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PrimeofLife

A Resource Guide
for Seniors
Volume IV

eat
smart,
live
long
p. 66

asking
for
help
Presented by:

is the
best way
to get it
p. 74

PrimeofLife
Publication
sponsored by:

Catawba County
Aging Coalition
join us at the prime
of life senior expo p. 3

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PrimeofLife

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gold Sponsors:

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silver Sponsors:
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Presenting Partners: Senior Information Resources, Inc., Catawba County Chamber of Commerce, Catawba County Aging Coalition

Save the Date! - Prime of Life Senior Expo August 23, 2016

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 3

The heart of the community.

PrimeofLife
A Resource Guide for Seniors

5 Tips to Avoid Medication Mishaps........................... 7


Are You Ignoring Your Spine?................................... 11
Aging in Place Means Making
Our Homes Safer.................................................. 13
Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory.............. 15
A.D.A.P.T. Providing Guidance
and Direction......................................................... 17
Senior Spring Ball 2015 Photos................................ 20
Healthy Dental Habits................................................ 22
Drug Free Stress and Pain Management................. 25
Macular Degeneration: Keep Your Eyes
on Prevention........................................................ 29
HIV, Am I at Risk?....................................................... 31
Life Settlements: The Treasure in a
Desk Drawer.......................................................... 32
Medication Management: Game of Chance?.......... 34
Up for an Adventure?................................................. 36
Recipes....................................................................... 37
Someone to Lend a Hand......................................... 38
Managing Alzheimers Disease at Home................. 39
Your Guide to Senior Housing.................................. 42
Forgetfulness: When to be Concerned.................... 44
Protect Yourself from Financial Abuse...................... 46
A Medley of Faith and Health.................................... 47
Take It or Lose It ........................................................ 49
Sitting is Hazardous to Your Health.......................... 50
Think F.A.S.T............................................................... 52
R U Ok? Saves Lives................................................. 54
What You Need to Know About
Lung Cancer . ....................................................... 56
SIR Partnership with Chamber a Success............... 58
Avoiding Mistakes in Estate Planning....................... 59
Medicaid Myths.......................................................... 61
A Problem Too Big to Ignore..................................... 63
Dont Know Where to Turn?
Dial 2-1-1................................................................ 65
Eat Smart, Live Long.................................................. 66
ATTENTION! The Library Has
Left the Building..................................................... 68
Stay in the Know........................................................ 70
A Simple Plan............................................................. 71
I Cant Breathe!.......................................................... 72
Asking for Help is the Best Way to Get It.................. 74
Coping with Life Transitions...................................... 76
Avoiding Falls............................................................. 78
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

On the cover:
Annie Killian and
Joe Pratte,
Queen and King
of the Senior
Springtime Ball

2015 Sir Board


Members
EXECUTIVE BOARD:
President: Julie Packer
Vice President: Tamara Faulkner
Secretary: Carol Robinson
Treasurer: Amber McIntosh
BOARD MEMBERS:
Catawba County Aging Coalition: Michelle Roseman
Burke County SIR: Amanda Duckworth
Events: Melissa Walsh
Prime of Life Expo: Lindsay Keisler
Media & Promotion: Rik Covalinski
Education & Programs: David Hudson
Communications: Trisha Lowman
Membership: Angie Cannon Co-Chair: A.J. Kerley
Past President: Darius Nouri
MEDIA & PROMOTION COMMITTEE,
Prime of Life Publication
Chair: Rik Covalinski
Lindsay Keisler
Co-Chair: April Berg
Trisha Lowman
David Hudson
Michael Richey
Tamara Faulkner
Ashley Martin

PrimeofLife n 5

Presenting our Prime of Life Resource Guide for Seniors!


Once again, our local Unifour area
based Senior Information Resources
organization, best known as SIR, brings
you our annual Prime of Life Resource
Guide for Seniors, Volume IV. The Board
of Directors, staff, and members of SIR
hope that you will find this resource
guide useful as you seek up-to-date
information about senior-related
issues and the array of services and
businesses that are available
to you, to your loved ones, and to
those who care for our communitys
older population.
SIR can best be described as a very
effective local, non-profit, collaboration
of over 100 members representing all
types of senior service providers. SIR
members meet regularly in Catawba
and Burke counties, work together, and
stand strongly and uniformly behind the
common goal of enhancing the lives of
those in our area who are aging. SIR
strives to reach this goal by providing
a comprehensive and collaborative
point of contact, focusing on education,
resources, and programs for seniors in
the Unifour. Many of our SIR activities
are organized to address senior
needs as defined in surveys you may
have completed and that have been
described in our communitys
Aging Plan.
So, specifically, how can SIR help you?

1)






Contact our new Community


Liaison, Amanda Edwards, by
phone or email with your
questions or to receive direction
to the resources you might
need (See Amandas
introduction, photo, and contact
information on this page).

Amanda is SIRs newest


dedicated staff person who was
hired to help you in your search for
answers to your senior-related
questions and to connect you to
senior service providers and senior friendly businesses.
2) Review our up-to-date SIR
website, www.SIRNC.org
for a current listing of SIR
members by category and to
see a listing of upcoming senior
events organized by many of
these members.
3) Sign up to receive SIRs
weekly e-newsletter, called
SIR-Real which contains real
time announcements, descriptions
and reminders of whats going on in
the senior community. Sign up with
Amanda Edwards using her contact
information listed on this page.
4) Attend our annual SIR Prime
of Life Senior Expo and bring
your friends! Organized in
partnership with the Catawba
County Chamber of Commerce,
the Expo is held at the Hickory
Metro Center on the fourth Tuesday
of August each year and offers
you a chance to one stop shop at
booths displaying our communitys
vast array of senior services. The
event is free and is open to persons
of all ages. Please come for
opportunities to learn more about
whats available to you or your loved
ones, receive free health checks,
snacks, and prizes, and to mingle in
a festive atmosphere with seniors of
all ages!
5) Get out and enjoy our
communitys senior events!
Many local senior events are
planned and paid for by individual














6)








SIR members who wish to offer


you these programs. Others
may be larger, collaborative,
SIR organized, and SIR
member funded and sponsored
events like last years Bowl-AThon, and this years Senior
Springtime Ball, planned with
the Hickory Recreation
Department. We hope you will
attend and enjoy both types
of events.
Use this Prime of Life Guide
as a resource. Refer to it
when you have a seniorrelated need. Senior-related
articles for instruction are
listed by page number in the
front of the guide, and senior
service advertisements
with contact information are
listed throughout the guide.

I personally feel blessed to live in a


community that cares very much for
its older citizens and that consists of
organizations which wholeheartedly
work together to support SIR in order to
improve the quality of life for its seniors.
I also feel privileged to work for one
of these organizations and to witness
the kind of concern I hope to one day
receive. Lastly, I am overwhelmed with
the teamwork displayed each and every
day by our local senior providers all for
the betterment of your lives. I urge you
to take advantage of everything SIR and
these organizations have to offer you!
Sincerely,
Julie Packer
President
Senior Information
Resources (SIR)/2015

Introducing Amanda Edwards, Senior Information Resources Community Liaison. Amanda is here as a
resource for seniors, caregivers and the professionals who work with them. She takes calls from seniors
and caregivers who need guidance, helps plan informative and fun events, and produces a weekly email
newsletter highlighting our events, news and members just to name few of her duties. If you arent
signed up already, you will want to! Amanda is a native of Hickory, NC and cares deeply about this and
our surrounding communities. Her goal is to be a resource for anything regarding seniors and senior care.
Feel free to contact Amanda at: amanda@SIRNC.org or (828) 358-6272.

6 n PrimeofLife

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

5 Tips

to Avoid Medication Mishaps

s our 55 and over population


continues to rise, so does the
concern of health professionals
regarding how to best manage
their health and safety. One such
concern is for the number of medications that
are prescribed for seniors. According to the
Journal of the American Medical Association,
nearly one-third of Americans ages 57-85 take
at least five or more prescription drugs, and
some with chronic illness may take as many

Trisha Lowman
Community Relations Director
Kingston Residence
of Hickory
828-327-9955
www.kingstonhealthcare.com

as 20. Medication has tremendous benefits


to curing, preventing and easing chronic
conditions. At the same time, the combination
of medicines can lead to negative effects on
the body, or even dangerous outcomes, if
not carefully monitored. Elderly patients are
particularly susceptible to issues caused by
polypharmacy, a term used when a patient
is taking over four different medications
increasing the risk of misuse or negative
effects.
Continued on pg. 8

come
Home.

Serving patients and their


families wherever they call
homeprivate residences,
long-term-care facilities, or
in our two patient care units.
Caldwell Hospice serves residents of
Caldwell, Alexander, Ashe, Avery, Burke,
Catawba, Watauga, and Wilkes counties.

l www.caldwellhospice.org
Lenoir Location
902 Kirkwood Street, NW
828.754.0101
Hudson Location
526 Pine Mountain Road
828.754.0101

Caldwell Hospice.
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 7

Continued from pg. 7

As a Certified Nurse Practitioner (CNP), Teresa Cating is


all too familiar with the challenges of polypharmacy. Ms.
Cating has managed and prescribed medications for
many years. As a full time CNP at Kingston Residence of
Hickory, she has seen how the stress of keeping track of
medications can take a toll on residents and caregivers. In
some cases, its the medication overload that is the tipping
point for choosing to come to assisted living.
Ive seen many patients who can manage their own
medications on a daily basis, and then as they age or their
symptoms continue to worsen, the pill burden can become
overwhelming, states Ms. Cating.
Part of Ms. Catings experience is de-prescribing
medications for patients to improve their well-being and
quality of life. What you find is that people will take the
same medication for years without question, or have
prescriptions from the cardiologists, pulmonologist and
family physician. Its a case of having several healthcare
providers prescribing medicines without having the entire
picture. So people get a number of pills and doses that
could create potentially negative outcomes like higher risks
of falls or hospitalization, Ms. Cating explains.
The success of any medicine truly hinges upon the
communication among patients, doctors and caregivers.

8 n PrimeofLife

A few simple measures can be taken to bridge


communication to increase the success of a medication
program and hinder the risks of medical mishaps.

1. Create a medication journal and


keep it up to date
This is particularly important for patients who take multiple
medications. Be sure to include the physician, date the
medication was originally prescribed, diagnosis (why
and what it will be used for), and how long it needs to be
taken. Write down both the brand and generic name of the
medication as well as the pharmacy source. If you use a
smart phone, take a picture of all your prescription labels.
Make a few notes about a drug after you start taking it.
Include positive and negative effects that it caused you
such as nausea, anxiety or joint pain. Remember to include
over the counter medication and herbal remedies as well.
Tell your loved ones about the journal and where to find it
in case of an emergency health situation.

2. Bring your medication journal everywhere


you will receive healthcare
Your healthcare is a team effort with you being the
key player. Keep all your doctors informed about your
medications to ensure that you do not run the risk of
having drug-related problems. Review your medications
frequently with your physicians, particularly if you have
been taking them for quite some time. The pharmaceutical
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

market is continually making progress, so you may find


that new alternatives are available for your condition.

3. Choose one pharmacy source if possible


Many drugs come with pages of information that tend to
be confusing rather than educational. Find a pharmacy that
has a strong team of experts who take the time to answer
your questions and follow your medications closely.
Studies show that about 40% of seniors fail to
take their medication as instructed. Take advantage of your
pharmacys counseling service when you have a question
about a medicine. Be sure to review your prescription if
you have any doubt as to how and when to take it. If you
take generic drugs, ask the pharmacists if
the company providing your medication has changed.
Even though drugs are closely monitored, they can have
a small change from one generic provider to the next.
A change to your generic prescription could cause new
side effects. Contact your pharmacist if you suspect that
your generic prescription is different.

4. Pay close attention to changes


in your body or behavior
Just as your body changes over time, so can the way
you react to a certain medication. Symptoms such as
headaches, dizziness, lethargy, irritability or forgetfulness
could be caused by alterations in the way you are
reacting to your medications. Dr. Chad R. Worz,
PHARMD, a pharmacy expert for Kingston HealthCare
shares, older adults metabolize medication differently
than younger adults. This will affect how the medication
works as people age and also how medications may
interact with one another. Ask your spouse or caregiver
to mention changes in your behavior that you may not be
aware of such as confusion or anger. Be sure to call your
physician when you notice a difference in how you feel
and act.

5. Accept help
Often seniors avoid asking for help for fear of being seen
as dependent or weak. In the case of medication, one
should consider that the result could be a better quality of
life versus dire consequences. Seek help of a caregiver
such as spouse or other family member. Involve them with
your medication journal and together seek resources to
help manage your medication. Ask your pharmacist or
physician about resources that they recommend for your
particular needs.
While medications are necessary and invaluable for help
managing illness and experiencing better quality of life, it
is important to be aware of mishaps that could occur by
taking an uneducated approach to medicine whether it be
over the counter, natural remedies or pharmaceuticals. By
becoming more informed and involving your loved ones
and clinical care givers you increase the chances of having
the best outcomes for health and wellness.
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

GUIDING YOU TO

IMPROVED
HEALTH, WELLNESS
& PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
Call or visit the Y today to
ask if your insurance provider

the YMCA through the SilverSneakers Fitness Program or
Silver & Fit Fitness Program.
We offer classes including
Muscle, Strength & Rangeof-Motion; Yogastretch;
Cardio Circuit;
Water Aerobics
and various
other senior classes.

Bring this ad to
the YMCA for a
1-week guest pass
Adrian Shuford, Jr. YMCA

464-6130
Hickory Foundation YMCA

324-2858

ymcacv.org

YMCA Mission: To put Christian


principles into practice
through programs
that build healthy spirit,
mind and body for all.

PrimeofLife n 9

3 Years in a Row

4 Times in a Row

Our patients are pleased,


and our peers are impressed.
The Womens Choice Award by WomenCertified represents the voice of female
consumers, and for the third consecutive year that group recognized Catawba Valley
Medical Center as one of Americas Best 100 Hospitals for Patient Experience. We also
recently received our fourth Magnet recognition for nursing excellence from the
American Nurses Credentialing Center, the first hospital in the state and only the 23rd
hospital in the nation to do so. Together, theyre a nice confirmation of our
commitment to caring for the health needs of our community.

10 n PrimeofLife

828/326-3000
www.CatawbaValleyMedical.org

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

are you ignoring

your spine?
F

or many Americans,
especially among those
over the age of 50, they are
discovering that a lifetime
of neglect may lead them to
a lifetime of pain, functional disability,
and the scarce reality that they may
be outliving their mobility. Should we
not all have life-long goals that include

Eric Goans, DC
Conover Chiropractic
Center
828-464-7791

that ability to LIVE while you are alive?


That means that you still have the ability
to be active in your community, be fit
and spend time with your children or
grandchildren. Losing mobility is about
more than the pain that you may be
experiencing. It is a direct correlation
to your overall health. We have all
witnessed that as a person begins to
Continued on pg. 12

A trusted adult day service


provider to the Unifour area

for over 30 years


Helping adults stay vital, connected, and
involved by providing safe, quality adult
day services to enhance participants
lives and to support their care-givers.
Central Office

226 2nd Street NW Hickory

828-326-9120

Center Locations: Hickory Conover Maiden


www.adultlifeprograms.com info@adultlifeprograms.com

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 11

Continued from pg. 11

lose their mobility their general health also


begins to decline. Wouldnt you rather
be counting the fish you caught that day
instead of the medications that you will
be taking at each meal? Wouldnt you
rather see the wheels of a bicycle under
your feet than that of a wheelchair? The
actions that we take towards our health
now will play a drastic role in outcome of
our quality of lives.
According to a statement from the Center
for Disease Control (CDC), disability
related costs for medical care and lost
productivity has exceeded an estimated
300 billion dollars annually. Experts
recognize that the largest portion of our
population (Baby boomers born 19461964) is aging and the percentage of
functional disability is also on the rise.
In 2005, the United States had 16.2
million people that were disabled due
to arthritis or spinal related conditions,
out of the total 47.5 million people who
were disabled. It is apparent that spinal
related conditions have been ignored and
neglected until it completely takes away
our ability to function.
Our spines have a very special and
unique function that is designed to protect
our spinal cord and spinal nerve roots as
they divide and feed communication to all
parts of the body, all while still providing
us with the ability to move, bend, twist, lift,
work and play. It is essential that we make
time for our spinal health.
It is not too early or late to start caring for
your spine in a very special way. A Doctor
of Chiropractic (DC) is the only trained
professional that will analyze and correct
misalignments (vertebral subluxations)
in the spine that are contributing
factors to functional restrictions and
neurological symptoms, which could
lead to complications with continued
neglect. I encourage you to visit your
local chiropractor for an orthopedic and
neurological evaluation to see if you are a
candidate for chiropractic treatment. It is a
safe and effective conservative treatment
that does not include drugs, shots, or
surgeries. Make a healthy choice for a
more mobile lifestyle! Its not too late!

12 n PrimeofLife

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

aging in place
Means Making Our Homes Safer

ccording to an AARP survey 89% of


homeowners want to stay in their own
homes as they grow older. A home gives
us a feeling of independence, holds a
treasure of memories, provides a location
for family interaction, as well as being a major
financial asset.
As we age, our senses decline, our physical abilities
reduce, and our reaction times slow. These normal
changes in perception, physical abilities and judgment
make us more prone to accidents. Some simple
precautions and adjustments can help make our
homes safer and more accident free.

The top eleven changes made in a seniors


home according to the US Dept of Housing
and Urban Development are:
1. Levered doorknobs (do not have to grip with fingers)
2. Grab bars in the bathroom
3. Levered faucets in kitchen sink
4. Handrails on both sides of stairwells and on front
and rear steps
5. Grab bars in shower
6. Removal of any door threshold
7. Moveable or hand held shower heads for those
who must sit
8. Portable shower seats
9. A bathroom with a bath/shower and bedroom on
the first floor

Carol Robinson
Seniority Program and
Lifeline Specialist
Catawba Valley
Medical Health
First Center
828-485-2696
crobinson@cvmc.us

10. Widened door to accommodate wheelchairs


11. Ramps for those using walkers and wheelchairs

Some changes we can all make to our


homes to keep us safer are:
1. Add an elevated toilet seat.
2. Put in a shower chair or bench so you can sit while
you wash and add a handheld shower head.
3. Set water heater at 120 degrees or less to
avoid scalding.
4. Store dishes and glassware in low drawers instead
of high cabinets so you dont have to reach.
5. Make sure you have night lights to light your way
when you get up at night.
6. Remove all clutter from the floor so we have a
clear path for walking (this includes throw rugs,
magazines, newspapers, drop cords, etc.).
7. Make sure your shoes have non-skid soles and are
in good condition.
8. Install smoke and carbon dioxide detectors and
change the batteries on your birthday.
9. Make sure outside entrances are well lit.
10. Make sure all outside doors have sturdy locks.
11. Keep all shrubbery and trees around doors and
windows trimmed back.
12. Install a personal medical alert system so you
can get help with the push of a button that you
always wear around your neck.

