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AMA NEWSLETTER

172
2 October 2014

The dark side of the asian art market


Top stories
page 4
Report
Artprice Contemporary
Art Market Report 2014
page 6
Museums
page 7
Galleries
page 10
Interview
Bridging the gap:
Morehshin Allahyari
page 14
Artists
page 18
Interview
Elise van Middelem School of Doodle
page 20
Data
Juan Muoz
page 23
Interview
Laurent Dassault
page 28
Auctions
page 31
Fairs & festivals
page 33

According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2

to 5% of global GDP is laundered money; in currency, $800 million to $2 trillion. The art market, notoriously opaque and uncontrollable, is one in which a staggering amount of this criminal
activity takes place, where dirty money obtained from illegal
activity is laundered into legal tender. Worldwide cases of money laundering and illegal activity conducted through the purchase and sale of artwork are far from uncommon, with cases
involving high profile figures such as Edemar Cid Ferreira, the
Brazilian ex-banker who laundered millions of dollars through
a collection of 12,000 works, and art dealer Helly Nahmad, who
was caught on tape arranging the price increase of a Raoul Dufy
painting he was selling, and explaining his plans to split the profit
with another member of his gambling ring.
However, the phenomenon is particularly rife in the Asian art market, with one auctioneer estimating that 30%-50% of works in
the market are related to the practice of money laundering, reports French newspaper Le Figaro. In Asia, the combination of a
booming economy, lax regulations on the sale of art and strict
capital control laws means that the art market is a primary target
for those looking to launder or export capital.

Why Asia?

In well-established art markets in the West, measures have been


taken to make sure that potential money launderers cannot
operate through the purchase of works; in February 2013 the
European Commission brought in a law which ensures galleries
declare any sale that is more than 7,500 in cash. Brussels Developments from 2012 make sure that galleries who do trade in
cash for values more than 15,000 are registered as high value
dealers, and undergo more stringent checks. These galleries are
also under pressure from organisations such as the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), an inter-governmental body which targets
money-laundering, and the Association for Research into Crimes
Against Art (ARCA) to undertake Know Your Customer (KYC) checks
to customers identities and sources of their funds.

10 30 2014

95 rivington street

christian berst art brut


klein & berst

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AMA Newsletter 172 2

2 October 2014

The dark side of the asian art market

The Asian market, on the other hand, is far newer and understandably less regulated. For the
majority of the 20th century, China lived under the rule of Chairman Mao, whose Cultural Revolution not only censored and restricted artistic output, but made it illegal to own or inherit a
piece of art. After Maos death in 1976, regulations were loosened, but it was still not until the
late 1990s that the Chinese art market truly began to pose a threat to those of the USA and Europe, the latter of which has been operational since the 15th century. In 2010 China was declared
the worlds largest art market, with $8.2 billion in sales, increasing by 700% from 2000-2011
a growth worthy of what is now the worlds second-largest economy.
However, Chinas emerging millionaires and billionaires are also subject to strict capital control
laws, technically restricted to taking only $50,000 out of the country. Due to these restrictions,
China saw as much as 10% of its GDP leave the country illegally between 2000 and 2011 according to Global Financial Integrity, an US-based advocacy group. As there are few open money
and commodity markets in China, more and more people are looking to money laundering as not
only a form of legitimising illegally-obtained funds, but as a form of tax avoidance.
Furthermore, the huge demand and limited supply of artworks mean that the Asian market is rife
with fakes, and an operative policy of caveat emptor means that there is no legal support for buyers.
Antony Lin, former chairman of Christies Asia, told MarketWatch.com that, at Chinese auctions, they
dont guarantee any authenticity. Theres no legal recourse, no warranties for fakes. In any kind of
market that escalates at this pace, theres going to be fakes. In the business of money laundering,
however, authenticity is not always the number one priority as long as auction houses (several of
which are rumoured to be in on the deal) verify it, it can be sold and money can be cleaned through
the sale. Many have suggested that the fact that Chinas largest auction house, Poly, is owned by the
government and is the auction branch of a large company which is also a weapons manufacturer,
makes it hard for it to be regulated by any other external body. Nancy Murphy, a Beijing-based art
lawyer, estimated that up to 80% of works at Poly are fakes, reported Forbes.
A notable example of a supposedly fake work on the market is the sale of a scroll by Song Dynasty
poet Su Shi, which was estimated at $500,000, but was actually sold for $8.2 million by Sothebys.
After the sale, several art historians declared the scroll to be a fake. This demonstrates the ample potential for money launders; the market is volatile and deals with huge amounts of money in an anonymous and unregulated setting, allowing criminals to buy works (real or fake) in cash, and legitimately
sell them on for often inflated prices at auction. China also has a history of non-payment in auctions;
the most expensive Chinese painting at auction, sold in 2011 for $64.5 million dollars, Eagle Standing
on a Pine Tree by Qi Baishi, remained unpaid for six months after its sale. More than half of winning
bids on objects over 1 million also remain unpaid six months after auction. This has a dangerous
effect on prices, allowing them to skyrocket on paper but not reap the financial reward in reality. From
a criminal perspective, the high monetary stakes in the art world are an advantage, allowing them
to launder more money at a time. However, when auctions are fixed, or when empty bids are placed
purely to raise the profit, it results in a disproportionate raise in price records, leaving genuine collectors either unable to afford the work, or overpaying. The true value of art becomes easily distorted as
prices soar, raising questions about how long the market can continue to beat its previous records.

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Cover : Scroll by Su Shi


"Gongfu tie" calligraphy,
ink on paper
Image courtesy of Sotheby's
Poly auction Beijing
courtesy Poly Auction

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AMA Newsletter 172 3

2 October 2014

The dark side of the asian art market

Elegant bribery

The art market facilitates the covert exchange of funds through the process of using art as
bribes for officials, the practice of which has become so widespread it has its own name in
Chinese: Elegant bribery, or Yahui. Works can be bought in cash, gifted, and then re-sold, often
involving rigged galleries. In 2009 Chinese authorities detained the city of Congquings deputy police chief Wen Quiang; upon searching his home they found over 100 works including
sculptures made from ivory, a stone Buddha head, ancient calligraphy and a painting by the
legendary Zhang Daqian. He was executed in 2010 for taking $1.76 million in bribes. In the highest echelons of Chinese society and government, art is treated as a commodity which allows
for the exchange of funds with no obvious paper trail, and also provides a handy opportunity
for those involved to escape punishment if caught they can always claim (or reveal) the
inauthenticity of the painting and stress its lack of value, handily avoiding legal repercussions.
The case of Hong-song Won

One of the most recent and publicised cases of criminal activity in the Asian art market is the case
of Hong-Song Won, whose recent arrest comes after a string of accusations of assisting money
laundering and tax fraud. The Korean market, even newer and smaller than the Chinese, has only
recently started to implement stricter tax regulations on artwork. Hong-Song Won is the owner
of Seouls Gallery Seomi, whose controversial presence became known in 2008 when one of her
customers, the director of Leeum, the Samsung Museum of Art (and wife of Samsungs chairman),
Hong Ra-Hee, purchased Roy Litchensteins Happy Tears from her using illegal money. In 2011
she was given a suspended jail sentence for aiding the chairman of Orion group, Tam Cheol-gon,
purchase art with company funds and embezzle the money for himself. She has also been implicated in the forging of papers of high-value art works involving high profile businessmen. Yan
Lynn, director of the Seoul branch of Able Fine Art Gallery, New York, spoke to The Korea Herald,
saying that it was not only big companies, but small and mid-size companies use art in creating
slush funds, suggesting that Hong-Son Wons case had been picked up on because it involved
major corporations, and that it is far from an isolated incident within the industry.
Effect on the industry

Speaking to The Art Newspaper, an FBI art crime expert and Dean of the Yale University School of
Art expressed the desire for a sense of perspective about the problem. Although referring to the US
market, their point of view is transferable; they argue that art is fundamentally still about legitimate
collectors buying real art. Despite the fact that the criminal nature of money laundering makes it hard
to estimate exactly how prevalent it is in the art world, it seems clear that it is; Judge Fausto Martin
De Sanctis (the judge who handled the Ferriera case) explains his book Money Laundering through
Art: a Criminal Justice Perspective, that authorities and international bodies manifest a lack of awareness and regulation which leads to art becoming an invisible asset in the criminal underworld. The
problem of money laundering and bribery through art is evidence of an attitude which has grave potential; the sale of art for exclusively financial purposes and the distortion of prices, disadvantaging
passionate collectors and those who are involved in art for arts sake. Although the problem is not as
of yet that widespread (particularly in Europe, where steps are being taken to combat it), its unnerving
presence in the underbelly of the Asian art market is something which should worry all tiers of the
art market, from collectors and auctioneers down to enthusiasts and admirers of artistic output.

