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Camozzi Solutions

Air-Treatment FRLs

CALCULATE WITH AIR

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CYLINDERS

DETERMINING CYLINDER FORCE

ESTIMATED TRAVEL
SPEED OF A LOADED
AIR CYLINDER

The table below shows cylinder forces in pounds for both extension and retraction.
Numbers in color text represent extension forces, using the full piston area. Numbers in
black show retraction forces with various rod sizes. These values are theoretical, derived
by calculation.
Pressures in the top row of the chart represent differential pressures across the two
cylinder ports. In practice, the air-supply line must supply another 5% of pressure to
make up for cylinder loss, and must supply about 25% to 50% additional pressure to
compensate for flow losses in lines, fittings, and valves so the cylinder will attain sufficient travel speed. Most manufacturers recommend designing a system 25% greater
than theoretical calculations.

Reliability and
high performance

MODULAR FRL UNITS


COMPACT, LIGHTWEIGHT

PATENTED BOWL LOCKING


MECHANISM
INTEGRATED SOFT-START, SHUTOFF AND TAMPER-PROOF DESIGN

Piston
diameter,
in.

Rod
diameter,
in.

1 2
1

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212

Effective
area
in.2

60

None

1.77

106

124

142

159

177

195

230

1.46

88

102

117

132

146

161

190

0.99

59

69

79

89

98

108

128

None

3.14

188

220

251

283

314

345

377

2.83

170

198

227

255

283

312

340

2.35

141

165

188

212

235

259

283

3 4

10

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MIDLAND METAL MFG.

100

110

120

4.91

295

344

393

442

491

540

589

4.60

276

322

368

414

460

506

552

4.12

247

289

330

371

412

454

495

None

7.07

424

495

565

636

707

778

848

6.76

406

431

540

608

676

744

814

None

8.30

498

581

664

747

830

913

996

7.51

451

526

601

676

751

826

902

138

6.82

409

477

545

613

681

818

818

None

12.57

754

880

1006

1131

1257

1283

1508

11.78

707

825

943

1061

1178

1296

1415

138

11.09

665

776

887

998

1109

1219

1330

19.64

1178

1375

1571

1768

1964

2160

18.85

1131

1320

1508

1697

1885

2074

2263

18.16

1089

1271

1452

1634

1816

1997

2179

None

28.27

1696

1979

2262

2544

2827

3110

3392

138

26.79

1607

1875

2143

2411

2679

2946

3214

134

25.90

1552

1811

2069

2328

2586

2845

3104

None

50.27

3016

3519

4022

4524

5027

5530

6032

138

48.79

2927

3415

3903

4391

4879

5366

5854

134

47.90

2872

3351

3829

4308

4786

5265

5744

None

78.54

4712

5498

6283

7069

7854

8639

9425

1 4

76.14

4568

5329

6091

6852

7614

8375

9136

75.40

4524

5278

6032

6786

7540

8294

PISTON ROD STRENGTH


A cylinders extended piston
rod can buckle if subjected to a
heavy load. The accompanying
chart suggests minimum rod diameters for various loads when
the rod is extended and unsupported. The values are based on
no side load or bending stress
at any point along the rod.
The exposed length of rod is
shown at the top of the table.
This length is typically longer than the stroke length of
the cylinder. The vertical scale
shows the load on the cylinder and is in English tons (1
ton = 2,000 lb). If the rod and
front end of the cylinder barrel are rigidly supported, then
a smaller rod will be sufficient;
use the column that is 1/2 the
length of the actual piston rod.
If pivot-to-pivot mounting is
used, double the actual length
of the exposed rod and use the
suggested rod diameter.

9048

None

113.10

6786

7917

9048

10179

11310

12441

13572

110.00

6598

7697

8797

9896

10996

12095

13195

212

108.20

6491

7573

8655

9737

10819

11901

12983

164
0.062
0.068
0.073
0.083
0.095
0.105
0.123
0.140
0.158
0.176
0.194
0.211
0.229
0.264
0.300
0.335
0.370
0.406
0.441
0.476
0.494

132

116

18

14

38

12

5/8

34

78

0.249 0.993
0.272 1.09
0.293 1.17
0.331 1.32
0.379 1.52
0.420 1.68
0.491 1.96
0.562 2.25
0.633 2.53
0.703 2.81
0.774 3.10
0.845 3.38
0.916 3.66
1.06 4.23
1.20 4.79
1.34 5.36
1.48 5.92
1.62 6.49
1.76 7.05
1.91 7.62
1.98 7.90