Quality Coverage

from the most trusted health insurer in North Carolina

Call me for information on:

Individual Health Plans


Health Savings Accounts (HSA)
Medicare Supplement Insurance
Dental Plans for Individuals
Dental Plans for Seniors

HICKORY STORE

1830 Startown Road Hickory, NC 28602

828-855-9155

info@bluestorehickorync.com www.bluestorehickorync.com

U2082l, 3/13

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 13

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828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org
14
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TEEN AN
THE TW
VALLER
WHITE R
WINDY
YESTER

| 2015-2016

alive inside:
A Story of Music and Memory

For more information about


Alive Inside or Music and
Memory visit their website at
www.musicandmemory.org

he Area Agency on Aging, in partnership


with Lenoir Rhyne University, School of
Humanities and Social Sciences presented
the Alive Inside: A Story of Music and
Memory documentary with two showings
in early 2015. The film highlights the profound effect
music can have on those suffering with dementia
and other cognitive impairments by providing
personalized music to individuals through iPods and
other digital devices.
The documentary follows social worker Dan Cohen,
founder of the nonprofit organization Music &
Memory, as he demonstrates musics ability to
combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of
self to those suffering from it. It is a joyous cinematic
exploration of musics capacity to reawaken our
souls and uncover the deepest parts of humanity.
Individuals are revitalized through the simple
experience of listening to music.
Alive Inside won the 2014 Sundance Film Festival
Audience Award, and continues to earn recognition
around the world. Most recently it received the prize
for Best Documentary at the Milan International
Film Festival. We live in a world that honors the
individual, that raises things and productivity above
human connection, stated producer Michael
Rossato-Bennet. Music gives us the ability to reach
a population that might otherwise be unreachable. It
allows us to touch hearts and ignite souls. Through
music, we can help the old and the aging sustain
their humanity and by doing so, inevitably, well prove
our own.
The goal of the partnership between the Area Agency
on Aging and Lenoir Rhyne University was to bring
awareness to the community about the benefits of
providing personalized music to residents of long
term care facilities and those being cared for at home
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

by a caregiver. To share this message, we invited


family caregivers, healthcare professionals, nursing
students, faculty and the community at large to attend
and witness the power of music. Lenoir HealthCare
Center, a skilled nursing facility in Lenoir, NC, was
present to share their success in providing the Music
& Memory program to their 120 long term care
residents.
In addition to raising awareness with this event,
the Area Agency on Aging has encouraged the
community to hold iPod drives to support the Music
& Memory program. Lenoir Rhyne University recently
concluded a student led iPod drive on campus, and
other community iPod drives are now in progress.
The Area Agency on Aging will continue to support
these efforts throughout the region to bring music to
residents and families by serving as a donation site.
Facilities interested in starting a Music & Memory
program can contact the Regional Long Term Care
Ombudsman at (828) 485-4213.
Anyone interested in donating an iPod or beginning
an iPod drive may contact Mary Mitchell, Family
Caregiver Support Specialist at (828) 485-4256,
mary.mitchell@wpcog.org.

PrimeofLife n 15

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828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016
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16

of

a.d.a.p.t.
Providing Guidance and Direction

magine you are finally going on a


well-deserved vacation. You have
been looking forward to it for a long
time. You start your trip on a beautiful
sunny day. You arent driving so you
eventually doze off. After a while, you
wake up not knowing how long you have
slept. The sky is no longer sunny. It is
dark. It seems to be getting darker by the
minute. Nothing looks familiar. Your driver

David Hudson RFC, CEP


Alzheimers Dementia Awareness
Professional Team
1-855-290-5300

seems disoriented. You wonder if there is


enough fuel in the tank to get to the next
service station. You are afraid. You arent
sure where you are or how to get back to
where you wanted to be. The thoughts of
a wonderful vacation have vanished. You
are in the middle of nowhere with no way
to get back. You fight back tears. You try
not to panic!
Continued on pg.18

With BAYADA Home Health Care

I found the perfect match


for extra help at home.
Mary Lou P., Client

Mary Lou P. with Peggy Peck, her BAYADA Home Health Aide

BAYADA Home Health


Care provides nursing and
assistive care such as bathing
and grooming 24 hours, 7
days to keep adults of all
ages safe at home.
Call 828-327-3300 l www.bayada.com

Compassion. Excellence. Reliability.


828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 17

Continued from pg.17

LIFETRANSITIONS
treating the person, not just an illness

We help

These are the feelings of many family members that


have had a loved one diagnosed with Alzheimers
disease. They know the journey will be long, but
have no idea how long. They know the days seem
dark, but arent sure how dark the days will get.
Their loved one is disoriented, and unable to help.
They dont know which way to turn, or where to
get the strength to make the journey. Getting back
to normal is no longer an option. The fear and
confusion is devastating.
Meeting the urgent needs of such families is
the purpose behind the Alzheimers Dementia
Awareness Professional Team (ADAPT). This group
of professionals have three commonalities. First,
each member is skilled in a field associated with
helping families deal with Alzheimers and other
forms of dementia. Second, each team member has
personally been touched by the tragedy of dementia
in their own family. Thirdly, the team members are
motivated by a sincere concern for others that are
struggling with dementia related diseases.

manage
chronic
illnesses that

The team is made up of five professionals. Robert


Brown and Paul Mastrovito both hold Master of
Social Work degrees. David Hudson is a Registered
Financial Consultant, Tom Hannah is a local
attorney, and Susan Vincent is an educator who
teaches coping skills to caregivers.

limit daily
activities.

The group was formed in late 2013. Their initial


work began with offering educational seminars in
libraries, churches, facilities, and senior centers.
The series is designed to give hope and direction
to loved ones dealing with dementia. The four, one
hour programs cover understanding the distinction
between normal aging and dementia, dealing with
financial concerns, understanding legal rights, and
managing difficult behaviors in the middle and later
stages of the disease.

Life Transitions cares for patients with


heart disease, COPD, pneumonia, and
other acute medical issues.

Call for a consultation today.

Phase two began in January of 2015 when ADAPT


opened their toll-free 24 hour per day phone line.
Families dealing with the challenges of dementia
can call 1-855-290-5300 to get direction and
information on any of the four areas of concern.
They can also receive referrals to other professional
help as needed.
ADAPT neither ask for nor accepts financial
compensation for their work. All expenses are paid
for by team members from their own funds.

828.464.9459
YourLifeTransitions.org
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

TRAVEL
TRAVEL

www.qets.com
www.qets.com
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14 Riding hog
Created by Evelyn Baily Johnson
17 Advice
www.qets.com
18 Jitney
20 Climb a mountain
21 Chart

Answers on pg. 73

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

2 Government travel
document
4 Picture taker
9 Teach
10 Road
13 Transport ship
14 Riding hog
17 Advice
18 Jitney
20 Climb a mountain
21 Chart
DOWN
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Movie goer's need


Dulles
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Use a car
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PrimeofLife n 19

senior
spring

ball 2015

20 n PrimeofLife

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Best Value Hearing Care Centers


The Young family at Best Value Hearing
Care Centers has been helping your friends
in the Unifour hear better since 1973
Let us check your ears!

Free Hearing Tests. Honest Answers. No Pressure.


(Hearing tests to determine hearing aid candidacy)

Dont be CHARGED to have your


hearing aids CLEANED! We SERVICE any
instrument at NO CHARGE!

Three Year Full Laboratory Warranty


and Three Years of Free Batteries
included with our Premium Fittings
We Give Free Second Opinions

Ask About Our Close-Out Specials


Generous Trade-In Allowances
Call Now for Your FREE Hearing Check-Up!

Best Value Hearing Care Centers


302 4th Street SW, Hickory 322-9323
819 E. Sycamore St, Lincolnton 735-0028
Hearing Evaluations Are Always Free at Best Value Hearing Care Centers.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 21

healthy

Michael Cordora, DDS, PLLC

dental habits

lthough adults over 60 constitute the


largest majority of the population with
complete dentures, the per capita
number is dropping every year as
senior adults of today are keeping
their natural teeth longer than they did in the past.
With that said, having a healthy mouth and teeth
allows individuals to eat delicious and nutritious
foods, speak clearly, and feel more confidently
about themselves. A healthy mouth at any age
is essential for a good quality of life; conversely,
unhealthy bacteria in the mouth not only harms
the teeth and gums but also has been shown to
be associated with serious medical conditions
such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and
pneumonia.

22 n PrimeofLife

Cordora Dental
828-324-9800
www.cordoradental.com

A. Healthy Habits













Brush and floss daily seniors have a


higher risk of cavities due to an
increased presence of plaque from dry
mouth, which is a common side effect
of taking several prescription
medications. Brush twice per day, and
use a toothbrush with soft bristles;
replace the toothbrush every three
months. Floss between teeth daily.
Those individuals who have arthritis
or other dexterity issues may benefit
from using an electric toothbrush and
floss picks.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Clean dentures daily bacteria can also adhere


to full and partial dentures. Use cleaners
specifically made to clean dentures. Do not use
household cleaners or toothpastes that are
made for natural teeth since those are too
abrasive and can damage dentures. Remove
dentures at bedtime to prevent irritation and
inflammation of the gum tissues.

Visit a dentist regularly annual dental


checkups are recommended whether or not an
individual is experiencing pain. Seniors need to
be examined for oral cancer and gum disease
which do not necessarily cause pain until the
advanced stages of each disease. Dentures may
also need adjustment or realignment due to
gum tissue changes and instability.

B. Concerns







Dry mouth this condition is a common side


effect in more than 500 medications including
those for allergies, asthma, hypertension,
high cholesterol, anxiety, depression,
Parkinsons, and Alzheimers diseases. Dry
mouth leads to an increased occurrence
of cavities.

Recommendations to help relieve


dry mouth symptoms:

o Use over-the-counter oral moisturizers



such as spray or mouthwash
o Drink more water
o Get a humidifier to help keep moisture

in the air
o Avoid/limit foods and beverages that

irritate dry mouth such as coffee, alcohol,

soft drinks, and acidic fruit juices









Gum disease many senior adults have gum


or periodontal disease caused by the bacteria in
plaque which irritates the gums and makes them
swollen, red, and more likely to bleed. As gum
disease is often a painless condition, it is
widespread in senior adults and can be
undetected until infection or tooth loss occurs.
Regular dental visits can help treat or completely
prevent the disease.

Mouth cancers a significant number of cases


of mouth, throat, and tongue cancer are
diagnosed annually, and the average age of
diagnosis is over 60. Symptoms include open
sores, white or reddish patches, and changes
in size and shape of lips or tongue that last more
than two weeks.

C. Nutrition Tips


























Limit alcohol intake alcohol is a fermented


sugar that can irritate linings of mouth and
cheeks, especially in those with symptoms
of dry mouth. Alcohol can also increase the risk
of oral cancers and fungal infections.
Calcium having an appropriate intake of
calcium prevents bone loss and helps to
maintain the structure of teeth. Most adults
should get approximately 1000 milligrams per
day (i.e., approximately three cups), and this
intake should preferably come from foods.
High-calcium foods include low-fat dairy
products such as cheese, milk, yogurt as
well as vegetables such as broccoli, spinach,
and kale.

COMFORT. SECURITY.
COMMUNITY.
Live fully at Brookdale.

brookdale.com
Brookdale Falling Creek
Assisted Living
910 29th Avenue North East | Hickory, NC 28601-1135
(828) 328-6090
BrookdaleBrandWorks

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Monitor processed sugar intake the risk of


tooth decay is higher in senior adults; limit
foods and beverages that are high in sugar
or artificial ingredients as they increase the
risk of tooth decay. Examples include soft
drinks, candy, energy drinks, and sweet
iced tea.

BROOKDALE is a trademark of Brookdale Senior Living Inc., Nashville, TN, USA

PrimeofLife n 23

Good Eating - Word Search

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TEEN AN
THE TW
VALLER
WHITE R
WINDY
YESTER

| 2015-2016

DRUG FREE
sTRESS AND PAIN MANAGEMENT

hen under stress or


experiencing pain, extra
demands are placed on your
heart. Your blood pressure
may rise, muscles tighten,
you may sweat but have cold hands and feet
with blood vessel constriction. Breathing can
become dysfunctional resulting in carbon
dioxide deficiencies and poor body chemistry,
all of which can worsen your condition.
Biofeedback empowers you to take control of
this vicious cycle.

Julie Moose, CBP, CAM


BioEnergetic Health, LLC
828-578-6517
www.bioenergetichealthnc.com

Biofeedback practitioners are educators


that use technology to assess imbalances
in your physiology and help you learn to
self-regulate it. We look for dysfunctional
breathing habits, carbon dioxide levels, muscle
tension, skin temperature, sweat gland activity,
blood pressure or heart rate variability. The
recordings of your physiology are shown on a
computer screen and used as a training tool
along with various relaxation methods to help
you learn to self-regulate your systems. You
get to see the results of your efforts to
Continued on pg. 26

In- Home Care Services


Shes Always Been The Independent Type.

We Aim To Keep Her That Way.

We help to keep her independent spirit strong. Comfort Keepers provides


compassionate in home care that helps seniors live safe, happy and independent
lives in the comfort of their own homes.

NOW
HIRING

Companion Care
Light Housekeeping
Personal Care
In-Home Safety Solutions

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

(828)

C o m f o r t K e e p e r s. c o m

PrimeofLife n 25

Continued from pg. 25

self-regulate in real time on the screen as you practice,


ensuring proper and effective technique.
Years of clinical research have shown biofeedback to
be most helpful for stress related health conditions
such as anxiety and panic disorders, sleep disorders,
headaches/migraines, hypertension, Raynauds
Disease, TMJ (temporomandibular joint disorders),
respiratory disorders, gastrointestinal disorders and
muscular dysfunction. Anyone can benefit from
biofeedback as long as they are able to actively
participate and practice the techniques. Selective
insurance companies and plans will compensate for
biofeedback but may have special requirements.
Some biofeedback practitioners also offer counseling,
helpful exercises or stretches, general dietary or lifestyle
recommendations, or nutritional, herbal or homeopathic
products. There are many adjunctive therapies that can
be safely and effectively used to further alleviate stress
and pain that have allo-biofeedback components but
also involve adding energy to the body in the form of
laser or micro current.

More Noninvasive, Drug


Free Approaches to Stress
and Pain Management
Auricular Therapy
Did you know that your brain projects pain and
pathology in your body onto your external ear?

26 n PrimeofLife

Changes in your mental, emotional or physical health


can be detected on your ear visually, with palpation for
tenderness or even electrically detected with special
devices. With proper stimulation via acupressure,
laser or mild micro current, messages are sent to
the brain and then to the body to restore balance
and reduce stress and pain. The science of auricular
therapy has been well documented, internationally
researched and published in medical journals. The
World Health Organization has approved auricular
therapy as being a safe and effective technique
for over 150 health conditions. Examples include
various neurological and orthopedic disorders such
as headaches, migraines, trigeminal neuralgia, facial
paralysis, peripheral neuropathy, Menieres disease,
intercostal neuralgia, tennis elbow, sciatica, lumbar
pain, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer pain, dry mouth, hot
flashes, etc. It has also been successful in helping
people with chronic allergies.
Auricular therapy is most commonly used for general
pain control, addictions and cravings, weight loss and
help with mental and emotional problems. Points and
protocols exist for many internal disorders as well.
Nearly any health condition can be addressed with this
method as a primary or complimentary form of care
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

with virtually no side effects. The conditions listed are


not comprehensive but merely examples of what can be
treated successfully.
Alcoholism
Allergies
Anxiety
Asthma
Bells Palsy
Bladder Control
Constipation
Depression
Drug Addiction
Fibromyalgia
Gall Bladder
Headache
Hemorrhoids
Hyperactivity

Impotence
Insomnia
Knee pain
PMS
Shingles
Sinusitis
Smoking Withdrawal
Sore throat
Stuttering
TMJ
Toothache
Vision Problems
Weight Control

SCENAR Therapy
A scenar device electronically finds and treats problem
areas in the body and uses micro current frequencies
to quickly relieve pain and rejuvenate function. When
applied to the skin on areas of pain or dysfunction, or on
zones connected to those areas, nerve receptors in the
skin send signals the brain. As the brain refocuses on the
areas being treated, it triggers a wave of neuropeptides.
These are natural healing and regulatory substances,
including some of the strongest known natural pain
killers (endorphins). Scenars effectiveness comes from
a combination of constant, interactive communication
(helping the body to re-focus on problem areas) and
intensity (pushing the body for fresh responses every
second); yet it remains gentle, soothing and non-invasive.
There are over 700 studies in Russia demonstrating its
safety and effectiveness and scenar is becoming and more
popular in the U.S. Scenar is able to help with a huge
range of issues.

ASA Balance
ASA Balance technology can be used to assess the body
for over 100,000 possible triggers of stress to include
energetic imbalances associated with our physiology with
85% accuracy. It is not used to diagnose but can be used
as a guide to determine what triggers you may need to
avoid or where energetic blockages are in the body. This
technology is also used to provide desensitization for
those triggers! Many people report that they can include
foods, be around pets or other past triggers with little or no
symptoms after treatment with this technology. If we help
you with your allergies, we help you with a lot.
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 27

MACULAR
DEGENERATION:

Yupheng Ly, O.D.


Elite Family Eye Care
828-569-1037
www.elitefamilyeye.com

KEEP YOUR EYES ON PREVENTION

ccording to the National Eye Institute,


age-related macular degeneration
(AMD) is the number one cause
of vision loss in the United States
for patients over 60. Macular
degeneration is a disease that affects the center
of the retina, which is responsible for sharp
central vision.

Are You at Risk for AMD?


Risk Factors for AMD:
Age: patients over 60 years old
Family History: blood-related family members

who have AMD

Continued on pg. 30

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 29

Continued from pg. 29

Smoking History: smoking doubles the risk of AMD


Race: Caucasians are at higher risk than
African-Americans and Hispanics
Sun Exposure: patients who work or spend time
outdoors may accelerate AMD progression from
prolonged UV radiation

How do you know if you are


suffering from AMD?

to improve their lifestyle. Your eye care provider will be able


to guide you make the best decision to suit your needs.
Though there is no cure for early AMD, the key to
managing the disease is prevention and maintaining useful
vision for as long as possible. To ensure that you are not
suffering from AMD or any other eye diseases, such as
cataracts, and glaucoma, it is recommended that you get a
comprehensive eye exam every year.
Data courtesy of the National Eye Institute/National Institute of Health

Symptoms of AMD:




Blurred vision
Distorted vision: straight lines may appear wavy
Decreased color perception
Difficulty with reading
Missing central field of view

Generally, the disease process is slow and may take


months to years before vision loss is noticeable. However,
others may experience a faster rate of deterioration in their
vision. There are different levels of AMD ranging from early
to late stage. The disease is also classified as either a dry
or wet form depending on the presence of leakage from
the retinal blood vessels.
Treatment options may range from oral multivitamins to
eye injections and laser treatment. Studies have shown
that Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Copper, Zinc and Lutein
supplements may slow down the progression of AMD.
Patients who have lost vision to AMD may benefit from low
vision aids such as magnifying glasses and other devices

30 n PrimeofLife

Normal vision

Central vision become


blurred for people with AMD

Yupheng Ly, O.D.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

HIV
Am I At Risk?