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AMA Newsletter 172 4

2 October 2014

Top stories

article of the week


Japanese art market looks set to recover
The Japan's long-suffering art market
seems to finally be recovering thanks
to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's new policies, nicknamed abenomics, and the
weakening of the yen.
The market suffered greatly from the global financial crisis in 2008, but is now on
the road to recovery; the turnover of the
Japanese art market for the first half of

the 2014 reached $30.7 million, putting


it on track to beat last year's $76 million.
A spokesperson for the largest Japanese
auction house, Mainichi Auction, told
Reuters that, there is an increase in purchases, definitely a sign of recovery from
when the art market hit rock bottom during the economic crisis in 2008. However, the size of the market remains very

small, accounting for just o.44% of the


global market.
An example of improvement not only in
the market but in the value of Japanese
art in general is the work of artist Yayoi
Kusama, whose small lithographs used
to sell for under a thousand dollars, but
which now reach as much as $74,000.

BaN
Potential ban of cadmium pigments in Europe
The EU is considering a Europe-wide ban on
cadmium pigments found in acrylic, oil and
watercolour paints.
The news follows pressure from Sweden to ban
the chemical due to its negative effects on the
environment. The argument is that when artists
wash the paints off their equipment, the toxic
chemical then ends up in sewage which is used
in agriculture, thus entering the food chain. Pure
cadmium is highly toxic, but according to Reach,
an EU body that advises on the use of chemicals, the compounds used to create vivid yellows, oranges and reds in paints are not dangerous. Those opposing the ban refute the claims
that artists are to blame, pointing the finger instead at the incorrect disposal of nickel-cadmium
batteries. Whilst there are alternatives on offer,
artists claim that they are no adequate replacement for the vibrancy of cadmium and could significantly alter their palettes.

award
ICI announces nominations for Independent
Vision Curatorial Award
Independent Curators International (ICI) have
announced their list of nominations for the
biannual Independent Vision Curatorial Award.
The award is designed to honour up-and-coming curators; this year, nominees hail from
traditional art centres New York, Paris and London, as well as Guatemala, Costa Rica, Slovenia,
and Senegal. The nominees are: Eva Barois De
Caevel, Bao Dong, Anne Dressen, Inti Guerrero,
Agung Hujatnikajennong, Naima Keith, Thomas
Lax, Tev Logar, Emile Maurice, Diana Nawi, Mary
Pansanga, Marina Reyes Franco, Gaia Tedone
and Natalia Valencia. The winner will be selected by Nancy Spector, chief curator and deputy
director of Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
The prize will be awarded during the ICI's annual
gala in New York 17 November 2014, with the
winner receiving $3,000 to put towards a new
curatorial project.

Danseuse ajustant son chausson


Edgar Degas

theft
6 million Degas painting stolen in Cyprus
The Degas painting Danseuse ajustant son chausson, has been stolen from the
Limassol home of a 70-year-old Cypriot on the Mediterranean island on Monday
29 September.
One suspect has already been arrested a 44 Greek Cypriot man, whilst two
other suspects from South Africa and Russia respectively, are currently being investigated. The three men were apparently known to the elderly collector.
The stolen work was one of many studies of dancers adjusting their shoes from different angles, completed by the artist between 1873 and 1874. The thieves also made
off with seven gold watches and three gold opera binoculars, amongst other items.
The Degas piece is believed to be the most expensive work to have ever been stolen
on this island and was not insured.
Degas is considered to be one of the founding fathers of Impressionism; his work
covers the mediums of painting, drawing and sculpture whilst almost half of his
oeuvre focuses on dancers

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AMA Newsletter 172 5

2 October 2014

restoration

legal

Sopranos actor finds and restores Guercino


painting
Federico Castelluccio, an actor who played a key
role in the television show The Sopranos but who is
also a painter and expert in Old Master and Baroque
paintings, has found and restored a lost painting by
the 17th-century Italian artist Guercino.
Castelluccio found the work at a dealership in
Frankfurt, when its origin was still unknown, he
then had it verified by experts, who found it to
be a Guercino work. It is estimated that Castelluccio spent about $140,000 dollars on restoring
the painting, a process which took several years
however it is now estimated that the work could
be worth millions.
350 years since it was last on public display, it is to
be presented as part of the exhibition Saint Sebastian: Beauty and Integrity in Art Between the 15th and
the 17th Centuries by the Cosso Foundation and the
Miradolo Castle museum in Turin, opening 4 October.

US Court agrees on tax break for art estate


The United States Court of Appeals has ruled that the Elkins family
will get a substantial discount when settling the taxes of their art
inheritance due to the shared ownership of the collection.
The three children of James and Margret Elkins inherited a huge collection of works from their parents including works by Picasso, Czanne, Jasper Johns and Jackson Pollock. Before their parents died, they
arranged a guarantor retained income trust (GRIT) which meant that each
of the children would have partial ownership of the collection. Although
they have made it clear that they have no intention of selling the works,
the GRIT impedes the sale or transfer of works as all three successors
must be unanimously agreed before any action can be taken.
Initially they were given a 10% fractional interest discount when
determining the collections fair market value for tax purposes
leaving the family with a hefty $14 million tax bill but this was
appealed on the basis that the GRIT affected the value of the works.
The jury came out in favour of the family, accepting their proposed
47.5% discount and consequently handing them a $14.4 million tax
estate refund.
The familys attorney, Donald Wood, told artnet News: There is a
long history under tax law of allowing discounts for minority interests in all kinds of tangible and intangible property as well as real
estate. This case simply extended that well-established law to works
of art. This is really the first case to ever seriously consider that issue
in the case of fine art.

appointment
International Contemporary Art Prize in Monaco appoints new director
Lorenzo Fusi has been appointed as the new artistic director of the Prince Pierre Foundation International Contemporary Art Prize, which is awarded
on a three-yearly basis. He has been a member
of the International Jury for the prize since 2003.
Fusi is an art historian and critic, and was the chief
curator for International the lead exhibition at
the 2012 Liverpool biennial. Since 2005, the prize
has been awarded to by Carlos Garaicoa, Sadane
Afif, Candice Breitz, Didier Marcel, Su-Mei Tse, Guido van der Werve and Dora Garcia. The winner receives 20,000 in cash and 20,000 funding for
new artworks.
The Prince Pierre foundation was established in
1966 by Prince Pierre's son, Prince Ranier III, in
memory of his father. It aims to promote contemporary art and culture not only through the
Contemporary Art Prize, but through a music composition prize and literary prizes.

Cultural Educataion
Third season of Cls de l'Art et de la Collection
From 17 October 2014, the Cercle Menus Plaisirs in Geneva is to
launch their new season of Cls de l'Art et de la Collection.
For this its third consecutive year, the society will offer classes and
expert workshops as well as tours around Geneva.
250 hours of programmes are planned, with workshops to educate 5-12
year-olds about the history of art, professional talks about the art market, and classes on Spanish and Latin-American art, as well as the 100
most important living artists, Flemmish and Dutch art, and video art.
The Cercle Menus Plaisirs is a Swiss society, founded in 2011, which
works in consulting, education and promotion in the fields of the art
market, design and communication. The name was inspired by the
Minister of Menus Plaisirs which was created in 1627 to organise the
finances of the different parties and ceremonies which took place in
the court. The position was abolished at the same time as the monarchy during the French Revolution.

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AMA Newsletter 172 6

2 October 2014

Report
Artprice Contemporary Art Market Report 2014

Artprice have released their 2014 Contemporary Art Market Report. The report takes into account

sales registered between July 2013 and the beginning of July 2014 and concerns contemporary
artists born post 1945 (all prices refer to hammer price excluding buyers premium and taxes, and
refer to works sold at auction only).

