FreePress

FRIDAY, august 7, 2015 • VOL. 18, NO. 19 • FREE

thechampionnewspaper.com

Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.

Quick Finder
Business.................................20A
Education.........................18-19A
Sports................................22-23A
Opinion.......................................5A
Classified................................21A

Gender
discrimination and
the American male

Two attorneys
seek House
seat

opinion, 5A

local, 8A

• A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS •

Summer camp at
Emory focuses on
technology

education, 18A

Atlanta United soccer
complex approved
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
DeKalb County commissioners voted 4-3 on Aug. 4 to approve
an incentive package with Arthur
Blank, a cofounder of The Home
Depot, set to bring major league

soccer franchise Atlanta United FC
to the county.
The facility Blank plans to build
will be the only soccer complex in
the region.
DeKalb County will spend
roughly $12 million and relinquish
41 acres of government land for

See Land on page 15A

Lou Walker Senior Center: 10 years later

The Lou Walker Senior Center hosts classes, activities and events for members, including a “Showdown with Motown!” event.

by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

technology, dancing, aquatic classes and
more.
“We believe every senior has a voice and
or June Green, becoming a member of is valued,” said center facility coordinator
the Lou Walker Senior Center was “one Darryl Blackwell.
of the best things I’ve ever done” since
The center has an average of 3,000
becoming a senior citizen.
members.
“It’s the best senior center in the United
Donna Dees, president of DeKalb For
States,” Green said. “It has been great for
Seniors Inc., said the center has been an
me. “
“amazing” addition to the community.
The Lou Walker Senior Center is
“The center itself has been a life saver
celebrating its 10-year anniversary. The
for so many,” she said. “It gives the seniors
center has been a staple for seniors in the
a place to go, something to do, to make
south DeKalb area since 2005. The center
friends. Sometimes people come after
holds various classes for seniors from
they’ve lost a husband or a wife and instead

F

See Center on page 15A

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Members gather in the Victory Room for events and other social activities.

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local

Page 2A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

Lithonia asks to manage countyowned part of local park
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Lithonia has asked
DeKalb County to transfer
management of the countyowned portion of Lithonia
Park to the city.
During the Aug. 3 city
council meeting, Lithonia
Mayor Deborah Jackson
said she recently sent a proposal to the county asking
that it hand over management of the pavilion and ball
fields to the city. Jackson said
the city entered into a lease
agreement with the county
years ago to manage part of
the city-owned park, excluding the amphitheater.
“The agreement expired
in 2003, but the county had
been continuing to maintain
that part of the park,” Jackson said. “We were looking at
taking back the management
of the park, but we would ask
that they would continue to
do the maintenance of the
park.”
Jackson said a service
delivery agreement with the
county is up for renewal next
year.
“Between now and then
we can discuss what changes,

if any, we may want to make
in that relationship,” Jackson
said.
The proposal sent to the
county states the city would
like to manage the county-

they’ll come to the city.
“It seems like [the
county] was not objecting to
us taking it back,” Jackson
added.
Although the county

‘We get calls first anyway.
The city really has been
doing it all along.’
-Police Chief Roosevelt Smith

own part of the park beginning in August 2015 to “get
a sense of what things they
have rented out, or what
ongoing contracts they have
and things like that.”
“In the past, we’ve been
referring people to the
county when they wanted
to use the pavilion, Jackson
said. “Once we agree on a
date that becomes effective,

has owned areas of the park
that are mostly used by the
public, Lithonia police have
monitored all activity in the
park.
“We’re closer [to the
park] than the county,”
Lithonia Police Chief Roosevelt Smith said. “We get
calls first anyway. The city
really has been doing it all
along.”

Avondale Estates updating
comprehensive plan
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
The deadline is approaching for Avondale Estates to update its comprehensive
plan, and city officials are seeking residents’
assistance.
The city’s comprehensive plan 10-year
update is a citywide blueprint for future development activities.
“We’re working on doing an entire plan
for the whole city, not just focusing on the
downtown area because we’ve done that with
the Downtown Master Plan,” City Planner
and Community Development Officer Keri
Stevens said during the July 15 work session
meeting.
The city is asking residents to take an
online survey on key community issues and
topics; these and responses will be included
in the final plan. The city has held two public
meetings to discuss ideas and issues regarding the city’s needs.
A third public meeting will be held Aug.
26 at city hall, and Commissioner John
Quinn is encouraging all citizens to attend
the meeting.
“It’s a great opportunity to be a part of

the planning process and to see how that
works,” Quinn said.
Avondale Estates is required to update
its comprehensive plan every 10 years. The
city’s 10-year update is due Oct. 31, 2016 and
the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) is
assisting the city, without cost, with the comprehensive plan development, drafting and
meetings.
The plan can be used to promote “orderly, rational and quality development,” according to the city. The planning process can also
help the city invest money in infrastructure
such as streets, parks and other facilities.
According to a presentation on the plan,
the city is considering adding greenspace,
an active and passive recreation facility and
annexation. The city is also reviewing at a
community aesthetic strategy, such as wayfinding and signage, sidewalks, beautification
projects and more.
A steering committee has been formed
to assist in the development of the plans and
public presentations. The group consists of
representatives from city boards and commissions, residents and business owners.
The survey is posted on the city’s website
and results will be collected through Aug. 9.

Wade Walker Park chosen for county’s
Centennial Bowl
DeKalb County Recreation, Parks and Cultural Affairs has announced Wade Walker Park as the host site
for the 2015 Centennial Bowl to be held Aug. 7-9 in
Stone Mountain.
Home of the most competitive youth football tournaments in the nation, the annual Centennial Bowl
hosts 100 football teams from around the country.
Wade Walker Park is the home of the Central DeKalb
Jaguars, the largest youth football program in the Atlanta metropolitan area.
For more information about the Centennial Bowl,
contact Valister Wilson at (678) 768-7444 or valister@
centennialbowl.com.

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local

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 3A

County implements special purpose home repair program

Stone Mountain councilwoman
proposes mosquito control program
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Stone Mountain has a mosquito problem and one city councilmember is on a
mission to fix it.
During the July 20 city council
work session, Councilwoman Andrea
Redmond proposed adding a mosquito
control program to the 2016 city budget.
The program would bring in a biomist to
spray pesticide from a service truck.
Redmond said the cost of the program would be $9,275. She said the service truck will have a 30-gallon drum to
spray pesticide in a 150 feet radius in the
spring and in the fall.
“There are two applications per year,”
she said. “We would do half on one night
and half [of the community] on another
night.”
Redmond said the cost for a 30-gallon drum is $1,800. The program would
also allow larvicide to be thrown into
clogged drainage ditches and ponds.
Redmond said she got information
from the city of Sugar Hill.
“They have been using these products
from Clark Manufacturing for the last
four years,” she said.
Redmond said the city has been
discussing ways to control mosquitoes
since March because there are abandoned
homes with standing water.

“We have buildings with flat roofs
and water is trapping in there,” she said.
“We are a dish for mosquitoes, but not
only that there has been an introduction
into Georgia of a mosquito that is a tiger
mosquito and it’s relentless. It does not
just stop with regular pesticide.”
Redmond said it is the city’s responsibility to take on this problem.
Councilman Richard Mailman, who
owns a landscaping business, said the city
should look into educating citizens.
“The problem is that normally you’re
taking care of everything in your house,
but what I see, when I go to 10 to 15
houses a day, is people have flower pots
full of water, there are tires laying out full
of water, there are tarps that has water in
them and that’s where the problem is,”
Mailman said. “To deterred or to get rid
of majority of the problem before we even
do this spraying is we need to get that information out to people.”
Redmond said education will be a
part of the program.
“It’s the same thing as with code compliance too,” she said. “It’s all about education, and we all should know that and
we all should contribute but you know
that there is always going to be someone
that does not. Therefore, I felt like if we
took more of a proactive approach that
this could help eliminate our problem.”

The DeKalb County Human and Community Development
Department has created the Special Purpose Home Repair Program to assist low income elderly and legally disabled homeowners
in DeKalb County with the costs of critical home repairs.
“The program will help eligible homeowners with preventing
imminent threats to health or safety due to dangerous, hazardous
and/or unsanitary conditions in their homes,” according to a news
release. “The program is available to assist low-income homeowners that cannot afford to make the repairs in a timely manner.”
All repairs will be limited to the basic systems of the home:
electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling and roofing systems.
The Special Purpose Home Repair Program will be open for
new applicants on Aug. 10. Applications will be available on the
DeKalb County website at www.dekalbcountyga.gov.
Applications will also be available for pick-up at the following
DeKalb County locations: Clark Harrison Building, 330 W Ponce
De Leon Avenue, first floor, Decatur; Manual Maloof Building,
1300 Commerce Drive, first floor, Decatur; Central DeKalb Senior
Center, 1346 McConnell Drive, Decatur; DeKalb/Atlanta Senior
Center, 25 Warren Street, Atlanta; Lithonia Senior Center, 2484
Bruce Street, Lithonia; Lou Walker Senior Center, 2538 Panola
Road, Lithonia; and Scottdale Senior Center, 3262 Chapel Street,
Scottdale.
Interested applicants may also call (404) 371-2144 for additional automated information or instructions.

County selected as site for state reentry initiative
DeKalb County has been selected by the Governor’s Office
of Transition, Support and Reentry (GOTSR) as the pilot site for
Phase II of its Georgia Prisoner Reentry Initiative (GA-PRI).
Nearly a year ago, interim DeKalb County CEO Lee May
launched DeKalb County’s Reentry and Recidivism Task Force in
an effecty to reduce recidivism and those barriers that impede successful reentry of DeKalb’s returning citizens.
The GA-PRI is a component of the governor’s efforts to
streamline state agency operations to better provide tools and support and to improve public safety. This state-level initiative focuses
on prisoners who have served their terms and are assimilating
back into society.
The DeKalb Reentry and Recidivism Task working in collaboration with GOTSR, is building a network of wrap-a-round
services to eliminate gaps in service for juveniles, as well as those
going in and out of local jails, state and federal prisons.
“The governor’s reforms will fit well within the framework of
our reentry and recidivism strategies here in DeKalb,” May said.
“We are honored to have attracted this partnership with the GAPRI, and together, we will be working diligently to produce the
kind of measured success our citizens deserve to expect.”
For more information, contact Kathleen Smith at kathleen.
smith@dcs.ga.gov, or call DeKalb County Human Development at
(404) 270-1178.

OPINION

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 4A

‘Just downright stupidity’
Former Attorney General
of Georgia Michael Bowers in his remarks about
preliminary findings of his
comprehensive investigation
of DeKalb County said he
and his team of investigators
are finding “misdeeds, ineptitude, some corruption…
significant corruption, but
mainly just downright stupidity.”
Bowers was asked by Interim DeKalb County CEO
Lee May to “to investigate
the affairs, records, expenditures of employees and
departments under the authority of the CEO.” May announced the pending investigation at a press conference
held March 18.

John Hewitt
johnh@dekalbchamp.com

Chief Operating Officer

County employees were
first supposedly told that
they were expected to cooperate fully with Bowers and
his team of investigators; but
were subsequently told that

that they would not be forced
to.
When Bowers first
launched the investigation he
said, “We’re going to root out
conflicts of interest, corruption, malfeasance and misfeasance, so help me, God.”
It seems that Bowers and his
team are doing just what he
promised.
Bowers also told Belcher
that he and his team have
questions about “significant
sums of money” and that
their findings, when released,
will likely “make folks real
mad.”
DeKalb needs a complete
investigation and I commend
May for taking the initiative
to have the audit done. May

might be sorry he ever asked
for this comprehensive investigation. It seems that there
may be questions about powerful leaders and that when
the final findings are released
it could just be the proverbial
straw that broke the camel’s
back.
Bowers’ findings coupled
with a class action lawsuit
against the county that also
references alleged wrongdoings by the CEO’s office, the
district attorney’s office and
the now-dissolved recorders
court that could potentially
affect 100,000-plus individuals may send heads rolling
and leave DeKalb residents
with even less leadership
than we have had in a long

time.
When the same departments and individuals
continue to be involved in
controversy, the likelihood
of innocence becomes more
difficult to presume and the
public’s trust continues to
plummet.
Meanwhile, we will wait
on the outcome of Bowers’ investigation and see
whether May will make good
on his initial promise that he
would know the results at the
same time as the public.
Hopefully there is a substantial amount of county
money set aside for legal
defense funds, it may be
needed soon.

