the
messages they have received about what men and
women should be like.
- Sub-groups should preferably work in separate
locations. The facilitator should monitor the process.
- When the sub-groups are ready, bring them back into
one group, review the results and ask members of the
other sub-group to add (some of) their own thoughts.
- Debriefing: Explain to the group that despite some
possible arguments on one word or another, very
different groups of people usually manage to put
together lists of these characteristics in a short period
of time. Explain that the reason for this is that we all
learn about how women and men should be from
common sources. The collective name for these lists is
gender roles. These roles are presented to us as

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

boxes into which women and men are expected to fit.


As you say this, draw a blue and a red rectangle
around the words on the flipcharts. Explain that what
differentiates gender from sex is that, whereas the list
of sexual characteristics is very short and has not
changed in the last hundred thousand years, lists of
gender roles are long, and vary both geographically
and historically, often within a short distance or
period of time.
- Begin a discussion around the main issues raised by
the exercise.
- Summary and conclusion: The existence of gender roles is
often denied, with gender roles being considered natural.
How can something be natural and part of our biological
set-up if it changes within ten years or a hundred
kilometers? Here you can refer to cultural and
geographical differences raised by participants during the
brainstorming. Many individual boys and girls, women
and men, suffer from the demands put on them to conform
to specific gender roles. A rigid definition of gender roles
contributes significantly to the inequality between women
and men and to gender-based violence.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Focus:

Variations:
Photo:

This exercise demonstrates that inherited gender roles and


socialization are partly responsible for the fact that men are
encouraged to participate in the public sphere and in the
political and economic life of the country. It is not surprising,
therefore, that these systems are more representative of
mens realities and needs. Women, on the other hand, are
often encouraged to stay in the family sphere and to engage
in care-taking, resulting in their disproportionate underrepresentation in decision making and their financial
dependence on men. These severely limit the life options,
choices and freedom of women.
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

4. Evaluation activities

Evaluation activities: a systematic way of reflecting on and assessing the value of what is

being done (i.e. a project, a program, an event). Evaluation is commonly interpreted


as an end product or an activity taking place at the end of a project. However
evaluation should be considered as a process, taking place across all phases of a
project, used to determine what has happened and whether the initial aims of the
project have been carried out and achieved.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:

Wiki Blog
No Gender No Rights
Inge Arends / Piera DArrigo
Gender differences
The wiki-blog activity ensures daily reflection and
communication about the progress of the project
within the group and towards the outside world.

Type of Activity:

Evaluation

Time:
Material needed:
Tips and Tricks:

30/ 45 min
Pen/Paper / Computer and internet
To increase the level of communication between
participants and stimulate a flowing process the
choice can be made to include a secretary who will
write during the discussion.

Source:

https://nogendernorights.wordpress.com/2014/11/20/our-last-dayin-marineo/

Comments/Suggestions:

By posting the Blog on a daily basis you ensure


dissemination of the process and outcome during the
project.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

Focus:
Variations:
Photo:

1. Divide the group of participants trough the


number of activity days during the first day of
activity.
2. Each group will be appointed to a specific day
during the activity week.
3. On the appointed day the group will gather to
discuss the progress of the project goal and
activities during that day.
4. After the discussion a blog will be written
about the discussed topics in step 3.
5. When they have written the blog it will be
posted on the previous created Blog website
(Wordpress).
6. To increase the level of dissemination the link
to the blog can be send to collaborating
organizations and other partners.
Make sure the blog will communicate all the key
aspects of that day.
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Objectives:

The River of Learning


Women in Europe
Senem Kalafat
Gender equality
The river is a very versatile evaluation method. It
can be used on the last day of the programme, for
mid-term evaluation and for daily evaluation. It
offers participants the possibility to express, in a
creative way, how they see their development
during the programme.

Type of Activity:

Evaluation

Time:
Material needed:
Tips and Tricks:

60 / 90 min
paper, scissors, glue, pencils and markers
Create some other obstacles and objects that
participants can place in the river to express their
progress.

Source:
Comments/Suggestions:

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Description:

Focus:
Variations:
Photo:

1. Participants are divided into small groups (5


to 7 participants).
2. Each group is provided with the picture of a
River drawn on a large piece of paper.
3. The beginning and the end of the river should be
marked on the paper. Each group receives paper
(different colors), scissors, glue, pencils and
markers. Participants are asked to work
individually on giving creative expression,
using the material provided, to their personal
development during the program and to place
the results of their creative efforts onto
whichever part of the river they consider
appropriate.
4. When everybody has finished participants
are asked to explain their creations.
It is important to repeat a conclusion when
participants have shared their experience.
-

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

5. Materials

Materials: Make sure the material placed in this section is numbered, and

the connected number is added in the materials needed section in the template
describing the activity.
The first form in this section can be used to add an activity to the manual, the second
form can be used for the purpose of formal evaluation at the end of the project.

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Non-Formal Training Activities


Name:
Training:
Trainer:
Theme:
Type of Activity:
Objectives:
Focus:

What is the name of the activity?


In which training/project was this activity used?
Who was the executing the activity?
What was the theme of the project?
Group Building /Energizer/Training activity/
Evaluation
What are the goals and objectives connected to
this activity?
What aspects of the activity need the focus of the
trainer?

Time:
Material needed:

How much time is needed to complete the activity?


What materials are needed to be able to execute
the activity? (If you add any materials please
number it according to the order in the materials
section.)

Description:

Direct each step in the process of executing the


activity.
Are there tips and tricks towards making this
activity extra successful?
Are there any variations (additions/adjustments)
for this activity?
If available, add a photo of the activity that is
representative of its essence.
Is there a source (book, website, article etc.) where
the trainer can find more information on this
activity?

Tips and Tricks:


Variations:
Photo:
Source:

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

Training Evaluation & Feedback

course title & date

a lot

some

a little

none

Enjoyment: Did I enjoy the activity?

o o

o o

New knowledge and ideas: Did I learn


what I needed to, and did I get some new
ideas?

o o

o o

Applying the learning: Will I use the


information and ideas?

o o

o o

Effect on results: Do I think that the


ideas and information will improve my
effectiveness and my results?

o o

o o

Groupdinamics: Do you experience the


intercultural group as beneficial to this
project?

o o

o o

Staff/Trainers: Do I think that the


approach and imput of the trainer(s) is/are
contributing to the activiy?

o o

o o

Any other comments? (Venue,food,


logistics etc.)

2015 Inge Arends| Human Rights Youth Organisation - H.R.Y.0

specific highlights and/or suggested improvements?