3.97
4.34
4.68
5.30
6.07
6.72
7.86
8.98
10.1
11.3
12.4
13.5
14.7
16.9
19.2
21.4
23.7
26.0
28.2
30.5
31.6

15.9
17.4
18.7
21.2
24.3
26.9
31.4
35.9
40.5
45.0
49.6
54.1
58.6
67.6
76.7
85.7
94.8
104
113
122
126

35.7
39.1
42.2
47.7
54.6
60.5
70.7
80.9
91.1
101
112
122
132
152
173
193
213
234
254
274
284

63.5
69.5
75.0
84.7
97.0
108
126
144
162
180
198
216
235
271
307
343
379
415
452
488
506

99.3
109
117
132
152
168
196
225
253
281
310
338
366
423
479
536
592
649
705
762
790

143
156
168
191
218
242
283
323
365
405
446
487
528
609
690
771
853
934
1016
1097
1138

195
213
230
260
297
329
385
440
496
551
607
662
718
828
939
1050
1161
1272
1383
1494
1549

254
278
300
339
388
430
503
575
648
720
793
865
938
1082
1227
1371
1516
1661
1806
1951
2023

10

20

40

60

70

80

16

1116

1 8

1 4

1 8

16

1316

1 3 8

1 1 2

13

112

11

16

15

134

1716

1916

1316

16

1 8

1 8

1 16

3
4

15

1 8

178

120

16

1 16

1 2

1 8

1 4

2 4

1 1 8

1516

1916

134

178

2 1 8

2 3 8

80
0.012
0.022
0.035
0.050
0.059
0.091
0.143
0.205
0.369
0.576
0.831

90
0.013
0.025
0.039
0.055
0.065
0.100
0.159
0.227
0.408
0.637
0.919

100
0.015
0.027
0.043
0.060
0.071
0.110
0.174
0.249
0.447
0.698
1.010

110
0.016
0.029
0.047
0.066
0.078
0.119
0.189
0.270
0.486
0.759
1.090

120
0.017
0.032
0.050
0.070
0.084
0.129
0.204
0.292
0.525
0.820
1.180

130
0.018
0.034
0.054
0.076
0.090
0.139
0.219
0.314
0.564
0.881
1.270

140
0.020
0.036
0.058
0.081
0.096
0.148
0.234
0.335
0.602
0.940
1.360

150
0.021
0.039
0.062
0.087
0.102
0.158
0.249
0.357
0.642
1.000
1.450

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Knowing the supply pressure, go to the corresponding column. Each value represents a 1-in. extend-andretract cycle. Multiply that value by the actual stroke and by the number of the actual cycles per minute.
The result will be the flow, in scfm, for the application.

For more information:


Call: 1-800-Go-Festo
1-800-463-3786

APPROXIMATE CYLINDER SPEEDS

Global manufacturer of process control and factory automation solutions

Valve orifice diameter, in.

Bore, in.
1
1 1 8
1 1 2
2
2 1 2
3
314
4
5
6
8
10
12

132
6

116
15

18
37

14

5
3

12
7
4

28
16
9
6
4
3

85
50
28
18
12
10
7
4
3

38

12

34

72
48
37
28
18
12
7
4
3

79
60
40
26
15
9
6

82
55
32
20
14

70
45
30
24
17
11
7
4

Values in the table are in in./sec and represent approximate speeds under average conditions where the
force required is 50% of available from a constant 80- to 100-psi inlet pressure and the directional valve
internal flow area is equal to its port area. Acceleration distance is assumed to be relatively short compared
to a sufficiently long stroke.