Stop bullying now
stand up • speak out

OPINION

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 5A

Being stoned, Part 1
(“The South owes a debt of
honor to the living and revered dead to make Stone
Mountain an appropriate
shrine to the Confederacy. Thousands of schoolchildren now grown, remember
giving their pennies more than
two decades ago to see that
dream come true,” from a letter by six-term Atlanta Mayor
William B. Hartsfield (18901971) in February 1945, urging reactivation of the long
dormant Stone Mountain Memorial Commission to then
Georgia Gov. Ellis Arnall
(1907-1992). 
Being stoned on the African continent, or much of
the war-torn Middle East
today would likely mean a
violent death, or maiming
and crippling injury, after
being pummeled and pelted
with dozens or hundreds
of large rocks and stones,
often thrown at the victim
by members of their family
or community, for crimes
ranging from adultery to
theft. Victims remain disproportionately female, particularly in Arabic and Muslim
countries, often related to
accusations of bringing
shame to a family. This is an
extra-judicial process, akin to
lynching.
In most parts of the western world, and certainly in
the Americas, being stoned

Bill Crane
bill.csicrane@gmail.com

Columnist

has a much more positive
connotation and denotation,
both related to experiencing a hallucinogenic high
from smoking, ingesting or,
in some cases, shooting up a
variety of herbal and pharmacological products. Same
words, very different meanings, from differing cultures,
and of course differences of
context, and perspective.
Since before the cave
men, and arguably one of
the modern wonders of the
world, is the granite outcropping that we now refer
to as Stone Mountain. Long
called Rock Mountain, and
other names by the Cherokee, Creek and other native
American tribes, the mountain and its smaller cousins
Arabia and Pine Mountain,
were all long quarried and
sources of industry and jobs. 
When Georgia settlers

were encroaching on Creek
Indian territory around the
mountain in 1813, President
James Monroe dispatched
U.S. troops, led by Andrew
Jackson to relocate the stubborn pioneers who were then
squatting on Indian territory. 
Settlers who did not heed
Jackson’s warnings and notice to vacate were typically
burned out of their farms
and homesteads. 
Ironic that Old Hickory
was chosen for this assignment, as he would dispatch
troops again to Georgia
while serving as president in
the 1830s to expel thousands
of Cherokees and other Native Americans in the Trail of
Tears.
The mountain and its surrounding acreage were originally part of Henry County
until 1822, when DeKalb
County was created.
Fulton would be later cut
out of DeKalb and Stone
Mountain Park now straddles
and in some places forms the
border between DeKalb and
Gwinnett Counties. 
Approaching the Civil
War years, DeKalb County
supported maintaining
the Union, and sent Stone
Mountain attorney George
K. Smith to the state convention considering secession. Smith twice voted
against leaving the Union,
but when the vote went state-

wide in favor of secession,
by a vote of 166 to 130, the
entire state pulled behind the
war effort. 
As the most important
railroad in the state at that
time was the Georgia Railroad, connecting Atlanta to
the state capital in Milledgeville, as well as other population centers such as Athens
and Augusta, there were
numerous battles between
Sherman’s Union troops and
Confederate forces, as Sherman attempted to sever the
railroad lines between Stone
Mountain and Decatur.  After Atlanta fell, the rail line
was destroyed and the railroad ties and timber burned.
Post-war, the mountain
was primarily known for
the fine granite quarried
on the mountain’s southern side. Due to the low
iron content, uniform color
and poor water absorption,
Stone Mountain granite
became desirable as building stone. This granite was
used in the construction of
hundreds of courthouses and
post offices across the country and in the U.S. Capitol,
Stone Mountain granite was
used to build the steps on the
East Wing of the U.S. Capitol
building, the vaults of the
U.S. Treasury, the Arlington
Memorial Bridge, the Federal
Reserve’s gold depository
at Fort Knox, the locks of

the Panama Canal and the
tunnel connecting Detroit,
Mich., to Canada—to name
just a few prominent edifices.
To be continued .This summary relies heavily on the
work of David Freeman, author of Carved in Stone: The
History of Stone Mountain,
Mercer University Press, 1997.
Bill Crane also serves as a
political analyst and commentator for Channel 2’s Action
News, WSB-AM News/Talk
750 and now 95.5 FM, as well
as a columnist for The Champion, Champion Free Press
and Georgia Trend. Crane is
a DeKalb native and business
owner, living in Scottdale. You
can reach him or comment on
a column at bill.csicrane@
gmail.com. 

F ree P ress
Let Us Know What You Think!
THE CHAMPION FREE PRESS encourages opinions from its readers. Please
write to us and express your views. Letters
should be brief, typewritten and contain
the writer’s name, address and telephone
number for verification. All letters will be
considered for publication.
Send Letters To Editor, The Champion Free Press, P.
O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 30031-1347; Send email
to Andrew@dekalbchamp.com • FAX To: (404)
370-3903 Phone: (404) 373-7779 . Deadline for news
releases and advertising: Thursday, one week prior
to publication date.
EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions written by columnists and contributing editors do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editor or publishers. The
Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any
advertisement at any time. The Publisher is not
responsible for unsolicited manuscripts.

Publisher:
John Hewitt
Chief Financial Officer:
Dr. Earl D. Glenn
Managing Editor:
Andrew Cauthen
Production Manager:
Kemesha Hunt
Photographer:
Travis Hudgons
Staff Reporters:
Carla Parker, Ashley Oglesby
The Champion Free Press is published
each Friday by ACE III Communications,
Inc., • 114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur,
GA. 30030 • Phone (404) 373-7779.

www.championnewspaper.com
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Statement from the
publisher
We sincerely appreciate the
discussion surrounding this and any
issue of interest to DeKalb County.
The Champion was founded in 1991
expressly to provide a forum for
discourse for all community residents
on all sides of an issue. We have no
desire to make the news only to
report news and opinions to effect
a more educated citizenry that will
ultimately move our community
forward. We are happy to present
ideas for discussion; however,
we make every effort to avoid
printing information submitted to
us that is known to be false and/or
assumptions penned as fact.

local

Page 6A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

Lee Williams
Lee Williams has served
the community as a volunteer and as an employee of
the city of Decatur for 15
years.
Williams, 53, was honored for his work in Decatur
by receiving the Thomas O.
Davis Award at the June Decatur Business Association
meeting. The award honors
a public employee who has
helped strengthen the bond
between government and
the community, served as
a role model for others in
public service, contributed
to the well-being of the com-

munity, inspired others to
get involved in public service

and served the public with
respect.
The award is named for
Decatur’s longtime city attorney. Williams is the facility
manager for Decatur Active
Living.
“It is very humbling to
be a recipient of this award,”
Williams said. “It is an honor
and a pleasure to have my
name listed among the previous winners of the Thomas
O. Davis Award.”
During his years with
Decatur, Williams has taught
children to ride bikes safely;
managed sports camps,

facility rentals and adult
programming, and he is an
active participant in the Safe
Routes to School program.
Williams, a resident of Stone
Mountain, is also a member
of the Georgia Recreation
and Parks Association and
the National Recreation and
Parks Association.
He also serves as a mentor to teens and young men
in the community. Williams
said his passion for community service began with his
parents.
“Both my mother and
father were very giving peo-

ple,” he said. “Their moto,
was see a need, fill a need.
So, when I was asked to participate with these organization I did not hesitate.
“I feel that it is important to be able to give back
to your community and one
of the best ways to do that is
through volunteering your
time,” Williams added. “I
think that it is very important to introduce our youth
of today into the service of
volunteerism. Volunteering
is a great way to help youth
expand their horizons.”

If you would like to nominate someone to be considered as a future Champion of the Week, please contact Andrew Cauthen
at andrew@dekalbchamp.com or at (404) 373-7779, ext. 117.

Nalley Nissan to
inhabit Assembly
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
A series of questions from Doraville
Councilwoman Trudy Jones Dean at a public
hearing on July 20 revealed the name of the
newest addition to the former General Motors
site:
Nalley Nissan which was recently acquired
by Asbury Automotive Group.
The Duluth-based automobile company
purchased 20 acres from The Integral Group,
lead developer for the Assembly project for
$19 million.
According to US Securities Exchange
Commission records, “As of June 30, Asbury
operated 86 dealership locations, including...
29 brands of new vehicles, as well as 26 collision repair centers and three stand-alone used
vehicle stores.”
Until Dean’s questions, no public announcement had been made about the dealership.
In a July 6 council meeting Dean said, “It’s
not council’s job to promote this project but to
find out as much as we can to ensure that it is
the best fit for the developers as well as for our
community.”
Egbert Perry, chief executive officer of
The Integral Group, confirmed the sale and
future car dealership when questioned by
Dean.
Perry said the dealership will have a showcase for cars “and if I understand correctly,
they intend to do about $47 million’ worth of
improvements by May or June of next year,
about $250 million in sales tax revenue per
year.”
The dealership will be inside the tax allocation district (TAD) but will not be receiving
TAD dollars.
Perry said the car dealership will represent
“$47 million in property value increase – an
immediate increase in the TAD’s $350 million
tax base.”
The plan was approved by majority of the
city council.

An aerial view of the former General Motors plant, currently known as Assembly.

local

AroundDeKalb

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 7A

Avondale Estates

Registration opened for Labor Day race
Runners and walkers can register for Avondale
Estates’ 37th annual Labor Day Race. The race
will be held Sept. 7 and benefits the Amyotrophic
Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Association. The event includes a 1-mile and 5K race followed by an awards
ceremony. The race will start and end by Willis
Park, at the corner of Dartmouth Avenue and
Clarendon Place. To register, visit www.active.com.

Brookhaven
Registration open for adult softball league
Adults ages 17 and older can sign up for
Brookhaven’s 2015 Fall Adult Softball League this
fall. Registration is open Monday through Friday until Aug. 14. Participants must have turned
17 years old prior to Jan. 1, 2015. The registration fee is $625 per team. Registration will be
taken at the Parks and Recreation main office at
Lynwood Community Center, Monday through
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Registration also
will be accepted via fax, mail and online at www.
brookhavenga.gov/city-departments/parks-recreation-/activities-programs and requires a commitment form to reserve a team spot in the league.
Mailed or faxed registration forms must include
payment and be received by Aug. 12.
League play begins the week of Aug. 31 and
will continue until the week of Nov. 9. Lynwood
Community Center is located at 3360 Osborne
Road NE. For more information, contact Taylor
Davis at (404) 637-0542 or visit www.brookhavenga.gov/city-departments/parks-recreation.

Decatur
Organization to host back-to-school drive
Blessings on Wheels will host its August BackTo-School Drive Aug. 8 and is in need of supplies.
The organization is requesting donations of book
bags, notebook paper, spiral notebooks, two pocket folders, rulers, erasers and calculators. Donations will be accepted through Aug. 7. Donations
can be dropped off at NBE Shipping and Business
Services, 3564 Wesley Chapel Road in Decatur. For
more information, contact Keischa Robinson at
(404) 820-6341.

Emory researcher partners with the Lupus
Foundation of America for Decatur seminar
Georgia chapter of the Lupus Foundation of
America continues to partner with S. Sam Lim
of the Emory University School of Medicine to
raise awareness and educate the lupus community.
The chapter is presenting Lupus 101: The Basics
Seminar on Saturday, Aug. 15, from 9 to 11:30 a.m.
at the Courtyard Atlanta Decatur, located at 130
Clairemont Ave. in downtown Decatur Georgia.
Lim is an associate professor of medicine and

epidemiology, clinical director of rheumatology at
Emory University School of Medicine, and chief of
rheumatology for Grady Health Systems. He also
serves as the co-chairman of the Georgia chapter’s
medical advisory board.
Lim will present information on lupus, its
symptoms, treatments and coping techniques. The
program will include a question-and-answer segment followed by a panel discussion with patient
testimonies and success stories. The seminar is
free and breakfast will be provided to registered
attendees and their families.
For more information or to register, visit www.
lupusga.org.

Local church model for improving financial
literacy in community
Pastor E. Dewey Smith Jr. and the House
of Hope Atlanta (Greater Travelers Rest Baptist
Church) will host the No Longer Bound Financial
Literacy Fair to help participants increase their
economic strength. This event will take place Saturday, Aug. 15, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the
HFS Multiplex, 4650 Flat Shoals Parkway, Decatur.
The program will feature topics ranging from
student loans, bankruptcy, credit building, debt
elimination, entrepreneurship, investing, wills
and estate planning and much more. There will be
exhibits, seminars and a panel discussion where
attendees are able to ask questions of financial experts.
Among those participating in the financial
literacy fair are the Securities and Exchange Commission, Georgia Student Finance Commission,
Small Business Administration, Wells Fargo Bank,
Bank of America, Farmers Insurance, Prudential
Financial and AFLAC.
The event is free and open to the public. To
receive registration details for this event, email
NoLongerBound10@gmail.com.

Lithonia
Stonecrest Library to host arts event
Stonecrest Library will host its monthly celebration of the arts through the Scribes and Vibes
event Aug. 8, 1-4 p.m. The event will feature poetry, music and fine art through musical performances, open mic and art exhibits.
The library is located at 3123 Klondike Road
in Lithonia. For more information, call (770) 4823828.

City to host comprehensive plan open house
Lithonia will hold an open house to discuss its
comprehensive plan Aug. 17 at city hall. The open
house will begin at 5 p.m. and end at 6:45 p.m.
Residents, business owners and city leaders can
share their thoughts to develop a vision, goal and
direction for the city. City Hall is located at 6920
Main Street. For more information, call (770) 4828136.

Tucker

Handbell choir seeking ringers
The three octaves of Schulmerich Handbells
and Handchimes at Lawrenceville Road United
Methodist Church in Tucker is offering those ages
10 an up an opportunity to participate in community handbell choir.
“Want to be a real ding-a-ling? Now’s your
chance to live up to a reputation,” states an announcement about the handbell choir.
The community bell choir will entertain folks
with a mix of popular, novelty, sacred and classical tunes in nursing homes, schools, community
groups, churches and local festivals.
Practices will be held on Sunday afternoons or
Saturdays for approximately an hour.
Ringers do not need to be a member of the
church.
For more information email the church at
LRUMC@bellsouth.net, Jack Sartain at jbs5951@
aol.com, or Pat Mosley at pmos1@bellsouth.net.

