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Inertia of a Disk, best determined when?

Comparative study about the determination of


moment of inertia of disk when
rotated about the center and rotated about the diameter

MATH30-5/B2/Pagdagdagan
ABSTRACT
Moment of inertia is the name given
to rotational inertia. The moment of
inertia must be specified with respect
to a chosen axis of rotation. For a
point mass the moment of inertia is
just the mass times the square of perpendicular distance to the rotation axis, I = mr2. That point mass relationship becomes the basis for all other
moments of inertia since any object
can be built up from a collection of
point masses. The purpose of this research is to determine if rotating
about the center is more accurate
than rotating about the diameter in
determining the moment of inertia of a
disk. The gathering of data is done
through an experiment in a physics
laboratory wherein I tallied 3 trials for
both type and determined that rotating about the center is more accurate
than rotating about the diameter.
BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY
The accuracy and preciseness of getting results determining the moment
of inertia manually should be close
to the true value. The accuracy and
preciseness of getting results in experiments conform to the given equations for determining the moment of
inertia which is done by physics experts and professors.
This led me to conduct a small comparative study about 2 different ways
to find out the better way to determine
the moment of inertia of a disk.
PROBLEM:
Students try to determine the results
in determining the moment of inertia
of a disk in two ways. One is by rotating about the center and by rotating
about the diameter. I used a disk with
a mass of 1475.7 grams and a radius
of 1.12 cm. In rotating about the center, I computed an actual value of mo-

ment of inertia using the equation 1/2


multiplied by mass of disk multiplied
by the square of radius of disk, and I
got 925.56 g-cm^2. In rotating about
the diameter, I computed an actual
value of moment of inertia using the
equation 1/4 multiplied by mass of
disk multiplied by the square of radius
of disk, and I got 462.78 g-cm^2. In
rotating about the center, 1 out of 3
trials didn't exceed a 10% percent difference. In rotating about the diameter, 3 out of 3 trials didn't exceed a
10% percent difference. Can I conclude that rotating about the center is
more accurate than rotating about the
diameter? Use a 0.05 level of significance.
METHODOLOGY
So, I did an experiment about moment of inertia this term with my
PHY11 group mates. First, we determined the moment of inertia by rotating about the center. We measured
moment of inertias in 3 trials such as:
1007.84, 1038.825, and 905.418. We
found out that 1 of this trials didn't exceed a 10% error margin. The group
then went to the next table, determining the moment of inertia by rotating
about the diameter. This time, we
were able to get moment of inertias in
3 trials such as: 610.172, 516.679,
and 519.631. We found out that all trials exceeded the 10% error margin.
The group then recorded the data
(observed value out of the sample
size) which is to be used in analyzing,
formulating the null and alternative
hypothesis and concluding the problem.
DATA AND RESULTS

CONCLUSION
Finally, after a number of steps in
conducting the data regarding to the
comparison of the two types of determining the moment of inertia of a
disk, using the hypothesis shown in
previous parts, we can conclude that
rotating about the center is more accurate than rotating about the diameter." If we want to continue the process of this research, now this is time
to look for the causes and effects of
the statement. There are reasons why
the rotating about the center is more
accurate than rotating about the diameter, which are not supposed to be
studied at this time.
RECOMMENDATION:
Since we still dont know the causes
and effects and we just based our research to a limited number of trials in
this experiment, we can recommend
that experts should have more trials
or discover new ways to solve the
moment of inertia. In that way, we can
have more basis to determine the moment of inertia in different ways and
have a less error of margin.

CENTER

DIAMETER

observed value (x1) = 1

(x2) = 0

sample size (n1) = 3

(n2) = 3

population proportion (p1) =


(p2) =

Using two sample ttest, z=1.216

STATISTICAL HYPOTHESIS/TEST STAT

Null Hypothesis: Rotating about the center is more accurate than rotating about the diameter.
Ho =
Alternative Hypothesis: Rotating about the diameter is
more accurate than rotating about the center.

H1 =

z=1.216; Df =4; 0.2<p-value<0.5; alpha = 0.05 therefore p-value > alpha


meaning we accept Ho.