712

1316

114

1716

134

178

214

2 1 2

10

1 3 8

1716

158

178

2 1 8

2716

234

15

11

11

16

1 4

1 8

2 8

2 4

2 8

2 16

20

2 1 8

2 3 8

212

258

278

314

30

2 3 8

27

16

212

234

234

278

314

3 1 2

40

2 4

2 4

2 8

3 4

3 2

334

50

3 8

3 8

3 4

3 8

3 2

3 2

3 4

75

334

334

378

4 1 8

4 3 8

4 1 2

100

4 3 8

4 3 8

4 3 8

412

434

434

4-7/8

150

5 3 8

5 3 8

5 3 8

512

512

5 1 2

534

4.Determine volume of 80 psig air consumed in one minute:


25.12 in.3 30 cycles/min = 753.6 in.3/min of 80 psig air
5. Convert in.3 to ft.3:
(753.6 in.3/min) (1728 in.3/ft3) = 0.436 ft.3/min
6. Convert air compressed to 80 psi to uncompressed (free) air:
(80 psig + 14.7 psia) 14.7 psia = 6.44, which is the compression ratio.
7. Determine volume (ft3) of free air used per minute:
0.436 ft3 6.44 = 2.81 ft3 of free air used per minute.
8. Therefore, the consumption rate of a 2-in. bore cylinder with a 4-in. stroke
operating 30 cpm from 80-psi air is 2.81 scfm of free air. (Standard conditions
are 70 F at sea level.)

Air consumption by a cylinder is calculated using geometry and using compression ratio, which is simply the applied pressure expressed in absolute units divided by atmospheric pressure. The concept is best illustrated with an example.
Determine the air consumption of a 2-in. bore cylinder with a 4-in. stroke operating 30 complete cycles (extend and retract) per minute at 80-psig inlet pressure.
1. First, find the area of the piston by converting the bore into the area of a
circle:
(2 in. / 2) 2 = 3.14 in.2
2. Determine air consumption in a single stroke:
3.14 in.2 4 in. = 12.56 in.3
3. Determine consumption per complete cycle (in most cases, the volume displaced by the piston rod can be ignored): 12.56 in.3 2 = 25.12 in.3/cycle

Fluid Power 3.25 x 4.625.pdf

VALVES

Table shows minimum suggested rod diameters for various rod diameters and unsupported lengths. Any
cylinder mounting other than vertical can cause bending stress on the rod when extended, just from the
weight of the rod and cylinder itself. Therefore, trunnion mounting should be used in these applications
to help balance the cylinder weight when the rod is extended.

Cylinder forces are shown for extension and retraction. Values in blue represent extension, where
pressure is applied to the cap end of the cylinder (no rod area). Values in black text represent
retraction forces, with pressure applied to the cylinders cap end.

70
0.010
0.020
0.032
0.044
0.053
0.081
0.128
0.184
0.330
0.516
0.744

CALCULATING COMPRESSED AIR CONSUMPTION RATE


1

1.50
2.00
2.50
3.00
3.25
4.00
5.00
6.00
8.00
10.00
12.00

Cylinder speed is difficult to estimate because of flow losses within


the system from piping, fittings, and flow paths and restriction in the
particular valves used. Flow losses cause a drop in pressure, which
directly affects the force output. The sum of all flow losses, pressure
required for the force output, and the available inlet pressure must all
be known to accurately determine maximum speed of the cylinder.
Because these losses cannot be accurately determined by calculation, detailed simulation and physical testing are the only ways to
accurately determine cylinder speeds. However, general rules can be
applied to approximate air cylinder speed.
The first general rule is to choose a cylinder that will allow at least
25% more force than what is required. For extremely fast operations,
choose a cylinder that will provide 50% more force than required.
This will leave 25% or 50% of inlet pressure to satisfy system losses.
The second rule is to select a directional control valve that has the
same port size as the cylinder it will be operating. Larger valves often have internal flow capacity that is the same as the connection
size, whereas the internal flow capacity of smaller valves is typically
much less than the connection size. However, always compare manufacturers flow rating and other specifications to help ensure that
the system will deliver the best combination of speed, output force,
and efficiency.

3
13

100

60
0.009
0.018
0.028
0.039
0.046
0.072
0.113
0.162
0.291
0.455
0.656

ESTIMATING CYLINDER SPEED

EXPOSED LENGTH OF PISTON ROD, IN.


Tons

Pressure, psig

Cylinder
bore

www.festo.us

This table helps determine approximate flow through a sharp-edged orifice using line pressure, orifice
size of the valve, and applying correction factors.