Countywide

Apparent phone scam targets DeKalb County
residents
A phone scammer who has plagued other
metro area counties has called DeKalb County
residents with hollow threats of arrest if fines are
not paid for jury duty summons. The calls are not
legitimate, said DeKalb County Sheriff Jeff Mann.
According to one potential victim’s experience, the caller identifies himself as a DeKalb
County Sheriff ’s Deputy, uses the last name of an
actual deputy and gives a fake badge number. If
the caller is unable to make direct phone contact, he or she will leave a voicemail message and
phone number but that number does not reach
the DeKalb County Sheriff ’s Office. The caller is
being told that a DeKalb County Superior Court
Judge–again using a real judge’s name–issued a
jury or grand jury summons to the person being
called and the person being called did not appear.
According to the caller, a warrant has been issued
for the called person’s arrest. To lift the warrant,
the person called must pay a fine.
“Not so,” Mann said. “The DeKalb County
Sheriff ’s Office is not calling people to collect fines
for any purpose, nor have we authorized anyone to
make phone calls on our behalf. This is suspicious
behavior and a scam.”
The scammer then gives specific and detailed
instructions on how to pay the fine by going to a
CVS Pharmacy and purchasing an InstaPay card in
amounts from $400 to $2,100 to be deposited in a
“National Treasury” escrow account. If the person
called says he or she will go to the Sheriff ’s Office
instead or contact an attorney, the scammer generally hangs up.
“Please protect yourselves,” Mann urged.
“First, do not pay these people in any form, including debit, credit cards or cash. The best way to
avoid being scammed is to just hang up.”
Anyone who receives such a suspicious call
should contact the DeKalb County Sheriff ’s Office
Investigative Unit at (404) 298-8125.

local

Page 8A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

Two attorneys seek vacant House seat
Voters will go to the polls
Aug. 11 to fill the vacated
Georgia House of Representatives District 80 seat.
Attorney Taylor Bennett and former Brookhaven
mayor J. Max Davis will face
off in the runoff. In the July
14 special election, Bennett
received 35.97 percent of the
vote, while Davis received 32.9
percent.
The District 80 seat became
empty when former Rep. Mike
Jacobs was appointed by
Gov. Nathan Deal as a State
Court judge of DeKalb, replacing Eleanor Ross, who is now
a federal judge for the Northern District of Georgia.
Each candidate was given a
questionnaire by The Champion with instructions to limit
answers to 75 words.
-----

tion. Transparency is equally
important. Citizens deserve
government that they can
trust, and I will remain open,
accountable, and transparent. Serving in a manner that
makes my constituents proud
is paramount, and I look forward to the task. 
What expertise do you have
that will help you fulfill the
duties of this office? As an
employment attorney I am
well acquainted with the challenges facing our economy.
We must find better ways for
employers and employees to
thrive, and I am well prepared
to facilitate commonsense solutions to problems that stifle
economic growth. As a former
athlete, I know what it takes to
lead a team, and that a team is

stronger than the individual.
I believe in teamwork, and I
am eager to lead our district
forward.
-----

Name:  J. Max Davis
Education:   UGA, GSU, JD,
John Marshall Law School
Occupation:  Attorney
What political offices have
you held in the past?  Mayor
of the city of Brookhaven

Have you ever been convicted
of a crime? No.
Why are you seeking this office?  I want to continue to
build on my record of reforming and helping our community and state to be the best it
can be. I want to cap property
taxes so no one will be hit
with skyrocketing tax bills and
seniors on fixed incomes can
keep their homes. I also want
to work to improve educational outcomes for all children
with a new city school system. 
What do you understand the
duties of this office to be?  I
learned the duties of a member of the State House from
watching my father serve for
22 years. We have to listen to
our constituents and understand that the government is

there to serve the taxpayer not
vice versa. We are there to pass
a balanced budget that meets
the needs of our growing state,
while facilitating freedom and
limiting the growth of government. 
What expertise do you have
that will help you fulfill the
duties of this office?  My life
experience has prepared me
for this office. My time as an
attorney and small businessman, working at the grassroots level to create the city
of Brookhaven and serving as
its first mayor give me unique
perspective on how to make
the different levels of government work together to meet
our shared goals.

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ELECTION
DECATUR CITY COMMISSION AND
DECATUR BOARD OF EDUCATION
The Decatur City Commission officially announces the Call for the City's General Election to be held in the
City of Decatur, Georgia, on November 3, 2015 for two Decatur Board of Education members for four year
terms of office, and three City of Decatur Commissioners for four year terms, such terms to begin at the
organizational meeting in January 2016.

Name: Taylor Bennett
Education:  Georgia Institute
of Technology 2004-2008.
Degree: B.S. in international
studies
Occupation: Attorney (focus
on labor and employment)
What political offices have
you held in the past? I have
not held political office in the
past.
Have you ever been convicted
of a crime? I have never been
convicted of a crime.
Why are you seeking this office? I am running for office
because I believe the people
of House District 80 deserve
a state representative who is
committed to transparency,
accountability, and a cooperative approach to solving our
state’s biggest problems. We
must work together—elected
officials and constituents,
teachers and parents, employers and employees—in order
grow our economy, improve
transportation, cut wasteful spending, and rebuild
our public education system.
House District 80 deserves
that kind of representative.
What do you understand the
duties of this office to be? 
Listening to and communicating with my constituents will
be my first priority. A representative should be a conduit
for his or her constituents at
the state house, and soliciting
input from citizens is essential to effective representa-

One City Commissioner from Election District 1, Post B
One City Commissioner from Election District 2, Post B
One City Commissioner District At-Large
One Decatur Board of Education member from Election District 1, Post B
One Decatur Board of Education member from Election District 2, Post B
DeKalb County will conduct this election at the following proposed precincts:
Election District
Clairemont East
Clairemont West
Glenwood Precinct
Oakhurst
Ponce De Leon
Renfroe
Winnona Park

District :
1
1
1&2
2
1&2
2
2

Polling Place for Election
: First Baptist Church of Decatur, 308 Clairemont Ave
: The Church at Decatur Heights, 735 Sycamore Drive
: Holy Trinity Parish, 515 E. Ponce de Leon Ave.
: Oakhurst Baptist Church, 222 E. Lake Dr.
: First Christain Church of Decatur, 601 W. Ponce de Leon Ave
: Renfroe Middle School, 220 W. College Ave.
: Winnona Park Elementary School, 510 Avery St.

Each candidate will file notice of his or her candidacy and the appropriate affidavit in the office of the Election
Superintendent at City Hall, 509 North McDonough Street, Decatur, Georgia. The opening dates for qualifying
will start Monday, August 31, 2015 beginning at 8:30 A. M., and continuing until Wednesday September 2,
2015 at 4:30 P.M. The qualifying fee for City Commission office is $144.00 and the qualifying fee for Board of
Education members is $35.00
Registration for voting in the November 3, 2015 election will cut off on Monday, October 5, 2015.
For the November 3 General Municipal Election, the Absentee Poll will open 21 days prior to the Election (October 12).
All Advance Voting (Absentee in person) will be held at 4380 Memorial Drive, Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM
to 4:00 PM, October 12 through October 30.

Questions concerning absentee voting, early voting or voter registration should be directed to DeKalb County
Elections Division at 404-298-4020.
The Decatur City Commission gives notice this 20th of July, 2015

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 9A

Stone Mountain businesses
receive grant awards
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Two Stone Mountain
business owners have extra
funds to spend on business
needs thanks to a grant program.
Artsy Fawn and Sweet
A’Roma, both located on
Main Street, were recipients
of BOOST Stone Mountain
grant program awards. Artsy
Fawn received $650 and
Sweet Aroma received $350.
Sherry Fortner, coowner of Sweet A’Roma, said
it is great to receive the grant
money.
“I’m so excited,” she said.
“I love to play with a new toy
and I can’t wait to play with
it.”
Stone Mountain Downtown Development Authority (DDA) created the grant
program earlier this year.
Mechel McKinley, executive
director of the DDA, said
the grant is funded by local
investors who want to see
small businesses thrive in the
Stone Mountain Village.
“We had an informational meeting in March and
have been talking to potential investors over the past
several months,” McKinley
said. “The investor group
met in mid-July and voted
on the applications.”
The first round of grant
applications were accepted
through July 1, and 10 applications were submitted.
“We were really excited
about [the applications]
and they varied from equipment, to facades, to interior
renovations,” McKinley said.
“They were really widely
varied and it was exciting to
read through them.”
Fortner heard about
grant program and was excited to apply for it.
“The town really tries to
support its local businesses
and I thought that was great,”
she said. “They’ve supported
us since we’ve been here.”
Fortner’s business has
been open for 17 months,
and she said it has been busy.
“We haven’t had to do
anything to boost the business,” she said. “The food
speaks for itself and the customers have been from word
of mouth and they keep
coming back. We appreciate
their business.”
Investors contribute a
minimum of $200 a year

with a commitment to remain part of the BOOST
Stone Mountain group for
two years. Business owners
are able to apply for grants
quarterly.
Grants are available for
investments such as signage,
equipment, marketing or
advertising needs, and interior or exterior renovations.
Grants will be made for
amounts between $100 and

$1,000. The awarded funds
are not to be used for day-today operating expenses.
The due date for the next
round of grants is Oct. 1, and
grants will be awarded at the
end of October.
The BOOST Stone
Mountain applications forms
are posted on the city of
Stone Mountain’s website,
www.stonemountaincity.org.

Sweet A’Roma was awarded $350 from the BOOST Stone Mountain grant
program. Photo by Carla Parker

Proposed Substantial Amendment to the 2008-2013
Consolidated Plan, including the 2013 Annual Action Plan;
Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant I, and the 2014-2018
Consolidated Plan, including the 2014 Annual Action Plan
DeKalb County is proposing a substantial amendment to the 2008-2013 Consolidated Plan, including
the 2013 Annual Action Plan, the Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant (1), and the 2014-2018
Consolidated Plan, including the 2014 Annual Action Plan.
The purpose of this amendment is to revise the original 2013 CDBG Annual Action Plan Budget so that
more funds can be utilized in the completion of DeKalb County Fire Station #3 construction in Avondale.
The proposed amendment will reallocate funds which were originally designated for the Improvements to
Shoal Creek Park, The City of Lithonia Plaza, and Streetscape Improvements.
Additionally, the County proposes to amend the Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant (1) Budget by
adding CDBG as an additional source of funding for the completion of the redevelopment of Brookside
Park. The County therefore proposes to amend the 2014 Annual Action Plan to reflect the reallocation
of funding which was originally designated for the Tobie Grant/Scottdale Intergenerational Center to the
Brookside Park project.
All citizens are invited to review the proposed substantial amendment to these programs from August
6 – August 21, 2015 on the DeKalb County website, www.co.dekalb.ga.us, and at the locations identified
below.
DeKalb County Human and Community Development Department
330 W. Ponce de Leon Avenue, 6th Floor, Decatur, Georgia 30030
Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Chamblee Branch Library
4115 Clairmont Road, Chamblee
(770-936-1380)
Redan-Trotti Branch Library
1569 Wellborn Road, Redan
(770-482-3821)

Decatur Branch Library
215 Sycamore Street, Decatur
(404-370-3070)
Wesley Chapel-William C. Brown Branch Library
2861 Wesley Chapel Road, Decatur
(404-286-6980)

Please contact the libraries for days and hours of operation.
Comment forms may be obtained and completed at each of the above listed locations. Comments
may also be faxed or emailed to the Human and Community Development Department.
Fax: (404) 371-2742
Email: bkcampbell@dekalbcountyga.gov

local

Page 10A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

DeKalb police train faith-based
leaders on crisis procedures
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
In the wake of the
Charleston church massacre,
DeKalb public safety officials
want the faith-based community to be properly prepared for any type of emergency.
The DeKalb County Office of Public Safety held a
community training session
July 29 at Rehoboth Baptist
Church in Tucker to teach
faith-based leaders and staff
how to prepare for a potential crisis.
Detective J.K. Walker of
the DeKalb police homeland
security unit instructed leaders on how to develop emergency operations plans and
how to respond to incidents
such as an active shooter on
the premises, severe weather
and fires.
Deputy Chief Operating Officer of Public Safety
Cedric Alexander said he
wanted to bring faith leaders
together because, “we are in
a very different time in this
American history.”
“With the tragic things
that we hear about and see
so frequently, sometimes
way too frequently, we have
to acknowledge the fact that
we have to be able to protect

ourselves,” Alexander said.
On June 17, Dylann
Roof, a 21-year-old White
man, shot nine Blacks to
death at Emanuel African
Methodist Episcopal Church
in Charleston. Among those
killed were the church pastor and State Sen. Clementa
Pinckney.
The attendees were told
of resources they can use to
secure their churches, such
as security cameras and hiring off-duty police officers.
In Georgia, citizens are
allowed to bring a concealed
weapon inside a church if the
church allows it. Alexander
said that they or someone
on their staff have the right
to bear arms if they cannot
afford to hire an off-duty officer.
“I understand the fact
that you may not have money in your budget in order to
hire off-duty police officers,”
Alexander said. “What I
would encourage you to do is
make sure you talk with your
attorneys, make sure that you
receive proper training in
the use of the firearm so that
you all won’t hurt each other.
You have the right to defend
yourself, you have the right
to defend your congregation.
How you chose to do that is
going to be left up to each

one of you individually.”
Alexander also informed
leaders that if there is an
emergency at their place of
worship, DeKalb police and
the sheriff ’s office will respond swiftly.
“Here in DeKalb we are
going to respond,” he said.
When you call we are going come, and we’re going to
come very hard and we’re going to come very fast.
“Unfortunately, as sad as
it may be, the likelihood of
these types of events to continue to happen are going to
be great,” he added. “That’s
a reality. It’s not a matter of
where it’s going to happen or
how it’s going to happen, it’s
just a matter of when. We all
need to be cognitively aware
J.K. Walker of the DeKalb Police Homeland Security Unit inof it happening and be ready Detective
structs leaders on how to develop emergency operations plans.
to respond.”
Karl Moore, pastor
of Clarkston First Baptist
Church, said his church has
security measures in place,
but he will share the information that was presented
with his staff.
“There was great insight
of what might be coming
and to prepare us for the imminent threats that seemed
to be prevailing themselves
now,” Moore said. “This here
will just enhance what we
already do.”
Interim CEO Lee May speaks to about 50 faith-based leaders during a

Pet of the Week

Meet Tallon (ID# 27774280) this 2 year
old Lab mix is as friendly as they come! He
greets everyone he meets with a smiling face
and wiggly tail. This playful boy heads straight
for the toy box as soon as he enters a room.
He loves plush toys the most and can’t wait to
carry them around in his forever home. Tallon
has been great with other dogs at the shelter
and would probably really enjoy having a
canine companion in his new home. He walks
nicely on a leash too; so your weekend hikes
should be a breeze with this boy by your side!
Is Tallon your perfect match? Come meet him
at DeKalb Animal Services and find out!
If you adopt Tallon or any dog weighing
over 20 lbs. or any cat during August you’ll
pay only $10 during our “Tail End of Summer”
special” including their spay/neuter, vaccines
and microchip at no additional charge. If you
would like more information about Tallon
please email adoption@dekalbanimalservices.
com or call (404) 294-2165. All potential
adopters will be screened to ensure Tallon
goes to a good home.

safety training session.