IV is a very serious virus that does not


discriminate. It is a virus that slowly
destroys your immune system. As your
immune system over many years gets
weaker and weaker your body can
not fight off infections any longer and you begin to
transition from HIV positive to AIDS. There are only four
fluids that you can contract HIV from and those are
blood, semen, vaginal fluids and breast milk. You have
to be doing very specific things to contract HIV, but it
only takes that one time. You can receive HIV by having
unprotected oral, vaginal or anal sex, sharing needles
with another person for any reason, and transmission
from mother to child. HIV can infect anyone; gay or
straight, rich or poor, young or old. It is not about who
you are, but what you are doing to put yourself at risk.
Almost one-fourth of all people with HIV/AIDS in
America are age 50 and older. Since you may not
show symptoms for many years, doctors are not
testing the older American population for HIV. Older
Americans also have less education about HIV than
younger people do. They may not always know how
it is spread, the importance of using condoms, needle
usage, talking with their doctor or how important it is
to be tested. Many clients will not talk to their doctors
about their sex lives or drug use to know that they
are engaging in risky behaviors. Many widowed and
divorced older Americans are dating again and are
less likely to protect themselves because of the lack
of education about HIV. According to the CDC in 2013
there were an estimated 8,575 new HIV diagnoses
among people aged 50 and over. Those aged 50-54
accounted for 44% of the new diagnoses.
Since older Americans are not being tested, their
diagnoses are being caught at a later stage in the virus,
which means a late start to treatment and possibly
more damage to their immune system. This can also
lead to a shorter survival after the HIV diagnoses.
Facing a serious disease like HIV/AIDS may lead to
depression. When diagnosed as a young adult you
have a strong network of family and friends who can
help you cope, but as an older adult you may not

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Linda Sheehan
Director of Education
and Outreach
AIDS Leadership
Foothills - Area Alliance
828-322-1447

have a strong support system to understand what


you are going through. CDC estimated of the 13,712
deaths among people with AIDS in 2012, 59% were
among people aged 50 and older. Remember that it is
extremely important to get tested for HIV/AIDS early.
The sooner you are tested, the better your prognosis.
Early treatment increases the chances of living a
longer life.
AIDS Leadership Foothills-area Alliance (ALFA) is the
only HIV/AIDS service organization in the region. They
serve a nine county area of North Carolina that includes
Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba,
Lincoln, Watauga and Wilkes. ALFA offers medical case
management for those infected with HIV, prevention
education programs, and free HIV testing to the
community. ALFAs mission is to improve the lives and
health of those affected by HIV/AIDS while preventing
transmission through education and testing. Currently
40% of ALFAs clients are aged 50 and over.
To schedule a program or test call Linda Sheehan,
Director of Education and Outreach at 828.322.1447
ext 224 or email at prevention@alfainfo.org or Megg
Lail, Director of Programs and Events at 828.322.1447
ext 231 or email at gettested@alfainfo.org. You can
also visit our website at www.alfainfo.org for
more information.

Specialized
Transport
AMBULATORY, WHEELCHAIR AND
GERIATRIC CHAIR TRANSPORTS AVAILABLE

Local or Long Distance

(828) 441-2000 or (704) 735-5676 or (828) 438-0447


Email: specialized.tran@gmail.com Text: 980-241-0215
SERVING THE UNIFOUR AREA

PrimeofLife n 31

life settlements:
the treasure in a desk drawer

Life Insurance:
1. Is not just for beneficiaries; it can be turned into
money that you can use to take care of your

needs today.
2. Unlike investments that have shrunk or
disappeared, a life insurance policy retains

its value.
3. Rather than keep a policy until maturity, letting it
lapse, or taking the cash surrender value offered by
the insurance company, a senior can convert it to
cash at true market value.
4. A life settlement is a transaction allowing seniors to
convert their policies into cash they can use today
for living expenses, prepayment of final expenses,
long-term care, charitable giving and investing for
their future.
5. It can also be used when someone can no longer

32 n PrimeofLife

Amanda Edwards
Owner
GRACE Financial Solutions
of Hickory, NC
828-358-6272

afford their premiums, they no longer need the


policy because their circumstances have changed,
and in business transactions where there is a key
main policy to consider.

Historically, seniors believe they have


only two options when they can no longer
afford or need their life insurance:
1. Stop paying the premium and simply let the policy
lapse, or
2. Take the small cash surrender value payment from
the insurance company.
In fact, only 10% of life insurance policies end up
paying a death benefit, resulting in wealth loss for the
insured and wealth gain for life insurance companies.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

There is a 3rd Option: A Life Settlement


Seniors can leverage their life insurance policy as an
assignable asset, a life settlement.

What is a Life Settlement?


1. It is the sale of an existing life insurance policy to an
institutional investor on the secondary market for more
than the cash surrender value but less than the death
benefit.
2. It is primarily for those age 65 and older or with
impaired health and a death benefit of $50,000

or more.
3. A recent government report indicated that sellers of
secondary insurance policies get an average of 7 times
more than the cash surrender value from the insurance
company. Thats a lot of money being left on the table
if someone isnt considering the true market value of
their policy!

How Does it Work?


1. The legal basis for the secondary market in life
insurance started in 1911 with the U.S. Supreme Court
case of Grigsby vs. Russell.
2. With this case, it was shown that life insurance had
all the legal qualities of property which meant that life

insurance could also be transferred in similar manners.


3. Grigsby vs. Russell set the rights that a policy owner
could name the beneficiary, borrow against it, sell the
policy, and change the beneficiary.
4. This means, like a house, a life insurance policy

can be bought and sold so an owner can get the most
for their property by selling it on the secondary market
rather than letting it go for less than its worth.

Do You Have a Treasure in Your


Desk Drawer?
1. If you own a life insurance policy of virtually any type
that you are certain you no longer need, you may
benefit by having a no cost and no obligation appraisal
of your policy.
2. More and more people are realizing that their life
insurance policies can provide a significant source of
cash while they are still alive to enjoy it.
3. Talk with a life settlement broker today about your
options. Determining what your policy may be worth
in the secondary marketplace is easy and starts with
a process that takes just a few minutes of your time. It
may be the most profitable time you ever spend!



828.256.0184

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 33

Medication
Management:
Game of Chance?

are for a spin on the roulette


wheel? Or perhaps blackjack is
more your style? Or perhaps you
prefer to avoid games of chance
all together?
In life, we cannot avoid all risks. And so we
make choices that reduce our risks. We
put aside money for a rainy day. We wear
our seat belts. We research our purchases.
Life is a series of decisions about how to
manage risks. Our health decisions should
be made with the same risk-management
approach.
Seventy-six percent of Americans over 60
use two or more prescriptions, and 37%
use five or more prescriptions. We all know

34 n PrimeofLife

Jason Kihneman, MD
Catawba Valley Family Medicine
West Mountain View
828-294-1116

that modern drugs have saved many, many


lives and improved the standard of living for
millions more.
There are risks associated with taking
medications and those risks increase as
we age and as we take more medications.
The more medications we take, the more
likely we are to have those drugs interact
badly or to have bad side effects. The more
medications we take, the harder it is to
figure out which drug or drugs is causing
our symptoms.
Additionally, many common side effects
and drug interactions can be mistaken for
normal signs of aging. Loss of appetite,
unsteadiness or dizziness, memory

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016


drug interact with the foods I eat? When will I

be done taking this drug?
Use a pill sorter, and if the bottles are difficult

for you, ask a friend or family to help you sort

your pills once a week.
Use the brown bag method. Take all the

medications you are currently taking with you in

bag to your doctors appointments.
Be sure to include over-the-counter drugs,

herb, supplements, and vitamins when listing

your medications.
As we age, our bodies absorb and process medications
differently. Medications have not been studied as much
in older populations, and we have less room for error
because older bodies do not adapt and repair themselves
as quickly as those of younger people.
It is amazing what modern medical science can do with
drug therapies, but these drugs are not without risk. As
responsible health consumers, we can take steps to
manage the risks of taking multiple medications and still
reap the benefits.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. NCHS Data Brief: Prescription Drug Use Continues
to Increase: U.S. Prescription Drug Data for 2007-2008. 2010; http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/
databriefs/db42.htm. Accessed July, 2013.
2
Budnitz DS, et al. Emergency hospitalizations for adverse drug events in older Americans. N
Engl J Med. 2011;365(21):20022012.
3
Conry, M. (2000). Polypharmacy: Pandoras medicine chest. Geriatric Times, 1, 1-6.
1

problems, confusion, incontinence are all symptoms that


could be caused by a medication or interaction of two
medications.
The risk of a negative drug interaction increases as the
number of drugs a person is taking increases. There is a
13% risk when an elderly person is taking two medications,
but that risk jumps to 58% with five medications, and
82% with seven or more medications. Furthermore, 28%
of hospitalizations are caused by medication mishaps.
The more drugs we are taking the more likely that we will
take one incorrectly, either by accident, confusion, or just
forgetting.

What we can do to manage medication risk:

First, be aware of new or sudden-onset



symptoms and consider recent changes in your

drug regimen as a cause.
Use one pharmacy and coordinate all your

medications with one physician.
Keep a detailed list of medications you are

currently taking. Record the drug name and

strength, dosage, which doctor prescribed

it, and what it is treating. It is also helpful to

educate yourself about the drugs you are

taking. What color and size is this pill? What

side effects are common with this drug? When

should I take this drug? How should I take this

drug (with food or without food)? How does

this drug interact with alcohol? How does this

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Ready to
enjoy retirement?
Make the move to Kingston.

Independent & Assisted Living


Private Apartments with Bathroom & Kitchenette
3 Chef Prepared Meals Served
All Utilities (Cable TV, Power & Telephone) Included
24/7 Emergency Call System
Routinely Scheduled Exercise Programs
Licensed Nurses On Duty 24/7 For Assistance
Transportation Services
Weekly Housekeeping
Wide Range of Activities
904 Second St., NE
Hickory, NC 28601

828-327-9955

www.kingstonhickory.com
Genuine Care Dedicated To You

PrimeofLife n 35

Up for an

adventure?

ots of retirees have waited for their golden


years to travel, and the baby boomers are
now ready to go on adventures of their own,
but traveling by yourself can be expensive
and time consuming while planning. Senior
travel groups offer a number of benefits socially as well
as financially. There are many senior centers and other
traveling groups around the area that offer group travel
to the senior population. Below is a list of reasons why
traveling with a group might benefit you:

1. Make New Friends:


Travel with most senior groups can be with a spouse
or with a friend or even by yourself, but you are sure
to meet others within your age range who hold similar
interests and who have a passion for travel as you do,
creating great conversations and bonding experiences.
Some travel groups even allow adult children to travel
with you. It can be a great way to bond and to create
great traveling memories.

2. Save Money:
Group trips are often more reasonably priced because
of the large group discount and include transportation
and lodging all together. This can reduce the amount
that you would have to spend to have the adventure
alone.

3. Safety in Numbers:
When traveling as a group there is safety in numbers as
well as the fact that a group guide is there to help direct

36 n PrimeofLife

Amanda L. Clarke
Activities & Program
Coordinator
Morganton-Burke
Senior Center
828-430-4147

where all the attractions are. When traveling as a senior


group the level of physical ability is often lower and
group guides will make this level known to the group.

4. You can relax and enjoy the trip - All of


the details are taken care of:
Independent travel can be a worrisome job, having to
make all the plans and reservations. Then theres the
task of having to get all the tickets to the attractions
that you would like to visit. This takes a lot of time
and research, and then comes the actual travel in
an unknown city. Group travel can make the trip
enjoyable; the trips have guides or leaders along
with a professional driver. There is no worrying about
planning or parking, just about enjoying the trip. Your
Tour Director can also help alleviate any issues that
pop up as a result of traveling, which means your only
responsibility is to sit back and enjoy your trip.

5. Youll get to see things you might not


get to on your own:
Whether its skipping lines at a major attraction or
eating dinner at a local favorite spot, theres no better
way to gain exclusive access than by being on a group
tour. And with a Tour Director handling the logistics
of your itinerary, youll be sure to see the major sites
(plus some one-of-a-kind hidden gems) while getting
historical context as you go.
If you like to explore new places, call your senior center
or find a travel group and give group travel a try!
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

recipes
Quiche
1 unbaked 9 Pastry Shell
1 cups grated cheddar cheese
1/2 lb ground beef
1/3 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup Mayonaise
1/4 cup Bell Pepper chopped
1/2 cup milk
Pepper (dash)
2 eggs
1 Tbsp corn starch
Brown meat. Drain and set aside. Blend mayo, milk,
eggs, corn starch, and pepper until smooth. Stir in
beef, onion, bell pepper, and cheese. Pour into pastry
shell and bake at 350 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes or
until brown on top and knife inserted in center comes
out clean.

Hay Stacks
1 - Large can Chow Mein Noodles
2 - 8oz pkgs. Butterscotch morsels
1 - 8oz can salted peanuts (optional)
Melt morsels over hot water in double pan. When
melted, remove from heat and add noodles and
peanuts. Stir until well mixed. Drop by teaspoon onto
waxed paper and place in refrigerator until set.

Mushroom Delight
11oz - Cream Cheese
1 - 4oz can chopped mushrooms
1 - 8oz can Crescent Rolls
1 - Egg White

Courtesy of
Michael Richey

Refrigerate until very cold. Slice in inch slices and


place on baking sheet. Brush egg white on top before
baking. Bake at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes.

Cauliflower and Cheese


1 - Head of Cauliflower
1 - Cup Mayonnaise
2 - tsp Mustard
1 - Cup Grated Cheddar Cheese
Place whole head of cauliflower in glass mixing bowl.
Pour about an inch of water in bowl, cover bowl with
saran wrap. Place a small slit in top so that top acts
like a steamer. Place in microwave and cook 12- 15
minutes to soften cauliflower.
Drain the water off the cauliflower and uncover. Mix the
mayonnaise and mustard together and spoon onto the
top of the cauliflower. Sprinkle the cheese on top of the
mixture. Place in the microwave and heat on high until
the cheese melts.
SERVE HOT!!

Pineapple Cheese Casserole


1 - 15oz can- Crushed pineapple in juice
1 - cup Grated Cheddar Cheese
2 - Tbsp Flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 stick margarine- melted
1 - cup crushed Ritz crackers
Mix all ingredients (reserving cup crackers) and place
in casserole dish. Sprinkle remaining crackers on top.
Bake in oven at 300 degrees for 20 minutes. Serve.
Great accompaniment to any pork meal.

Mix cream cheese and mushrooms. Spread this mixture


on flattened crescent rolls. Roll in jelly roll fashion.
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 37

someone to lend

a hand

ith millions of baby


boomers now 65
and over, families
are considering many
creative ways to provide
support. The sandwich generation
is being pulled in many directions,
stretching their time, energy and
resources as they juggle raising
children, managing careers and
home, in addition to helping
their aging parents. Many are
looking for unique services that
empower their aging loved ones
to live independently while giving
themselves much needed relief from
time consuming tasks and errands.
As seniors become home bound due to medical
conditions or loss of driving privileges, they need help
with essential errands such as grocery shopping,
picking up dry cleaning, and trips to the pharmacy or
post office. If children or other family members live
close by they are normally the ones called upon to help
with these errands. Many are happy to help in this way,
but it can become difficult to add the extra errands to
already strained schedules of busy adults.
One easy alternative to relieve families of the burden
of time consuming errands is the use of home delivery
of groceries, dry cleaning and medications when
available. Another alternative would be to hire a
personal shopper. Non-medical home help agencies
for the elderly are also a great option. They offer a
wide variety of services tailored to help seniors stay
comfortably in their home, where most prefer to be.
When choosing which provider of this service is the
best option for your family, there are a few important
considerations. First and foremost, your aging parent

38 n PrimeofLife

Donna Townsend
Owner
Seniors Helping Seniors
828-485-0988
www.seniorcarehickorync.com

needs to be safe interacting with this


service. Always conduct interviews
and do a little online research into the
agencys credibility and integrity. Ask for
references from past or present clients
and follow through, speaking with each
until you are satisfied that they are
a respected service. Be very clear
about your expectations as a client
and ask how problems are resolved
should they arise. A trial run of the
service is a great way to see if they
are a good fit for your familys needs.
Never sign a contract until you are
completely satisfied that this is the best
option for you.
Another important consideration when choosing a
service are the fees involved. Some providers charge a
percentage of the cost of purchases, while others will
charge hourly. The most common method is to charge
a base fee per hour plus a commission. Others may
have a set fee that is charged regardless of the cost of
the purchases or the time involved. It will be important
that you have a safe plan to handle the money needed
to make the purchases as well. The service provider will
likely need cash for purchases and should present the
client with a valid dated receipt for the purchases, with
any remaining unspent money returned upon delivery.
All in all, a personal shopper or non-medical support
agencies are great options for balancing busy lives
and schedules as families help their aging loved
ones live independently as long as possible. Family
and friends get to enjoy their visits with aging family
members, instead of wasting that time in traffic, running
errands or standing in lines of crowded stores. Who
knows...perhaps the person providing the service may
also become a trustworthy and helpful new friend!

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

managing

Alzheimers
Disease at Home

ith a dementia diagnosis comes a


mountain of uncertainty. What does the
future hold? What is your role? How will
this condition impact your loved one?

Alzheimers disease or other dementias lead to nerve


cell death and tissue loss in the brain; in short, the brain
is failing. This means your loved one may experience
changes in personality, relationships, and abilities.
These changes can be among the hardest for families
to face. The right approach to caring for your loved
one with Alzheimers disease or another dementia is
key to maintaining your loved ones quality of life. That
approach needs to ensure your seniors needs are at
the forefront. Knowing key information, life experiences,
and personal preferences of your loved one helps
provide the dignified and respectful care they deserve.
People with dementia often use experiences from
the past to make sense of the present. When that
practice is accompanied by the reality that they can no
longer store new information efficiently, knowing their
preferences, routines, and life stories will likely help. By
knowing and using this information, it will help you to
engage them in meaningful activities, where they can

Rik Covalinski
Community Service
Representative
Home Instead Senior Care
828-256-0184
www.homeinstead.com/628

contribute and feel relevant in this likely confusing time.


Knowing their preferences and routines will help you
anticipate needs and provide individualized care.

Understanding Cognitive Symptoms


Alzheimers disease symptoms may not be obvious at
first and may be dismissed as someone just becoming
forgetful or getting old. The person may believe the
symptoms are not that serious or do not happen very
often, whereas a family member may recognize a
severe change in the person. Something that was easy
to do last month may be more challenging now, which
can cause stress on the entire family.
During this time, its important to remember that those
with dementia are likely living with fear and uncertainty,
and trying to find a way to maintain their life and
independence. A few tips to keep in mind if these
symptoms occur:
Treat the person with dignity and respect. Live in
their world and in the moment, trying not to judge or
correct, but to maintain their dignity.
Continued on pg. 40

Do you suffer from chronic KNEE PAIN...


grinding, continuous, aching pain in the knees with and without activity?

www.uni4painrx.com

You are not alone: 15-25% of the US population ages 45-55 suffer from chronic knee pain. This increases as we age
with estimates of 30% of the population suffering knee pain after 64.
In the past, surgery or daily medication were the options offered to treat chronic knee pain; but, the physicians at
UNIFOUR PAIN TREATMENT PHYSICIANS are now offering Cooled Radio frequency
, a state-of-the art,
non-surgical in-office technique which requires little down time, but offers significant pain relief.
If you are suffering from chronic knee pain and have been told you are
too young or too ill for knee replacement, have had knee surgery with
continued pain, or simply choose to avoid the surgical option, Coolief
may be for you. Contact us to get moving again!

Hickory NC
Phone: 828.327.0156
Lenoir NC
Phone: 828.757.6254

Statesville NC
Phone: 704.838.7165
Denver NC
Phone: 704.801.1760

A division of Unifour Anesthesia Associates, P.A.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 39

Continued from pg. 39

Try asking for the persons opinion or compliment the


person. Keeping them in as much control as possible will
help to ease the fear. Avoid arguments and situations that
may embarrass them.
Match their behavior and be patient. Making the person
feel comfortable and relaxed will help relieve the stress
they may be feeling. Show empathy by putting their needs
first and understanding how hard this must be.

