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Cessna P210N Notes

V-Speeds
VR = 65
VS0 = 55
VX = 80
VS = 73
VG = 85
VNE = VLE = 200
VY = 100
Max Crosswind = 21
VA = 120
VApproach = 70 - 80
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VFE = 160 for first 10 , 109 > 10o
Approximate cruise speed @ 75% = 160 @ 6,000
170 @ 12,000
180 @ 20,000

18 GPH @ 75%
15 GPH @ 65%
89 gallons usable, 66 @ tabs
VLO = 163

Checkout
Checkout for an experienced pilot will be about 7 hours of flight time, 4 flights
One ground session will also be required (SE ground review form)
Before first flight, review of previous experience, review checkout plan
Flight 1 - Intro
Preflight
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Differences from other airplanes
Location of pressurization bulkhead
Basic aircraft control
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Steep turns
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Slow flight
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Approach stall
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Departure stall
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Normal Landings
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Effects of speedbrakes: maintain 125 kts, drop gear and brakes
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Use of Lean Find, cooling, other EDM functions
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Flight 2 Aircraft control, maneuvers, emergencies
Review preflight, steeps, slow, use of EDM
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Emergency gear extend
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Short field takeoff and landing
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Soft field takeoff and landing
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Flight 3 Pressurization, high altitude ops
Pressurization use
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Emergency descent
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Approaches
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Critical altitude check


Before flight: plan cross-country using 400fpm climb, 500fpm descent
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Flight 4 IFR, avionics, and max gross
Max gross takeoff and landing (3800lbs. for landing)
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Approaches
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Autopilot preflight / usage / disengage
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No flap landing
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No airspeed indicator landing
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Items To Cover
Two alternator switches (not DC generator?)
Standby avionics switch?
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Executing a coupled ILS
See P210N Information Manual, Supplement 42, page 13
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Are fuel vents susceptible to ice?
Use of manual primer?
High altitude physiology
Pressurization system = Electric + Pneumatic + Mechanical
Implication for emergency operations
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Implications of cabin pressurization differential marginally high range (aircraft
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has reverted to backup outflow system)
Locations that can block pressurization outflow valves
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Critical altitude check procedure
How to identify turbocharger failure during runup
Note: Need high altitude enroute charts above FL180
Use and pitfalls of high altitude enroute charts
Consider filing for a full route clearance as preferable to jet routes
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Operating Tips for Big-Bore Continentals
http://www.avweb.com/news/airman/184350-1.html
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Pelican's Perch #31: Those Fire-Breathing Turbos
Part 1: http://www.avweb.com/news/columns/182102-1.html
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Part 2: http://www.avweb.com/news/columns/182103-1.html
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Got Heat?
http://www.planeandpilotmag.com/content/pastissues/2001/nov/gotheat.html
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New Systems
EDM
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Lean Find
Press button on lower right
Lean mixture slowly, by about an eighth of a turn a second.
Some EDMs can provide a differential of EGTs by pushing Lean Find
twice. This unit does not have that capability
Goes into automatic mode if left on manual long enough
CHT will flash at 450oC, oil temp will flash at 230oC.

TIT is displayed on EDM cycle through manually to see it.