CITY OF BROOKHAVEN NOTICE FOR ELECTION
AND QUALIFYING PERIOD
Notice is hereby given that an Election for the City of
Brookhaven will be held on Tuesday, November 3, 2015 for
the offices of Mayor and Council Member Districts One (1)
and Three (3).
Qualifying for said election will be held Monday, August
31, 2015, Tuesday, September 1, 2015, and Wednesday,
September 2, 2015, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 12:30
p.m., and 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. (Georgia Election Code
21-2-132(c) (3)). Each candidate shall file a notice of candidacy in the office of the City Clerk of Brookhaven, 4362
Peachtree Road, Brookhaven, Georgia. Each candidate must
meet the qualifications of the Charter and Code of the City of
Brookhaven, as well as applicable State law. The qualifying fee
for mayor is $480.00 and the council seats is $360.00 which is
3% of the total gross salary of a council person for the preceding year (Georgia Election Code 21-2-131 (a) (1) (A)).
The last day a person may register and be eligible to vote
in the Municipal Election and Runoff is Monday, October 5,
2015 (Georgia Election Code 21-2-224(a)). The polls will be
open on Election Day, Tuesday, November 3, 2015 from 7:00
a.m. until 7:00 p.m. The date of the Run-off, if necessary, is
Tuesday, December 1, 2015.
Questions should be directed to Susan Hiott, City Clerk, at
(404) 637-0464 or susan.hiott@brookhavenga.gov.
Susan D. Hiott, MMC
City Clerk

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 11A

Book festival ends first decade bigger than ever
by Kathy Mitchell
In its 10-year history, the
Decatur Book Festival—now
the Atlanta Journal Constitution Book Festival—has
grown to be the nation’s largest independent book festival
and the fourth largest book
festival of any type in the
United States.
The first year, the festival
featured six stages and drew
35,000 attendees. When the
festival returns Sept. 4-6, this
year there will be 18 stages
and more than 90,000 people
are expected.
“The 35,000 the first year
shocked us,” recalled Philip
Rafshoon, the festival’s program director. “The numbers
just keep growing. We were
warned early on that interest
in printed books was waning but that hasn’t been the
case. There was a drop-off in
sales of printed books when
e-books first came out, but
that didn’t last and sales of
printed books are going up
again.”
Rafshoon, the former
owner of an independent
bookstore in midtown Atlanta, said he worked with the
festival over the years and
took over as program director three years ago.
“It was a natural fit for
me since during the years the
bookstore was open, from
the early ‘90s through 2012,
we held lots of book-related
events. Of course, the festival
is on a much larger scale, but
it still involves working with
publishers and authors and
designing events,” he said.
Rafshoon noted that the
program committee works
year-round, but really kicks
into gear the early part of the
year looking to put together
the perfect mix of authors
and events. Festival officials
go to New York in the spring
to get publishers’ recommendations on authors to feature.
“They know we treat our
authors like rock stars so
they really make an effort to
find outstanding writers for
us. What we end up with is a
mix of authors that publishers recommended and people we decided to go after.
Because we’re independent,
we don’t feature authors
because a sponsoring corporation or institution wants
them; we choose authors we
want,” he said
“We want this to be everyone’s festival,” Rafshoon
added, noting festivalgoers
will not only find world-

famous authors but also new
and emerging authors. “We
want events for avid readers,
casual readers, those who are
interested in groundbreaking material and those whose
tastes are more traditional.
“We try for a broad
spectrum of interests and
demographics. The cooking
pavilion is very popular and
we’re expanding it this year.
There’s a romance pavilion

just for writers of romance
novels.”
Children’s books are a
major part of the festival,
according to Rafshoon.
“We even have a “kidnote”
speaker, who is a featured
children’s book author.”
This year’s kidnote address will be given by Judy
Schachner, creator of
the Skippyjon Jones picture
books. Schachner, whose

address will be one of the
festival’s first events on Friday at 5 p.m., will launch her
new character and picture
book, Dewey Bob, at the festival.
We are so fortunate to
have novelist Erica Jong as
our keynote speaker this
year,” Rafshoon said. Jong is
the author of the best-selling
novel Fear of Flying, which
challenged conventional

thinking about women, marriage and sexuality when it
was published in 1973. During her appearance at the
festival, Jong will launch of
her new novel Fear of Dying,
a sequel to Fear of Flying that
festival promoters describe
as “a hilarious, unsparingly
honest and heart-wrenching
story about what happens
when one woman steps reluctantly into the afternoon

See Books on page 14A

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Page 12A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

Students collected donated school supplies. Photos by Justin Beaudrot

DeKalb school students bowl with deputies
by Justin Beaudrot

Lt. L. Robertson and Director of Administration Lashawn Reaves bowl
with a CHMS student.

Children from local YMCA’s also participated in the community day.

Stars and Strikes Bowling Center, located
in Stone Mountain, hosted the Sixth Annual
Community Day with Sheriff Jeff Mann. This
event introduced children from Chapel Hill
Middle School and local YMCA’s to DeKalb
County law enforcement.
Tom Walker Sr. has hosted this event
for six years; originally at Suburban Lanes in
Decatur. After the sale of the Suburban Lanes
property earlier this year, Walker coordinated
with Stars and Strikes to host the event there.
Walker said he wants to help children be
able “to identify a positive role model, develop self-respect, [and] see if we can help
reduce the number of juvenile incidences in
our school system.” Walker also said he wants
children to know ”the opportunities you’ve
got to get yourself straight again, and make
sure they know there are police on campus
that they can turn to” in case they find themselves in trouble.
Amid bowling and donated pizza, DeKalb
County law enforcement officers and children
from around DeKalb enjoyed each other’s
company. The event is about showing the
community, and especially the children, that
members of law enforcement are people they
can trust to help and guide them.
Representatives from DeKalb County
Sheriff ’s Office, DeKalb County SolicitorGeneral, DeKalb County Police and Department of Juvenile Justice were in attendance.
They spoke with the children about trusting
and respecting law enforcement agencies,
making better life decisions and staying in
school. They also spoke with the children
about resources available to them should they
ever encounter any trouble.
DeKalb County Solicitor-General Sherry
Boston led a pledge, which the whole audi-

ence recited, about being a leader and promising to not miss any school days.
“Statistics show that 80 percent of people
in prison are high school dropouts or without
a GED. In the DeKalb County jail, it’s 90 percent. So there is a direct correlation between
not getting an education and committing
crime,” Boston said, “A big part of our office is
prosecuting crime everyday, but what we really want is to prevent crime, and the best way
to prevent crime is to get to kids and young
people at a young age, and talk about how
they don’t have to have a life of crime if they
do the things that can make them successful
in their life.”
Book bags, paper, folders, pens, pencils
and highlighters were given to the children as
part of this drive.
Lashawn Reaves, director of administration at DeKalb County Sheriff ’s Office, said
the donations were collected by the offices
and organizations present at the event. He
said that everyone was glad to help out, and
looks forward to the back-to-school drive
each year.
As a parting message to the children,
Walker said, “You all know about the bad
stuff that’s going on in the news about law
enforcement, well they [the officers] are here
because they care about you. They’re good,
they want you to respect them, and they definitely respect you…. We know we’re going to
have incidences, but we don’t want to have
you being one of those incidences, but if you
[are], we want you to know that’s not the end
of the world. That’s not the end of the world.
There are ways that we can help you get back
on your feet.”
Walker announced he will begin a junior
bowling program at Stars and Strikes, and
invited the children present to join him this
September and January for the program.

In

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Page 13A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

WEEK

City of Decatur’s skyline sees a new addition as the Arlo mixed-use development takes
shape. Photo by Travis Hudgons

Pictures

The new Peachcrest Elementary School is nearly ready to be filled with teachers and students on Aug. 10. Photo by Andrew Cauthen

A worker posts a “facility closed” sign at Browns Mill Aquatic Center on July 29. The center, which was closed July 28 after staffing problems, reopened on July 31. Photos by Andrew
Cauthen

Photos brought to you by DCTV

DeKalb County begins one-day-a-week sanitation collection service July 6, 2015
Residential customers will have same-day garbage, recyclable materials and yard trimmings collection
For more info, call or visit:

(404) 294-2900
www.rollingforwardtoone.com

local

Page 14A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

Food trucks a
possibility in Clarkston
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
In the past few years
food trucks have become a
popular trend nationwide
and may soon debut in
Clarkston.
On July 28 Clarkston
City Manager Keith Barker
said, “Given Clarkston’s location and desire to attract
more people to the downtown central business area,
the establishment of a regular
food truck event seems to be
a logical step towards achieving that desired outcome.”
Barker said food
trucks will be a success in
Clarkston, based on the popularity of the Refuge Coffee
Truck, a newly established
nonprofit organization that
offers jobs and job training
for resettled refugees living
in Clarkston. Currently, the
nonprofit is operating as a
coffee truck with two refugees hired and working.
Barker said he’s “constantly amazed at the number of people that are there

all day [even though] the
heat index is about 110 degrees.”
He said, “The city also
wants to do what we can to
make sure that we attract
people who may not be familiar with what Clarkston
has to offer, as well as give
something to the residents
who live in and around
Clarkston an opportunity to
come together as a community around some fun event.”
The city’s code restricts
or prohibits many forms
of outdoor vending, which
would restrict a food truck or
cart from conducting business on public rights-of-way
within the city.
Jason Gaines, planning
and development manager,
said the city council will
need to amend the code section to allow food trucks to
be exempt from having to
obtain temporary land-use
permits.
“Any change to the text
of the zoning ordinance falls
under the provisions of the
Georgia Zoning Procedures

Act, which means we must
properly advertise and conduct public hearings for that
change in language,” Gaines
said.
Clarkston’s city council
moved its upcoming planning and zoning board meeting to Aug. 24 to gather public comment before adoption
of the ordinance. If adopted,
the second public hearing
will take place at a regular
council meeting on Sept. 8
prior to a vote.
Barker said, “The long
range goal is that we want to
get people used to coming
to downtown Clarkston in
advance of us finishing our
streetscape.”
He said he also hopes
vendors will consider turning their food trucks into
“brick and mortar businesses
here in Clarkston.”
Barker said pending approval of the ordinance, the
city council is considering a
pilot food truck rally in October.

Books

Continued From Page 11A

of life.”
“Of course, we’re thrilled to have Pat Conroy returning
and so many other wonderful authors,” Rafshoon said. Conroy, the best-selling author of The Lords of Discipline, The
Prince of Tides, South of Broad and other books, will moderate a panel discussion, “All Stories Are True, Some Even Happened.” There also will be an author with a book about Conroy, Catherine Seltzer, who wrote Understanding Pat Conroy
which “sketches Conroy’s biography and explores each of his
major works,” according to a news release from the festival.
Other festival highlights include:
Drew Daywalt, author of the children’s book The Day
the Crayons Quit, will lead the Saturday kick-off parade and
launch his follow up, The Day the Crayons Came Home.
Damon Tweedy, M.D., author of Black Man in a White
Coat: A Doctor’s Reflection on Race and Medicine, will discuss
his memoir of his experience grappling with race, bias and
the unique health problems of Black Americans.
In a panel discussion, “Life, Me and Mom,” Jamie Brickhouse, author of Dangerous When Wet, and George Hodgman, author of Bettyville, will discuss mother-son relationships and self-discovery.
Ari Berman, a political correspondent for The Nation,
will discuss the impact of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, as
chronicled in his book Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America.
Libba Bray, author of many young adult novels, will return to the festival with her new book, Lair of Dreams.
Amy Stewart will launch Girl Waits with Gun about one
of the first female sheriffs in history — and whose story has
been previously untold.
Five contributors to Best American Poetry 2015, Afaa Michael Weaver, Evie Shockley, Denise Duhamel, Laura McCullough, Jericho Brown, will read from their works. 
Former “dad” columnist at CNN Josh Levs will discuss
his book  All In: How Our Work-First Culture Fails Dads,
Families, and Businesses — And How We Can Fix It Together
“We urge visitors to plan their visits by making a schedule for themselves before they come. Otherwise they may
miss something they really wanted to see,” Rafshoon said.
Some events, although they’re free, require tickets. For a
schedule and more information, visit http://decaturbookfestival.com/sessions.