Keep Your Loved One Engaged


When you know more about what your loved one used
to enjoy, engaging them in meaningful activities can help
them feel safe, secure and valued. Such an approach also
can help them stay connected to daily life.
Personalized activities create positive, emotional
experiences helping to diminish the distress that can lead
to challenging behaviors. Socializing also is important, for
the same reason.
We may think of activities as something special that we
do, but this does not have to be the case. Even simple
tasks like folding the laundry or making a meal can be
considered activities. The goal is to engage your loved one
in activities that are meaningful to their life and enjoyable
for you both.
There are several benefits to engaging your loved one in
activities:

40 n PrimeofLife

Bring fun and happiness Laughter is great for all


of us and doing a fun activity such as swapping
stories, playing simple games, or creating a scrapbook
can create happiness.

Reduce boredom Boredom can prompt seniors to


become frustrated, agitated, or depressed, causing
them to wander off or insist on going somewhere.
Activities can help maintain familiar routines which
may help reduce confusion. Designating a time to work
on a puzzle, taking a walk, or resting can help in
creating a routine.

Help make activities of daily living (ADLs) easier


When you turn a bath into an opportunity to smell
different soaps, or when getting dressed becomes a
chance to discuss fashion or special colors, personal
care tasks often are easier because your loved one is
happier and less stressed.

Staying engaged and stimulated helps to lift a persons


spirits and sense of accomplishment. It fosters a positive
and enjoyable relationship.

Understanding Behavioral Symptoms


Alzheimers disease and other dementias affect the way
seniors think and feel and, subsequently, how they act.
Your loved one may do things that are uncharacteristic or
even odd. In general, behavioral symptoms usually arise
when a person has an unmet need. Because language is
often affected by dementia, people with this disease may
tell you about their needs or issues by showing you. By
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

acting in a certain way, they may be trying to communicate


what they want or need. By listening to what they do, its
possible to understand and manage that unmet need.
Knowing how to respond when these problems occur
can be difficult. But by understanding the triggers to
these problems and knowing the persons routines and
preferences, you may be able to help reduce the stress
that individual is feeling.
Other tips include:
Redirect or change directions. To create a more
positive and safe result, change the topic or mood from
bad to good.
Give simple choices. Offering simple choices helps the
person feel in control. Someone with dementia may feel he
or she has no control over life.
Some examples of behavioral symptoms include:



Delusions/hallucinations
Wandering
Refusal
Aggression

Repetition
Agitation
Sexual inappropriateness
False accusations

Take Care of Yourself


The demands of caring for a person with dementia can
force you to focus all your energy on their care. Neglecting
your own needs could be a costly mistake. In fact, many
of us feel that if we take care of ourselves we are being
selfish. The truth is, its imperative that we take care of
ourselves, or we wont have the health or energy to care
for anyone else. Just like the battery in our cell phones, we
need recharging, too. Research shows that many people
start neglecting their own care when they are caring for
others. Be sure you dont fall into that trap! It is even more
important to focus on your self-care so that you have the
energy and good health needed to continue caring for
your loved one. Make sure you get enough sleep, exercise
regularly, eat well-balanced meals, and drink plenty of
fluids. And make sure you continue to get your regular
medical checkups and preventive tests.
Additional resources and information can be found at
www.HelpForAlzheimersFamilies.com.

Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly


PACE@Home delivers all necessary medical and supportive
services that enable seniors with chronic care needs to maintain
their independence in their own homes. These services include:

Adult day health services


Medical care and medical specialists
Dental, vision, hearing, and footcare
Meal planning and nutrition services
Skilled nursing, including home health care and personal care
Prescribed medications
Social services
Respite care
Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy
Recreational and social activities
Transportation to health-related appointments and PACE@Home
Hospital care, emergency services, and nursing facility care

To see if you are eligible for PACE@Home, please call today.

1915 Fairgrove Church Road SE


Newton, NC 28658
(828)468-3980

TTY users dial 7-1-1 or 800-735-2962


The champion for seniors wishing to remain in their community! www.pace-at-home.org
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 41

your guide
to senior housing

hether you are just getting ready to


retire to an active lifestyle, a senior
searching for assisted living options,
or a family member helping a loved
one, there are plenty of choices.
Understanding your options is the first step on your
search. Lifestyle, location, comfort, and amenities
are vital when choosing an active adult community,
independent retirement community, senior living or
assisted living community.

42 n PrimeofLife

Betsy Sher
Active Adult & Retirement
Communities Resource Guide
www.CarolinaLivingChoices.com

Active Adult Residential Communities


You may be seeking a single-family home,
condominium, villa or patio home. These active adult
communities offer amenities that may include fitness/
wellness centers, parks and trails, golf, swimming,
tennis, as well as recreational, educational, cultural
and social programs. Real estate options which
target the active adult are often designed with singlefloor living or master bedroom and bathroom on the
first floor. Home exteriors normally require very little

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

or no maintenance; yard maintenance is often included


in the residents monthly association fee. These active
adult communities are often conveniently located so that
you can enjoy nearby cultural and recreational venues,
fine dining and shopping, and premier medical care. So
whether it is a day on the golf course, meeting friends for
lunch, shopping for your grandchildren, or having a quick
check-up, convenience is yours.

Retirement Communities
Retirement or independent living communities with
amenities are another option. These adult lifestyle
communities typically only allow residents aged 65 years
or older; they include homes or apartments offering
relatively maintenance-free living with many amenities
such as such as transportation, dining, housekeeping,
easy access to health care and activities to fit your active
lifestyle. In addition, you will enjoy nearby natural and
cultural attractions, social groups catering to specific
interests, outdoor common grounds, exercise centers,
and nearby dining and shopping. Independent living
retirement communities are designed for older adults
who can generally care for themselves; some of these
offer a continuum of care through their designation as
a Continuing Care Retirement Communities or LifeCare
Community.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Senior or Assisted Living Communities


Assisted living communities, residential and personal care
homes, memory care communities, rehabilitation, skilled
nursing, hospice care respite care can all fall under the
umbrella of senior living. With assisted living communities,
senior residents live in a comfortable and safe environment
that feels just like home, offering customized personal
care, social events and activities, some health services,
and specialized accommodation to fit all variations of
senior needs. These may include 24-hour assistance
with day-to-day living and tasks as well as daily balanced
meals. Also included in the senior housing and care
spectrum are nursing and rehabilitation centers, which
have registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses
(LPNs) and certified nurse assistants (CNAs) providing
24-hour medical care, which is especially beneficial for
residents not strong enough to care for themselves.
Choosing the right retirement living option can be
daunting, but there are many choices and one is sure
to be a perfect fit for you. Explore your future in North
Carolina from the mountains, to the foothills, to the
beaches. Our statewide southern charm welcomes you.

PrimeofLife n 43

forgetfulness
When to be Concerned

re you concerned with becoming more


forgetful? Of course, we all forget, right?
Didnt we forget to take the chicken out of
the freezer last night for dinner? Or worse, a
friend told me she forgot to pick up a child a
daycare! Dont fret yetForgetfulness is a normal part
of aging.
But where are you on the forgetfulness train? Did you
just get on and forget where you left your keys? Or
you occasionally forget to write down a check in the
checkbook? Or are you forgetting to take your medicine
3 out of 7 days a week? Or are you having difficulty
managing that checkbook altogether?
Mild Cognitive Impairment is the stage between the
cognitive decline that is the expected part of aging and
the more pronounced cognitive decline of dementia.
Mild cognitive impairment involves problems with
memory, language, thinking and judgment that are
greater than the normal age-related changes. You might
be thinking you are losing your memory. Your friends
and family may notice a change. These changes in
your memorythis increased forgetfulnessas well as
other changes you may notice arent severe enough to
interfere with your daily routine.

44 n PrimeofLife

Teresa Cating, MSN, A-G NP-C


Adult & Geriatric Primary Care
Nurse Practitioner
Kingston Residence of Hickory
828-327-9955
www.kingstonhealthcare.com

Some examples of the normal signs of the aging


process include: inability to remember where you left
your keys, forgetting conversation details, forgetting
to write down a check in the register, missing an
occasional right turn, not being able to locate a recipe,
having to search for causal names and words.
Some examples of mild cognitive impairment
include: placing things in odd places, forgetting
entire conversations, inability to manage the entire
checkbook, getting lost in familiar places, withdrawing
from usual interests, inability to follow the recipe
directions, forgetting names of common objects.
I dont need to remind you that your cognitive health is
extremely important. Your health care provider should
be evaluating your cognitive health as well as your
physical health. Ask about screening for Mild Cognitive
Impairment. There are both medications as well as
medical foods to enhance your cognitive health. No
one wants to take another pill; however, if there is
one that can improve your cognitive healthenhance
your memory, slow down memory loss, delay mental
decline, or delay the onset of dementiayou should
want to hear about it.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

NOW SCHEDULING NEW PATIENTS

With us, your hearts


in the right place.
Dr. Brian Steg, Dr. Derek Luney, Dr. Luke Byrnes, Dr. James Ritter, Dr. Jeff Neal, Lisa Michel,
PA-C, and Sara Paul, DNP, FNP, combine their 110+ years of experience with the resources
of Catawba Valley Medical Center to provide the community a full-service cardiology
program. And at the heart of this practice is you the patient.

Catawba Valley Cardiology provides general cardiology, peripheral interventions,


pacemaker implementation, and interventional cardiology. Patients may request their
records be shifted to Catawba Valley Cardiology from their previous practice.

www.CVMGonline.org

828.326.2354

Conveniently located in the Graystone Professional Building across Fairgrove Church Road from Catawba Valley Medical Center

Protect

Denise Clay
Edward Jones Financial Advisor
828-294-1172

seniors from Financial Abuse

ts unfortunate but true: The elderly population is


targeted for financial abuse or exploitation. In fact,
by some estimates, this type of targeted abuse
results in billions of dollars in losses each year. If
you have elderly parents, what signs should you
watch for to determine their vulnerability? And what
can you do to help protect your parents from being
victimized?
In regard to the first question signs of vulnerability
the most important thing to watch for is your parents
mental state. As you know, many people go through
their entire lives with their faculties intact but even if
this is the case with your parents, you still may want to
be on guard against them falling prey to unscrupulous
operators. And if you have noticed your parents
becoming forgetful, confused, overly agitated or
showing any other signs of possibly diminished mental
capacity, you may want to be particularly vigilant for the
appearance of financial irregularities.
If you dont think your parents are, as yet, victims
of fraud or abuse, you can take steps to help
protect them. Most importantly, maintain constant
communication with them and be aware of whats going
on in their lives. Also, consider the following actions:
Advise parents on precautionary measures.
Suggest to your parents that they take several
common-sense steps to avoid financial scams.
For example, urge them to never give personal
information over the phone or in response to
emails. Since these types of requests are the

most common methods used to perpetrate

scams, encourage your parents to put all such
solicitations as well as requests for money
in the trash folder. Also, ask your parents to
remove paper mail promptly from their mailbox
resourceful identity thieves have been
known to steal mail and extract key pieces of
personal information from financial statements

46 n PrimeofLife

or correspondence from Social Security. And if


your parents dont already have a paper shredder,
present one to them as a gift and show them
how to use it to delete old statements, credit card
offers and similar documents.
Check for legal documents. Your parents, like
everyone, should have a will and a durable power
of attorney. These documents will enable someone
they trust implicitly to handle their finances if
they cant. Discussing these types of issues with
your parents may not be easy but its certainly
important.
Review parents situation regularly. Many parents
are not comfortable sharing the specifics of their
financial situation with their adult children. Yet,
as much as you can, try to periodically review
your parents insurance, banking and investment
statements. These meetings give you good
opportunities to look for irregularities or suspicious
activities, such as significant changes in their
spending patterns, unusual cash withdrawals or
transfers from their bank accounts, or sudden
transfers of assets to a relative or someone outside
the family.
Know the professionals. Your parents may not be
totally at ease involving you with their financial and
tax advisors. However, using your discretion, see if
you can accompany your parents when they meet
with their advisors. If these people are legitimate
professionals, they will not object to your interest in
your parents affairs in fact, they should

welcome it.
Your parents have done a lot for you. You can help
repay them by doing your part to help protect them
from threats to their financial security.
Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors cannot provide tax or legal advice. You
should consult your attorney or qualified tax advisor regarding your situation.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

A Medley
of Faith and Health

hoosing nursing as a career was


very effortless for me. I grew up in
an environment where families were
responsible for taking care of each other.
We nurtured each other during health
crises, surgeries and illnesses. Deciding to become a
nurse was really not a decision at all; it was a conscious
choice because I always loved caring for others. Most
young people my age would spend their spare time
outside playing, whereas I would remain close to adults
who had been assigned to care for others in
the family.

Carolyn Thompson, RN
Parish Nurse
Catawba Valley Medical
Center Health First Center
828-485-2300
cwthompson@cvmc.us

I exposed myself to all aspects of nursing from bedside


care to community care, from surgical nursing to
outpatient care, from physician office to nurse manager.
Nursing takes on many forms and eventually you find
your niche. Parish nursing was made for me!
For fifteen years, I have had the honor to serve as parish
nurse for a community which is underserved and where
there are many health disparities. Parish nursing is a
ministry of caring and supporting others to reach their
individual optimal levels of health. This is perceived
differently for each individual.
Continued on pg. 48

A FULL-SERVICE LAW FIRM


PROUDLY SERVING OUR CLIENTS AND COMMUNITY SINCE 1946

Kim Whitley
kwhitley@phd-law.com

Estate Planning

Medicaid Planning

Wills and Trusts

Asset Protection

Powers of Attorney

Special Needs Trusts

Estate Administration

Guardianships

Contested Estate Proceedings

Elder & Special Needs Law

Will Caveat Proceedings

Medicaid Estate Recovery

Casey Pope
cpope@phd-law.com

34 Second Street NW, Suite 400


Hickory, NC 28601
(828) 322-7741
www.patrickharperdixon.com

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 47

Continued from pg. 47

As the parish nurse, I act as a vital link between the


faith and medical communities. This form of nursing is
multifaceted. There are many roles to play including
the role of nurse educator, counselor, and advocate for
individuals not only in the faith community, but local
communities at large. The parish nurse is a resource for
preventative and restorative care, ministering holistically
to individuals and their families as well as to clergy. Parish
nurses are not to be confused with medical care nurses.
That is not our role. As the parish nurse I facilitate and
coordinate the care of the individual while incorporating
other agencies and community resources when necessary.
The roles of the parish nurse may include:
Integrator of Faith and Health - serving as a translator
between faith and healthcare communities. With a
knowledge base in both areas, many times the parish
nurse can clarify issues and or reinforce the strong tie
between faith and health.
Health Educator - providing educational programs to the
congregation and community such as health screenings
and illness prevention classes (diabetes, cancer, healthy
living, nutrition, exercise programs).
Health Counselor - providing individual and/or group
health counseling services in the home or long-term care
facility (grief counseling, divorce, grandparenting).
Navigator or Advocate - assisting individuals in finding
their way through healthcare systems so they dont fall
through the cracks.

Parish nursing services are designed to involve individuals,


families and congregations as active partners in their
personal health. Through this involvement, nurses help
empower communities and foster an environment of
understanding and support.
The concept of parish nursing was introduced by the
Reverend Granger Westberg in 1984. The idea was
simple: to help a congregation live a healthy life. His goal
was to provide non-medical nursing services to church
congregations and help people of faith understand the
importance of caring for their physical as well as their
spiritual health.
As the parish nurse I provide emotional support and
information for members in times of illness. I visit people
in the hospital, nursing facilities or at home, helping
them understand their situation and progress. I relish
the opportunity to provide health screenings like blood
pressure checks or information about prenatal services
and community resources to young families. Parish nurses
are equipped with the knowledge of their profession and
access to health providers and community resources,
empowering them to add a new dimension to ministry.
Parish nursing is not rigid; there must be flexibility as
people and their situations change daily. Presently I
provide parish nurse services to roughly 10-14 local
churches with diverse congregations, and recently titled
myself as Faith Community Nurse. Getting up each
morning and going to work is not a task or a chore. It is a
privilege and a blessing to be part of a community ministry
that so rewarding.

Referral Agent - finding resources and making referrals to


agencies, organizations and support services to improve
the persons quality of life and assist during the time of
medical, mental or spiritual crisis.
Support Group Developer - initiating and organizing
groups designed to assist the participants with a specific
issue (cancer, grief loss, caregiver, Alzheimers Disease).
Volunteer Trainer - one of the most important role
is the recruiting and training of volunteers to provide
assistance to the Parish nurse in the congregations
(health ambassadors, visitation committees, homebound
ministries).
Parish nursing embraces the spiritual dimension of the
nursing practice in addition to the physical, psychological
and social dimensions. In essence, parish nurses care
for the body, mind and spirit. parish nurses collaborate
with the faith community leaders to form partnerships
with the congregation, other community health agencies,
physicians and hospitals.

48 n PrimeofLife

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Take It
or Lose It

ules around
Required
Minimum
Distributions
can be
confusing; the penalties for
failing to take the correct
distribution can be severe.
For that reason, weve
developed a brief primer to
help you understand your
obligations and show you
how to use your RMD to
pursue your financial goals.

What Are Required


Minimum
Distributions?
RMDs are minimum
amounts retirement account
owners must take out each
year, usually starting the
year they turn 70 .
RMDs must generally be
taken from any retirement
account eligible for taxdeferred contributions.
You do not have to take
RMDs from a Roth IRA.
There are different rules
regarding the age when you
must begin RMDs for some
retirement plan accounts;
talk to a qualified tax expert
to understand which rules
apply to your situation.

How Is Your
RMD Calculated?

Your minimum distribution


is calculated based on
the end-of-year balance
of retirement account
and a life expectancy
factor published by the
IRS. As you age, your life
expectancy decreases
and your RMD increases.
Though the RMD is
calculated separately for
each IRA, you can take the
total amount from a single
IRA if you prefer. RMDs from
most employer-sponsored
retirement accounts and
beneficiary accounts
must be calculated and
taken separately for each
account.
You can always take out
more than your RMD
each year, but you wont
be allowed to apply any
excess to future years.
The penalty for failing to
take out enough to satisfy
your RMD by the deadline
is a 50% excise tax on the
undistributed portions.

How Will Your RMD


Affect Your Tax
Situation?
RMDs are generally treated
as ordinary income and will
be taxed at your income tax
rate. If you turned 70 last
year you can delay your first
RMD until April 1st of the

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Amanda Chappell
Southeast Retirement Planners
828-855-2067
www.seretirementplanners.com

following year though youll


still need to take your RMD
for age 71 by December
31st. Taking two RMDs in a
single year can affect your
tax picture; speak to your
advisor about tax-efficient
strategies.
From a tax perspective, it
doesnt matter whether you
take your RMD earlier or
later in the year. However,
if youre interested in
making a tax-free transfer
of your RMD to charity,
you may want to consider
waiting until December.
Though the Qualified
Charitable Distribution
provision expired in 2013,
Congress temporarily
renewed it in December
2014, giving taxpayers a
very short window to make
a charitable donation, and
they may do it again in the
future.

RMD rules can be complex.


Its a good idea to consult
a financial professional
to develop strategies that
minimize our taxes and
support your retirement
goals.
Southeast Retirement Planners is a marketing
name for securities, insurance, and advisory
services offered through SagePoint Financial
Inc., member FINRA/SIPC.