75o rich of peak or by POH
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Snapshot Button picture of all engine conditions, one second before, is logged
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in memory
EDM buttons (four)
Top-left = Dim Adjust
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Nine levels of brightness available
When pressed and held in, brightness increases
When tapped, brightness decreases
Top-Right = Graphics
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Changes the display to graphics mode:
All EGTs are displayed in bar graph format and the hottest CHT in
digital format.
The top digit displays the hottest cylinder number.
The bar graph is 25o per bar, with seven bars covering a range of
175oF.
The graph is a moving window centered on the average of all
EGTs. A wide bar at the top or the bottom indicates the
temperature is more than 25o in that direction.
To normalize EGTs, hold the Graphics button for three seconds while in
graphics mode. To return to relative EGT readings, tap step and then reenter graphics mode. (Two button units enter Normalize by holding the
LF button for three seconds.)
Bottom-Left = Step
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Bottom-Right = Lean Find
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Sandel
Note that the OM and MM will flash on the EHSI on the lower right side of the
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screen
Important note: if the Garmin is tuned to a localizer, the Sandel will track the
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localizer regardless of the type of approach. If you are executing a GPS
approach, make sure the Garmin is not tuned to a localizer.
Garmin
Weather Radar
Adjust so radar is just above the horizon
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Map = raw reflections
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Wx = Weather contours around cells
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WxA = Weather Alert inside of contour will change intensity
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Pressurization
Squat switch prevents pressurization on ground
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All pressurization systems (that Dave Fry has encountered) fail open
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If it doesnt work, can imply: door open, dump didnt close, leak, bleed air,
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gauges
Will it operate at a lower differential?
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o
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Deice
N171TJ has known icing equipment.
How can you tell if deicing is not working on prop, stabilizer, or wings?
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If prop deicing is not working properly (check amps), turn off immediately. An
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imbalanced prop is extremely dangerous. Note that you can try to cycle the prop
to break off ice.
Similarly, if the boots are not inflating evenly, do not use. Its important to avoid
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a differential.
Ice on wings, behind boots no flaps, come in faster, dont want to move CL
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back, watch for tail stalls
Can use Ice-X to keep boots shiny (like patent leather).
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Note that if the right vacuum pump fails, the deice boots will not function.
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Intercooler
1 / 15oC differential for climb (1 approximately = 2.8% power)
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1 / 10oC differential for cruise (1 approximately = 4% power)
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PV = nRT
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P = pressure = constant reading on MP gauge
V = Volume = constant = 520 inches^3
R = Rydberg Constant
n is proportional to T
n determines the amount of power produced
T, std day = 15degC = 288K
10 degree differential = 3.4%
15 degree differential = 5.2%
30 degree differential = 10.4%
36.5 32.9
Autopilot
Preflight
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Use in flight
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Deactivation
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Never manually overpower autopilot pitch!
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Has automatic glideslope capture. ALT rocker switch will disengage at glideslope
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capture.
Maximum of 10o flaps allowable with autopilot active.
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For altitude hold, must also have a roll mode active
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The ALT switch automatically disengages when a glideslope is captured.
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NAV mode is used for approaches no APR mode.
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Acceleration sensor only checks acceleration along the vertical axis downward.
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Usually located under copilots seat on single-engine aircraft.
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When you pull dump, it will take only 2-3 seconds to depressurize.
Push the dump handle in slowly! (to pressurize)
Bleed air from the turbocharger provides pressure.

Notes
Power Setting:
Steep turns: cowl flaps , 22 @ 2300
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Slow flight: cowl flaps open, 20 @ 2500
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Approaches:
Configuration (before IAF): 110 kts, 10o flaps, 2500 RPM, 22
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Descents before FAF: 15
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At FAF: Gear down
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Precision Descent: 17, 600 FPM
Non-Precision Descent: 15, 900 FPM
Holds: 110 kts, 0o flaps, 2500 RPM, 20
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Emergency descent procedure:
1. If possible, keep the air conditioning off.
a. Air conditioning dries out the air and makes for a less impressive
emergency depressurization.
2. Attain a high altitude (19,000 or higher) and establish a normal cruise
configuration.
a. Set RPM and throttle, close cowl flaps, lean mixture
3. After some maneuvers to see effects of high altitude on controls and engine,
slowly reduce power and start a slow descent.
a. Note that if you do not start a slow descent, the engine will not get enough
cooling to sufficiently lower the CHTs before the emergency descent.
4. When you have reached 14,000 the CHTs should be lower than 300o.
5. Turn on all lights, clear the area (especially below you), and inform ATC that you
will be performing a rapid - not emergency - descent.
6. Completely close the cowl flaps.
7. Turn off the pressurization switch, pull the dump handle, and perform the descent.
Five fuel drains: two tank drains on wings, two reservoir drains on belly, and 1 pull-type
strainer drain.
171TJ high alt operation:
At 17,500, 23 max was available for engine.
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At 19,000, 71% HP, 250 fpm available
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Above 17,000, more power is available if the mixture is leaned.
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Fuel gauge is located just above selector.
Cylinder number 1 tends to run hottest during climbs.
171TJ autopilot set-up
The external AP switch (on LHS of panel) only switches source for heading
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There is no NAV2 tracking
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AP Localizer reverse switch does not reverse sensing on HIS
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Sandel doesnt receive NAV 2
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There is no annunciator for glideslope capture.
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There is a hum on ALT 2.
Speedbrakes will drop if power is lost.
Hot start procedure