DeKalb Chamber of Commerce announces new staff
DeKalb Chamber of Commerce has announced the hiring of three key staff members.
Chamber President Katerina Taylor said the new team
brings “new energy, enthusiasm and fresh ideas that will help
propel our goals to support and strengthen the business community.”
DeKalb Chamber members and the community can
meet the new staff at the upcoming Business After Hours on
Aug. 18 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Iberian Pig, 121 Sycamore
Street in Decatur.
The new staff members include:
Kim Childs, vice president of operations, who has more
than 20 years of experience working in corporate retail and
commercial banking. She is responsible for streamlining all
operational areas of the chamber.
Emily Yang, communications and experiential marketing
manager. She is responsible for managing internal and external communications and overseeing the chamber’s signature
events and programs.
Rick Young, director of membership development, a etail
and commercial banker with more 16 years of experience
working in the Atlanta and DeKalb market. He is responsible
for managing member acquisitions, retention and engagement and overseeing all member relation events.
For more details about the Chamber’s upcoming events,
visit www.dekalbchamber.org.

NOTICE OF ELECTION, QUALIFYING REQUIREMENTS, AND
REGISTRATION
CITY OF AVONDALE ESTATES, GEORGIA
Notice is hereby given that a General Municipal Election for the City of Avondale
Estates will be held on Tuesday, November 3, 2015 to elect one (1) Mayor and two (2)
Commissioners to the Avondale Estates Board of Mayor and Commissioners. The term
of office is four (4) years. Voting will take place at Avondale Estates City Hall, 21
North Avondale Plaza from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Any person who is a resident of the
City of Avondale Estates and who is registered with Dekalb County Board of
Registrations and Elections as an elector within the City of Avondale Estates at least
thirty (30) days prior to this election, shall be eligible to vote in this election. Deadline
for voter registration is October 5, 2015.
Persons wishing to qualify for this election may file a notice of candidacy with the
Qualifying Officer at Avondale Estates City Hall, 21 North Avondale Plaza, from 8:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. beginning Monday, August 31
through Friday, September 4, 2015. The qualifying fee is $3.00.
Application for absentee ballots may be made by mail, fax or in person to: DeKalb
County Election Supervisor, Memorial Drive Complex , 4380 Memorial Drive, Suite
300, Decatur, GA 30032-1239, Telephone: (404) 298-4020, Fax: (404) 298-4038.
This notice is given pursuant to Chapter 21 of the Official Code of Georgia, as
amended, pertaining to municipal elections, this 6th day of August 2015.
City of Avondale Estates

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 15A

Center

Land Continued From Page 1A

of sitting at home grieving, they get to
come out and participate in things to
keep them active.
“You have to be an active senior
to be a member,” she added. “There
are exercise classes, computer classes
and social activities. There is a travel
club where they travel to places such as
South Africa, Hawaii and New York. It
has been a major blessing to the south
DeKalb area.”
Green has been a member of the
center since 2011. She said she enjoys
the line dancing classes and the trips.
“I just enjoy it,” Green said. “When
we’re closed, I get bored because I miss
being there and associating with the
people that’s there. I love it.
“When I tell people of Lou Walker
they’re just amazed because they’ve
never heard of anything like it,” Green
added. “It’s wonderful.”
The center would not be where it
is without DeKalb For Seniors, Inc.
DeKalb For Seniors was incorporated
in 2003 to assist the center in obtaining
resources needed and not covered by
the county budget for programming
and other expenses. The organization
has saved the county more $700,000
so far through donations, purchases
and volunteer hours, according to the
center’s website.
The DeKalb For Seniors board of
directors is made up of six volunteers,
including Dees, who has been with
DeKalb For Seniors since 2008.
“I joined because I have a love for the
senior population and I wanted to serve
on a board where I will be able to make
an immediate and substantial difference,
a tangible difference where I could see
where the money was going and see
what type of work was being done,” Dees
said.
DeKalb For Seniors purchased
items or the center such as a baby grand
piano in the Victory Room, where
members often gather. They also provide
transportation to events, commission
meetings and other destination.
DeKalb For Seniors also sponsors
events for clubs within the center. It
sponsored an annual back-to-school
supply drive July 31. School supplies
were donated to Stoneview Elementary
School in Lithonia.
“We are a volunteer board,
so we have provided [the center]
with professional services through
marketing,” Dees said. “We have an
attorney that sits on the board, and we
have been able to help with legal things,
just being able to be a resource.”
Blackwell said DeKalb For Seniors is
a “fantastic” organization.
“They’ve helped us with a lot of
different programs over the years,” he
said. “They’ve been very supportive of all
the efforts that we have here at the Lou
Walker center.”
The group plans to assist with the 10year celebration, which the center’s staff
is currently planning. Although details
have not been finalized, whatever takes
place Green is sure to attend.

Blank’s Atlanta United FC to build
a $30 million soccer complex at
the intersection of Kensington
Road and Memorial Drive near
Interstate 285 in Decatur.
Commissioner Sharon Barnes
Sutton said, “It will be a tremendous benefit. I’m so elated that
we’re going to have this tremendous transformational partnership
for Memorial Drive.”
Barnes said the development of
the soccer complex opens many
possibilities for the corridor.
One benefit is that it will provide
“much needed recreation for the
people that live in DeKalb County
because residents will be able to
use the soccer fields,” she said.
“It brings exposure, it brings
people here and gives them a
reason to be over in the area and
I believe it will attract other businesses,” Sutton added.
Although many residents have
raised concerns about the cost
of the project, Sutton said, “the
cost is worth it. It’s a very low cost
considering the land is countyowned, so we don’t get any taxes
on it anyway.”

Continued From Page 1A

Soccer franchise owner Blank
plans to build a 3,500-seat stadium, three outdoor practice
fields and a two-story corporate
headquarters on land behind the
DeKalb County Jail. The proposal
states four additional fields and an
indoor training facility could be
built later.
Interim DeKalb County CEO
Lee May said the county was aggressive in landing this deal. “Memorial Drive has not seen a dollar
of development in two decades. If
the private sector was interested
in the Memorial Drive area it

would’ve happened by now,” May
said.
“For me it’s not as much about
a sports facility. It’s about having a financial investment in this
corridor that’s sorely in need,” he
added.
Commissioner Jeff Rader
said he would like to see Atlanta
United FC in DeKalb County but
wanted to renegotiate a better deal
“that’s good for everybody.”
DeKalb County beat out competitor Marietta for the deal with
Blank. According to the Atlanta
Business Chronicle, Marietta offered Blank and his team a 30-year
lease of 49 acres the city owns on
Franklin Road with an initial rent
of a $1 a year for five years and
then fair market value priced rent
for the remainder of the lease.
DeKalb County’s offer is said to
have been six times greater than
that of Marietta.
Rader said, “When DeKalb sat
down to negotiate we didn’t run
the model. Instead, the CEO’s office negotiated with Atlanta United and it was a David-versus-Goliath scenario. DeKalb was represented by the CEO’s staff without
an objective analysis but with a
burning desire to make something
happen south of Decatur.”
Unlike the biblical account,
Rader said, in this instance Goliath won.
Rader agreed that something
needed to be developed in south
DeKalb but said, “We didn’t have
the background to know what the
necessary incentive would be.”
Under the proposal, the total
cost for land preparation and
demolition of 40 acres is an estimated $3 million to $5 million.
Additionally, $7 million in rent

would be paid to Blank over three
years for office space for county’s
parks department. The annual
payment would be $2.33 million
for the first three years and then
$10 per year for the remainder of
the ground lease.
Atlanta United FC’s soccer season starts in January 2017.
Atlanta United FC is exempt
from paying property taxes, and
permitting fees for the soccer
complex.
Additionally, the county will
seek funding for pedestrian improvements from the soccer complex to the Kensington MARTA
Station and to demolish the current animal shelter.
Under the plan, DeKalb
County Parks and Recreation Department would be able to use the
property for lacrosse, 3v3 soccer,
rugby, field soccer, kickball and
ultimate Frisbee.
The agreement states Blank
is required to pay the county 15
percent of revenue for naming
rights and branded events held at
the complex and ownership of the
land and facilities would revert to
the county after 30 years.
It is estimated that approximately 83 people would work at
the team’s onsite corporate headquarters in 2017, growing to 123
people in 2018 with salaries that
average $150,000 per year, according to the memorandum of understanding proposal.
The deal is estimated to bring
123 construction-related jobs with
10 percent of the jobs going to
DeKalb residents.
Commissioners Rader, Kathie
Gannon and Nancy Jester voted
against the proposed deal.  

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-

37,408
2,994
4,109
3,455
6,689
3,315
6,264
1,104
759
1,244
4,242
1,569
1,835
2,575
3,969
776
112
432
4,562
290
1,978
992
639
466
6,980
1,352
7
(25,451)
5,204
113,264

79,331
6,527
9,241
7,206
14,119
7,168
13,621
2,355
1,630
2,455
8,703
3,158

3,865
4,233
9,031
1,744

493
1,372
14,100

641
4,156
1,984
1,278
4,812
-

17,322
2,705
44,768
10,139
356,714

Revenues:
Property Taxes
Sales Taxes
Other Taxes
Licenses and permits
Intergovernmental
Charges for Services
Fines and Forfeitures
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Proceeds of general long-term liabilities
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
General Government:
Chief Executive Officer
Board of Commissioners
Law Department
Ethics
Geographic Information
Risk Management
Facilities Management
Purchasing
Human Resources & Merit System
Information Systems
Finance
Property Appraisal
Tax Commissioner
Registrar and Elections
Civil and Criminal Court System:
Sheriff
Juvenile Court
Superior Court
Clerk Superior Court
State Court
Solicitor State Court
District Attorney
Child Advocate
Probate Court
Medical Examiner
Public Defender
Magistrate Court
Public Safety:
Public Safety Admin & Communications
Animal Control
Police
Fire & Rescue
Planning & Development
Public Works:
Directors Office
Economic Development
Public Services - Library
Health and Human Services:
Extension Services
Public Board of Health
Community Service Board
Family and Children Services
Human and Community Development
Citizen Help Center
Capital Improvement
CIP
GO Bonds - Parks
Non-Departmental
Debt Service
Grants
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Transfers To Other Funds
Total Expenditures
747
1,122
1,991
57
862
8,177
1,280
1,603
7,338
3,774
2,360
3,262
821

(118)
-

(118)

1,349
3,366
5,007
215
2,275
16,242
3,047
3,959
21,300
7,653
4,724
7,314
2,106

3,177
-

3,177

-

-

-

(118)

-

(118)

2,310
Urban
Redevelopment
Debt Service
Fund
414

2,310

-

-

-

2,310

2,310

2015
Actual
16,839
29,536
2,109
2
820
21,463
4,683
15
2,034
922
37,152
115,575

1,067
-

1,711
1,712
Hotel /
Motel
Tax
Fund
275

General Fund 100
2015
Budget
202,983
51,575
5,212
4
1,480
43,260
9,009
2,618
3,421
37,152
356,714

1,067

-

Total Liabilities And Fund Balance

-

-

3,177

1,067

-

-

-

-

3,177

1,067

-

(12,457)
Public Safety
Judicial Facilities
Debt Service
Fund
413

(8,990)
Building
Authority Bonds
Debt Service
Fund
412

(12,985)

-

528

-

(8,990)

528
-

(15,944)
(180)
3,667
(12,457)

Police Services
Fund
274

5,384
-

3,340

-

975
(8,990)

(9,965)

Hospital
Fund
273

91,245
-

2,311

-

-

2,044

88,934

1

1
-

1,712

1,712

PEG
Support
Fund
203

1,993

51

5,417
(33)
5,384

Development
Fund
201

5,629
7,315
654
75,160
176

31,487
502
91,245

59,256

Fund Balance

Liabilities:
Accounts payable
Deferred revenue
Payroll liabilities
Advance payments and deposits
Notes payable
Due to others
Other Accrued Liabilities
Total Liabilities

Assets:
Cash and investments
AP Clearing
Receivable
Inventories and prepaid items
Non-Current Assets
Total Assets

Total Liabilities And Fund Balance

Fund Balance

Liabilities:
Accounts payable
Deferred revenue
Payroll liabilities
Advance payments and deposits
Notes payable
Due to others
Other Accrued Liabilities
Total Liabilities

Assets:
Cash and investments
AP Clearing
Receivable
Inventories and prepaid items
Total Assets

Total Liabilities And Fund Balance

Fund Balance

Liabilities:
Accounts payable
Deferred revenue
Payroll liabilities
Advance payments and deposits
Notes payable
Due to others
Other Accrued Liabilities
Total Liabilities

Assets:
Cash and investments
AP Clearing
Receivable
Inventories and prepaid items
Total Assets

General
Fund
100

37,556
-

27,942

9,614

(3)

9,437
180

13,034
(624)
1,789
37,556

23,357

863
-

Water &
Sewer
Operating
Fund
511

863

-

-

-

863

863

(239)
Rental Motor
Vehicle Excise
Tax
Fund
280

(239)