What Can You Do


With Your RMD?
Once youve taken your
RMD from your retirement
account and paid the taxes
on it, you can treat it as you
would any other source
of income. If you dont
need the money to cover
your living expenses, you
can reinvest into a taxable
account, spend it, or gift it.

PrimeofLife n 49

sitting is

hazardous
to your health

t is alarming that we spend 70% to 90%


of our waking day SITTING. Evidence
suggests that sitting for long periods
increases the risk of obesity, diabetes,
cancer and early death, even for people
who exercise daily. In addition, too much sitting
contributes to weight gain and back issues,
as well as making our body less efficient at
processing insulin, and increases our risk of
heart disease.
On average, we went from standing 90% of our
waking day to only 35%. Do you remember
walking to school, riding your bicycle to the ball

50 n PrimeofLife

April Berg
Member Relations
Catawba Valley Medical
Centers Fitness Plus
828-326-3680
aberg@cvmc.us

www.catawbavalleymedical.org/fitness-plus

field, hand washing your clothes and hanging


them out to dry, hand washing all your dishes,
lifting the garage door by hand, and filling
buckets to flush the toilet? So why has this
changed?
Technology has driven physical activity out of
our daily life making it simple to just stay seated.
Today, with a click of a button we can turn on
the TV, find a phone number, wash the dishes
and clothes and dry them, and open the garage
door. We ride in a car, work at a desk, eat a meal
at a table, and sit while working on a computer
and watching television.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

It is critical that we increase our physical activity level


regardless of our age or health condition. Starting an
exercise program is a great way to boost our health
and wellness. The American College of Sports Medicine
(ACSM) recommends a minimum of 150 minutes per
week of moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise
each week, for example 30 minutes walking or bicycling,
five days per week. In addition, we should incorporate
muscle strengthening exercises 2 days per week. It is also
important for us to move throughout the day in addition
to a weekly exercise routine by incorporating frequent
spontaneous bouts of physical activity throughout our day.

Bringing Home
The Best in Healthcare

There are several Medicare Supplements and Advantage


Plans that offer the SilverSneakers and Silver&Fit
fitness programs which pay for your membership at a
local fitness facility. Visit www.silversneakers.com or
www.silverandfit.com to find participating facilities in
your area.
I encourage you to find ways to add physical activity to
your daily life so that we can reverse the effects of sitting
too much. For example, squat 10 times when you stand to
get up or every 30 minutes, walk to the farthest bathroom,
stand when talking on the telephone, get up and move
during every commercial when watching TV, look at minor
chores as an opportunity to prevent disease, walk your
dog, get off the couch to change the channel on the
television, do seated crunches during commercial breaks,
spend time gardening/landscape in your yard, do heel
raises while cooking and brushing teeth, do some vertical
wall push-ups before you shower, bring in groceries one
bag at a time.
Challenge yourself to reduce your sitting by 5 minutes per
hour! Lets take a STAND against SITTING to live a longer
quality of life.

Home Health Services Including:


Skilled Nursing

Wound Care Management

Home Health Aide

Telemonitoring

Physical Therapy

Lifeline

Speech Therapy

Pediatric Care

Occupational Therapy

Other Specialized Services

Medical Social Work


ACHC Accreditation - Deemed Status
Medicare/Medicaid Certified
4 Star Rating from Home Health Compare
Locally Owned and Operated

For additional information, please contact


our Community Liaisons:
Shea Ruff, RN, BSN 828-455-9314
Sandy Hardin 828-514-0777

(828) 324-3025

www.ghsnc.com

Think

F.A.S.T.
C

erebrovascular
accident (CVA)
is the medical
term for stroke.
It occurs when
there is a sudden loss of
function in the brain because
of a loss of blood supply.
When there is a loss of blood
supply, oxygen and other
important nutrients cannot be
delivered to the brain, which
causes the death of brain cells
within minutes.

52 n PrimeofLife

Teresa Cating, MSN, A-G NP-C


Adult & Geriatric Primary Care
Nurse Practitioner
Kingston Residence of Hickory
828-327-9955
www.kingstonhealthcare.com

Blood flow to the brain can


be disrupted by either by
hemorrhaging in the brain
(brain bleed) or ischemia
(clot). Eighty-five percent
of strokes occur when the
arteries to the brain become
narrowed or blocked
causing reduced blood
flow (ischemia). The most
common ischemic strokes
are called thrombotic and
embolic. A thrombotic stroke
occurs when a blood clot

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

forms in one of the arteries that supply blood to the brain.


This may occurs from atherosclerosis (hardening of the
arteries). An embolic stroke occurs when a blood clot or
other debris forms away from the brain (commonly in the
heart) and is swept through the blood stream and lodges
in the narrow arteries in the
brain. Hemorrhagic strokes
occur when a blood vessel in
the brain leaks or ruptures.
Brain hemorrhages occur from
many conditions, such as
uncontrolled hypertension
and aneurysms.

Vision problems trouble seeing with one or both eyes


Headache sudden onset severe headache, altered
level of consciousness
A stroke is a medical emergency.
Time = brain cells! If you believe
someone is having a stroke,
think

FAST:
F=Face ask the person to
smile. Look for one-sided facial
drooping.

The risk factors of a stroke


include: hypertension, smoking,
diabetes, high cholesterol,
obesity, physical inactivity,
obstructive sleep apnea, heavy
or binge drinking, illicit drug
use, cardiovascular disease,
family history of stroke and age
over fifty-five.

A=Arms ask the person to

raise their arms. Look to see if


unable to raise one arm.

S = Speech ask the person


to say a sentence. Look for
slurring.

T = Time Call 911 immediately


if the person has any stroke
symptoms!

The signs and symptoms of a


stroke include:
Trouble walking dizziness,
loss of balance, loss of
coordination

The person needs to be taken


immediately to the hospital so
treatment can be initiated before
the three hour mark. There
are thrombolytic agents (clotbusters) that can be used to
dissolve clots but time is critical.
DO NOT WAIT FOR SYMPTOMS
TO GO AWAY if you do it
may be too late to alleviate the
damage to your brain.

Trouble speaking
slurred speech, difficulty
understanding
Paralysis of arm, leg, face
facial drooping, sudden
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PrimeofLife n 53

R U OK?
SAVES LIVES

velyn Lowman, 87, of Maiden, couldnt pick


up her ringing telephone March 26, 2015
because she was barely conscious.

Her doctor changed her medication the day before.


Unknowingly, she mixed up her medications. I
didnt know I was in the world, Lowman said.
Fortunately for Lowman, it was the Maiden Police
Departments R U OK program calling her.
The R U OK program is a computerized telephone
program that checks on the well-being of senior,
disabled, handicapped and homebound adults. The
Maiden Police Department and Catawba County

54 n PrimeofLife

Monica Venituoli
Staff Reporter
Hickory Daily Record
828-322-4510
mvendituoli@hickoryrecord.com

Sheriffs Office have R U OK programs that are free


for residents.
The program allows participants to select what time
and what days they receive the pre-recorded call.
When participants answer the call, they are greeted
by a pre-recorded message wishing them well.
The Catawba County Sheriffs Office also has a
special pre-recording by the former program leader,
Capt. Alton Price.
He has a wonderful singing voice. I do not,
Catawba County Sheriffs Office Sgt. and R U OK
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

program leader Kelly Eckard said. He has it recorded so it


would sing Happy Birthday to the folks, so we kept that.

Lowmans four children check on her as much as they can,


but Lowman said they all work.

If program participants do not answer the call, an alert is sent


to local law enforcement personnel.

This program gives a peace of mind to people who work that


somebody else is checking on them during the day. It allows
them to go to work, Hartman said.

When Lowmans alert was issued, Maiden Police Department


Lt. Donna Hartman rushed to check on her. She found
Lowman in her bedroom.
She spoke to me, but she went right back to sleep. She was
all but unresponsive, Hartman said. Hartman subsequently
called Emergency Medical Serves, which took Lowman to the
hospital.
Lowman was one of the first people to sign up when the
Maiden Police Department started the R U OK program in
June 2014. She is now one of 25 program participants in
Maiden. The Catawba County Sheriffs Office has 58 people
enrolled in the program, Eckard said.
While Lowman said she likes living alone, she signed up for
the program so someone could be aware of her well-being at
all times.

She bought her house in 1962 and has lived in Maiden


since 1945. Lowman said she adores residing in the good
community of Maiden. She hopes every local police
department creates their own R U OK programs.
We got a good police department, Lowman said. They
saved my life. They sure did.
WANT TO SIGN UP?
Any resident who is older, disabled, handicapped or
homebound in Catawba County can sign up for the R U OK
program for free.
To sign up for the Catawba County Sheriffs Office R U
OK program, call 828-465-8336. Check with your local
municipality for similar programs.

PA

It does give me some relief to know that I can pick up that


phone and call and get help if I need it, Lowman said.

Lowman said the R U OK program allowed her to continue


living alone in her home after staying in the hospital for a few
days in late March.

W W W. C A R O L I N A O R T H O . C O M

GET BACK TO NORMAL. ENJOY LIFE.

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W. Luke Robinson, M.D.

J. Barry Sanderlin, M.D.

Alfred E. Geissele, M.D.

Matthew D. Hannibal, M.D.

James A. Hurt, III, M.D.

Stephen J. Sladicka, M.D.

James E. Stanislaw, M.D.

Mark A. Tiffany, M.D.

Jeffrey P. Keverline, M.D. Timothy H. Kirkland, M.D.

Earl W. Walker, Jr., M.D.

Jason D. Zook, M.D.

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828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

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PrimeofLife n 55

what you need to know about

Lung Cancer

Content Provided by
Frye Regional
Medical Center
828-315-3596
fryemedctr.com

hat comes to mind when you think lung


cancer? The first thing that comes to most
peoples minds is cigarette smoking.
Approximately 87 percent of lung cancer
cases are related to smoking. This
includes smoking cigars and pipes. Additional risk factors
for developing the disease include:

Having a family history of cancer


Being exposed to asbestos, arsenic,

chromium, nickel, tar and soot
The American Cancer Society says lung cancer is the
leading cause of cancer death for both men and women
in the United States and worldwide. According to the 2014
Surgeon Generals Report, there have been more than
20 million smoking-related deaths in the United States
since 1964; 2.5 million of those deaths were among
non-smokers who died from exposure to secondhand
smoke. More men than women will die of this disease. The
average lifetime chance of developing lung cancer is 1 in
13 for men and 1 in 16 for women. The average age of a
lung cancer patient is 71. African American men have the
highest occurrence and lowest survival rates for
lung cancer.
The cancer normally forms in tissues of the lung, usually
in the cells lining air passages. The disease is generally
divided into two main categories, small cell lung cancer,
and non-small cell lung cancer. The majority, between
80 and 90 percent, of lung cancers are the non-small
cell type. This cancer usually grows slowly and does not
spread quickly to other organs. The other type, small cell
carcinoma, tends to grow fast and spread to other organs.
Lung cancer can be treated and treatment depends on
cancer type, tumor location, stage, and overall health.
Treatment options include:


Surgery


Chemotherapy

56 n PrimeofLife

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Radiation therapy or a combination

If you believe you may have lung cancer, check with your
doctor. Lung cancer typically does not cause problems
until it has spread.
Common indicators for the disease include:












Persistent cough that worsens over time

Recurrent respiratory infections

Chest pain
Shortness of breath
Wheezing
Fatigue
Coughing up blood
Hoarseness

Loss of appetite or weight loss

The American Cancer Society has changed their


guidelines and a Low Dose CT Lung Screening has been
approved. This screen does not replace smoking cessation

but offers an opportunity to find cancer earlier when it may


be treatable, says Interventional Pulmonologist Franklin R.
McGuire, MD, People appropriate for this screen include:
people between the ages of 55-77 with a cigarette smoking
history of at least 30 pack years, are a current cigarette
smoker or a former smoker who quit within the last 15
years.
Your doctor may order one of several tests available to
diagnose the disease.


















Thoracentesis to sample the fluid around


the lungs
Bronchoscopy to view the airways or take
tissue samples using a long, flexible tube
Computed tomography scan to identify abnormal
tissue masses in the lungs
Positron emission tomography scan to look for
cancer cells in the lungs
Bone scan to check if cancer has spread to
the bones

Loose Dentures?
Missing Teeth?

DRH
Darab,Richardson&Hill

Wisdom Teeth & Dental Implant Experts

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 57

partnership with chamber a

success
A

ll it takes is one person with an idea, a


passion for the cause, the determination
to see it through and to organize and rally
enough volunteer support to bring it to
reality. I congratulate Susan Vincent, owner
of Home Instead Senior Care for being that leader with
the vision to bring SIR (Senior Information Resources)
to reality in Catawba County in 2012.
The mission of SIR is to enhance the lives of seniors in
Catawba County by providing a comprehensive and
collaborative point of contact, focusing on education,
resources and programs for seniors, their families and
their caregivers. Vincents goal back then was to form
this unique organizational cluster of services/agencies
to learn from each other about the ever increasing
population growth, needs and services that this senior
population sector is requiring and to communicate
these resources to the entire population of this Metro
region. In particular, helping those with little or no
access to social media, computers, transportation,
money, local relatives, caregivers, etc., that might
need it the most. It has worked now for four years and
their partnership with the Chamber has led to this 4th

58 n PrimeofLife

Danny Hearn
President and CEO
Catawba County
Chamber of Commerce
828-328-6111
www.catawbachamber.org

Annual Prime of Life Senior Expo that the Chamber


manages for SIR each year.
This SIR partnership also includes working with another
Board that was formed in 2012 called the Catawba
County Aging Coalition who manages the strategies
developed by the Catawba County Aging Consortium.
They developed a master plan for senior citizen
education, engagement and how to create easier
access to senior services within Catawba County.
The Chambers involvement is of economic necessity
as we deal with the fastest growing population in the
Metro region in the past last 10 years. We also want
to provide easier access for our 900 members to
introduce their products and services to this population
base and fill their needs locally instead of going out
of town. Americas 78 million baby boomers comprise
28% of the population but carry more than 50% of the
purchasing power. Unlike younger consumers, theyre
not interested in spending money on the latest trends,
but instead purchasing goods and services to enhance
their health conscious lifestyles.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Avoiding
mistakes

Casey W. Pope
Patrick, Harper & Dixon, LLP
Attorneys at Law
828-322-7741

in estate planning

s an attorney, I help clients plan their estates


or administer the estates of their deceased
loved ones. While every situation is different,
there are a few things I see regularly that
can cause a persons final wishes to go
unmet. Below are the three most common mistakes that
I see in estate planning and my recommendations for
how to avoid them.
1 There is no written estate plan. I once had a teacher
whose favorite saying was, If you fail to plan, plan
to fail. Few words ring truer in the estate planning
context. Even if your family knows your final wishes,
they are not legally binding unless they are spelled out
in a properly drafted, properly executed estate plan.
In fact, in the absence of such a plan, North Carolina
law determines who receives your property, how much
each receives, and who is responsible for settling your
estate. Property passing to a minor child may require a
guardianship, and if an heir is disabled or in a nursing
home, valuable government benefits could be lost.
Having an estate plan ensures that your assets pass
to whom you want them to go, in the amounts that you
desire, and under the conditions that you determine.
A written estate plan is also invaluable during your
lifetime. If you become incompetent to handle your own
affairs, powers of attorney will ensure that trusted
Continued to pg. 60

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

To be an artist is to believe in Life.


- Henry Moore

At Lenoir Healthcare, compassion is one of


our greatest talents and it is a gift that we are
able to give to each of our residents. even in an
increasingly fast-pased world, we continue to
embrace the art of caring.
Whether your stay is short or long, our goal is
to provide our residents with a perfect blend
of comfort, security and care and a lifestyle
that encompasses all aspects of health and
wellness.

Give us a call at 828-758-7326


322 Nuway Circle N.E., Lenoir, NC 28645

PrimeofLife n 59

Continued from pg. 59

persons you choose have control of your financial and


medical decisions. Without them, a court will appoint a
guardian for you, who may or may not be whom you
would have chosen for yourself.
2 Asset titling and beneficiary designations are not
coordinated with the Will. Right of survivorship and
beneficiary designations are not altered by the terms of a
Will or a Trust. Consider this example: Your Will dictates
that all of your property passes to your three children in
equal shares, with a trust set up for them until age 30. Your
daughter is 21 and your two sons are 13 and 15. You own
your bank account jointly with rights of survivorship with
your daughter, and your life insurance beneficiaries are all
three children. Regardless of what your Will says, when
you die the bank account passes only to your daughter,
outright, as the surviving joint owner. The life insurance
pays to the children outright, regardless of their age. If
the sons are still minors, guardians must be appointed for
them to receive the funds. A properly drafted estate plan
would coordinate the bank account ownership and the life
insurance beneficiary with your desire to share the assets
equally among the children and protect the funds in trust
until age 30.

60 n PrimeofLife

3 The estate plan is never updated. I sometimes see


folks whose estate plans are almost as old as I am. Back
when the plans were originally drafted, laws were different,
the kids were minors, and their estates were modest.
Now the kids are grown, the client has grandchildren, the
client has divorced and remarried, and the estate is worth
substantially more. In short, the original estate plan is not
at all what the client needs or wants now. As we all know,
change is the only constant in life. Your estate plan should
be a living document that is reviewed and updated as you
experience changes in life. It is a good idea to review your
documents on an annual or biannual basis and update
them if needed. In between those times, you should review
and update if there is a significant life change, such as a
death, divorce, remarriage, birth, substantial change in
wealth, or move to a different state.
Estate planning deals with incompetency and death,
neither of which are pleasant things to think about.
However, the consequences of not planning, or planning
poorly, are steep. Establishing a comprehensive, written
estate plan and keeping it current throughout lifes
changes will give you and your family the greatest gifts you
can give certainty and peace of mind.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Medicaid
Myths

ts no surprise that long term care


is a primary concern for our aging
population. Costs of long term
care, either at home or in a facility,
have increased exponentially, and
odds are high that you will need such
care at some point in your life. Many
myths about planning for long term
care persist. This article sets the record
straight about whats fact and whats
fiction.

MYTH #1: Medicare pays for


long term care.

Casey W. Pope
Patrick, Harper & Dixon, LLP
Attorneys at Law
828-322-7741

FACT: Medicare Part A pays for skilled


nursing care in a skilled nursing facility
only under certain conditions and for a
limited time. To be eligible, your entry
into the facility must be preceded by
an inpatient hospital stay of 3 days or
longer. Your care must be prescribed
by your doctor and necessary
for treatment of a hospital-related
condition. If you qualify, Medicare will
pay all costs for the first 20 days. You
must pay $157.50 per day for days
21-100. Medicare does not pay beyond
100 days.

Continued to pg. 62

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Newton, NC
7473 Sherrills Ford Rd
Sherrills Ford, NC

Hospice medical care


Patient and family support
COPD and CHF programs
Expert symptom control
and pain management
Bereavement services

828.466.0466 CatawbaRegionalHospice.org
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 61

Continued from pg. 61

MYTH #2: I will have to get rid of everything that I own to


qualify for Medicaid.
FACT: Medicaid exempts certain assets from its

qualification guidelines. You are allowed to keep your


home, other real estate owned jointly with a non-spouse,
one vehicle, personal and household items, jewelry,
artwork, and term life insurance. If your spouse is still
living at home, you may also keep a certain amount of
other assets for your spouse. These exempt assets are
not considered when determining whether you meet the
Medicaid asset qualification, which is currently $2,000.
However, if left in your name, these exempt assets would
be subject to Medicaid estate recovery after your death,
meaning they would likely have to be sold.