As has been widely reported, it has been another successful year for the global art market, which
grew 12% this year, with this broader success benefiting the contemporary sector. A record number
of sales reached the 1 million dollar/euro threshold and records were set for the most expensive
piece of work sold (Jeff Koons' Balloon Dog, which sold for 38.8 million) and the highest auction
turnover for a Post-War and Contemporary sale (Christie's New York, 477 million). 13 contemporary works sold for more than 10 million, beating last year's total of four works, constituting half
of the total 26 contemporary works which have ever sold for over 10 million. The contemporary
market proved the 3rd most profitable (after modern and post-war) representing 15% of the global
market, with sales totalling 1.5 billion a 33% increase on last year and a 1,078% increase over
the last decade, driven by a rise in prices caused by geographical expansion of the market and the
growing investment status of art.
The top three artists in Artprice's Top 500 Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jeff Koons and Christopher Wool
represent a huge 22% of the global contemporary market, all achieving prices over 10 million (a
threshold that was only first achieved in 2007 by Damien Hirst's Lullaby Spring) and their total auction
sales for the year totalling almost 100 times Japan's contemporary auction sales for the same period.
It is worth noting that all three of these artists are of American origin and owe much of their success
to the patronage of Larry Gagosian, one of the most powerful figures in the art world. Jeff Koons, as
well as achieving the record price for his Balloon Dog, is the most expensive living artist and this year
sold three works for more than 20 million, compared to Basquiat who only sold two in this bracket.
Chinese artists also featured heavily in the list and in fact made up a high proportion overall, with 47
Chinese artists in the Top 100 compared to 19 Americans, reflecting the strength of the Chinese art
market, which represents 40% of the global total; furthermore, Chinese artists constituted over 39%
of contemporary revenues, whilst American artists accounted for 35%. The uncontested top Chinese
artist was Zeng Fanzhi, who had a turnover of 59.6 million and whose prices are still increasing.
Despite the media focus on blue chip works, in reality, only 6% of lots sold are over 50,000; in
fact, 66% of contemporary lots sold are under 5,000. Many of these moderate prices can still be
found in the works of well-known artists, and artists such as Takashi Murakami and Jeff Koons have
released multiples with more than 2,000 editions in order to tap into the full strata of buyers. This
sort of range can also be seen notably in photography, with 40% of works by Cindy Sherman
ranked 24th selling for less than 6,000.
New York remains the most dynamic city for the sale of contemporary art, with Beijing second and London
third. New York and London also remain the springboards for widespread recognition, with exhibitions and
sales in the cities helping to promote new trends and artists from emerging countries with weaker markets. London is the leader in Europe by a large margin, accounting for 77% of the European market. The
French market, while fourth worldwide, has experienced a notable 10% drop and now counts for 1.75%
of the global market; there are also only four French artists in the Top 100. Europe overall is dominated by
lower-priced works, with 81% of lots sold going for less than 5,000 compared to only 38% in China.
European artists who are well-established and have works featuring in major national institutions consistently fail to reach the heady numbers achieved by their American contemporaries.
Artists from China, the United States and Europe are the most well-represented in the Top 100,
but in the Top 500 artists from emerging markets are showing promise. International institutions
are taking notice of artists from Latin America, Africa, the Middle East and Southeast Asia, which is
essential in helping these artists reach a wider audience.
Although not addressed in the report, it is worth noting that only four of the Top 100 artists were female,
with the most successful female artist (Cindy Sherman) achieving a mere 5.6% of the total reached by
Basquiat. Whilst most of the demographics in the Top 100 can be easily explained by economic factors,
there is no obvious explanation why only 4% of the top selling artists were women.

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AMA Newsletter 172 7

2 October 2014

Museums

Article of the week


Guggenheim New York announces plans to expand
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in city, a spokesperson told The Art NewsNew York is planning to expand through paper. There are also plans to build new
the construction of what will be known as office spaces, although it is not yet known
the Collection Centre.
if there will be a competition to design the
The Collection Centre will be a multi-use extension similar to that which is currently
building with a dynamic public-program- being held to design the Guggenheim's new
ming component for residents of the space in Helsinki. The museum first opened

its doors in 1959, ten years after the death


of its namesake. In 2002, the Guggenheim
foundation announced the cancellation of
its plans to construct a new museum by New
York's East River, designed by the same architect who created the iconic Guggenheim
museum in Bilbao, Frank Gehry.

controversy

icom

Brett Baileys Exhibit B closed down


Brett Bailey's controverisal installation Exhibit B, which features
black performers in replicas of the human zoos of the 19th century,
has been closed down by its host The Barbican in London.
This comes following an online petition which gathered more
than 23,000 signatures and protests outside the institution. Protesters criticised the piece as being racist, finding the sight of
the black performers voluntarily chained up by the white South-African artist Brett Bailey, extremely offensive.
The Barbican said in a statement that they were forced to close the
performance due to the extreme nature of the protest and the serious threat to the safety of performers, audiences and staff that it
posed. They also said that they believed this piece should be shown
in London and are disturbed at the potential implications this silencing of artists and performers has for freedom of expression.

Theme of International Museum Day 2015 announced


Theme of International Museum Day 2015 has been announced as Museums for a Sustainable Society, to take
place on 18 May 2015.
The initiative was created in 1977 by the International Council
of Museums (ICOM), with the aim of raising awareness about the
role of museums in the development of society. In 2014, 35,000
museums from 145 countries took part.
Professor Hans-Martin Hinz, President of ICOM said in a statement: Museums, as educators and cultural mediators, are adopting an increasingly vital role in contributing to the definition
and implementation of sustainable development and practices.
Museums must be able to guarantee their role in safeguarding
cultural heritage, given the increasing precariousness of ecosystems, situations of political instability, and the associated natural
and man-made challenges that may arise. Museum work, through
education and exhibitions for example, should strive to create a
sustainable society. We must do everything we can to ensure that
museums are part of the cultural driving force for the sustainable
development of the world.

2014
paris
October 2326
Hotel Le A
4 Rue dArtois
outsiderartfair.com

Donation
Cincinnati Art Museum receives $6 million gift
Cincinnati Art Museum has received a gift of $6 million from the
Louise Dieterle Nippert Trust.
The donation is to go towards the endowment of the museum's
director position, which will be filled by Cameron Kitchin from
1 October 2014. Kitchin will take the post following his time at
Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, where he was also museum director. Currently, the museum has an annual operating budget of
$11 million, and, as of the end of last year, an endowment of $87
million, much of which is intended for acquisitions. Whilst the museum has run several high-profile shows in recent years, the gift
will help support the museum.

initiative

Bill Traylor (18541947), untitled, detail, n.d., 22 14 in.

The Paris Museums Card


The Paris city council and Paris Muses have launched a card
which gives the owner access to selected exhibitions and museums in the city. The Paris Museum card gives you unlimited access
and queue jump for one year to selected museums and exhibitions. It gives access to the Muse d'Art modern de la ville de Paris, to the House of Balzac, the Bourdelle museum, the Carnavalet
Paris history museum, the Cernuschi museum, the Cognacq-Jay
museum, the Palais Galliera, the Jean-Moulin museum, the Petit
Palais, the Muse de la vie romantique, the House of Victor Hugo
and the Zadkine museum.

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AMA Newsletter 172 8

2 October 2014

what's on
australia
Wonder at the Fremantle Arts Centres Moores Building
Running until 12 October 2014 is the exhibition Wonder to be held at the Fremantle Art Centre's Moores
Building Contemporary Art Gallery, Australia, featuring
the work of Claire Pendrigh.
Pendrigh presents a series of sight-specific installations
drawing on astronomical data as inspiration, incorporating found objects, handcrafts, knitting, painting and
drawing. Highlights include RCB Cloud (2014), a suspended knitted cloud formation that emits breathing
sounds, representing an interpretation of the carbon
rich dust clouds ejected by RCB stars.
Pendrigh is an emerging artist originally from Canberra,
Australia. She has held artist residency in Iceland and
has exhibited in the United Kingdom and Australia. She
currently lives and works in Bunbury in the South West
of Western Australia. For this, her most recent exhibition, she exhibits works born of a collaboration with astrophysicist Melanie Hampel.
Belgium
Music Palace: The Power of Music Seen by Visual Artists
at Villa Empain
Running from 25 September 2014 until 8 February 2015,
Belgium's Villa Empain a centre for the discussion of
Eastern and Western cultures, set up by the Boghossian
Foundation is presenting an exhibition entitled Music
Palace: The Power of Music Seen by Visual Artists.
Tracing the relationship between music and artistic practice, Music Palace looks at the history, phenomenology and sociology of contemporary music in terms of its
development with modern technology. The exhibition
looks at music's ability to transport, galvanise and mentally affect us across many different cultures and periods.
Through recent digitalisation, the commercialisation, production and consumption of music has morphed the way
in which it is represented through visual artists.
The exhibition's media is diverse, including installations and
photography, and features an international selection of artists: from France and Chile, to Saudi Arabia and South Korea.
hungary
ilvinas Kempinas: Fifth Wall at the Budapest Mcsarnok Kunsthalle
Running until 2 November 2014, the Budapest Mcsarnok Kunsthalle is currently exhibiting the work of Lithuanian-born artist ilvinas Kempinas.
For his first exhibition in Hungary, Mcsarnok Kunsthalle
will present two new installations by the artist, whose work
is characterised by his habitual use of the magnetic strips
from video cassettes. The museum defines his work as marked by a spatial geometric abstraction and a precise and
austere execution, which opens a broad field of interpretation therefore rendering the pieces accessible for all. The
work Fifth Wall features thin black strips of tape, originally
a recording media, allowing air to pass through the installation, constantly transforming the space. The piece was first
presented in Japan in 2011, at the Yokohama Triennial and
has since been adapted for this particular exhibition.
Kempinas was born in 1969 and now lives and works in
New York City. His work has been displayed worldwide
at institutions such as PS1 Contemporary Art Center, San
Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Kunsthalle Vienna.
well as exhibiting at Art Basel and having represented Lithuania at the Venice Biennale in 2009.