Throttle full open, mixture ICO, aux pump on low for 60 seconds
ELT arm switch is not visible from the cockpit.
Overhead air lever
Recirculates internal air or allows ram air from wing scoops during unpressurized
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flight.
Check hydraulic fluid behind door near copilots left calf.
Dont do pattern work with high OAT. The oil temperature (not the CHT) will spike.
Watch the oil temperature for all pattern work.
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15 and gear not down warning horn.
Squat switch on nose gear prevents pressurization and retraction of gear
CABIN ALTITUDE warning light goes on when the cabin altitude exceeds 12,325 175
feet (a barometric switch closes).
Less dense air at high altitudes may not provide adequate engine cooling. You may need
to descend to lower altitudes (or increase fuel flow, decrease power, open cowl flaps) if
the CHTs become too high.
Leave a touch of power on in the flare and watch for high sink rates.
If a high sink rate develops, add power immediately or go-around. This plane is
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very heavy and cannot be flared like a lighter aircraft.
Note also that the nose will appear very high due to the massive instrument panel.
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On landing, follow-through and do not drop the nose. The nose is very heavy and
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dropping it can bend the firewall.
Its a good idea to keep the yoke back during taxi due to the weight of the nose.
The fuel pump is not needed during a normal tank switch, only if vapor is suspected.
There are gear-up and down-down switches for each of the wheels. These switches are
not visible during preflight.
Gear retraction: flap, flap, gear, flap
Engine: Continental TSIO-520-P
310 HP @ 36.4 and 2700 RPM (not including intercooler)
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Allowable for 5 minutes
Note that max allowable
285 HP @ 35.5 and 2600 RPM (not including intercooler)
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3-blade McCauley prop
89 gallons usable / 66 at standpipes
If the engine-driven pump fails and the aux pump is needed, land with 15 MP,
anything lower will lead to an excessively rich mixture.
For each system, discuss what can go wrong
Overspeed oil problem, where did oil go?
Takeoff:
Rotate slowly, this is a heavy airplane and needs time to get to VY
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Landing:
Make sure to leave power on in flare, especially at high gross weights
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Takeoff vs. landing weight
Takeoff: 4000
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Landing: 3800
Basic Empty: 2737
Full Fuel:
534
Baggage:
20
Passengers: 499 (190 + 170 + 149)
Climb rate low
ATC may expect higher climb and descent rates
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Descent
Plan to decrease MP by about 1 every minute, keep cowl flaps closed.
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Shoot for 25oC/minute cooling, max 50oC
Plan to reach pattern altitude at 20
Verify gear down with light and visual check
The dump valve stays closed with no electric. This can be a problem with fires.
Open the dump valve or turn the pressurization off before turning off the
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master
Be careful at high altitudes when reducing fuel flow. A large reduction can have a
dramatic effect on CHTs since the fuel provides a large amount of cooling.
Leaving the windshield heat on will warp the Plexiglas without cooling
Flight checkout
Fly accurately, to tolerance of PTS
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Checklist usage key setup flow, back up with checklist
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First flight 2-pilot CRM mode
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Second flight: flight levels, over critical altitude (17000)
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At 14000, depressurize, rapid descent
Then approaches
Gradually pull back power eventually loose power
At 14000 ask ATC for a rapid (not emergency) descent to 6000
Lead pull-out by 1000-2000
Bring power back in gradually dont want to shock heat engine
If they have experience in a similar airplane, can do differences training
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The turbo generates more pressure than is needed for the engine
Max pressure differential of 3.35psi
Safety valve limits pressure to 3.5psi
95-amp alternator
7-amp 28volt DC standby electric generator
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During checkout
Show effects of speedbrake 2, plus speedbrake produces 500 fpm
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Show speedbrake vs. gear maintain 125 kts, put gear down, put break on
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Dual vacuum pumps
Make sure to monitor engine during climb
Limiting factor for summer climbs = CHT
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Gauge will flash when limits are exceeded
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CHT < 400 if possible


EGT / TIT?
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Switch tanks consistently, short time frame, during flight
Factory autopilot can only handle a 50 lb. Imbalance
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Review time of useful consciousness
Risks increase significantly above FL190
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Always file IFR above 12000: it is often difficult from this altitude or above to
determine whether a pure VFR descent will be attainable.
Fuel pump switch
Right half (START/ON) is for starting, minor vapor purging, and continued
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operation in the event of an engine-driven pump failure
Left half (EMERG/HI) is used in the event of an engine-driven pump failure
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during takeoff or at high power operation. The HI setting may also be used
for extreme vapor purging.
Note (from POH, page 4-10): During climb under warm day conditions, turn on the
auxiliary fuel pump momentarily when switching tanks, and also be alert for fuel vapor
indications. If fuel flow fluctuations or a drop-off is observed, place the auxiliary pump
switch in the ON position and reset the mixture control as required to maintain the
placarded fuel flow.
Garmin 530 vs. 430:
530 has VNAV button. Same feature is available through AUX chapter on the
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430.
The 530 listens to Morse code from a VOR or LOC. If it can read the Morse
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code, it will display the identifier.
Note that the distance to the VOR is the horizontal distance as computed from the
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GPS signals. It is not DME distance.
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From P210 Training