MYTH #3: I should transfer all of my property to my


children to qualify for Medicaid.
FACT: While transferring property to your children is often
an excellent Medicaid planning strategy, there are several
issues to consider. First, the transfers must occur outside
the Medicaid lookback period, which is currently 5 years.
Second, after the transfers are completed, the children
need to execute proper Wills and Powers of Attorney to
ensure that the assets are protected from the childrens
creditors, death, and/or divorce.

MYTH #4: I can put everything in an annuity or a trust to


protect it from Medicaid.

62 n PrimeofLife

FACT: Only certain, very specialized annuities are helpful

in Medicaid planning. The annuity must meet specific


criteria or the value of the annuity will be countable toward
the $2,000 asset limit, or the transfer of the funds into the
annuity will be an impermissible transfer that will render
you ineligible for Medicaid for a period of time. With regard
to trusts, only an Irrevocable Trust can protect your assets
from Medicaid. A Revocable Living Trust does nothing to
protect your assets and should not be used for Medicaid
planning. Transferring assets into an Irrevocable Trust is
subject to the Medicaid lookback period, so this should be
done at least 5 years in advance of applying for Medicaid.

MYTH #5: The State or the nursing home will take my


house when I die.
FACT: Neither the State of North Carolina nor your

nursing home takes your house when you die. However,


Medicaid will file a lien and become a creditor of your
estate after your death. This is called Medicaid estate
recovery. In that event, regardless of how many or how few
assets are in your estate, a full estate administration must
be performed. All of the assets in your estate, including
your home, must be sold and the proceeds used to
repay Medicaid and your other creditors. Estate recovery
is waived if you are survived by a spouse. With proper,
advance planning, you can often protect many of your
assets from Medicaid estate recovery by removing them
from your estate.

*DISCLAIMER: This article is for general information only. It is not intended as a source of legal
advice, and no information provided should be considered or relied upon as legal advice on any
specific matter.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

A Problem

David Hudson, CEP, RFC

Too Big To Ignore

n 2009, Lawyers.com conducted


a study of the estate planning
efforts of adults. The results were
surprising! According to the
survey, 49% of the adult population
didnt have a will. The same survey
concluded that 72% did not have proper
powers of attorney. What does that
mean? There are about 230,000,000
adults over the age of 20 in the United
States; of that number 64,400,000 have
at least a basic estate plan including

Masters Estate &


Financial Services
828-322-6554

wills and powers of attorney. The other


165,600,000 dont have the most basic
estate documents. Nearly 3 out of 4 are
at risk for having the state take over the
management of their money, property,
and even their care if they become
totally disabled.
For years I have warned individuals
and audiences about the time,
expense, and humiliation that is
associated with competency hearings
Continued to pg. 64

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828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 63

Continued from pg. 63

and guardianship. In most cases a durable power of


attorney and a health care power of attorney can keep
individuals and their families from having to go through
these proceedings. In addition to the powers of attorney,
a person that is a parent or guardian would likely want
to also have a will expressing their wishes about the
distribution of their property and the care of minors.
Unfortunately, most adults fail to plan for the possibility
of disability or the certainty of death. After all, bad things
arent going to happen to them. If they do, it will only
happen when they are much older. There is always time to
plan later, right?
Who are these individuals that neglect the duty they have
to protect their loved one and their property? They are
our aunts, uncles, our brothers and sisters. In some cases
they are our parents or children. Are they bad people?
They arent bad at people at all. They are our friends and
neighbors. They may sit next to us in church.
So if the need is so great, and the people arent bad,
why is there such a gigantic problem? The problem isnt
a heart problem. Those without estate plans dont
necessarily love their family any less than those who do
have estate plans. It isnt a head problem either. Those
that have taken the time to plan may not have IQs higher
than those that havent. The problem IS an education
problem. For the most part those that havent planned
simply have never been taught the seriousness of the

64 n PrimeofLife

problem. It isnt that they dont believe its an urgent


problem. Its just a problem that can wait till later. Almost
everyone knows they need to plan, but its not a problem
thats near the top of their list. They dont know how
humiliating it is for a loved one to have to give account of
every dime they spend to the court because they become
disabled. They dont know how degrading it is for a
spouse, a son, or a daughter to have to ask permission
to spend money on behalf of a disabled person. They
dont know how serious the consequences can be when
a young single parent or a young couple dies without a
will and the count has to decide who will get the children.
They have no idea how hard it is for the guardian of those
children to have to ask the court for money each time the
children have needs because there was no will or trust set
up for them. They simply dont know how much additional
time, money, and heartache they may cost their family
when they die without a will.
What can you do to help? First educate yourself by reading
a book, or attending a seminar about estate planning.
Second, make sure you have a plan. You will be more
persuasive if you believe what you are saying enough to
act yourself. Finally talk to your friends, relatives, and those
you love. It will be a conversation you will be glad you
had. You cant make decisions for them, but you can make
sure they know the truth. Having a conversation with them
about estate planning is the loving thing to do because its
a problem too big to ignore.
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

dont know where to turn?

Dial 2-1-1

oure behind on your rent or mortgage. Your


home is on the verge of foreclosure. Youre
a single mother in need of affordable child
care. You have an aging parent that can no
longer be left alone during the day. Youre
overwhelmed and you need simple answers. Try dialing
a simple number: 2-1-1 (or 888-892-1162).

NC 2-1-1 is a service of Catawba County United Way in
conjunction with United Way of North Carolina. Dialing
2-1-1 provides free, confidential, 24/7 information and
referral. A live operator is able to pull information about
local agencies and services from a data base that
contains the most up-to-date details about the where to
go for help. A companion website containing the same
information can be found at www.nc211.org.

Cheryl Abee
Director
Catawba County
Volunteer Center
A program of Catawba
County United Way
www.nc211.org

The website is very helpful, but one of the real benefits


of 2-1-1 is being able to call the number and talk to a
live operator. By being able to talk with someone who is
trained on how to search for resources, a caller is going
to be less likely to be overwhelmed calling place after
place and most importantly, theyre going to find the
help they need available to them in community.

Last year there were 896 calls seeking services in


Catawba County. There were 10,719 page views of
the local programs at www.nc211.org. The top five
needs when it comes to services are typically Utility
Service Payment Assistance, Rent Payment Assistance,
Homeless Shelters, Food Pantries and Housing
Payment Assistance.
Along with being able to find services or even volunteer
opportunities, NC 2-1-1 can be updated in real time in
the event of a disaster providing the latest information
on shelters or resources. In July of 2013, when flood
waters resulted in extensive damage across Catawba
County, the American Red Cross set up a command
post and hotline - that hotline number and any shelter
information was entered into the NC 2-1-1 data base
and could be updated in minutes. During the frigid
temperatures this year, churches and agencies opened
up warming stations to get homeless off the streets.
Warming station information was entered and kept
updated through 2-1-1.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 65

Eat Smart,
Live Long

t is no secret that America is aging


rapidly. It is estimated that by 2030, those
individuals 65 years and older will grow to
72.1 million which will be approximately
20% if the population. This rapid growth
can be attributed to an increase in the number
of Baby Boomer retirees, an increase in the
life expectancy and lower birth rates. As
the American population ages, healthcare
professionals, as well as caregivers of older
adults, face many challenges especially in the

66 n PrimeofLife

Lynn Winkler, MA, RD/N, LD/N


Registered Dietitian/Food
& Nutrition Services Coordinator
PACE @ Home, Newton, N.C.
828-468-3980
pace-at-home.org

area of nutrition and healthy food access.


Although nutrition is key for overall care for
older adults living in healthcare communities
like assisted living facilities and nursing homes,
providing adequate nutrition are of great concern
for those caring for aging loved ones in the
home. Caregiver concerns include: what type
of healthy foods to provide, how to prepare
these foods, and how to adequately follow a
recommended diet, for example with diabetes

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

or for cardiovascular disease. Other barriers to providing


adequate nutrition in the older population may include:
changes in taste or appetite, weight changes, issues
chewing due to damaged or missing teeth, dentures and
proper hydration. These concerns can be overwhelming
for a caregiver.
However, making simple changes can go a long way in
improving ones health. For older adults it is often more
important to make sure the individual has access to good
quality food and that they enjoy the foods provided.
Keep it in perspective. Making healthy food choices may
not be a complete cure for chronic disease, but making
simple changes can better manage the symptoms of a
chronic disease. Healthy eating usually includes fruits
and vegetables, mostly whole grain foods, lean protein
and dairy, if tolerated. Treats are okay but in moderation.
It will not be beneficial to try to adhere to a strict diet if the
person you are caring for will not eat it. Planning meals
should start with having of the plate full of fruits and
veggies, with the remainder of the plate offering a serving
of whole grains and 2-3 oz lean protein. Prepare foods
with healthy fats such as olive oil, use herbs instead of salt
and try to bake, and grill or roast foods instead of frying.
Also try using a slow cooker to prepare meats in larger
quantities to be used in other meals throughout the week.
Batch cooking can also be helpful for time management.
Caregivers should keep in mind that when preparing
these healthier meals, food consistencies may need to be
altered to be softer if the older adult has issues with their
teeth or dentures. If low intake or weight loss is a concern,
try smaller, more frequent meals and snacks. Remember,
breakfast is usually the best meal for older adults, so dont
be too concerned if intake is less at lunch or dinner.
Encouraging adequate hydration in the older adult
population is also important. Often we all do not drink
enough water. Making sure an older adult is well hydrated
can help improve brain function and reduce risks of urinary
tract infections. Unless instructed by a doctor to limit
beverages, when thirsty always encourage water first and
try to keep caffeinated beverages to a minimum. Fruits and
vegetables also contain water, so consuming these foods
each meal or snack may play a role in proper hydration.
Remember, eating smart and making healthy food and
activity changes can happen at any age. Keep it simple.
Try to use fresh foods when possible and limit processed
foods found in boxes, bags or cans. Have a healthy
attitude towards food. Simple changes like drinking more
water and less soda, or adding one more vegetable per
day can improve quality of life and help us all live strong
and healthy lives for years to come.
For other meal planning ideas check out
www.choosemyplate.gov or www.nutrition.gov and click on
the seniors link for healthy meal planning ideas.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Experience

Abernethy Laurels
Rehabilitation Services
Newly renovated private suites with the
added convenience of wireless internet
Tailored schedules to fit your routine and
give you choices
At Your Request dining services; you choose
when to eat and what to eat
A caring team of on-site professionals
trained in physical, occupational, speech
and aquatic therapy ready to personalize a
program to get you back to enjoying the
things you love!

828.465.8532
102 Leonard Avenue
Newton, North Carolina
www.abernethylaurels.org

attention!
The Library Has Left the Building

ou do not have to come to the library


any more to check out your favorite
books, movies and audiobooks. You do
not have to come to the library to access
most library databases and streaming
services. In fact, you never have to step foot in a
library again.
If you are fifty-five and older and have a disability
that keeps you from leaving your home, you may
be able to receive public library outreach services
in your own home. Many libraries are now able to
provide materials including large print books, fiction
and nonfiction DVDs, audiobooks on CD, music
CDs and other resources to qualified individuals in
their own homes. You must complete an application
form in person or by mail and indicate what kind

68 n PrimeofLife

Tamara Faulkner
Senior Outreach
Coordinator
Hickory Public Library
828-261-2267
tfaulkner@hickorync.gov

of disability you have; for example, vision, hearing


loss, mobility, chronic disease, dementia or frailty.
Another qualification for home service is having
little or no access to transportation, including
public, private or family members.
Once your application is complete, an outreach
librarian will call you to schedule an appointment
with you. When she arrives, she will ask you about
your reading and viewing preferences, discuss
what kind of materials you want, and how often you
need her to visit. Most libraries will check out items
for at least a month, or longer if there is need, and
most will not charge overdue fees for individuals in
the home service program. Once the librarian has
a list of your favorite authors, genres, etc., she will
bring your new materials to you in a day or two and
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

you will be able to enjoy your books and other materials


at your leisure. Many times your personal librarian will stay
to talk for a while to get to know you better. You may even
make a new friend! You will begin to look forward to your
monthly library visits. However, if you are uncomfortable
having a stranger in your home, the librarian can switch
out your books and movies at the front door and not come
in the house at all.
Homebound individuals can also receive library materials
by mail. The qualification and application process is the
same, but a staff member will contact you by phone and
interview you about your preferences. Sending books by
mail is more expensive, and it is very difficult to mail items
such as DVDs and CDs that are easily damaged, but your
library staff will work with you to provide what you need.
You will receive two or three items at a time in a library
mailing bag, and when you are finished with them you will
mail them back in the bag, free of charge. Mail service
takes much longer than home visits, so if you would like
your materials faster, the personal visit may work better
for you.

To supplement public library service, The North Carolina
Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped provides
a lending library of equipment, recorded audiobooks
and books in Braille that can be sent all over the state to
individuals who qualify. The application can be found on
their website at http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/lbph/eligibilityapp.html. Your local library may also have paper copies
of the application which you can fill out and mail. You
must have a doctors signature to be considered for this
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

taxpayer-funded service, but it is a superb supplement


to your librarys collection, and it is also easy to use.
Once you are approved, you will receive the necessary
equipment free of charge. Items you can check out from
the State Library include Talking Books on cassette or
digital players, Braille books, large print books, and
musical scores and instructional texts. These are primarily
in large type and Braille.

You no longer have an excuse to watch TV all day! If you
are homebound and like to read, listen to audiobooks, or
watch high quality movies and documentaries, your public
library is the place to start.

You better get bookin!

Hickory Public Library


Mon.-Thurs. 9:00AM-9:00PM
Fri.-Sat. 9:00AM-5:00PM

www.hickorync.gov/library
Patrick Beaver Memorial Library
375 Third Street NE
Hickory, NC 28601
828-304-0500
Ridgeview Branch Library
706 First Street SW
Hickory, NC 28602
828-345-6037

PrimeofLife n 69

stay in
the know

f youre an older adult, theres never been a


better time to subscribe to your local newspaper.
Whether its local news, event announcements
or national news youre looking for, each issue is
packed with information that senior citizens need
to have.
Conover resident Lucille Woodrum said the newspaper
keeps her abreast of events
in the community. I cant
imagine people not taking
the newspaper, Woodrum
said. I use it to tell the
people about events like the
Western Piedmont Symphony
Orchestra, when they have their
symphonies and concerts, and
when the plays are going to be
in the different areas, that type
of thing.
Each issue of the newspaper
contains a sampling of
breaking local news, national or
international stories, as well as
listings of community events.
Woodrum said she often cuts
out clips to give to friends about
events like the Senior Olympics
or groups like the Catawba
Valley Quilters Guild. Im not
a quilter, but I love to read the
articles about them and I share those with the group
so there again its a new outlet for some people,
Woodrum said. They maybe never had time to quilt but
theyre kind of getting interested in it because theyre
hearing what the guild is, Woodrum said.
The newspaper is better, she said, than trying to find
out information on the computer or TV.

70 n PrimeofLife

Daphne Chen
Hickory Daily Record
828-322-4510

In fact, reading has been proved to keep your mind


and memory sharp in ways that watching TV doesnt.
A Mayo Clinic Study of Aging found that reading and
playing games can reduce your chances of developing
mild cognitive impairment by up to 50 percent, but
watching more than seven hours of TV a day has the
opposite effect.
The newspaper also features
a daily sports section, puzzles
and comics. Woodrum often
skips past the sports section,
preferring human-interest
stories, but looks forward to
doing the crossword puzzle
every day.
Reading doesnt have to be a
solitary activity. Its well-known
that socializing with groups of
friends on a regular basis can
help your brain stay sharp and
keep depression and anxiety
at bay.
Woodrum runs a monthly
current events club through
the Neighbors Network where
senior citizens meet for coffee
and discussion.
A lot of times if we hear of a
new business or new restaurant, well get together,
three or four of us, and go try it out, Woodrum said.
Seniors, they need something to look forward to
and so the newspaper has been keeping me pretty
well informed.
Were older, Woodrum said. But were still active.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

a simple

plan

s I was growing up, I never worried


about where home was, what to eat,
what to drink or who I was with. That
was in a time when you knew your
neighbors, left your doors unlocked,
drank from a garden hose, and used the five
second rule when you dropped your candy bar.
As I have grown older and have seen my
grandparents pass away and my parents age,
I am beginning to understand that life has
become very complicated. I can no longer take
things for granted. I own a home and a car. I
have kids and grandkids. My parents are now in
their seventies and have had numerous issues

No matter where you live - in a home,


apartment or retirement community having certain information handy can
prevent possible major issues:
Do you know where the main water cut-off is for
your residence? What about gas? Electricity?
Do you know what each circuit breaker in your power
box controls?
Do you know your insurance agent? Do you have their
number nearby?
Do you know multiple ways out of your residence in the
case of a fire?
Do you have a fire plan with a neighbor to make sure
that everyone is accounted for?
Does your neighbor have contact numbers in case
something happens to your home? Do you have theirs?
Do you have a list of all medications you take or any
special needs in emergency situations?

Michael Richey
Marketing Manager
SERVPRO of Hickory
828-322-4400
www.serveproofhickory.com

involving their health. Dad always says he has


everything covered. Dont worry! he says, but
I do anyway. I think it is an inherent trait that we
should always take care of our families. My kids
are grown with lives of their own, but I always
worry about them as well.
In my profession, we see many things happen
that most people think will never happen to
them and do not plan for, and because of that,
I make sure that I always talk to my family
about them.
A simple question begins a thought process
that many people never think about.

Do You
Know?

We all take things for granted in our lives, but taking a few
minutes and simply sitting down with family and close
friends, this information could be the difference in saving
your home or your familys lives.
We read about personal catastrophe every day. A simple
life plan could be the difference in your life tomorrow!
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 71

I Cant

Breathe!
S

easonal changes can affect people with chronic


obstructive pulmonary disease.

Temperature and weather can trigger Chronic


Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) flare ups. High
heat, ozone and air pollution all make breathing more
difficult. Increased temperatures can cause shortness
of breath and feelings of exhaustion as the body works
harder in attempts to maintain a normal body temperature.
Maintaining that constant temperature uses additional
energy and increases the amount of oxygen the body
consumes. Warm air also has a drying or irritating effect
causing the airways to constrict and limit airflow. Higher
humidity levels contain more moisture and less oxygen
making the air dense and harder to breathe. As humidity
increases, other airborne allergens such as dust and
mold increase. Symptoms of breathlessness, cough, and
increased phlegm production tend to get worse when the
air is hot and humid.
COPD symptoms may often be affected by barometric
pressure. As barometric pressure drops, less oxygen is
available in the air. Barometric pressure can change 30-40
millimeters of mercury during periods of thunderstorms
especially in the late spring and early summer. A change of
just a few points can increase shortness of breath. When
the barometric pressure drops too much for comfort,
circulating air may relieve feelings of breathlessness.