Most Wanted Men No. 12, Frank B (1964) detail


Andy Warhol
Copyright The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts
Courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

united kingom
Witches at the British Museum
The British Museum, London, is showing the exhibition Witches and
Wicked Bodies until 11 January 2015.
The exhibition explores the image of the witch in art from the Renaissance until the end of the 19th century through a collection of prints
and drawings. Since the classical era, women have been depicted as evil
temptresses or disgusting hags, representing an inversion of the natural
and social order. Prints from the 16th century, created during the religious
unrest that intensified the witch trials, show the latter vision of ugly
crones as in Albrecht Drers Witch Riding backwards on a Goat (1501)
or Hans Baldungs Witches Sabbath (1510); centuries later, Francisco
de Goya turns these hideous creatures into beautiful etchings. Henry
Fuselis Weird Sisters from Macbeth also features, as do illustrations of
Goethes Faust by Eugne Delacroix. By the end of the 19th century, femininity and mysterious sexuality become the overriding images of witchcraft, as seen in work by Edward Burne-Jones, Dante Gabriel Rossetti
and Odilon Redon.
United states
Exhibition marks anniversary of Warhols scandal at Worlds Fair
From 27 September 2014 until 7 January 2015, The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh is hosting an exhibition entitled 13 Most Wanted
Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World's Fair, 50 years after the event
where Warhol presented enlarged mugshots of wanted criminals, provoking outrage from officials.
Warhol installed the exhibit, only to find that upon the fair's opening
in New York the organisers had painted over his work with silver paint.
Nicholas Chambers, curator at The Warhol said that Warhol's installation
was an extraordinarily bold proposal for the pavilion. Warhol was in the
early stages of his career and the commission represented a high profile
opportunity [...] However, rather than propose a Pop subject associated
with his practice at that time, such as Campbells Soup, he decided to
depict a group of criminals wanted by the NYPD. The exhibition reunites
all of the murals for the first time in almost 50 years.

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AMA Newsletter 172 9

2 October 2014

coming soon
germany
The Forgotten Pioneer Movement at District
Berlin
From 3 October until 29 November 2014, District Berlin is to present the interdisciplinary
performance and exhibition project The Forgotten Pioneer Movement.
The Forgotten Pioneer Movement is a fictional movement that explores the experiences of
the transitional generation between socialism
and post-socialism, whose youth is linked to Perestroika and the 'post-Western' Europe of the
1990s. The figure of the pioneer lends itself to
investigation; the show seeks to examine the
ideologies in the formerly-seperated East and
West whilst moving towards a new pan-European focus, with the 25th anniversary of the fall
of the Berlin Wall adding a deeper significance.
The show consists of three elements: Set #A
comprises performances at different locations
in public space in Berlin, Set #B is an exhibition
at District and Set #C is a public seminar.
netherlands
ZERO at The Stedelijk
Running from 4 July until 8 November 2015,
Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, is to show an exhibition dedicated to the collective ZERO.
Active in the 1950s and 1960s, the ZERO movement was created in the context of reconstruction in the aftermath of war. Through innovative
experimentation with media and materials, the
collective sought to build a new future for art.
Stedelijk showed the first museum presentation
of ZERO's work in 1962, with a second show in
1965 considered to be a high point for the collective; exactly 50 years after this second exhibition, Stedelijk presents a survey of the avantgarde group which will include work by herman
de vries, Armando, Henk Peeters, Jan Schoonhoven, Piero Manzoni, Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein,
Jean Tinguely, Yayoi Kusama and others.
south africa
Rembrandt at Iziko, Cape Town
From 3 October 2014 until 28 March 2015, Rembrandt in South Africa: Pioneer Printmaker of Humanity and Modernity is to be on display at Iziko
Old Town House, Cape Town.
Whilst no South African public institutions own
paintings attribuable to the Dutch Old Master, the
show will be able source some of his etchings from
these major institutional collections within South Africa including the Michaelis Collection (Cape
Town); the Iziko SA National Gallery (Cape Town);
the Johannesburg Art Gallery; the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum (Port Elizabeth); the
Rupert Art Foundation; the Rembrandt van Rijn Art
Foundation (Stellenbosch) and UCT. The collection
of works from the Johannesburg Art Gallery has never before been seen in Cape Town, bringing Rembrandt to a new audience.

Cowcaddens (1964) (detail)


Alasdair Gray
credit: the artist/Private Collection

united kingdom
Alasdair Gray at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Glasgow
Running from 11 October 2014 until 22 February 2015, the Kelvingrove
Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow, is to present a major retrospective of the
work of Alasdair Gray, to mark the occasion of the artist's 80th birthday in
December.
The exhibition will comprise around 100 works spanning Gray's career, from
his first works produced as a student at the Glasgow School of Art, until the
present day. The works have been sourced from private collections as well
as museum and gallery loans.
Gray, an accomplished artist, is also a well recognised novelist, playwright and
poet; his first novel Lanark has been described as one of the landmarks of
20th-century fiction by The Guardian. From 1952-57 Gray studied Design and
Mural Painting at Glasgow School of Art, his work has since been exhibited
widely across the United Kingdom. Additionally his work forms part of the permanent collections at Edinburgh Printmakers, Edinburgh, Scotland and MoMA
Museum of Modern Art, New York City.
united states
Jamie Wyeth's portraits of Rudolf Nureyev at Museum of Fine Arts, Florida
From 11 October 2014 until 18 January 2015 the Museum of Fine Arts in St.
Petersburg, Florida, is to host an exhibition of portraits of the celebrated ballet
dancer Rudolf Nureyev by the American artist Jamie Wyeth.
The exhibition will display 19 portraits of the dancer, created between 1977
to 2001, some completed after the dancer's death in 1993, accompanied by
five of Nureyev's costumes. Nureyev, who was born in the Soviet Union but
who danced mainly in Europe and North America, was appointed director of
the Paris Opera Ballet in 1983, and described as a rock star of ballet by
The New York Times.
Jamie Wyeth was born in 1946 into a family rich with artistic heritage; his father
was the artist Andrew Wyeth and his grandfather the illustrator N. C. Wyeth. Jamie left school at 11 to study art with his aunt and observe his father at work. He
would later go on to learn anatomy at a morgue and work in Andy Warhol's Factory. Wyeth was praised by the co-founder of the New York City Ballet as the finest
American portrait painter since the death of John Singer Sargent.

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AMA Newsletter 172 10

2 October 2014

Galleries

Article of the week


Spanierman Gallery to close
New Yorks' Spanierman Gallery is to close
as its current managing director, Ira Spanierman, has decided to retire at the age
of 86 and close the gallery's doors.
The gallery was founded in 1928 by Ira's
father, expanding over time to include the

Spanierman Modern gallery, which opened


in 2006. The gallery showcases American art
from the 19th century to the present. It's location has changed three times since it resided
in a small shop on 57th street named Old
World Antiques; it now occupies a space of

14,000 square feett on west 55th street.


Ira Spanierman is well known for the Raphael painting he sold at Christie's in 2007
for $37 million, but which he bought in
1968 for a mere $325, when its creator was
unidentified.

openings

relocation

Fergus McCaffrey to open new outposts in Caribbean


and Japan
New York-based gallery Fergus McCaffrey is to open
a new location on the French Caribbean island of
Saint-Barthlemy in November.
The second space for the gallery will be the island's first yearround permanent fine art gallery. Saint-Barthlemy has a history of being a popular source of inspiration for artists, with
names such as Jasper Johns and Cy Twombly having been
influenced by the island. Fergus McCaffrey has been active
on the island before, having co-run an artists residency and
gallery program from 2005 to 2008 which hosted artists
such as David Noonan, Kelley Walker, and Douglas Gordon.
The gallery plans to expand further next year, with a third location set to open in Tokyo in 2015.

Shane Campbell Gallery Chicago to move to new 8,500 square


foot space
The Chicago-based gallery Shane Cambell is to leave its West Town
space that it has occupied since 2010, in order to take up residency in a new 8,500-square-foot space at South Wabash Avenue and
East 21st Street in the historic Motor Row district.
The gallery is due to reopen in April 2015 with an inaugural show
dedicated to Chicago-based artist Tony Lewis. The news was initially
released by way of their Instagram account on which they published
a photo of the new space captioned New Space, April 2015. The director of the gallery, John Schmid, has since divulged further details
to ARTnews explaining that the decision to move was due to increasing
storage space needs and ambitions of their artists.
Renovations are due to be carried out by architectural firm UrbanLab who will transform the former car dealership, that also recently
housed an ambulance company, into the new gallery, featuring 2,900
square feet of exhibition space.

Bruno David opening second space in St Louis


Bruno David gallery is opening a second space in the
Grove neighbourhood of St Louis.
The gallery was established in 2005 and specialises
in contemporary art, representing artists practising in
St Louis whose work is recognised internationally, including: Laura Beard, Ellen Jantzen and Judy Pfaff. The
new space, Bruno David Projects, is to be a satellite of
the gallery and will showcase the artists' works in a new
context from a different perspective.
The new director of the space is Keri Robertson, who will
be responsible for curating the gallery's programme.
The first exhibition at the new location is to open in early November 2014.

human resources
Nazy Nazhand leaves De Buck Gallery
Nazy Nazhand has left her position as artistic director at New York's
De Buck Gallery.
Before taking up the position at De Buck, she was the curatorial advisor for and founder of ART MIDDLE EAST (AME), which aimed to foster
cultural relations between the East and the West through events such
as artist talks, panel discussions, studio visits, book-signings, and private collection tours. She has also written for Harpers Bazaar Art, artnet, Artinfo, ModeWalk, Whitewall and New York Times Style. She was
born in Tehran and has lived in Athens, Washington DC, and New York.