-

-

-

(239)

(239)

County Jail
Fund
204

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

90
-

90

-

-

-

90

90

Juvenile
Services
Fund
208

-

72
479
261
14
114
302
162
419
(113)
3,524
23
1,905
658
-

155
2,088
2,240
73
1,097
111
2
908
4,095
313
11,477
1,785
(719)
13
1
4,868
(124)
16
248
21

558
202
760

630
97
33
760

Revenues:
PropertyTaxes
Sales Taxes
Investment income
Intergovernmental Revenue
Transfer from Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Workforce Development
Non-Departmental
Total Expenditures

2

664
(9,249)
(8,585)

2

1,054
1,054

2015
Actual

119
(26)
93

84
33
117

2015
Actual

(9,938)
299
1,054
(8,585)

2009 ARRA Stimulus Fund 260
2015
Budget

Revenues:
Investment income
Intergovernmental Revenue
Transfers From Other Funds
Deferred Revenue
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Police
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Grants/2005 JAG #10 Fund 257
2015
Budget

(322)
(236)
10,576

3,314

(11,558)
-

(13,426)

1,868

(2)

1,769
101
-

(11,558) -

5,015
-

(16,573)

(6,380)
-

(6,975)

595

-

580
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2015
Actual

9,964
-

9,800

164

-

164
-

9,964

25,838
5,670
718
(16,705)
15,521
Host Capital Projects Fund 330
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
335
Intergovernmental
(9,792)
Deferred Revenue
Transfers From Other Funds
312
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
(9,145)
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
27,545
Unappropriated
(36,690)
(9,145)

Revenues:
Investment income
Intergovernmental Revenue
Transfers From Other Funds
Contributions from private sources
Proceeds from sale of bonds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Parks
Library
Transportation
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated

165
297
462

4
315
5,922
6,241

2015
Actual

593
48
(348)
386
(13)
666

2006 G O Bonds - Parks, Transportation, Libraries Fund 315
2015
2015
Budget
Actual
(6,909)
24
(64)
(3,285)
(3,825)
(3,285)
32,889
32,889
15,521
32,913

242
(15)
227

-

-

9,964

Stormwater
Utility
Fund
581

591
-

590

1

-

1
-

591

591

3,397
Public
Safety
Judicial Facilities
Fund
354

3,195

202

-

184
18

3,397

3,397

19,410
3,613
23,023

4,925
-

4,917

8

-

8
-

4,925

-

4,925

Airport
Construction
Fund
552

COPS
Projects
Fund
351

1,313
-

1,308

5

-

5
-

1,313

1,313

Telephone
System
Fund
215

Emergency

16
23,225
23,241

-

Speed
Hump
Maintenance
Fund
212

2001 G O Bonds - Parks Fund 314
2015
Budget
1,855
(277)
(183)
(33)
(38)
(1,526)
23,225
23,023

9,670
-

9,530

140

-

94
46

9,670

-

9,670

Airport
Operating
Fund
551

23,006
-

19,086

3,920

-

451
3,469
-

870
23,006

22,136

(172)
Capital
Improvement
Projects
Fund
350

(175)

3

-

3
-

33
(172)

(205)

Street
Lights
Fund
211

Revenues:
Investment income
Intergovernmental
Contributions from private sources
Transfers From Other Funds
Proceeds from sale of bonds
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

7,402
-

7,402

-

-

-

7,402

-

7,402

5,820
Sanitation
ARRA Capital
Projects
Fund
544

5,779

41

-

41
-

5,820

5,820

Host Capital
Projects
Fund
330

7,812
-

6,648

1,164

493

25
646

73
7,812

7,739

Confiscated
Monies
Fund
210

Law Enforcement

(6,380) -

-

(6,380)

32,400
Sanitation
Construction
Fund
542

32,247

153

-

153
-

32,400

32,400

2006 G O
Bonds - P,T,L
Fund
315

320
-

293

27

-

27
-

320

320

23,024
-

2,407

(2)
(21,491)
9,582

Drug Abuse
Treatment
& Education
Fund
209

Sanitation
Operating
Fund
541

23,014

10

-

10
-

23,024

23,024

2015
Actual
141
8,921
521
200
2,637
12,420

37,137
-

26,162

10,975

-

10,975
-

37,137

-

37,137

Water &
Sewer
Sinking
Fund
514

-

-

-

-

-

-

1993
2001 G O
Bonds - Health Bonds - Parks
Fund
Fund
313
314

(172)
-

(187)

15

-

15
-

(172)

(172)

Recreation
Fund
207

Grant-In-Aid Fund 250
2015
Budget
1,860
13,411
(4,753)
(3,573)
2,637
9,582

273,003
-

233,844

39,159

32,815
6,344
-

7,091
36,545
273,003

229,367

Water &
Sewer
R&E
Fund
513

1998
Bonds - Jail
Fund
312

571
-

571

-

-

-

571

571

Victim
Assistance
Fund
206

Revenues:
Contributions from private sources
Intergovernmental
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
General Government:
Finance
Workforce Development
Civil and Criminal Court System:
Sheriff
Juvenile Court
Superior Court
State Court
Solicitor
District Attorney
Public Defender
Magistrate Court
Police Services
Fire & Rescue
Public Works
Community Development
Parks
Extension Service
Family & Children Services
Sanitation
Community Relations
Fleet Maint.
Animal Control
Bd of Health
Sr Citizen Services
Human Services
Keep Dekalb Beautiful
Arts, Culture, and Entertainment
Registrar/Elections
Water & Sewer
Non-Departmental
Fund Expenditures
Miscellaneous
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

346,646
-

345,537

1,109

-

765
344

346,646

-

346,646

Water &
Sewer Bonds
Construction
Fund
512

1987 G O
Bonds - Parks
Fund
311

589
-

580

9

-

9
-

589

589

Foreclosure
Registry
Fund
205

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION BY FUND
As of June 30, 2015
(In thousands of dollars / unaudited)

DEKALB COUNTY, GEORGIA

This statement is published in accordance with Section 19 (b) of the DeKalb County Organizational Act of 1981, p. 4304.

-

1,844

4,531

-

301
4,230
-

6,375

6,375

2,213
-

2,213

-

-

-

2,213

-

2,213

Stormwater
Construction
Fund
582

422
-

422

-

-

-

422

422

6,375
Building
Authority
Juvenile Court
Fund
355

GrantIn-Aid
Fund
250

84,351
-

54,750

29,601

-

29,601
-

84,351

-

18,866
-

14,582

4,284

4,284
-

18,866

1,717

17,149

Risk
Management
Fund
631

4,571
-

4,571

-

-

-

4,571

4,571

(14,612)
ARRA
Capital
Projects
Fund
360

(15,789)

1,177

1

1,176
-

2,928
(14,612)

(17,540)

Fire
Fund
270

-

4,635
-

(6,094)

10,729

-

10,729
-

4,635

-

4,635

Workers
Compensation
Fund
632

4,014
-

4,014

-

-

-

128
1,114
4,014

2,772

Debt
Service
Fund
410

(5,651)
-

(6,238)

587

-

587
-

1,168
(5,651)

(6,819)

Designated
Services
Fund
271

Special Tax

8,334
134,217
159,111
7,539
309,201

279,264
67,447
346,711

1
251
33,367
14,494
48,113
21,951
21,951

66,763
66,763

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Proceeds from sale of bonds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Fund Expenditures
CIP
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

2015
Actual

8,325
(652)
7,673

10
36,067
205,440
241,517

2015
Actual

19,365
(448)
18,917

266
364,188
364,454

2015
Actual

3,308
56,437
2
70,122
19,798
149,667

115
126,470
141
50,883
177,609

2015
Actual

203
203

Water & Sewer Sinking Fund 514
2015
Budget
541
51,728
14,494
66,763

142,811
15,172
157,983

Water & Sewer R & E Fund 513
2015
Budget
15,858
(46)
(63,269)
205,440
157,983
Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated

Revenues:
Investment Income
Proceeds from sale of bonds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated

Water & Sewer Bonds Construction Fund 512
2015
Budget
(17,477)
364,188
346,711

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Finance
Water and Sewer
Fund Expenditures
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Water & Sewer Operating Fund 511
2015
Budget
600
257,602
116
50,883
309,201

748
748

Urban Redevelopment Agency Bond Debt Service Fund 414
2015
2015
Budget
Actual
748
85
748
85

(1,028)
-

(2,238)

1,210

-

1,210
-

(1,028) -

28,009
-

56,342

Vehicle
Replacement
Fund
621

3,491
-

(17)

3,508

-

13
3,495
-

3,590
(99)
3,491

HUD Section
108 Loan
Fund
357

1,053
-

1,052

1

-

1
-

1,053

1,053

Grants
2009 ARRA
Fund
260

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Transfers out
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

-

149

(1,177)

Vehicle
Maintenance
Fund
611

3,062
-

3,039

23

-

23
-

3,062

3,062

Urban
Redevelopement
Agemcu
Fund
356

434
-

24

410

-

7
403
-

434

434

Grants
2005 JAG #10
Fund
257

-

Special Tax

1,019,353
-

804,367

109,909
19,013
10,240
75,160
664
214,986

889,333
(312)
83,130
8,868
38,334
1,019,353

Total
All
Funds

4,383
-

4,383

-

-

-

4,383

4,383

22,927
GO Bonds
STD
Debt Service
Fund
411

(3,129)

26,056

(132)

141
24,695
1,352

(5,759)
28,686
22,927

District
Unincorporated
Fund
272

Juvenile Services Fund 208
2015
Budget

Recreation Fund 207
2015
Budget

Victim Assistance Fund 206
2015
Budget

144
144

28
116
144

838
838

880
(42)
838

67
783
850

450
350
50
850

437
426
863

226
219
445

4,898
1,591
6,489

4,450
2,039
6,489

Revenues:
Charges for Services
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Emergency Telephone System
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

12,886
12,886

Emergency Telephone System Fund 215
2015
Budget
7
9,851
3,028
12,886

Speed Humps Maintenance Fund 212
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Charges for Services
290
Investment income
3
Fund Balance Carried Forward
1,400
Total Revenues
1,693
Expenditures:
Public Works-Roads & Drainage
379
Unappropriated
1,314
1,693

Revenues:
Sales Taxes
Investment income
Charges for Services
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Public Works-Transportation
Unappropriated

Street Lights Fund 211
2015
Budget

Law Enforcement Confiscated Monies Fund 210
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
Intergovernmental
940
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
6,569
Total Revenues
7,509
Expenditures:
Police
5,763
Sheriff
1,233
District Attorney
159
Transfers To Other Funds
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
354
Total Expenditures
7,509

Revenues:
Investment income
Fines and Forfeitures
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Health and Welfare
Unappropriated

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

4,827
(78)
4,749

2
4
4,910
3,028
7,944

103
103

10
1
1,400
1,411

2,396
2,396

182
2,039
2,221

678
26
65
(828)
(59)

5
15
6,569
6,589

88
(10)
78

151
220
371

43
(7)
36

10
116
126

610
610

457
8
(42)
423

6
6

291
236
50
577

204
(4)
200

103
677
780

Foreclosure Registry Fund 205
2015
Budget
186
677
863
2015
Actual

921
921

1,149
18
1,167

74
(7)
67

1
43
1,734
1,778

1,876
10
247
(1)
2,132

3,284
2
108
2,078
5,472

76
606
682

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

110
1,057
1,167

County Jail Fund 204
2015
Budget

1,047
768
1,815

1
80
1,734
1,815

PEG Support Fund 203
2015
Budget

4,861
800
2,569
8,230

6,132
2
(2)
20
2,078
8,230

Drug Abuse Treatment & Education Fund 209
2015
Budget
225
220
445

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Juvenile Court
Unappropriated

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Parks and Recreation
Unappropriated

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Fines and Forfeitures
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Victim Assistance
Transfers To Other Funds
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Revenues:
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Planning & Development
Unappropriated

Intergovernmental
Fines and forfeitures
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Transfers To Other Funds
Unappropriated

Revenues:

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
PEG Support
Unappropriated

Expenditures:
Planning & Development
Public Works- Director's Office
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated

Revenues:
Licenses and Permits
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Charges for Services
Transfers To Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues

Development Fund 201
2015
Budget

24,982
3,584
(90)
28,476

82
50,509
7,289
15
3,278
61,173

12,372
12,066
6,402
35
2,846
36,940

6
3,213
6,970
5,893
2,829
(154)
16,757

(6)
1,225

6,876
46,438
1,055
54,369

14,141
97,292
12,022
123,455

3
3

-

-

Revenues:
Investment income
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

1993 G O Bonds - Health Fund 313
2015
Budget
3
3

-

-

-

-

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

48
48

2015
Actual
231
1
679
911

991
1,569
2,560

-

Revenues:
Investment income
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

-

(19)
(19)

1998 G O Bonds - Jail Fund 312
2015
Budget

Revenues:
Investment income
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

1987 G O Bonds - Parks Fund 311
2015
Budget
(19)
(19)

Rental Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Fund 280
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Other Taxes
477
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
679
Total Revenues
1,156
Expenditures:
Development Authority
708
Unappropriated
448
1,156

Hotel / Motel Tax Fund 275
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Other Taxes
5,000
Fund Balance Carried Forward
1,867
Total Revenues
6,867
Expenditures:
Convention Bureau
2,187
Transfers To Other Funds
2,812
Unappropriated
1,868
6,867
2015
Actual
3,003
1,867
4,870