Electric Trim = Most Dangerous part of aircraft
Runaway trim can be unrecoverable if undetected
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Extreme control forces can occur by attempting to manually control pitch when
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autopilot is engaged
Need to memorize location of electric trim circuit breaker
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Typical target TIT <1500, CHT < 400, Oil temp < 200
Do not forget engine restart is more difficult above 15,000 feet: Consider additional
engine restart attempt at or below this altitude
Emergency procedures for vapor lock: fuel pump on, switch tanks
Full throttle activates high setting of fuel pump (important is engine failure occurs on
takeoff)
Discuss physiology of moving pressurization controls in flight
Small pressurization leaks are common, typically from right-side emergency door, and
may preclude reaching FL230 with appropriate cabin altitude
Aircraft responsiveness reduces with altitude, especially above FL200.
Avoid turning on fuel boost pump with engine running.

Robertson STOL
Benefits include:
o Shorter take-off and landing distances (as much as 50% reduction on some
models) are realized as a result of the increased efficiency and lifting ability of the
wing.
o A substantially increased safety margin can be realized by operating your aircraft
at the old performance figures. This benefit is best appreciated when flying in
gusty conditions or flying through wind shear.
o Slower speeds near the ground at takeoff and landing due to the full-flap system.
In and engine out emergency, slower speeds and added controllability reduce
impact effects.
o Sharp, crisp control at slower speeds and into the stall due to stall fences and
aileron gap seals.
o Takeoff with reduced power (75%) eliminates the need to reduce power
immediately after takeoff. This not only preserves your engine but reduces the
chance of engine failure after takeoff.
o Reduced insurance rates are available to owners of R/STOL equipped aircraft due
to the excellent safety record compiled through the years.
o Enhanced cruise speeds on most models are a result of gap seals and a generally
more efficient wing.
o Automatic elevator trim that avoids need for pilots attention when flaps are
extended during critical landing regime
R/STOL LEADING EDGE: A slight downward droop of the leading edge results when a
cuff is added to the Cessna wing. Cessna has incorporated the drooped leading edge on
many of their models built since 1972. The drooped cuff recontours and smoothes airflow over the wing, particularly at high angles of attack. The R/STOL leading edge postpones wing stall and gentles stall action when it does occur.
AUTOMATIC TRIM: R/STOL's patented system interconnects the stabilizer with the
flaps to relieve the pilot from frequent retrimming as flaps are lowered. This automatic
trim operation eliminates one pilot activity during landing approach or when "cleaning
up" after takeoff.
STALL FENCES: A chord-wise fence installed on the upper wing surface forward of the
flap-aileron location restricts outboard movement of low speed air which develops at the
wing root when a stall begins. By maintaining a smooth unstalled airflow over the
ailerons, full and responsive aileron control remains available well into the stall.
DROOPED AILERONS: R/STOLS's patented system droops ailerons symmetrically
whenever the flaps are extended. In their drooped position, the ailerons increase outboard
wing lift by recambering airflow as flaps do for the inboard wing section. Yet, the
ailerons offer full roll-control response. Aileron droop is the key to R/STOL's Hi-Lift
System for single engine Cessna Aircraft.
DURING TAKEOFF: No (or less) offloading when flying from high altitude or high
temperature airports with your Robertson-equipped Cessna. Hi-Lift extends sea level,
standard-day performance to high density altitudes - allows you to lift off heavy payloads
from short runways or fly with full loads safely. Take off with enough fuel to avoid an

extra fuel stop. R/STOL's extra performance adds flexibility to your flight operations avoids extra trips - lets you fly into small airstrips closer to your final destination.
DURING APPROACH AND LANDING: R/STOL permits slow approaches with sharp,
crisp control at slow speeds. You gain more decision time for correction and confident
handling during crosswinds and gusts. R/STOL Hi-Lift Systems upgrade your Cessna
permitting slower approach speeds that reduce wear and tear on landing gear, brakes, and
tires. Even with power off you retain confident control with reduced risk of stalling.
Overall, R/STOL's Hi-Lift System permits 15 to 25 MPH slower approaches and requires
as much as 40% less runway distance.

Aircraft Model
Take Off Distance over 50ft Obstacle [m]
Robertson Standard Procedure
Robertson Procedure
Cessna Handbook
Take Off Speed [KIAS]
Robertson Standard Procedure
Robertson Procedure
Cessna-Handbook
Cruise Speed [KTAS]
Robertson
Cessna Handbook
Service Ceiling [m]
Robertson
Cessna
Final Approach Speed [KIAS]
Robertson Standard Procedure
Robertson Procedure
Cessna Handbook
Landing Distance over 50ft Obstacle [m]
Robertson Standard Procedure
Robertson Procedure
Cessna Handbook

P210
494
402
690
55
51
73
193
190
7346
7010
60
57
73
360
293
463