THURSDAY OCTOBER 9th 2014

Night opening in 40 art galleries in Le Marais

Guided tours, openings and artist talks.

lesjeudisarty.net

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AMA Newsletter 172 11

2 October 2014

event

representation

Les Jeudis Arty begins in the Marais, Paris


A concept originating in London with First Thursdays, Les Jeudis Arty is to promote the French capital's art offering in much the same way, with 32 contemporary art galleries in the Marais district of Paris staying open from 6pm until 10pm,
on 9 October 2014 for its 2nd edition.
Participating galleries include: FauveParis, Galerie Alain Gutharc, Galerie Duboys
and School Gallery. There are three possible self-led walks to take during the evening: Performances, Meet the Artists and Openings, as well as guided tours
with contemporary art experts, available for purchase via the website.
Les Jeudis Arty will take place on three more Thursday evenings over the course
of the year.

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac now representing


Imran Qureshi
The Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, which has
spaces in Paris and Salzburg, Austria, has recently announced that they are now representing the Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi.
Imran Qureshi specialises in miniature
Mughal paintings, a traditional practise
developed in India at the end of the 16th
century, which he currently teaches. His
work gathers together the motifs and techniques of this art and translates them into
a more contemporary language. His work is
currently on display at the inaurgural exhibition of the Aga Khan museum in Toronto
entitled Garden of Ideas: Contemporary
Art from Pakistan. His recent projects include The God of Small Things (May - August 2014), at the Eli and Edyth Broad Art
Museum in Michigan, as well as the The
Roof Top Garden Commission (May - November 2013) at the Metropolitan Museum
of Art in New York. He also took part in the
Venice Biennale in the main exhibition,
The Encyclopedic Palace.
Winner of the Deutsche Bank Artist of the
Year 2013 prize, his work is found in the permanent collections of institutions such as
The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York
and the V&A in London. He is currently working on an important installation which will
be presented as part of Paris' Nuit Blanche
on the Quai d'Austerlitz, as well as in a performance which will take place 4 October at
the Sainte-Genevive bookshop in Paris. The
Ikon gallery in Birmingham will dedicate a
solo exhibition to him next November.

representations
New Galerie reprenting Dora Budor
New Galerie, Paris, is now representing New York-based artist Dora Budor.
New Galerie, owned by Marion Dana and Corentin Hamel, also has a space in New York.
They represent contemporary artists including collectives DIS and A Kassen.
Croatian artist Dora Dudor, now based in New York, is a former designer who draws upon
the varied political situations she has experienced throughout her life. She studied Architectural Studies at the University of Zagreb followed by a Masters in Design, a background
which has influenced her artistic output. A multimedia artist, she took part in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013 and has featured in group exhibitions across the world.
Pieter Hugo now represented by Galerie Priska Pasquer
Galerie Priska Pasquer, Cologne, has announced that it will now be representing
Pieter Hugo.
Pieter Hugo is a South African photographic artist born in 1976. His work has
featured in solo museum shows at The Hague Museum of Photography, Muse
de l'Elyse in Lausanne, Ludwig Museum in Budapest, Fotografiska in Stockholm,
MAXXI in Rome and the Institute of Modern Art Brisbane among others. He has also
been part of major group shows at Tate Modern, the Folkwang Museum, Fundao
Calouste Gulbenkian, and the So Paulo Bienal; his work forms part of permanent
collections at MoMA, V&A Museum and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
Priska Pasquer will exhibit work from Hugo's series There's a Place in Hell for Me
and My Friends at the upcoming Paris Photo in Paris' Grand Palais from 13 to 16
November 2014.

Leiko Ikemura. Zarathoustra

1455, rue Sherbrooke O. Montreal

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AMA Newsletter 172 12

2 October 2014

what's on
china
Liu Jianhua at Pace Beijing
Pace Beijing is presenting a solo exhibition of Liu Jianhua's
work, entitled Square, running until 8 November 2014.
Occupying the gallery's main exhibition hall, Square transforms the 'numerous' into the 'brief', demonstrating the artist's investigation into form and beauty. A rethinking of the
traditional social environment, Liu Jianhua explores a creative path which differs from the direct and realistic approach.
One of China's best-known sculpture and installation artists,
Liu Jianhau works predominantly with porcelain and mixed
media, creating experimental and often large-scale pieces.
Spending 14 years living and working in Jingdezhen a city
renowned for its porcelain , Jianhua graduated in Fine Art
of Sculpture at the Jingdezhen Ceramics Institute in 1989 and
went on to start his individual work. Through his installations,
Jianhua looks at the social changes in China and the problems
that arise thereafter. An example of this is Regular Fragile
chosen to represent China at the 2003 Venice Biennale ,
which comprised porcelain replicas, broken and scattered on
the ground, denoting pieces which valued beauty and symbolism over function.
france
New visions of landscape in photography at gallery Rivire/Faiveley
Until 24 October, gallery Rivire/Faiveley, Paris, is hosting
the collective exhibition (Re)Shaping Landscapes, dedicated to a new vision of landscape in photography.
Photographs by artists Jean Noviel, Bruno Fontana, Santiago
Vanegas, Robert Overweg, Jrmie Lenoir, Olivia Lavergne,
Alexandra Davy, Karine Maussire, Jean de Pomereu and Albin Millot are on display, as well as the large format On the Anthropogenic Landscape by Clment Verger, whose landscape
studies are also shown at the RX gallery in Ivry-sur-Seine.
The exhibition (Re)Shaping Landscapes revisits the notion
of landscape, which has been present since the beginnings of
photography, relegated as a simple motif or a background decoration, but is just as much as the main subject of an image.
The exhibition shows how contemporary photography reworks
the landscape and represents a new perception of space.
germany
Gianni Piacentino at VeneKlasen/Werner
Running until 8 November 2014 at the VeneKlasen/Werner gallery Berlin is a solo exhibition of works by Italian
artist Gianni Piacentino, curated by Centre dArt Contemporain Genevas director Andrea Bellini.
The exhibition will present a comprehensive body of works,
tracing the artist's career over the last 50 years from the monochrome compositions of 1965 to the present day. Piacentino,
who lives and works in Turin, was one of the founding members
of the Arte Povera movement, which he soon abandoned in
search of a personal maverick aesthetic. His works are inspired
by dynamism and speed: motorcycles, monocycles, automobiles, and planes influence his work, whilst all of his pieces
bear traces of rich psychological and intellectual references.
The artist's work has previously been displayed at: Museum
of Contemporary Art Chicago (2009); MoMA PS1 in New York
(1997); Centro de Arte Reina Sofa in Madrid (1990); the Gesellschaft fr Aktuelle Kunst in Bremen (1981); the Nationalgalerie in Berlin (1978); the Palais des Beaux Arts in Brussels
(1972) and the University Museum in Sydney (1971). He was
also a participant at the 1993 XLV Venice Biennale.

Square
Liu Jianhua
credits : Pace Beijing

turkey
Nevin Alada at Rampa
Rampa gallery, Istanbul, is dedicating a second solo show to artist
Nevin Alada entitled Diapason, running until 25 October.
The term Latin word diapason has been used throughout the ages
as a musical term and its use by Alada highlights the exhibition's
focus on the transformative potential of music and sound, both
of which appear as a kind of leitmotif in her work. In her video
works Session (2013) and City Language (2009), city portraits
are enhanced by musical and rhythmic elements including the
use of percussion, string and wind instruments. Raise the Roof
(2007/2008/2010) is a performance piece in which women dance
with headphones on, only their t-shirts revealing what each is
listening to privately, the tapping of their high-heeled shoes providing the soundtrack for the observer. Alada also converts one
of the gallery spaces into a music room, where everyday objects
become instruments.
united states
Wayne Thiebaud at Acquavella
From 1 October until 21 November 2014, Acquavella gallery, New
York, is for the second time hosting a solo exhibition by Wayne
Thiebauld, one of the key names in contemporary art. The show is
to feature 49 of his works including 35 paintings and 14 drawings,
most of which were created especially for the exhibition and are to
be shown to the public for the first time.
Thiebauld is often associated with Pop Art with his depictions of
everyday objects, but his work is distinct from the movement by
the particular attention given to presenting his subjects, placing
him closer to the tradition of still life. The commonplace is found at
the centre of Thiebauld's work, with Eleanor Acquavella describing
the exhibition as, a testament to his unique ability to illuminate
the everyday and elevate the ordinary.