2015
Actual
3,611
9,692
2
248
197
19
54
16,340
11,221
41,384

Police Services Fund 274
2015
Budget
48,090
16,924
1
593
385
87
46,154
11,221
123,455

Revenues:
Property Taxes
Sales Taxes
Other Taxes
Licenses and Permits
Charges for Services
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Non-departmental
Police Services
Unappropriated

11,645
11,645

18,545

(559)
19,737

2015
Actual
730
2,491
(7)
(559)
2,655

1,192
19,737

Revenues:
Property Taxes
Sales Taxes
Intergovernmental
Investment Income
Proceeds of general long term liabilities
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Health and Welfare-Hospital
Fund expenditures
Unappropriated

Hospital Fund 273
2015
Budget
15,946
4,350
-

Special Tax District - Unincorporated Fund 272
2015
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Actual
Charges for Services
Sales Taxes
Other Taxes
32,864
2,330
Licenses and Permits
19,864
14,444
Investment income
(29)
Fines and Forfeitures
17,594
5,806
Miscellaneous
(2)
Transfers From Other Funds
(57,810)
(20,505)
Fund Balance Forward
492
492
Total Revenues
13,004
2,536
Expenditures:
General Government:
Chief Executive Officer
562
183
Finance
106
State Court
2,658
1
Recorders Court
2,152
2,433
Planning & Development
5,221
1,897
Non-Departmental
1,905
905
Transfers From Other Funds
15
Unappropriated
491
140
Total Expenditures
13,004
5,665

Public Works - Roads and Drainage
Parks and Recreation
Arts, culture & entertainment
Non-Departmental
Transfers to Other Funds
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Revenues:
Property Taxes
Sales Taxes
Licenses and Permits
Investment income
Intergovernmental
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Public Safety - Police
Public Works - Transportation

2015
Actual
835
2,368
4
266
159
5,447
1,440
10,519

2015
Actual
2,335
7,495
(5)
386
25
2,451
12,687

2015
Budget
44,970
13,087
1
631
33
2,451
61,173

Fire Fund 270

Special Tax - Designated Services Fund 271
2015
Budget
15,011
4,134
624
346
15,385
1,440
36,940

Revenues:
Property Taxes
Sales Taxes
Other Taxes
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Public Safety-Police
Public Safety-Fire
Non-Departmental
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

-

422
422

13
13

603
603

-

-

183
3
3,828
4,014
-

2,328
2,144
4,472

4,208
4,208

2015
Actual
1,253
2
7,336
8,591

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Transfers out
Total Expenditures

925
2,253
3,178

-

Public Safety Judicial Facilites Authority Debt Service Fund 413
2015
2015
Budget
Actual
(1)
3,178
3,178
3,178
3,177

Building Authority Revenue Bonds Debt Service Fund 412
2015
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Actual
Investment income
Miscellaneous
2,704
1,352
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
175
175
Total Revenues
2,879
1,527
Expenditures:
Debt Service
1,550
460
Unappropriated
1,329
2,879
460

GO Bonds STD Debt Service Fund 411
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Taxes
11,679
Investment income
Miscellaneous
10,000
Fund Balance Carried Forward
7,336
Total Revenues
29,015
Expenditures:
Debt Service
27,540
Transfers out
1,475
Total Expenditures
29,015

2015
Actual

GO Bonds Debt Service Fund 410
2015
Budget
644
3,828
4,472
Revenues:
Property Taxes
Investment income
Interfund Transfers
Proceeds of general long term liabilities
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated

1
1

245
245

282
1
(55)
228

4,572
4,572

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

1,199
(12)
1,187

6
4,220
4,226

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

7
133
3,828

728
1,646
71
-

38
175
18
292
74
646
-

151
50
7,152
15,561
22,914

2015
Actual

ARRA Capital Projects Fund 360
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment income
Intergovernmental
(315)
Fund Balance Carried Forward
4,572
Total Revenues
4,257
Expenditures:
Capital projects
34
Unappropriated
4,223
4,257

2,094
728
2,822

HUD Section 108 Loan Fund 357
2015
Budget
(6,223)
9,100
(55)
2,822

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital projects
Unappropriated

2,836
1,384
4,220

Urban Redevelopment Agency Fund 356
2015
Budget
4,220
4,220

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital projects
Unappropriated

Building Authority - Juvenile Court Fund 355
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment income
(56)
Proceeds of long-term Liabilities
1,261
Fund Balance Carried Forward
422
Total Revenues
1,627
Expenditures:
Capital projects
421
Unappropriated
1,206
1,627

Public Safety - Judicial Facilities Fund 354
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
(1,744)
Deferred Revenue
Fund Balance Carried Forward
603
Total Revenues
(1,141)
Expenditures:
Capital projects
17
Unappropriated
(1,158)
(1,141)

COPS Projects Fund 351
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
1,419
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
1,419
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated
1,419
1,419

53,944

107
5
(9,632)
1,255
-

378
4,690
614
2,796
450
787
200
(86)
250
17,439
600
18,519
14,311
277
984

Capital Improvement Project Fund 350
2015
Budget
26,652
433
(111)
3,555
20
7,834
15,561
53,944

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Investment Income
Contributions from private sources
Miscellaneous
Charges for Services
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Board Commissioners
GIS
Facilities Management
Fleet Maintenance
Information System
Finance
Clerk Superior Court
Sheriff
Police
Library
Transportation
Property Appraisal
Host Capital Outlay
Road & Drainage
Parks
Planning & Development
Community Development
Economic Development
Extension Service
Non-Departmental
Fire
DFACS
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

3,061
(7,998)
(4,937)

31,414
(24,812)
6,602
2015
Actual
4,855
53
(6,327)
(1,419)
2,787
1,888
4,675

118,395
118,395
Workers Compensation Fund 632
2015
Budget
18,386
(6,327)
12,059
12,059
12,059

Revenues:
Taxes, Service Charges, Income & Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Fund Balance Carried Forward (for encumbrances)
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Approved Budget
Encumbrances rolled forward from 2011
Total Appropriations

Revenues:
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Non-Departmental
Unappropriated

581,626
64,040
645,666

2015
Budget
581,626
64,040
645,666

2015
Actual
6,021
718
14,445
21,184

Risk Management Fund 631
2015
Budget
8,400
95,550
14,445
118,395

ALL TAX FUNDS

20,872
(11,898)
8,974

80,618
11,914
92,532

Revenues:
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Payroll deductions and matches
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Risk Management
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

13
12,983
50,728
63,724

Vehicle Replacement Fund 621
2015
Budget
10
25,894
15,900
50,728
92,532

2015
Actual

15,199
(95)
15,104

30,210
(666)
29,544

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Vehicles
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated

72
13,642
37
(885)
12,866

2015
Actual

(304)

(304)

1,117
792
1,909

2015
Actual

5,805
(145)
5,660

6
696
14,758
15,460

2015
Actual

390
(8)
382

121
5,178
5,299

2015
Actual

1,353
(20)
1,333

12
2,594
8,257
10,863

2015
Actual

-

7,402

Vehicle Maintenance Fund 611
2015
Budget
246
30,103
80
(885)
29,544
Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Fleet Maintenance
Interfund Transfers

7,098
(5,061)
2,037

Stormwater Utility Construction Fund 582
2015
Budget
187
1,258
392
200
2,037
Revenues:
Contributions from private sources
Intergovernmental
Charge for Services
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated

23,273
6,266
29,539

Stormwater Utility Fund 581
2015
Budget
12
14,769
14,758
29,539
Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Stormwater Utilities
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

17,420
(13,925)
3,495

Airport Construction Fund 552
2015
Budget
(2,346)
663
5,178
3,495

Revenues:
Investment income
Intergovernmental
Deferred revenue
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated

2,919
4,005
6,102
13,026

4,769
8,257
13,026

Airport Operating Fund 551
2015
Budget

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
DeKalb-Peachtree Airport
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

(4,937)

Sanitation ARRA Capital Projects Fund 544
2015
Budget
(12,339)
7,402

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
7,402

2,206
(17)
2,189

14,942
18,945
33,887
2015
Actual

1,000
(5,786)
(4,786)

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Contributions from private sources
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

2015
Actual

112
33,428
1,225
(372)
34,393

224
72,198
1,377
73,799

Sanitation Construction Fund 542
2015
Budget
6,000
1,200
32,473
(5,786)
33,887

(4)
12,061
27
8,883
20,967

2015
Actual

Sanitation Operating Fund 541
2015
Budget
63,682
1,053
181
8,883
73,799

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Transfers From Other Funds
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Finance
Sanitation
Interfund Transfers
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

EDUCATION

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 18A

Summer camp at Emory
focuses on technology
by Ashley Oglesby
ashley@dekalbchamp.com
Parents often limit the
amount of time children spend
in front a screen. At iD Tech,
an eight-week summer camp at
Emory University, those rules
don’t apply.
The company uses the online game Minecraft to introduce students to concepts such
as basic game design for ages 9
to 12, as well as programming
for ages 13 to 18. The camp is
divided into weeklong segments
and offers courses related to
programming and app development, robotics engineering,
game design, 3D modeling and
animation, filmmaking, photography and web design. There are
a total of 16 classes taught on a
weekly basis.
Camp Director Yolanda
Moore said “Most kids play
Minecraft on their tablets.
When they come here and play
it on a computer they get a
completely different feel for the
game, and they’re very excited
to go in and modify it.”
Campers range from beginner to advanced level. She said
allowing campers to explore the
game helps them “see what they
can create.”
While Minecraft’s appeal is
helping iD Tech grow, the company has also worked games
like Portal 2, Trackmania, and
Shootmania into its curriculum.
Video games are just the
bait, according to one of the
program’s director.
“We look for products that
are interesting–that’ll appeal to
kids–because we want to show
them how they can take a hobby
like video gaming and turn it
into a career,” Moore said.
The company is also partnered with Code.org. The organization is a nonprofit with a
mission to expand participation
in computer science by making
it available in more schools.
Moore said additionally,
to ensure that each student receives quality instruction each
class had its own game, an eBook that “gives the campers a
reference to go back to instead
of having an instructor standing
over them and lecturing.”
Each game plan includes
practice modules and each
camper is encouraged to complete the modules before asking
a question.
She said the game plan forces campers “to be able to specifically ask and address questions
that are applicable to what it is

that they are trying to gain an
understanding about.”
Moore said although the
number of campers is steadily
growing, what makes the camp
unique is its ability to maintain
small student-to-teacher ratios.
The camp is designed with an
eight students per instructor
ratio.
“We’re able to give individualized attention within these
small groups and with our curriculum we’re able to bend it
and mold it according to that
camper’s learning style. This
gives them a lot of exposure and
opportunities to learn,” Moore
said.
The camp is in its 15th season on the Emory University
campus.
Moore said the biggest
change has been the rise in girls
becoming interested in the field.
“Traditionally it’s a maledominated field, but now when
you look into the groups you
will see a lot more girls,” she
said.
Rachel Smith a 3D modeling and animation student, said
the hardest part of learning a
new program is learning the
controls.
“You’re constantly clicking
the wrong buttons and moving
things so you use control + Z, a
lot.”
Pressing the Z key while
holding down the Control key
on a computer keyboard can be
used to undo the last action.
Smith said, “Once you learn
the controls it gets a lot easier
and you can develop more complex and intricate designs.”
Smith’s group was assigned
to create an object and build a
scene around the base object.
Smith chose to design a camera
and built a bookshelf and walls
around it.
Moore said Smith and other
students are on the “cusps of
what they want to do after high
school.”
She added, “When campers
have been here repeatedly the
instructors set goals for them
to accomplish in terms of what
a camper’s next steps should
be and if a student is invested
in their craft they can start to
look at colleges they offer what
they’re interested in.”
She added, “It’s a great
stepping stone for campers to
discover what they want to do
next.”
For additional information
about iD Tech camp visit idtech.
com. Registration for the camp
begins as early as November.

iD Tech campers at Emory University take a break from working on computer monitors to play outside.

Scratch programming camper Olivia R. receives assistance from the programming instructor.

Campers in the scratch programming camp session help each other create interactive games.

Youngsters create blocks and shortcuts in the Minecraft video game.

Student finalize their week-long design projects.

EDUCATION

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 19A

DeKalb Chamber Chairman Al Edwards; DeKalb Chamber President DeKalb Chamber President Katerina Taylor; Dr. Stephen Green;
Katerina Taylor; Dunwoody Mayor Mike Davis; Lithonia Mayor
Doraville Mayor Donna Pittman
Deborah Jackson

Publix Media & Community Relations Manager
Brenda Reid; Oglethorpe Power Corporation Director of Community Relations Diane McClearen;
DeKalb County Board of Education Member,
District 2, Marshall Orson

New Georgia Law Concerning
High School Graduation
Passed by Governor

Dr. Stephen Green and wife Kimberly with James Tsismanakis, executive director/CEO - Discover DeKalb / DeKalb Convention & Visitors
Bureau

Dunwoody Mayor Mike Davis; Adrienne Alexander (Chief Alexander’s
daughter); Deputy Chief Operating Officer of Public Safety Dr. Cedric L.
Alexander; Silverman Construction Program Management President &
CEO Arnie Silverman; DeKalb Chairman Al Edwards

Chamber of Commerce
hosts reception for
school superintendent
DeKalb Chamber of Commerce hosted an official welcome reception for more than 150 guests to meet and support
Stephen Green, the county’s new school superintendent. The
event was in partnership with the DeKalb County Board of
Education.
The reception took place July 29 at the DeKalb County
Board of Education, Administrative & Instructional Complex
in Stone Mountain.
“We are very excited to have Dr. Green joining DeKalb
County Schools as the new superintendent,” said Katerina
Taylor, president of DeKalb Chamber of Commerce. “I’m
familiar with his past school system, having been educated
myself in kindergarten through 12th grade in the Kansas
City, Kansas Public School System. It will be great to be a part
of what he will bring to the table.”
Green previously served as the superintendent for Kansas
City Public Schools for nearly four years. During his leadership, he helped the school system earn provisional accreditation from the state, balance three consecutive budgets and
pass financial audits and stabilize enrollment.