2357

138

2
12

90

BRASS FITTINGS | VALVES | NIPPLES & FITTINGS | HOSE CLAMPS | TUBING


PNEUMATICS | HYDRAULIC ADAPTERS | ACCESSORIES

80

None

70

None

5
1

Pressure, PSI

Pressure
across
orifice, psi
5
6
7
9
12
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130

CYLINDER AIR CONSUMPTION

The figures in the table are for cylinders using standard piston-rod
diameters. Air consumption was calculated assuming the cylinder
would dwell momentarily at the end of each stroke, allowing air to
fill up the cylinder to set system pressure. If the cylinder strokes before compressed air fills it, air consumption will be less than what is
shown in the table.
Assuming pressure losses through piping, fittings, and other components will be about 20% to 25%, ensure that the cylinder bore
selected will overcome the load at 75% of available system pressure.
Without this surplus pressure the cylinder may not travel at its desired speed. As an example, calculate the flow, in scfm, of a cylinder
in a punching operation that moves a 2,250-lb weight 60 times per
minute through a 6-in. stroke.
By selecting a 6-in. bore cylinder, the 2,250-lb force is produced
from a pressure of 80 psi. As a general rule, you should provide about
20% higher pressure (20 psig), to account for system losses and set
the regulator at 100 psig. Then, using the table at right, make the
following calculation:
0.249 x 6 (stroke) x 60 (cycles per minute) = 89.6 scfm

Orifice diameter, in.

The chart at right gives theoretical SCFM air flow in SCFM


through sharp-edged orifices.
In actual practice, only about 23
of this flow is achieved. Assume
75% of line pressure is actually
working on the load; the remaining 25% is consumed by flow
losses, valves, connecting lines,
etc. Use the accompanying table to approximate flow through
a sharp-edged orifice.
Calculate 75% of line pressure, in psi, and find it in the leftmost column in the accompanying table. Scan across the table
to the column corresponding to
the port size of the control valve.
Because valves do not contain
sharp-edged orifices, divide
this flow value in half. After determining the flow, convert it to
cfm at the pressure required to
move the load. Travel speed can
be estimated from this value.

CYLINDER FORCE

RAPID ASSEMBLY

DETERMINE AIR VOLUME REQUIRED

APPROXIMATE AIR FLOW THROUGH AN ORIFICE

VALVE SIZING AND CV


Coefficient of velocity, CV, is widely used to compare flow rating of valves. The greater the coefficient, the higher the flow rating. Often it is
useful to convert CV into scfm (standard cubic feet per minute) or scfm to CV. Although CV represents flow capacity at all pressures, scfm
represents flow at a specific air pressure. The accompanying table relates CV to scfm for pressures commonly encountered with industrial
pneumatic systems.

PIPING

CV TO SCFM CONVERSION

Pipe sizes listed in this table assume a 100-psi pneumatic system to carry air at a 1-psi loss per 100
ft. A conservative approximation considers each pipe fitting equivalent to 5 ft. of pipe. Flow capacities at pressures other than 100 psi will be inversely proportionate to pressure, as calculated using
Boyles Law using absolute pressure values.

PNEUMATIC PIPE SIZE


Flow,
scfm
6
18
30
45
60
90
120
150
180
240
300
360
450
600
750

Cartridge Check
Valves

Designed for
Installation into Plastics
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Length of run, ft
25
1
2
1
2
3
4
3
4
3
4
1
1
114
114
114
1 1 2
1 1 2
2
2
2

50
1
2
1
2
3
4
3
4
1
1
114
114
1 1 2
1 1 2
2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2

75
1
2
1
2
3
4
1
1
114
114
114
1 1 2
1 1 2
2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2

100
1
2
3
4
3
4
1
1
114
114
1 1 2
1 1 2
2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2
3

150
1
2
3
4
1
1
114
114
1 1 2
1 1 2
2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2
3
3

200
1
2
3
4
1
1
114
114
1 1 2
2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2
3
3
3

300
1
2
3
4
1
114
114
1 1 2
1 1 2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2
2 1 2
3
3
3 1 2

500
3
4
1
114
114
1 1 2
1 1 2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2
3
3
3
3 1 2
3 1 2

Compressor
hp

100
3
4
1
114
114
1 1 2
2
2
2 1 2
2 1 2
3
3
3
3 1 2
4
4

1
3
5
7 1 2
10
15
20
25
30
40
50
60
75
100
125

PNEUMATIC PRESSURE LOSS


Free air,
cfm
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
125
150
175
200
250
300
350
400
450
500

in.

in

1 in.

114 in.