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AMA Newsletter 172 13

2 October 2014

coming soon
france
VHILS at Galerie Magda Danysz
From 11 October until 15 November 2014, Galerie Magda Danysz,
Paris, is to host a solo exhibition by street artist VHILS.
The exhibition Vestige is to show original works exploring themes
typical of VHILS' work, created in a variety of media including cork,
metal, wood and paper. His work sits somewhere between portraiture and the abstract, questioning collective memory and stories of
those who live in the city.
Portuguese artist VHILS creates his street art all over the world
and was described by art critic Tristan Manco as, one of the
finest examples of world street art from these past few years.
His technique involves using destruction as a force of creation,
chiselling away at the layers of various urban environments,
which forms sculptures that give a new face to the city.

United Arab Emirates


Swarming by Sara Rahbar at Carbon 12 gallery
Swarming, an exhibition by the Iranian-born artist Sara Rahbar, is to be held from 2 November 2014 until 8 January 2015
at Carbon 12 gallery in Dubai.
Although Sara Rahbar lives and works in New York, this is her
third solo show in Dubai. She has previously studied mixed media in New York and at Central Saint Martin's College of Art and
Design in London. The exhibition will present a series of sculptures which combines casts of wheels, batons, shoes, weapons,
sickles, shovels and limbs to form what are described as sites
of collection and remembrance to workers. The contents of
the exhibition presents memory and ideological symbols[...]
remixed with a very direct, physical syntax, which deconstructs
personal history and the 21st-century human condition.

italy
Louise Nevelson at Cardi Gallery, Milan
From 9 October until 20 December 2014, Cardi Gallery, the Milan-based contemporary and Modern art gallery, is to display a
range of 30 works by the artist Louise Nevelson.
The exhibition will present collages and sculptures created by the
artist between 1955 and 1970, a period which marked the emergence of her trademark Modernist style. Louise Nevelson was a
crucial figure in the American sculpture scene of the 20th century. Her work challenged the assumption that women could not
make large-scale works, turning her into an icon of the feminist art
movement. She said about her work: Sometimes it's the material
that takes over; sometimes it's me that takes over. I permit them
to play, like a seesaw. I use action and counteraction, like in music,
all the time. Action and counteraction. It was always a relationship
my speaking to the wood and the wood speaking back to me.

united states
Albert Oehlen at Skarstedt
Running from 4 November until 20 December 2014, Skarstedt
gallery, New York, is to present the exhibition Albert Oehlen:
Fabric Paintings dedicated to the German artist.
The Fabric Paintings, created between 1992 and 1996, see
Oehlen abandon the formal compositions of his early works to
embrace a style which plays with and questions the conventions associated with painting. Instead of pristine white canvas,
he uses patterned fabric to create fractured and explosive surfaces. Painting itself is pushed to the limit as he interrogates the
dominance of the artist's hand in modern painting.
Ancient Secrets II (1964)
Louise Newelson
Black painted wood h 90cm 140 x 15 cm
courtesy Cardi Gallery

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AMA Newsletter 172 14

2 October 2014

Interview
Bridging the gap:
an interview with Morehshin Allahyari

Morehshin Allahyari is a new media artist born in Iran and living in the United States. She has
presented her work at numerous exhibitions and conferences around the world, including a TED
conference, the Nasher Sculpture Centre and the Dallas Museum of Art. Talking with AMA, Allahyari
discusses her work with particular reference to her pieces Like Pearls, an interactive web-based
collage of Iranian spam emails, and Dark Matter, a series of both virtual and 3D-printed sculptures
combining objects which are forbidden in Iran.

Can you begin by introducing your work?


Im really interested in political and cultural issues, mostly focusing on the Middle East and, more
specifically, Iran. However Im also interested in the use of technology to talk about these issues and
pushing the boundaries of the technology that I employ. When Im using software such as Maya, its
the experimental and critical aspect of that which really interests me, and how it lets me approach
a topic from a different angle as opposed to the usual commercial use of the medium.

Process Dark Matter


Morehshin Allahyari

How have your experiences of being in an artist in Iran and the US differed?
As an artist in Iran there are certain limitations you learn how to censor yourself and your work.
It becomes quite a dangerous process, as somehow you are giving in to the system, knowing that if
you say certain things, or if your work is about certain issues, you can get into trouble. Just being
aware of this fact made the process of my work very different, in that I had to choose topics which
wouldnt be so political or which wouldnt send political messages. For example, the cultural issues
I looked at in my recent work Like Pearls, which criticises the perspective of womens bodies as seen
from a hyper masculine culture, both from a western and an Islamic stance, I could never work on in
Iran. Since I moved to the US and decided not to return to Iran I have more freedom to work on the
projects Im really interested in.

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AMA Newsletter 172 15

2 October 2014

Interview
Bridging the gap:
an interview with Morehshin Allahyari
What kind of role would you say censorship plays in your work?
Its interesting because in 2009 I started a series of works specifically on censorship, which began
as looking at censorship in Iran but then expanded to looking at countries like China and North
Korea. It interested me because its something I've dealt with a lot in my daily life even during the
first couple of years when I moved to the US, I wanted to go back to Iran, so I still had to censor my
work. I did a lot of performances which treated censorship in an ironic but also serious way.
How important are politics and activism in your work?
If youre from a place like the Middle East, or if you grow up constantly dealing with politics in your
daily life, you dont have the privilege of not approaching political issues in your work because its
so embedded in many aspects of your life. Every decision that you make, from what you are going to
wear to what you watch, all comes down to something political. It is because of this direct influence
that I think that both politics and activism are so important in my work and in the work of so many
other Middle Eastern artists. Even being in the US for the past seven years, there are still aspects of
politics such as sanctions which have a direct influence on my life.
In a lot of your work you use multimedia and new technology why does this appeal to you more
than traditional artistic methods?
I think firstly because of my background I did my bachelor's degree in Media Studies, which was
very much based on media theory and social science. One of the reasons that Im interested in digital media is because it hasnt been used as much and it doesnt have the same history as traditional
artistic methods. I was interested in the ways in which I could push the limitations of new media,
and make it different to a lot of the other traditional work that comes out of the Middle East. Secondly, I think it is because of my general interest in technology and the possibilities that it brings
for my work. Every day there is something new being released, which gives you the opportunity to
think about how you can use this new technology to influence your work in a critical way. Its this
limitless aspect of technology which interests me as an artist and which gives me so many options.
Your work Like Pearls tackles the paradoxical representation of women in Iran how do you
think gender issues relate to your work?
What specifically interests me in Like Pearls is this mashup of the sexual and the romantic that I collected from spam emails sent to me from Iran. In these I saw these sexualised, but at the same time
censored, bodies of women which feature in the piece. Under Iranian law these websites cannot
publish a nude female body so instead they have to come up with these incredibly strange aesthetics as a solution to censor out the bodies. Instead of what you usually see in Iran, in magazines and
books, which is that the body is blacked out (I remember going into public libraries and seeing that
the female body was blacked out, and just thinking how strange it was that somebody was spending
their time doing that), they use different colours and textures, even just white instead of black to
censor out the body. In doing this, they are keeping the aesthetic not directly censored, which I find
really fascinating. As well as the aesthetic side, I was also interested in the concept - its all geared
towards men, selling this underwear to men for their wives/lovers. So basically, you have both the
westernised female body in that the woman is objectified, but the women are also objectified in the
Islamic sense. There is a saying that a woman in a hijab is like a pearl in a shell, telling the woman to
cover herself so her body will become more valuable; an example of the objectification of womens
bodies but in a completely different way from the Western example. I wanted to combine this with
the masculine aggression of the spam in these emails.
Like Pearls is an interactive piece, the viewer scrolling through and clicking on certain parts of
the site to reveal pop ups how important do you think it is to directly involve the viewer in
your work?
Not all of my works are interactive in this sense but with this particular piece I wanted to make the
viewer experience the same feeling that they would if they were receiving this spam in their email;
you might accidentally click on something and then something unwanted will pop up. I also wanted
to include the messages which came along with these advertisements, but a lot of them were in
Farsi so to include a wider audience I translated them into English. I think with this piece you have
to spend more time to discover it; if you go and see something which happens very quickly, its just
action then reaction; you have such a small amount of time to engage with the piece.