72 n PrimeofLife

Heather Lackey, RN, BSN


Gentiva Cardiopulmonary
Coordinator
Gentiva Home Health Care
828-328-1871

Ozone levels are highest between May and September


and tend to be higher in the afternoons compared to the
mornings. Although it is impossible to control the weather,
managing or avoiding your triggers is the best way to
prevent COPD symptoms.
Turn off exhaust fans and turn on a ceiling fan, open
doors and windows to allow air flow.
On extremely hot and humid days, stay indoors with the
air conditioner on and limit outdoor activities.
Plan activities during the morning hours when humidity is
lower.
Avoid allergens such as dust, pet dander, fumes and
fragrances.
Do not smoke and try to avoid secondhand smoke.
Take all medications and oxygen as prescribed by your
doctor.
There is no cure for chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease. Sufferers of COPD can learn to control their
symptoms by avoiding triggers and recognizing the signs
of an impending exacerbation.
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

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828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

PrimeofLife n 73

asking for help

Content provided by
Catawba Regional
Hospice

is the best way to get it

hat simple sentence


is one that people
working in end-of-life
care often hear from
families. Unfortunately,
its usually communicated after the
fact, meaning that a good deal of
the support that could have been
available ultimately went unused.
When families are faced with
advanced illness, their first
impulse is to shoulder all of the
caregiving themselves. They

74 n PrimeofLife

coordinate doctors appointments,


medications, errands, bathing,
meal preparation, and round-theclock availability in order to show
their compassion and love. They
become a whirlwind of motion and
good intentions.
As a disease progresses, however,
caregiving becomes harder and
harder, and family members
get worn down, tired, and even
irritable. They discover that they

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

dont know how to provide everything a loved one needs


on their own, and they struggle, sometimes for months
or years.

All of these things are most beneficial when you ask for
help early on. Monitoring a patients health, getting to
know him or her personally, and creating an individual plan
of care all work in tandem to improve a patients life and
extend valuable time with family and friends.

I wish Id
known about
hospice earlier.

If youre unsure about hospice at first, check with anyone


whos been served by them, and youll likely get a positive
response about the breadth of care provided. Plus,
wouldnt it be better to inquire and be told, No, youre not
appropriate for hospice than to find out, Oh, theres so
much we could have done to make things easier for you
all.

[ [

What they dont understand is that hospice offers a host


of services to make the journey more manageable for
everyone. Hospice providers have lots of experience with
advanced illness, and they sincerely want people to know
that its not necessary to figure things out on your own.
Theres a team ready to help make things better.
All you have to do is ask for the services that you and your
loved ones need. Reaching out doesnt mean that youve
failed someone. It doesnt mean youve given up anything.
It simply means that you want to give the people you love
the best care possible at a time when it matters most.

In essence, thats the simplest advice: Just ask and be


open. The best thing you can discover is compassionate,
understanding professionals to support you and your
loved ones, along with an offer of hope for their enhanced
quality of life.

Isnt that what we


want, after all?

Asking hospice for assistance opens up a


number of useful options:
Hospice can quickly help with pain management so
that a patient stays comfortable.
Hospice can provide care in a home, facility or
wherever the patient prefers.
Hospice can step in if theres a medical crisis without
having a patient go to the emergency room.
Hospice can admit a patient to a facility briefly to give
a caregiver time to rest.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

More than just a place to stay

The SECU Family House provides friendship, support,


and affordable accommodations for adult patients
traveling to Winston-Salem for medical treatment.
For more information: www.familyhousews.org

PrimeofLife n 75

Coping
with Life Transitions

atawba County
Social Services
is now offering
Information and
Options Counseling
to adults in the county who
are experiencing a major life
transition, and need assistance
discovering and navigating the
services that may be available to

76 n PrimeofLife

Rodney Franklin
Long-Term Care
Team Supervisor
Catawba County
Social Services
828-695-5609

them. Information can be provided


about services ranging from inhome assistance and adult day
care services to assisted living or
nursing home placement.
This service is designed to help
the person identify options, weigh
the pros and cons of each, and
make an action plan to help meet

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

their goals. The counselor


will work with the person to
discuss their preferences,
values, service needs
and circumstances. The
counselor will provide
information about various
options so the person can
make informed choices
about long-term services
and supports. Information
and Options Counseling
provides valuable
information to individuals
who may not be aware of
what services are available.
While Social Services has
always provided information
and referral services to
persons who need to make
decisions such as these,
the new Information and
Options Counseling service
is a more in-depth and
personalized approach.

The goal is to help the


individual make decisions
about their own care. To
make use of this service,
the person in need of care
must be able to make their
own decisions. However,
caregivers or family
members are invited to

participate in the process if


they wish.
To schedule an
appointment with a
certified Information and
Options counselor, call
Catawba County Social
Services at 828-695-5609.

Alzheimers Care
Dementia Care
Personal Care
Nursing Care
Meal Preparation
Light Housekeeping
Medication Reminders
Professional Hands
Shopping & Errands
Guided by Caring Hearts
Free In-Home Assessment Serving Our Community with
Quality Homecare Since 1981
Caregivers that are state
certified, insured & bonded www.UnifourNursing.com
24-hr and
(828) 464-0244
Over Night Care available

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Naturopathic
Medical
Physician

Doctor Herb
Cole, N.D.
Call
828-322-5316

Nearly all people die of


their remedies and not
from their illnesses.
Mention this ad for a free
supplement.

NATURAL
FOOD STORE
1920 Hwy 70 W.
Hickory, NC 28602

PrimeofLife n 77

avoiding
falls

ccording to the Center for Disease Control


(CDC), one in three adults age 65 and
older falls each year. Falls can result in a
wide range of injuries from bruises and
broken bones to head trauma and even
death. Preventing falls is serious business. What are
some things you can do to prevent falls?
Review the following questions carefully. For best
results, correct the items you identify could be
potential threats.

Health & Safety:


Do you take four or more medications daily?
Multiple medications can cause dizziness,
drowsiness and balance problems. It is
important to have all of your medications
reviewed at least once a year by a pharmacist
or doctor.

Have you or those around you noticed a
change in your hearing? Dizziness can occur
with hearing loss. Set up an appointment to
have your hearing checked.

Have you or those around you noticed a
change in your vision? Seeing obstacles is
the first step in avoiding a fall. Keep your
glasses clean. Have your eyes examined
once a year.

Have you fallen two or more times in the past
six months? Get a checkup! Falls lead to
injuries. You need to find out why you are
falling.

Do you wear floppy slippers or a long
bathrobe? Wear well-fitting slippers with
non-skid soles. Avoid night clothing that
drags on the ground. Keep your robe tied.

Abilities:


Do you have trouble reaching overhead?
Put commonly used things on shelves that
are easy to reach. If you must reach

78 n PrimeofLife

Keith Gray
Director/Owner
Visiting Angels Homecare
828-572-4300

overhead, keep a sturdy stool handy.



Picking up objects from the floor? Plan ahead.
Move the object closer to something sturdy to
hold on to.

Do you have trouble getting in and out of the
bathtub? Consider adding grab bars to the
walls or using a tub seat to assist with
bathing. Non-skid tub mats and a hand held
shower can also be useful.

Trouble getting in and out of a chair? Avoid
sitting on low furniture. Chairs with arms make
it easier to get up.

Trouble walking without holding on to
something? If you feel unsteady without
holding on to something, you may need a
cane. Consult your doctor or health care
provider.

Home: Do You Have ...






















Throw rugs? Throw rugs pose a tripping


hazard. They should be tacked down or
removed.
Stairs without rails? Using hand rails to go up
and down stairs is easier and safer. Add hand
rails to all stairs, if possible.
Clutter in your walking space? Clutter such
as shoes, electrical cords and magazines are
a safety hazard. Keep pathways clear.
Dark hallways or stairwells? Good lighting can
reduce the chance of falling. Consider adding
night lights where overhead lighting is
lacking. Add bright tape strips to the edge of
each stair. Always keep a charged flashlight
near your bed for emergencies. A night light
in the bathroom can also make night trips to
the bathroom safer.

Its important to take a critical look around your home


and eliminate any threat of falls. Hopefully this list will
help you avoid a fall in your home.

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

RESOURCE directory
Abernethy Laurels

Rob Hartsell, Director of Marketing


Julie Beebe, Marketing Coordinator
102 Leonard Ave.
Newton, NC 28658
828-465-8519
828-465-8552
RHartsell@uchas.org
jbeebe@uchas.org
www.AbernethyLaurels.org
_________________________

ACAP - Hickory

(formerly Adult Children of Aging Parents)


PO Box 8278
Morganton, NC 28680
1-877-599-ACAP (1-877-599-2227)
info@ACAPcommunity.com
www.ACAPcommunity.com
_________________________

Adult Life Programs

Adult Life
PROGRAMS

Mark Bumgarner, Executive Director


226 2nd St NW, PO Box 807
Hickory, NC 28603
828-326-9120
www.adultlifeprograms.com
info@adultlifeprograms.com
mbumgarner@adultlifeprograms.com
_________________________

Alzheimers Association
of Western Carolina,
Foothills Office
Meghan Lawton
226 2nd Street NW, PO Box 2565
Hickory, NC 28601
828-514-3124
1-800-272-3900
828-327-2661 (fax)
mlawton@alz.org
www.alz.org/northcarolina
________________________

Barbaras Hearing Service

Barbara Lockwood, MA, FAAA


21 Years Experience
715 Fairgrove Church Rd. SE , Suite 102
Conover, NC 28613
828-322-4750
Hear well. Live well.
www.barbarashearing.com

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Bayada Home Health Care


Melissa Walsh, Director
1985 Tate Blvd SE, Ste 417
Hickory, NC 28602
828-327-3300
mwalsh1@bayada.com
www.bayada.com
_________________________

Bennett Funeral Service

Robbie Bennett
502 1st Ave. S
Conover, NC 28613
828-465-2111
www.robertbennettfuneralservice.com
________________________

Best Value Hearing


Care Centers

Donna M. Young BC-HIS, ACA


Board Certified Hearing Instrument
Sciences, Audioprosthologist
302 4th Street SW
Hickory, NC 28602
828-322-9323 (Hickory)
828-754-2754 (Lenoir)
828-438-9685 (Morganton)
________________________

BlueCross BlueShield
of North Carolina
Hickory Office
1830 Startown Road
Hickory, NC 28602
828-855-9155
info@bluestorehickorync.com
www.bluestorehickorync.com
________________________

Brookdale Senior
Living Solutions

d.b.a Brookdale Falling Creek and


Brookdale Hickory Northeast
Melissa Mooney
910 29th Avenue NE/2530 16th Street NE
Hickory, NC 28601
828-328-6090
828-324-5400
mmooney1@brookdale.com

PrimeofLife n 79

Burke Hospice &


Palliative Care

1721 Enon Rd.


Valdese, NC 28690
828-879-1601
www.burkehospice.org
_______________________

Caldwell Hospice &


Palliative Care

902 Kirkwood Street, NW


Lenoir, NC 28645
(828)754-0101
FAX: (828)757-0402
www.caldwellhospice.org
_______________________

Carolina Living Choices


Active Adult & Retirement Communities
Housing Guide

Betsy Sher
1854 A Hendersonville Road #243
Asheville, NC 28803
828-650-8428
www.CarolinaLivingChoices.com
_______________________

Carolina Orthopaedic
Specialists
Boone 828-832-1189
Hickory 828-324-2800
Lenoir 828-758-7091
Morganton 828-437-6500
Newton 828-464-3771
Taylorsville 828-635-8430
Valdese 828-874-3379
www.carolinaortho.com
________________________

Catawba County

Sheriffs Office
Captain Jason Beebe,
Community Relations Division
100 Southwest Boulevard
PO Box 385
Newton, NC 28658
Tel: 828-465-8337
www.catawbacountync.gov/sheriff
Social Services
Tami Hefner,
Adult Services Program Manager
3030 11th Avenue Drive, SE
Hickory, NC 28602 (physical)
PO Box 669, Newton, NC 28658 (mailing)
Tel: 828-695-5607
Email: tami@catawbacountync.gov
www.catawbacountync.gov/dss
________________________

Catawba Regional Hospice


3975 Robinson Road
Newton, NC 28658

7473 Sherrills Ford Road,


Sherrills Ford, NC 28673
828-466-0466
828-466-8862 (fax)
info@pchcv.org
www.CatawbaRegionalHospice.org
_______________________

Catawba Valley
Medical Center

810 Fairgrove Church Rd. SE


Hickory, NC 28602
828-326-3000
www.CatawbaValleyMedical.org
www.facebook.com/CatawbaValleyMedicalCenter
_______________________

Emergency Services
Bryan Blanton, Director
100A Southwest Boulevard
PO Box 389
Newton, NC 28658
Tel: 828.465.8230
www.catawbacountync.gov/emergencyservices

CVMC Fitness Plus

Home Health
Sarah Rhodes,
Interim Home Health
Program Manager
3070 11th Avenue Drive, SE,
Hickory, NC 82602
Tel: 828-695-5871
Email: smrhodes@catawbacountync.gov
www.catawbacountyhomehealth.com

Comfort Keepers

80 n PrimeofLife

810 Fairgrove Church Road SE


Hickory, NC 28602
828-326-3680
www.catawbavalleymedical.org/fitness-plus
Silver&Fit provider facility
________________________
AJ Kerley
415 7th Avenue SW, Suite 7
Hickory, NC 28602
828-431-2273
hickory@comfortkeepers.com
www.comfortkeepers.com

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Conover Nursing
& Rehabilitation Center

920 4th Street SW, Conover, NC 28613


828-695-8282 828-695-8217 (fax)
admissions@conovernursingandrehab.com
www.ConoverNursingAndRehab.com
_______________________

DRH
Darab, Richardson&Hill

Wisdom Teeth & Dental Implant Experts

Darab, Richardson, & Hill


3452 Graystone Place SE
Conover NC 28613
828-322-1667
www.omsdrs.com
_______________________

Foot Solutions Hickory


Step into the
perfect fit

242 Union Square NW


Hickory, NC 28601
828-328-9844
Mon.-Fri. 10am - 6pm; Sat. 9am - 2pm
hickory@footsolutions.com
www.footsolutions.com/hickory
________________________

Frye Regional Medical Center


420 N Center Street
Hickory, NC 28601
828-315-5000
www.fryemedctr.com
_______________________

Frye Heart Center

420 N Center Street


Hickory, NC 28601
828-315-3278
www.FryeHeartCenter.com
_______________________

Gentiva Home Health

Lenoir Rhyne 828-322-6131


23rd Street 828-328-1871
Amanda Lael 828-302-9506
Ann Joines 828-312-5926
Heather Swanson 828-234-8694
Angie Cannon 828-234-8435
Referrals for all Gentiva Branches:
828-322-4461
Hickory, NC
________________________

Granite Works
Monuments, LLC

1070 Taylorsville Rd.


Lenoir, NC 28645
828-754-4002
graniteworks2014@gmail.com

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Guardian Health Services


Sandy Hardin & Shea Ruff
100 Main Avenue NW, Suite 200
Hickory, NC 28601
828-324-3025
shardin@ghsnc.com
sruff@ghsnc.com
www.ghsnc.com
_______________________

HealthMarkets

Sybil Melton, Licensed Agent, NC & SC


Health, Life, Medicare & Long Term Care
3945 Chevlot Hills Rd
Sherrills Ford, NC 28673
704-277-6005
smelton@healthmarkets.com
_______________________

Hickory Falls Health


& Rehabilitation

100 Sunset Street


Granite Falls, NC 28630
828-396-2387
www.SanstoneHealth.com
_______________________

Hickory Public Library

Patrick Beaver Memorial Library


375 Third Street NE, Hickory, NC 28601
828- 304-0500
Ridgeview Branch Library
706 First Street SW, Hickory, NC 28602
828-345-6037
Mon.- Thurs. 9am - 9pm; Fri.
& Sat. 9am - 5pm
www.hickorync.gov/library
_______________________

Home Instead Senior Care


Susan Vincent, Franchise Owner
Rik Covalinski, Community
Service Representative
833 2nd Avenue SW, PO Box 2636
Hickory, NC 28603
828-256-0184 828-256-0186 (fax)
www.HomeInstead.com/628
_______________________

Kingston Residence
of Hickory

Independent & Assisted Living


940 Second Street NE
Hickory, NC 28601
828-327-9955
www.kingstonhealthcare.com

PrimeofLife n 81

Lenoir Healthcare Center


Tamika Clark
322 Nuway Circle
Lenoir, NC 28645
828-758-7326
_______________________

Life Transitions

A Mobile Palliative Medicine Practice


828-464-9459
828-466-8862 (fax)
info@YourLifeTransitions.org
www.YourLifeTransitions.org
_______________________

Lutheran Services Carolinas


Trinity Ridge
2140 Medical Park Drive
Hickory NC 28602
828- 322-6995
www.trinityridge.net

TRINITY
VILLAGE

Trinity Village

1265 21st Street NE


Hickory, NC 28601
828- 328-2006
www.trinityvillage.net
_______________________

Natures Goodness

Dr. Herb Cole, N.D.


Naturopathic Medical Physician
1920 Hwy 70 W
Hickory, NC 28602
828-322-5316
_______________________

Specialized Transport
Dean Hastings
828-441-2000
704-735-5676
828-438-0447
specialized.tran@gmail.com
_______________________

Unifour Nursing

Darius Nouri
805 W. 25th St.
Newton, NC 28658
828-464-0244
info@unifournursing.net
www.UnifourNursing.com
_______________________

Unifour Pain Treatment


Physicians
250 18th Street Circle SE
Hickory, NC 28602
info@uni4painrx.com
www.uni4painrx.com
______________________

Veterans Service Office


Cindy S. Travis
County Veterans Service Officer
PO Box 389
100-A SW Blvd.
Newton, NC 28658
828-465-8255
ctravis@catawbacountync.gov
www.catawbacounty.gov
______________________

Visiting Angels

1915 Fairgrove Church Road SE


Newton, NC 28658
828-468-3980
828-464-2845 (fax)
_______________________

Keith Gray & Elizabeth Gray


1822 Hickory Blvd SW
Lenoir, NC 28645
828-572-4300
www.VisitingAngels.com
______________________

Patrick, Harper & Dixon LLP

The Wheelchair Place

PACE@Home

34 2nd St. NW Suite 400


Hickory, NC 28601
828-322-7741
info@patrickharperdixon.com
www.PatrickHarperDixon.com
_______________________

Brandon Watson
920 Tate Boulevard SE, Suite 104
Hickory, NC 28602
828-855-9099
www.TheWheelChairPlace.com

SECU Family House


Richard J. Reynolds III &
Marie M. Reynolds Campus
1970 Baldwin Lane
Winston Salem, NC 27103
336-793-2822
info@familyhousesws.org

82 n PrimeofLife

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

ALEXANDER
COUNTY
SERVICE LIST FOR CAREGIVERS
AARP North Carolina.............................. 1-866-389-5650
Adult Life Programs.......................................... 326-9120
Adult Protective Services.................................. 632-1080
After Hours/Weekends
Alexander County Sheriffs Office................. 632-4658
Alexander County Council on Aging................ 632-1717
Alexander County
Department of Social Services...................... 632-1080
Alexander County Government ....................... 632-9332
Alexander County Public Health....................... 632-9704
Alexander County Tax Office............................. 632-4346
Alexander Senior Center................................... 632-1717
ALFA (AIDS Leadership Foothills Alliance) . .... 322-1447
Alzheimers Association of Western North Carolina
24 Hour Helpline . ............................... 1-800-272-3900
American Red Cross......................................... 632-1990
Area Agency on Aging - Western Piedmont
Council of Governments................................ 322-9191
Are You OK?
Telephone Reassurance Program................. 632-4658
Caregiving Corner
Geriatric Care Management.................(704) 492-0554
Christian Crisis Ministries.................................. 632-0022
Emergency Services.................................................. 911
Energy Assistance Programs
(LIEAP and CRISIS)....................................... 632-1080
Family Caregiver In-Home Respite
HomeCare Management............................... 754-3665
Family Caregiver Support Program.................. 485-4256
Grief/Loss Support-Hospice and
Home Care of Alexander Co......................... 632-5026
Habitat for Humanity......................................... 635-7889
Hospice and Home Care of
Alexander County.......................................... 632-5026
Hospitals
Caldwell Memorial Hospital........................... 757-5100
Catawba Valley Medical Center.................... 326-3000
Frye Regional Medical Center....................... 315-5000
Davis Regional Medical Center............(704) 873-0281
Iredell Memorial Hospital......................(704) 873-5661
Wilkes Regional Medical Center..........(336) 651-8100
Home Health/ Home Care Agencies
See Home Health Services in
Yellow Pages of Area Phone Directory
Legal Aid of North Carolina
Morganton...................... 1-800-849-5195 or 437-8280
Medicaid Programs....................................... 632-1080
Medicare Hotline................................. 1-800-633-4227