80 psi

125 psi

80 psi

125 psi

80 psi

125 psi

0.45
1.75
3.85
6.95
10.50

0.30
1.15
2.55
4.55
7.00

0.11
0.40
0.90
1.55
2.40
3.45
4.75
6.15
7.75
9.60
15.50
23.00
23.00

0.08
0.28
0.60
1.05
1.60
2.35
3.15
4.10
5.15
6.35
9.80
14.50

0.04
0.15
0.30
0.45
0.75
1.00
1.35
1.75
2.25
2.70
4.20
5.75
8.10
10.90
4.05
5.80
7.90
10.30

0.02
0.08
0.20
0.30
0.50
0.70
0.90
1.20
1.50
1.80
2.80
4.00
5.45
7.10
2.65
3.85
5.15
6.75

80 psi

0.18
0.25
0.35
0.45
0.56
0.65
1.05
1.45
2.00
2.60
1.80
2.55
3.55
4.55
5.80
7.10

125 psi

0.12
0.17
0.23
0.30
0.40
0.45
0.70
1.00
1.30
1.75
1.20
1.70
2.35
3.05
3.80
4.70

Values in the table are approximate pressure losses at specified flows for every 100 ft. of
clean Schedule 40 steel pipe. Losses will increase as residue builds up on the inner surface
of pipe over time.

112 in.
80 psi
125 psi

0.16
0.20
0.25
0.30
0.45
0.65
0.90
1.15

0.10
0.14
0.17
0.20
0.32
0.45
0.60
0.80

AIR-FLOW LOSS THROUGH PIPE


Flow,
scfm
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
220
240
260
280
300

Pipe size, in. NPT


2
12.7
50.7
114
202
316
456
621
811
1

4
1.2
7.8
17.6
30.4
50.0
70.4
95.9
125
159
196
282
385
503
646
785
950
3

1
0.5
2.2
4.9
8.7
13.6
19.6
26.6
34.8
44.0
54.4
78.3
106
139
176
217
263
318
369
426
490
570
628
705
785
870

11

0.5
1.1
2.0
3.2
4.5
6.2
8.1
10.2
12.6
18.2
24.7
32.3
40.9
50.5
61.1
72.7
85.3
98.9
113
129
146
163
177
202
244
291
341
395
454

112

1.4
2.0
2.7
3.6
4.5
5.6
8.0
10.9
14.3
18.1
22.3
27.0
32.2
37.8
43.8
50.3
57.2
64.6
72.6
80.7
89.4
108
128
151
175
201

134

0.7
1.1
1.4
1.9
2.4
2.9
4.2
5.7
7.5
9.5
11.7
14.1
16.8
19.7
22.9
26.3
29.9
33.7
37.9
42.2
46.7
56.5
67.3
79.0
91.6
105

1.2
1.5
2.2
2.9
3.8
4.8
6.0
7.2
8.6
10.1
11.7
13.4
15.3
17.6
19.4
21.5
23.9
28.9
34.4
40.3
46.8
53.7

2 12

1.1
1.5
1.9
2.3
2.8
3.3
3.9
1.4
5.2
5.9
6.7
7.5
8.4
9.3
11.3
13.4
15.7
18.2
20.9

Find the value from the table


according to the pipe size and
flow in scfm, then divide this
value by the compression ratio.
Compression ratio is calculated
by adding atmospheric pressure
(nominally 14.7 psia) to the
gauge pressure and dividing the
sum by atmospheric pressure.
Multiply the quotient by the
actual length of pipe, in feet,
then divide by 1,000. The result
is the pressure loss, in psi.

Gate
valve
0.31
0.44
0.57
0.82
0.98
1.3
1.6
2.1
3.0
3.9

Long Medium- Standard Angle


radius
radius
elbow
valve
elbow
elbow
0.41
0.52
0.84
1.1
0.57
0.73
1.2
1.6
0.77
0.98
1.6
2.1
1.1
1.4
2.2
2.9
1.3
1.6
2.6
3.5
1.7
2.2
3.6
4.8
2.2
2.8
4.4
5.9
3.0
3.6
5.7
7.7
3.9
5.0
7.9
10.7
5.1
6.5
10.4
13.9

Closereturn
bend
1.3
1.8
2.3
3.3
3.9
5.3
6.6
8.5
11.8
15.5

Tee
(through
side)
1.7
2.3
3.1
4.4
5.2
7.1
8.7
11.4
15.8
20.7

This table gives values for air-pressure flow losses through screw fittings expressed in the
equivalent lengths of straight pipe of the same diameter. For example, flow resistance of a
2-in. gate-valve flow resistance is the same as that for 1.3 ft. of straight pipe.