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AMA Newsletter 172 16

2 October 2014

Interview
Bridging the gap:
an interview with Morehshin Allahyari
In Dark Matter, the combination of objects, such as the dog and the dildo, can seem to have a kind
of surreal humour what role do you think humour plays in your work?
Thats a really interesting question because I feel like for a long time my work was very serious. The
more I grew as an artist, the more I learned the importance of using humour to talk about serious
issues. It doesnt necessarily lighten the gravity of the topic, but more exposes the ridicule of it. So
in Dark Matter, I am combining objects that are forbidden or unwelcome in Iran. When you step back
from the piece and think about how ridiculous it is that things like dogs and satellite dishes are
forbidden, then the humorous aspects of these 3D sculptures start to make more sense.
Your works are very much tied to your self identity, but do you think they also have a much broader application?
I think it is interesting to try and find a line between the personal and the universal. I try to talk about
my personal experiences but also to engage an audience which is not specifically Middle-Eastern or
Iranian. Maybe in a way you can think about it as being a cultural ambassador, bringing awareness
to some of these issues. Also central to my work is the balance between complex concepts and relationships which are tethered to emotion. In every single project, I think of ways to exploit and expand
the personal to the collective. For example, in a recent body of work called The Romantic Self-Exiles, I
seek to understand the relationship of a diasporic existence. I use 3D animation and narrative to build
landscapes and to reconstruct memories of home. I use a cinematic and surreal aesthetic to push the
limits of real and unreal, memory and imagination, locality and universality, time and space.
Speaking about the role of cultural ambassador, do you see yourself as this? If you do, how do you
go about bringing Iranian culture to the US?
I dont actively think of myself as a cultural ambassador, but somehow my work always go back to
topics which are trying to raise awareness about something. It goes back to what I was saying about
activism. I have never really consciously thought about trying to explicitly raise awareness, but it
comes in subconsciously. I get a lot of responses where people are shocked by, say, the fact that
certain objects are forbidden in Iran, but I think my work goes into it in more depth by exploring how
we relate to these objects and what role a 3D printer could play in creating a historical collection
and documentation of our lives.

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Morehshin Allahyari

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AMA Newsletter 172 17

2 October 2014

Interview
Bridging the gap:
an interview with Morehshin Allahyari
When you moved to America, how was the transition between the Iran and the US?
I had travelled to the US before as my mum was a flight attendant, but I always think travelling
to a place is very different from living there. Also, when I first travelled to America it was before
9/11; post 9/11, people had very specific ideas about the Middle East, kind of thinking of all of the
countries as the same. When I would say I was from Iran, I would always get strange stereotypical
questions, which I guess were because of the preconceived notions people had about the Middle
East because of the media. I always had to explain to people that it was different. This was a huge
part of my move from Iran, but I also tried to deal with it by getting involved with collaborative art
projects (I did one called IRUS Art and one called Your Night/My Day) which worked with artists in
Iran and the US. I wanted to create a dialogue which was free of politics, in which we could connect
as individuals and not just nations.
Moving from one culture to another means youre working in two languages; how have you found
working in a language which is not your mother tongue?
Its a very complex process. My interest in art stems from creative writing, and Im a good writer in
Farsi, but in English its completely different. However I also feel like having access to the two languages, being able to think about the world in these two different ways, is an incredibly amazing experience which changes how your brain works. Its fascinating because, like a lot of other aspects of
my life, my relationship to language is about co-existing, living in two different worlds and learning
how to go back and forth between the two and accepting and enjoying this idea of betweenness.

#dog #dildo #satelite-dish


Morehshin Allahyari

Finally, what are you working on at the moment?


Im currently working on a new series of animations, similar to some of my previous works such as
The Romantic Self-Exiles, which combines 3D rendering with narrative. I want to explore ideas about
architectural spaces and our relationships with spaces and landscapes in the virtual world; its interesting that my relationship to the spaces I left behind is purely virtual. As an artist using technology
and living outside my home country, this virtual relationship is something that I am interested in
exploring.

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AMA Newsletter 172 18

2 October 2014

Artists

Article of the week


Saatchi Art announces shortlist for 2014 New Sensations Prize
Saatchi Art, the online art gallery, has recently released its list of shortlisted artists
for its 2014 New Sensations Prize. The
award was created in 2007 by Rebecca
Wilson, chief curator of Saatchi Art, with
the aim of supporting talented graduates
across the United Kingdom and Ireland.
The full list of shortlisted artists is as follows:
Lauren Cohen, Elizabeth-Anne Curistan, Mol-

lie Douthit, Collette Egan, Felicity Hammond,


Aimee Henderson, Roy Immanuel, Nicholas
Johnson, Roderick Laperdrix, Chao Lu, Jonathan Lux, Stephen Marshall, Emily Motto,
Miroslav Pomichal, Jessica Ramm, Charles
Richardson, Sarah Roberts, Babette Semmer,
Daniel Silva, Marlene Steyn, Jack Towndrow,
Grace Ann Thompson, Thomas Valentine,
Lauren Wilson and Vivien Zhang. The artists'

work will be presented at the New Sensations exhibition in London, opening October
13 during Frieze Week London.
This years judges are gallery founder and
curator Ceri Hand, artist Tom Hunter, arts
writer Jessica Lack, Bloomberg New Contemporaries director Kirsty Ogg, and Saatchi Art
chief curator Rebecca Wilson.

awards

award

Winners of Nam June Paik Awards announced


The Nam June Paik Award International Media Art Award of the Arts
Foundation of North Rhine-Westphalia worth 25,000, was given to
Camille Henrot, a multimedia artist who was born in Paris and is now
based in New York.
Also recognised by the jury is Manuel Graf, who is the recipient of the
Nam June Paik Newcomer Award 2014. Graf is a Dsseldorf-based artist
who studied at the Arts Academy in Dsseldorf in the sculpture class of
Magdalena Jetelova and Rita McBride. Graf 15,000 for the realisation
of a new work.
The award exhibition features the work of the four nominees for the
International award (Ulf Aminde, Cory Arcangel, Camille Henrot and
Thomson & Craighead) and is on display at Kunstmuseen Krefeld/Museum Haus Lange until 15 February 2015.

Mary Weatherford awarded Artists Legacy Foundation Award 2014


Los Angeles-based artist Mary Weatherford is to
be awarded the eighth annual Artist Award by the
Artist's Legacy Foundation.
The award is a gift of $25,000 given to an accomplished artist where evidence of the hand is a
significant factor in making art , which began in
2004, thanks to a large bequest by groundbreaking sculptor Viola Frey. The aim of the Foundation is to support the visual arts, to protect the
legacies of deceased artists and for painters and
sculptors to encourage other artists.
Weatherford's best-known work uses Flashe on
linen and incorporates neon tubing, addressing
themes of mortality and morality. The artist described receiving the award as Incredible [...] I am very
honored and delighted. I've known Viola Frey's art
since I was a teenager. Her work taught me that art
can be colorful and serious.

Leiko Ikemura awarded Cologne Fine Art prize 2014


Japanese artist Leiko Ikemura is the recipient of the annual Cologne
Fine Art prize.
The prize of 10,000 is awarded by Koelnmesse and the German art
dealers association Bundesverband Deutscher Galerien und Kunsthndler
(BVDG), and is given to a contemporary artist in Germany with previous
winners including Sigmar Polke, Georg Baselitz and Gnther Uecker.
Leiko Ikemura was born in Japan but moved to Europe as a student and now
spends her time between Cologne and Berlin. Her 30-year career includes
painting, sculpture, and works on paper and has produced a huge body of
work. Her paintings have evolved from early canvasses depicting struggle
and conflict, to later abstract experimentation with the female form.
An exhibition will be dedicated to Ikemura's sculptures and drawings at the
Cologne Art Fair, to take place 19 to 23 November 2014.
Mike Cloud awarded inaugural Chiaro Award
Headlands Center for the Arts has announced Brooklyn-based painter Mike
Cloud as the recipient of its first Chiaro Award.
The prize is awarded to an accomplished mid-career painter and is intended to have a tangible impact on their life and work, recognising past
success and fostering ability to encourage more exceptional works in the
future. It includes a residency at the Headlands Center lasting six to ten
weeks, with use of a private studio, accommodation, and a cash award
of $15,000. The centre encourages peer-to-peer exchange of ideas in
combination with rigorous individual practice.
Mike Cloud has work in the permanent collections of institutions including Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Eileen Harris-Norton, Santa
Monica; and the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Omaha. He has also had
solo shows at MoMA PS1 and the Lincoln Centre, New York

ban
Artist SinGh banned from ArtPrize for life
The controversial, self-styled stunt artist SinGh
has been banned for life from ArtPrize, the yearly
independent art competition held in Grand Rapid,
Michigan, after a series of controversies surrounding his work.
SinGh, real name Gurmej Singh, disputed with the
owner of the prize two years ago over his work
Captivity, which consisted of an effigy of Saddam
Hussein in a cage and which promised to explore
controversial issues such as suicide and bestiality.
The work did not go on display after the well-publicised feud, and SinGh burnt his work in protest.
Last year the artist revealed a three-mile-long
painting, which director Kevin Buist said blocked
traffic and violated basic safety, despite winning
a Guinness world record for the world's longest
painting. In reaction to his exclusion, SinGh has
posted drawings from his latest series Project Holy
Cow in windows around the town.
The 2014 edition of the non-profit prize drew
1,537 entries and gave out awards totalling
$560,000.