828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Provided by
WPCOG
Area Agency
on Aging

Medical Equipment
See Medical Equipment, Supplies & Repair in
Yellow Pages of Area Phone Directory
Morganton Regional Resource Center for the Deaf
and Hard of Hearing..................................... 433-2958
NC Assistive Technology Program
(hearing, vision, other).................................. 433-2431
NC Cooperative Extension Service.................. 632-4451
North Carolina 2-1-1 - Finding Community
Health and Human Resources........................ Dial 211
North Carolina Baptist
Aging Ministry (NCBAM)..................... 1-877-506-2226
North Carolina Senior
Legal Helpline...................................... 1-877-579-7562
Nursing Homes & Rest Homes
Call Regional Ombudsman.......................... 485-4213
Nutrition Programs of Alexander County
Congregate Nutrition &
Home Delivered Meals ................................. 632-4133
PACE @ Home-Program of All-Inclusive
Care For The Elderly......................................... 468-3980
Police Department (Taylorsville)...................... 632-2218
Project Lifesaver................................................ 632-4658
Senior Health Insurance Information
Program (SHIIP).................................. 1-800-408-1212
Local Senior Health Insurance Information Program
Counseling Alexander Senior Center............ 632-1717
Services For The Blind...................................... 632-1080
Sheriffs Office................................................... 632-1111
Smoky Mountain Center................................... 586-5501
Access to Care.................................... 1-800-849-6127
RHA Health Care Center............................... 848-2515
Social Security........................................ 1-800-772-1213
Support Groups-See Alexander Sr.
Center For Assistance....................................... 632-1717
Supportive Solutions - In-Home
Alzheimers Counseling.................................... 358-1110
The Enrichment Center Adult
Day Care Home............................................ 632-0433
Town of Taylorsville........................................... 632-2218
Transportation
Greenway Transit........................................... 464-9444
MediVan Transportation Specialists.............. 441-2000
United Way of Alexander County . ................... 632-9565
Veterans Administration.................................... 632-5411
Vocational Rehabilitation
Services/Independent Living......................... 322-2921

PrimeofLife n 83

BURKE
COUNTY
SERVICE LIST FOR CAREGIVERS
AARP North Carolina.............................. 1-866-389-5650
Adult Protective Services.................................. 764-9600
After Hours/Weekends
Burke County Sheriffs Office........................ 438-5500
ALFA (AIDS Leadership Foothills Alliance)....... 322-1447
Alzheimers Association
24 Hour Helpline..................................... 1-800-272-3900
American Red Cross......................................... 438-8844
Area Agency on Aging-Western
Piedmont Council of Gov.............................. 322-9191
Telephone Reassurance For Burke - TAB......... 430-4147
Blue Ridge Adult Day Services........... 438-6255 ext. 230
Blue Ridge Community Action.......................... 438-6255
Burke County Council on Aging....................... 430-4147
Burke County Department of Social Services.... 764-9600
Burke County Health Department.................... 764-9150
Burke County Local Government..................... 761-9000
Burke County Senior Services.......................... 430-4147
Burke County Tax Office .................................. 764-9430
Burke Hospice and Palliative Care................... 879-1601
Burke United Christian Ministries..................... 433-8075
Caregiving Corner
Geriatric Care Management.................(704) 492-0554
Consumer Credit Counseling........................... 433-1576
Department of Social Services Adult Services ... 764-9600
East Burke Christian Ministries......................... 397-7074
East Burke Senior Center................................. 397-3397
Emergency Services.................................................. 911
Energy Assistance Programs
(LIEAP and CRISIS) ..................................... 764-9600
Family Caregiver In-Home
Respite-Handi-Care, Inc. . ............................ 437-8429
Family Caregiver Support Program.................. 485-4256
Foothills Service Project................................... 879-8400
Good Samaritan Clinic...................................... 439-9948
Grief/Loss Support
Burke Hospice and Palliative Care............... 879-1601
Habitat for Humanity......................................... 437-0370
Home Health Agencies / Home Care Providers
See Home Health Services in Area Phone
Directory Hospitals
Broughton Hospital........................................... 433-2111
Carolinas HealthCare Blue Ridge Morganton .580-5000
Carolinas Health Care Valdese Hospital.......... 874-2251
Independent Living........................................... 322-2921
Legal Aid of North Carolina
Morganton . ................... 1-866-219-5262 or 437-8280
Lifeline (Emergency Telephone Response)...... 580-6446
Linkup Discount Local Telephone Service....... 764-9600

84 n PrimeofLife

Provided by
WPCOG
Area Agency
on Aging

Medical Equipment
See Medical Equipment, Supplies & Repair in
Yellow Pages of Area Phone Directory
Medicaid Programs........................................... 764-9600
Medicare Hotline..................................... 1-800-633-4227
Mental Health Partners-Access/Crisis.............. 439-2535
Morganton Regional Resource Center for the Deaf and
Hard of Hearing................. 433-2958 or 433-2960 TTY
NC Assistive Technology Program
(hearing, vision, other).................................. 433-2431
NC Cooperative Extension............................... 439-4460
NC National Guard Family Assistance............. 437-0746
NextStep Geriatric Care Management.............. 640-4188
North Carolina 2-1-1 Community
Health and Human Resources........................ Dial 211
North Carolina Baptist Aging Ministry
(NCBAM)............................................. 1-877-506-2226
North Carolina Senior Legal Helpline..... 1-877-579-7562
Nursing Homes & Assisted Living Facilities
Call Regional Ombudsman........................... 485-4213
Nutrition Programs of Burke County Congregate
Nutrition & Home Delivered Meals................ 430-4147
Olive Hill Community Economic Corp.............. 439-8893
PACE @ Home Program Of All-Inclusive
Care for the Elderly....................................... 468-3980
Project Lifesaver-Valdese Police Dept.............. 879-2109
Salvation Army
Financial Assistance..................................... 430-8392
Thrift Store (412 A W Fleming Drive)............ 439-8080
Senior Health Insurance Information
Program (SHIIP).................................. 1-855-408-1212
Local Senior Health Insurance Information Program
Counseling East Burke Senior Center......... 397-3397
Local Senior Health Insurance Information Program
Counseling Burke Senior Services............ 430-4147
Services For The Blind...................................... 764-9704
Sheriffs Office-Administration.......................... 438-5500
Social Security Administration................ 1-800-772-1213
Support Groups
See Burke Sr. Services for Assistance.......... 430-4147
Supportive Solutions
In-Home Alzheimers Counseling................. 358-1110
Transportation
Greenway Transit.......................................... 464-9444
Handi-Care, Inc............................................. 437-8429
Medical Transportation, Inc........................... 448-1674
United Way........................................................ 430-8356
Veterans Services............................................. 439-4376
Vocational Rehabilitation Services.................... 433-2423
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

CALDWELL
COUNTY
SERVICE LIST FOR CAREGIVERS
AARP North Carolina ............................. 1-866-389-5650
Adult Life Programs.......................................... 326-9120
Adult Protective Services.................................. 426-8200
After Hours/Weekends-Caldwell
County Sheriffs Office.................................. 754-1518
ALFA (AIDS Leadership Foothills Alliance)....... 322-1447
Alzheimers Association of Western....... 1-800-272-3900
American Red Cross......................................... 754-4161
Area Agency on Aging Western Piedmont
Council of Gov............................................... 322-9191
Blue Ridge Community Action.......................... 754-9085
Caldwell County Cooperative Extension.......... 757-1290
Caldwell County Council on Aging................... 758-2883
Caldwell County Department of
Social Services.............................................. 426-8200
Caldwell County Health Dept............................ 426-8400
Caldwell County Local Government................. 757-1300
Caldwell County Sheriffs Office....................... 758-2324
Caldwell County Tax Office............................... 757-1340
Caldwell Hospice and Palliative Care............... 754-0101
Caldwell Memorial Hospital.............................. 757-5100
Caldwell Senior Center..................................... 758-2883
Clerk of Court.................................................... 759-3502
Concilio Hispano............................................... 572-2235
Crossroads Daily Bread Ministries................... 757-0262
Diabetes Health Center..................................... 757-6450
Emergency Life Threatening................................... 911
Ambulance Service-Non Emergency........... 758-2324
Energy Assistance Programs
(LIEAP and CRISIS)....................................... 426-8200
Family Caregiver In-Home Respite-HomeCare
Management Corp........................................ 754-3665
Family Caregiver Support Program.................. 485-4256
Foothills Service Project................................... 879-8400
GRASP-Grandparent/Relative
Advocacy Support Partnership..................... 485-4256
Grief/Loss-Caldwell Hospice and
Palliative Care................................................ 754-0101
Habitat For Humanity........................................ 758-8757
Helping Hands Clinic........................................ 754-8565
Home Health Agencies/Home Care Provider SeeHome Health Services in Area Phone
Directory Yellow Pages
Information & Assistance for Older Adults....... 757-8635
Legal Aid of North Carolina
Morganton...................... 1-800-849-5195 or 437-8280
Lenoir Soup Kitchen......................................... 758-1411
Lifeline (Emergency Telephone Response)...... 324-3025
Living Wills........................................................ 758-2883
Medicaid Programs (Caldwell County DSS).... 426-8200
Medical Equipment
See Medical Equipment, Supplies and
Repair in Directory Yellow Pages
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Provided by
WPCOG
Area Agency
on Aging

Medicare Hotline..................................... 1-800-633-4227


Medication Assistance Program....................... 758-2566
Morganton Regional Resource for Deaf
and Hard of Hearing........................... 1-800-999-8915
NC Assistive Technology Program
(hearing, vision, other).................................. 433-2431
NC Cooperative Extension Service.................. 757-1290
NC National Guard Family Assistance Center... 757-4365
NextStep Geriatric Care Management.............. 640-4188
North Carolina Baptist Aging Ministry
(NCBAM)............................................. 1-877-506-2226
North Carolina 2-1-1 -Community Health
and Human Resources................................... Dial 211
North Carolina Senior Legal Helpline..... 1-877-579-7562
Nursing Homes & Assisted Living Facilities..... 485-4213
(Call Regional Ombudsman)
Nutrition Programs
Congregate Nutrition & Home Delivered
Meals............................................... 754-9085 ext. 226
PACE @ Home-Program Of All-Inclusive Care
For The Elderly.............................................. 468-3980
Palliative Care-Caldwell Hospice and
Palliative Care................................................ 754-0101
Police Department (Lenoir)............................... 757-2121
Project Lifesaver................................................ 757-1419
Register of Deeds............................................. 757-1310
Salvation Army (Granite Falls).......................... 496-2370
Seniors Health Insurance Information
(SHIIP)................................................. 1-855-408-1212
Local Senior Health Insurance Information Program
Counseling Caldwell Senior Center........... 758-2883
Services For The Blind...................................... 426-8316
Smoky Mountain Center 24 Hour Services................................. 1-800-849-6127
Customer Service................................ 1-888-757-5726
Social Security Administration................ 1-800-772-1213
South Caldwell Christian Ministries.................. 396-4000
Support Groups See Caldwell Sr.
Center for Assistance.................................... 758-2883
Supportive Solutions In-Home
Alzheimers Counseling................................ 358-1110
Transportation
Greenway Public Transportation................... 464-9444
United Way........................................................ 758-9300
Veterans Administration.................................... 322-6616
Veterans Service Office..................................... 757-1345
Veterans Clinic (Hickory).................................. 431-5600
Vision Services (Dept. of Social Services)........ 426-4247
Vocational Rehabilitation/Independent
Living............................................................. 757-5639
Womens Shelter Home.................................... 758-0888
Yokefellow......................................................... 754-7088

PrimeofLife n 85

CATAWBA
COUNTY
SERVICE LIST FOR CAREGIVERS
AARP North Carolina.............................. 1-866-389-5650
Adult Life Programs.......................................... 326-9120
Conover Center................................................. 464-0078
Hickory Center.................................................. 324-1313
Maiden Center................................................... 428-9010
Adult Protective Services.................................. 695-5609
After Hours/Weekends-Catawba
County Sheriffs Office........................................... 911
ALFA (Aids Leadership Foothills Alliance)........ 322-1447
Alzheimers Association of Western
North Carolina..................................... 1-800-272-3900
American Red Cross......................................... 322-4151
Area Agency on Aging Western Piedmont
Council of Governments............................... 322-9191
Are You OK? Telephone Reassurance
Program......................................................... 464-4639
Catawba County Coalition on Aging................ 485-4212
Catawba County Council on Aging/West
Hickory Senior Center................................... 328-2269
Catawba County Department of
Social Services.............................................. 695-5600
Catawba County Health Department................ 695-5800
Catawba County Local Government................ 465-8200
Catawba County Tax Office............................... 465-8414
Catawba Regional Hospice.............................. 466-0466
Catawba Valley Behavioral Healthcare............. 695-5900
Christian Community Outreach Ministries........ 328-1803
Consumer Credit Counseling........................... 322-7161
Eastern Catawba Cooperative Christian
Ministries (ECCCM)....................................... 465-1702
Emergency Services.................................................. 911
Energy Assistance Programs
(LIEAP and CRISIS)....................................... 695-5600
Family Caregiver In-Home RespiteHealth
& Home Services,Inc.................................... 322-2710
Family Caregiver Support Program.................. 485-4256
Family Guidance Center................................... 322-1400
Greater Hickory Cooperative Christian
Ministries (CCM)............................................ 327-0979
Grief/Loss Support-Catawba Regional
Hospice......................................................... 466-0466
Habitat For Humanity........................................ 328-4663
Here To Home-Transition Specialists................ 475-4424
Home Health Agencies / Home Care Providers
See Home Health Services in Yellow Pages
of Area Phone Directory
Hospitals
Catawba Valley Medical Center.................... 326-3000
Health First Center (CVMC) at
Valley Hills Mall ............................................ 485-2300
Frye Regional Medical Center...................... 315-5000
Legal Aid of North Carolina..................... 1-800-849-5195
Lifeline (Emergency Telephone Response)...... 485-2696
Life Transitions (Palliative Medicine

86 n PrimeofLife

Provided by
WPCOG
Area Agency
on Aging

Consultation Service).................................... 464-9459


Link-Up Discount Local Telephone Service...... 695-5600
Medicaid Programs (Catawba County
Dept. of Social Services)............................... 695-5692
Medical Equipment
See Medical Equipment, Supplies & Repair in
Yellow Pages of Area Directory
Medicare Hotline..................................... 1-800-633-4227
Morganton Regional Resource Center
for the Deaf and Hard
of Hearing......1-800-999-8915 or 1-800-205-9920 TTY
NC Assistive Technology Program
(hearing, vision, other)...................................... 433-2431
NC Baptist Aging Ministry (NCBAM)...... 1-877-506-2226
NC Cooperative Extension Service.................. 465-8250
Neighbors Network.......................................... 464-1111
NextStep Geriatric Care Management.............. 640-4188
North Carolina 2-1-1 -Community Health
& Human Resources....................................... Dial 211
Nursing Homes & Assisted Living Facilities..... 485-4213
(Call Regional Ombudsman)
Nutrition Programs
Congregate Nutrition & Home
Delivered Meals............................................. 695-5610
PACE @ Home-Program Of All-Inclusive
Care For The Elderly..................................... 468-3980
Project LifeSaver............................................... 465-8337
Re-Nesting Resources (Professional help with
downsizing/moving).......................................... 381-7622
Salvation Army.................................................. 322-8061
Senior Centers
West Hickory Senior Center.......................... 328-2269
Westmont Senior Center............................... 324-1200
Senior Health Insurance Information
Program (SHIIP) ................................. 1-855-408-1212
Local Senior Health Insurance Information
Program Counseling-Catawba
Council on Aging.......................................... 328-2269
Senior Legal Helpline.............................. 1-877-579-7562
Services for the Blind........................................ 695-5605
Sheriffs Office................................................... 464-5241
Social Security Administration................ 1-800-772-1213
Support Groups-See Catawba Council
on Aging for Assistance................................ 328-2269
Supportive Solutions In-Home Alzheimers
Counseling.................................................... 358-1110
Transportation
Greenway Public Transportation................... 464-9444
Medivan Transportation Specialists.............. 441-2000
United Way........................................................ 327-6851
Veterans Administration.................................... 322-6616
Veterans Clinic.................................................. 431-5600
Vocational Rehabilitation Services/Independent
Living............................................................. 322-2921
Womens Resource Center............................... 322-6333
828-358-6272 | www.SirNC.org | 2015-2016

Rehabilitation Services:

Cardiac/Congestive Heart
Failure Program

Pain Management

Stroke Rehabilitation

Dementia Management

Fracture And Joint


Replacement Therapy

Speech Therapy

Vital Stimulation Therapy

Swallowing Programs

Therapeutic Ultrasound

Neurological Intervention

Electrical Muscle
Stimulation
Paraffin Bath

Prosthetic Management

Outpatient Therapy

Orthopedic Programs

We Proudly Offer:

24-Hour Nursing Care


Foods Deliciously
Prepared On-Site And
Served In A Pleasant
Dining Environment Or Via
Room Service
(Vegetarian Available)
Private And Semi-Private
Accommodations
Respite Care
Daily Housekeeping And
Laundry Service
Resident-Centered Care
Planning Process

Medical Director And


Physican Services
Television And Telephone
Daily Recreational
Programs
Wireless Internet
Short And Long-Term
Care
Beauty & Barber Services
24/7 Admissions
Transportation Service
Outpatient Therapy
Program

Our Passion Makes Us Different


Part of the SanStone Community
100 Sunset Street Granite Falls, NC 28630
828-396-2387
828-502-0520

www.SanstoneHealth.com

You have choices.


You can choose
home health or
you can choose

Gentiva Home Health

We believe in compassionate care. We believe in industry-leading


excellence. And we believe theres no place like home for healing.
Maybe thats why so many patients and physicians turn to us every day
for skilled nursing, rehabilitation and therapy services.
NURSING AND PHYSICAL THERAPY
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
SPEECH THERAPY
MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICES SUPPORT
HOME HEALTH AIDES

ALL THE COMFORT OF YOUR HOME!


If you would like to learn more about Home Health
services call one of our community liaisons:

Amanda Lael

828-302-9506

Ann Joines

828-312-5926

Heather Swanson 828-234-8694


Angie Cannon

828-234-8435

Robbie Anderson 828-228-0276


Crystal Sigmon

828-320-0883

They can answer any question you may have.

Referrals for all Gentiva Branches


828.322.4461
Gentiva accepts patients for care regardless of age, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, being a qualified disabled veteran, being a qualified
disabled veteran of the Vietnam era, or any other category protected by law, or decisions regarding
advance directives. Gentiva Health Services, Inc.