March 30, 2015, Governor
Nathan Deal signed House
Bill 91 into law, thereby
creating a new code section,
O.C.G.A. § 20-2-281.1. This
law became effective upon
the Governor’s signature.
This law states that students
shall no longer be required
to earn a passing score on
any graduation tests to earn a
high school diploma.
Students that were unable
to earn a high school
diploma solely due to not
earning passing scores on
the graduation tests will
be eligible to petition and
receive their high school
diploma. The law includes all
subjects, forms, and versions
of the Georgia High School
Graduation Tests (English
Language Arts, Mathematics,
Science, and Social Studies),
Georgia High School Writing
Test, and Basic Skills Tests
(Reading, Mathematics, and
Writing).
Eligible students must
have completed City Schools
of Decatur graduation
requirements in order to

receive their diploma.
If Decatur High School
was the last high school
that you attended and were
unable to earn a high school
diploma due solely to not
achieving a passing score on
the graduation tests, you are
eligible to petition for the
awarding of your high school
diploma.
Former Decatur High
School students interested
in petitioning for their high
school diploma should follow
the process listed below:
Contact Deborah Shadrix,
404-370-4187, ext. 2165,
dshadrix@csdecatur.net at
the Decatur High School
Counseling Office to receive
information regarding the
petitioning process. Once the
petition has been received
a team comprised of the
Graduation Coach and a
Counselor will review the
petition and determine
whether City Schools
of Decatur graduation
requirements have been met.
There is no deadline by which
a petition may be submitted.

BUSINESS

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 20A

Back-to-school spending needn’t wreck the budget
by Kathy Mitchell
The reopening of DeKalb County schools Aug. 10 means more to
families with school-age youngsters
than a change in schedule. It means
significant shopping and spending.
The National Retail Federation
(NRF), which lists back-to-school
among America’s major retail events,
estimates that the average family
with children in grades K-12 will
spend $630.36 on electronics, apparel and other school needs this year.
Total spending nationally is expected
to reach $24.9 billion.
With careful planning even
families with several children and
relatively modest household incomes
can get through the period with family finances intact, according to Dunwoody financial planner Howard
Joe, senior vice president of wealth
management at Merrill Lynch.
“There is a tendency to think
that because education is important—and it is—families should
spend freely on education-related
expenses, but even these expenses
should be carefully thought through.
The most important thing is to start
with a budget,” Joe said. “Never
head out on a shopping trip without deciding beforehand how much
you can spend. It’s easy to pull out

a credit card and keep buying without really thinking about how much
you’re spending. Every child is different and every situation is unique.
Parents should shop with individual
children in mind.”
The NRF survey indicates that
92.7 percent of families involved in
back-to-school shopping will purchase new apparel, spending an average of $217.82 per child.
“Retailers know the stores will
be full just before school starts, and
shoppers can find bargains if they
look carefully. Many schools, public and private, have gone to school
uniforms. This limits the number of
new outfits a child needs. Also, parents can contact the school to see if
there are parents who have uniforms
their children have outgrown that
are still in good condition that they
can buy for less than a new uniform
would cost,” Joe suggested.
He said it’s important for families to distinguish between wants
and needs. “Children may not understand that the family’s financial
resources are limited, so they may
say ‘I need,’ when in fact what they’re
asking for is not a necessity, just
something they’d like to have. A
youngster may ask for designer shoes
or clothes when a less expensive
brand will work just as well. This is

a great opportunity to teach young
people about money and living within a budget.”
Joe said while the Georgia tax
holidays for this year have passed,
parents would do well to be mindful
of them in future years. “Not having
to pay state taxes doesn’t save a lot,
but every little bit helps.”
It’s not necessary to buy everything at once if stretching out school
purchases works better for a family’s
budget, Joe said. Families will spend
an average of $117.56 on new shoes,
according to the NRF. However, Joe
noted, a child may not need new
shoes right away. “He may be fine
in the shoes he’s been wearing for a
couple of months. Remember, the
weather here is still hot when school
starts. Purchases of cold weather
clothing can wait. Sometimes prices
go down later. On the other hand, if
parents find a coat at a really good
price, they can buy it now and put it
away until temperatures drop.”
Approximately 94.1 percent of
families with school age youngsters
will buy school supplies, spending an
average of $97.94, according to NRF.
Comparison shopping can mean big
savings, Joe said, adding that retailers are competing to lure customers in with school supply bargains.
Even so, he said, parents should be

InnovatIon

practical and get what children really
need. Also, families on a tight budget
should know that many churches
and community organizations are
giving away school supplies at backto-school events.
Electronics now factor into
school shopping more than they did
only a few years ago. Although NRF
reported a slight drop in spending from last year’s all-time high of
$212.35, families are still spending
close to $200 per student on electronics for school. “Before buying
a computer for home or classroom,
parents should find out what the
school will be using. I have two children and one is entering a school
that requires a particular type of
electronic notebook. My child already owned another type, but it was
important to have what the rest of
the class would be using.”
Joe said that in spending for
education long-term planning is also
important. “Some parents don’t start
to think about paying for college until after high school graduation. The
planning should start much earlier.
Even when young people earn scholarships, there are many expenses
associated with higher education. It’s
never too soon to start saving.”

DeKalb Chamber of Commerce • Two Decatur Town Center, 125 Clairemont Ave., Suite, Decatur, GA 30030 • 404.378.8000 • www.dekalbchamber.org

CLASSIFIED

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 21A

Classifieds
TheChampion

For Prices, Deadlines and Information

Visit www.championclassifieds.com
Rates: $30.00 for up to 40 words, each additional word $0.60.
All ads are prepaid! All Major credit cards accepted!

Ads Due By Friday - Noon
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The Champion is not responsible for any damages resulting from advertisements. All sales final.

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SPORTS

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 22A

Marist to play in Ireland in 2016
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
The Marist War Eagles
will kick off its 2016 football
season in Dublin, Ireland.
Marist, along with Roswell’s Blessed Trinity and
10 other teams from across
the United States will participate in the Global Ireland
Football Tournament Sept.
2, 2016. The tournament is a
part of the Aer Lingus College Football Classic weekend.
Georgia Tech will take on
Boston College in the classic, which will be held Sept.

3 at Aviva Stadium in Dublin. Twelve U.S. high school
teams are invited to attend
the game, which will be aired
on ESPN2.
Marist Athletic Director
Tommy Marshall said July
29 that the trip will be a great
experience for the students.
“It’s neat for our kids
and culture of our school,”
Marshall said. “We have two
Marist schools in Ireland that
we will be able to visit, do
some stuff over there. It will
be a great trip for our [players], our band, our cheerleaders and our parents. It’s a
once in a lifetime [trip].”

Marshall said the tournament will feature six games,
double headers, at three different stadiums. There will
also be a pep rally for the
high school teams.
Marist attendees will see
former alums compete in the
classic. Myles Willis is a junior running back at Boston
College and Chase Martenson is a sophomore quarterback at Georgia Tech.
“We’re looking forward
to it,” Marshall said. “We
don’t want to take anything
from this year, but at least we
have a year to plan.”

Marist will open the 2016 football season in Dublin, Ireland, in the Global
Ireland Football Tournament. Photo by Travis Hudgons

South DeKalb tennis team wins Metro championship
The Dottie Bridges 12u
Tennis Team came out on
top at the 2015 United States
Tennis Association (USTA)
Atlanta City Championship.
The title was the third for
the Dottie Bridges program
in the last three seasons. The
UTSA Atlanta playoffs took
place July 11-18, with the
semi-final and final rounds
held at Harrison Tennis Center in Marietta.
The team, which is
composed of 10-, 11-, and
12-year-olds from south
DeKalb, qualified for the city
playoffs as the second seeded
team from USTA Intermediate Division 2. The team
finished the regular season
behind Druid Hills Country
Club, a team Dottie Bridges
split contests with during the
regular season.
In the July 11 opening
round of the playoffs, Dottie
Bridges traveled to Kennesaw
The Dottie Bridges 12u tennis team won the United States Tennis Association championship July 18.
to take on the overall No. 1
seed Legacy Park, which the
team defeated in an upset 31 John’s Creek’s St. Ives CounIn the finals, Dottie
umns of Alpharetta with a
games to 21. In the semiBridges defeated White Col- dominant close-out perfortry Club 40 to 0.
final, Dottie Bridges defeated

mance; winning girls singles
4-0, 4-0; boys singles 4-0,
4-1; boys doubles 4-0, 4-1;
and the mixed doubles pair
played the closest match, going to a third-set tiebreaker
but falling, 0-4, 4-3, 0-1.
Dottie Bridges took 29 games
to 18 to complete the championship win.
The Dottie Bridges 12u
team members are Kennedy Talbert, Alexis Grant,
Kenedy Hampton, Kendall
Brutus, Aria Adams, Camille Irvin, Kamau Muse
Morris, Michael Lawrence,
Jeremiah Todd, Ajani Claxton-Warner, Declan Butts
and Logan Butts.
In 2014, the 10u team
won the USTA Atlanta City
Championship, and the 8u
team won the USTA Georgia State Championship in
2013. In 2012, the 10u team
finished first in the USTA
Atlanta – South Atlanta
Division and was a Atlanta
Championship semi-finalist.

SPORTS

The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015Page 23A

Jordan Smith to explains his decision to commit to South Carolina. Photos by Travis Hudgons

Lithonia defensive end Jordan Smith puts on a South Carolina visor after announcing his
commitment to the football program.

Demeca Howard celebrates with her son Jordan Smith after announcing his commitment
to South Carolina.

Lithonia’s Jordan Smith commits to South Carolina
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Lithonia defensive end Jordan
Smith decided before the football
season to make his choice on which
college football team he will suit up
for next in 2016.
That team is the University of
South Carolina Gamecocks.
Smith, a 4-star recruit, announced
his commitment July 29 before
football practice in front of family, friends, coaches and teammates.
Smith will join two former Lithonia
Bulldogs in South Carolina—defensive ends Cedrick Cooper and David
Johnson, which was a factor in his
decision.
“I have a great relationship with
Cedric Cooper and David Johnson,”
he said. “I had a great opportu-

nity to see how it really feels to be
a Gamecock. My relationship with
[co-defensive coordinator] coach
[Lorenzo] Ward and [defensive line]
coach [Deke] Adams is fantastic, and
with the new system with coach [Jon]
Hoke at [co] defensive coordinator
and also Coach Ward I think I’ll be a
good fit for South Carolina.
“South Carolina felt like home,”
Smith added. “I go down there and I
feel like I’m still at Lithonia. It’s kind
of set aside from other schools.”
Smith selected South Carolina
over Georgia, Florida and Clemson.
“It was a very difficult decision
because there were a lot of great
schools out there and a lot of great
programs, so it took a lot of hard
times, a lot of long nights with [Lithonia] coach [Marcus Jelks] in the
office with my mom and my dad,” he

said. “Now we’re here.”
Smith’s mother, Demeca Howard,
said her son made the right decision
for him.
“He has a great coaching staff
here at Lithonia—Coach Jelks, Coach
[Lloyd] Morrison, Coach [Jeremy]
Johnson, and I trust that they helped
him make the right decision to where
he is going to spend his next four
years,” Howard said.
The 6-foot-6, 225-pound pass
rusher finished last season with 55
total tackles, 18 tackles for a loss
and seven sacks. He led the team in
all three categories. Smith said the
Gamecocks are getting an all-round
defensive player.
“Speed, pass rush, all of the
above,” he said. “I’ll stop the run and
everything.”
Jelks said South Carolina is get-

ting a dynamic football player.
“He’s definitely going to help that
football team,” he said. “I’m looking
forward to seeing him a couple of
years from now heavier, stronger and
making an impact on the field.”
Jelks said Smith’s athletic ability
and size is what separates him from
other defensive ends.
“He has very long arms and not
many people can get their hands
on him, and his first step is one of
the best in the nation,” Jelks said. “It
makes him a dynamic football player.”
Smith said the South Carolina
coaches have told him he may get
playing time early, which also played
a role in his decision.
“They’ve been telling me that I
have the potential to play, not right
away, but to make an impact early in
the season,” he said.

local

Page 24A The Champion FREE PRESS, FRIDAY, August 7, 2015

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!
Dr. Craig Heigerick is a board certified physician who has been practicing
medicine in the Gwinnett area for over 30 years. In addition to caring for
and treating all kinds of healthcare services and needs, Dr. Heigerick takes
special interest in educating his patients and treating chronic conditions.

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Dr. Craig Heigerick

Need a primary care physician?

Call: 770.232.6166 to schedule your appointment.
Our office is conveniently located approximately 1 mile from Lawrenceville Highway

615 Beaver Ruin Road, Suite B | Lilburn, GA 30047
www.beaverruinprimarycare.org