50

60

70

80

90

100

Factor

0.0370

0.0312

0.0270

0.0238

0.0212

0.0192

0.0177

CM

To obtain flow in scfm at a particular pressure, divide the CV value by the appropriate factor from the table. For example, to determine the
output in scfm of a valve with a CV of 0.52 when operated at 80 psi, simply divide 0.52 (the valves CV) by 0.212 (the factor from the table
corresponding to 80 psi):
0.52 = 2.45
0.212
To determine CV from scfm, simply multiply the scfm value by the factor corresponding to the appropriate pressure.

Hose ID,
in.

Pressure, psi

Flow,
scfm
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110

50
1.8
5
10.1
18.1

0.4
0.8
1.5
2.4
3.5
4.4
6.5
8.5
11.4
14.2
0.2
0.3
0.5
0.8
1.1
1.5
2
2.6
3.5

60
1.3
4
8.4
14.8
23.4

0.3
0.6
1.2
1.9
2.8
3.8
5.2
6.8
8.6
11.2
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.2
1
2
2.6

70
1
3.4
7
12.4
20
28.4
0.2
0.5
0.9
1.5
2.3
3.2
4.2
5.5
7
8.8
0.1
0.2
0.4
0.5
0.7
1
1.3
1.6
2

80
0.9
2.8
6
10.8
17.4
25.2
34.6
0.2
0.5
0.8
1.3
1.9
2.8
3.6
4.7
5.8
7.2
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.5
0.7
0.8
1.1
1.4
1.7

90
0.8
2.4
5.4
9.5
14.8
22
30.5
0.2
0.4
0.7
1.1
1.6
2.3
3.1
4
5
6.2
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.7
0.9
1.2
1.4

100
0.7
2.3
4.8
8.4
13.3
19.3
27.2
0.2
0.4
0.6
1
1.4
2
2.7
3.5
4.4
5.4
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.8
1
1.2

110
0.6
2
4.3
7.6
12
17.6
24.6
0.1
0.3
0.5
0.9
1.3
1.8
2.4
3.1
3.9
4.9
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.7
0.9
1.1

CY

ONE SIZING METHOD

FRICTION IN AIR HOSE

MY

CMY

CV =

Globe
valve
2.5
3.5
4.7
6.5
7.8
10.6
13.1
17.1
23.7
31

40

Different methods can be used for sizing air valves, and one popular method is explained
here. You may consider oversizing the valve by 20% to 25% to compensate for the inevitable losses in a pneumatic system.
A formula and table will yield the valve velocity coefficient (CV) for operating a cylinder
within a specific cycle period:

PRESSURE LOSS THROUGH PIPE FITTINGS


Pipe
size,
NPT
1
2
3
4
1
114
112
2
2 1 2
3
4
5

Air pressure,
psig

A X S X CPXFC
T X 29

Where:
A = bore area, in.2
S = stroke, in.
CP = pressure-drop constant (from table), psi
FC = compression factor (from table)
t = time, sec

COMPRESSION FACTOR AND P CONSTANTS


Inlet Pressure,
psi

Compression
factor, FC

Constant for pressure drop (CP)

10

1.6

20

2.3

0.129

0.083

0.066

30

3.0

0.113

0.072

0.055

40

3.7

0.097

0.064

0.048

50

4.4

0.091

0.059

0.043

60

5.1

0.084

0.054

0.040

70

5.7

0.079

0.050

0.037

80

6.4

0.075

0.048

0.035

P @ 2 psi

P @ 5 psi

P @ 10 psi

0.102

90

7.1

0.071

0.045

0.033

100

7.8

0.068

0.043

0.031

110

8.5

0.065

0.041

0.030

120

9.2

0.062

0.039

0.029

Use P at 5 psi to determine pressure-drop constant for most industrial applications.


Use 2 psi for critical applications or 10 psi to conserve cost and mounting space.

Pressure drop per 25 ft. of hose. Factors are proportionate for longer or shorter
lengths.

Copyright 2015 by Penton Media Inc.

2015-02-04

3:38 PM