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Hires
Miroslav Pomichal
shortlisted to the 2014 New Sensation Prize

AMA Newsletter 172 20

2 October 2014

Interview
Elise van Middelem School of Doodle
The School of Doodle is the brainchild of Elise van Middelem and Molly Logan and is a free online school
of creativity aimed at teenage girls. The project received backing from crowdfunding website Kickstarter,
where it managed to raise $107,129 over $32,000 more than their initial target. With support from
some of the biggest names in the creative arts world including Marina Abramovic, Salman Rushdie and
Kate Costello, to name a few - the School of Doodle aims to encourage teenage girls to 'be loud' and
unleash their full potential. AMA met with co-founder Elise van Middelem to find out more.

How and why did school of doodle first come about?


I was introduced to Molly Logan via the artist Doug Aitken whilst we were both working on Station
to Station. About a year ago, Molly told me about her idea of building a Khan Academy [non-profit
online educational resource] for Creativity, a space where girls can connect to creative lessons and to
each other, allowing them to collaborate with a global community of young women and finally, offer
opportunities for future offline exploration and learning. By December 2013, we were thinking what
the name was going to be. I said School of Doodle; for me the word doodle is fun, but also involves
no measurement or grading its something that cant be taught and is universal. Its perfect. So thats
how it came about; in January it all came together and we were able to launch our Kickstarter page.

Courtesy School of Doodle

Both of us come from an art and business background. We like to think that our deep belief in the
power of art and the lessons learned in terms of how to build a brand and distil often abstract
concepts down to something that is engaging and digestible will serve School of Doodle well.
We recognised that art has this liberating force; you can walk into a studio and suddenly anything
is possible. Theres nobody to say You cant do that, you cant touch that; its this imaginary world
that empowers you.

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AMA Newsletter 172 21

2 October 2014

Interview
Elise van Middelem School of Doodle
The School of Doodle is targeted at teenage girls so why specifically teenage girls, and how
does this tie-in to the philosophy of being loud?
Being loud is a mantra; a state of mind. Its being colourful, compassionate,curious and confident;
its all these non-cognitive skills we have been blessed with naturally. So its really those elements
that we wanted to transmit to people. Why? Because theyre as important as algebra; non-cognitive
skills are incredible.
So why girls? We just feel strongly about girls. We think thats an at-risk group. Girls are mostly
taught to be beautiful, not to be smart. What was being offered to girls between 13 and 18? Mostly
pink toys and things like that. So we thought, this is the group at risk that needs to be opened up
to imaginative projects.
We would have benefited from it if it had happened to us earlier in high school. Whats most important is that we create a space that girls will respond to. We want to encourage girls to do something
that has no measure of good or bad.
The project takes place via online lessons; can you explain how these work?
There are three words that are important to the School of Doodle: education, entertainment and
community. Our goal is to make entertainment more educational rather than education more entertaining. Therefore, School of Doodle will be part-classroom and part-content platform with original
programming, created by both teens and professionals, to engage and inspire imagination.
The idea is to build a social network, a community where teenage girls can explore together and feel safe.
We will launch with lessons, taught by some of todays most visionary artists and creators, otherwise
known as Daily Doodles. At the end of each Daily Doodle, we will issue a Doodle Challenge for girls
to take what they learn and start making. And if they are still in the Dabble stage, there is a library of
short how-to videos (or in Doodle world, How Do videos!) to support them. What weve understood
from all the educators weve spoken with is that what teen girls really want is to learn from heroes,
who are the artists, and from peers.
Why is arts education so important?
It goes back to what I was saying about non-cognitive skills; arts education is as important as algebra because through what we understand, what we learn, what we read, through our own experiences of growing up, we can discover other worlds through imagination. Its not technology that
put the man on the moon; its imagination.
What we will offer will liberate girls to open up their non-cognitive skills; to be passionate, be curious, be confident, colourful, and creative. Thats really what we believe in.
What kind of response has the project received?
For Molly and I, doing a Kickstarter has been one of the most rewarding and humbling aspects of
the project. However what has been the most touching for us is the feedback that we receive from
teens and parents. Some teens say we sit here every day and we hope that you meet your goal
because we really need this; it's a reminder that we need to build the School of Doodle sooner
rather than later!
Moreover, Kickstarter has been a huge help in creating our Teen Advisory Board. We have recruited
teens from the UK, Chile, Israel, Australia; so now we have people from around the world who will
tell us what they want. Ultimately School of Doodle should be a platform run by teens; were just the
ones steering it, but they will give us the input on what they believe works.

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Yayoi Kusama
Courtesy School of Doodle

AMA Newsletter 172 23

2 October 2014

Art Analytics

Juan Muoz
Muoz

Born in 1953 into a wealthy, educated family in Madrid, Juan Muoz is a Spanish sculptor wor-

king primarily in paper mach, resin and bronze. Growing up under the repressive regime of
Franco in Spain, his work has been described by Adrian Searle as, the most significant of the first
generation of artists to achieve maturity in post-Franco Spain. Muoz died in 2001 of cardiac
arrest at his summer home in Ibiza.
In the 1970s Muoz moved to England to pursue his studies; first at Croydon College then at the
Central School of Art and Design, before being awarded a Fulbright scholarship in 1982 to study
in the US at the Pratt Institute in New York. His works were first exhibited in 1984 at the Fernando
Vijande gallery in Madrid.
The artists work focuses principally around sculpture, whilst also experimenting with the auditory arts, creating pieces for the radio. His pieces do not conform to traditional sculpture conventions, creating narrative smaller-than-life pieces to tell a story, inviting the viewer to participate
in the work. Muoz turned to the human figure much later in his career, beginning with sculpture
pieces such as balconies and banisters placed randomly across a gallery; his style is described
by Tate as more classical or Baroque than purely contemporary. In 2000 Muoz was awarded the
Premio Nacional de Bellas Artes.
The work of Juan Muoz has been featured in multiple exhibitions, notably at Museo Guggenheim
de Arte Moderno y Contemporneo, Bilbao; Tate Modern, London; Skarstedt Fine Art, New York
City; Galerie Marian Goodman, Paris and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofa, Madrid.
The artists work also forms part of the collections of contemporary art at renowned museums
including: MuHKA Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen, Antwerp; Fondation Cartier pour
l'art contemporain, Paris; Museu dArt Contemporani de Barcelona - MACBA, Barcelona; Tate Britain, London and MoMA - Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Evolution of the number of


exhibitions by type
Evolution of the number of
exhibitions by type of venue

20
15
10
5
0

1986

1988

1990

1992

1994

1996

1998

2000

2002

2004

group shows

2006

2008

2010

2012

solo shows

20
15
10
5
0

1986

1988

1990
gallery

1992

1994

1996
museum

1998

2000

2002

2004

2006

biennials

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2008

2010

2012

other

www.artmediaagency.com

AMA Newsletter 172 24

2 October 2014

Art Analytics

Juan Muoz

It is in Spain, the artists country of origin, that he has been most frequently exhibited, ahead of
the United States, France, the United Kingdom and Germany. The artists with whom Muoz is most
frequently exhibited include: Bruce Nauman, Thomas Shtte, Franz West and Christian Boltanski.
The work of Muoz has been most regularly exhibited at the following institutions: SMAK Stedelljk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Belgium; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Spain;
MuKHA Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen, Belgium; Frith Street Gallery, United Kingdom and the Marian Goodman Gallery, USA.

4%

Distribution by venue type


Distribution by exhibition type
Distribution by country

14%

19%

22%
49%
19%
86%

74%

Evolution of the number


of articles published on
Juan Muoz

gallery
events

museum
other

group shows
solo shows

10%

Spain
France

United States
other

400
300
200
100
0

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Europa Press

Distribution of the number of


articles by country

494

El Pais

439

El Periodico

14%
3%
3%
6%

334
0

100

200

300

Natividad Pulido

400

500

Distribution of the number of


articles by langage

4%

7%

74%

86%

16

Teresa Ses

Spain
United States
other

ngeles Garca

Josina Surez

7
0

10

15

20

United Kingdom
Portugal

Spanish
Portuguese

English
other

Top 3 authors and publications


whose works have addressed
Juan Muoz

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AMA Newsletter 172 25

Juan Muoz
Muoz

2 October 2014

Art Analytics

At auction, Juan Muozs work has totalled over $33 million, averaging at $203,000 per work.
The record for the artists highest selling work was set at Christies London in June 2011, for his
1992 bronze sculpture Esquina Positiva for $4.7 million (hammer price). This work comes in just
above another bronze sculpture entitled Conversation Piece (1993) sold at Sothebys London in
February 2011 for over $4.3 million (hammer price). In May 2010 a third bronze sculpture entitled Conversation Piece III (2001) was sold at Sothebys New York for $4.3 million (hammer price)
rendering it the third most expensive work sold by the artist.
Whilst sculptures represent 98% of the artists turnover in public sales, amongst the 164 sold
lots, of the seven sculptures created by Muoz, six were sold, for an average of $161,000 each,
four of which surpassed their highest estimate; 16 drawings average at $22,445; six multiples
average at $1290; 9 paintings average at $32,000 whilst photography has a 100% sold rate - 3
photographs have been sold at an average price of more than $42,000.
The number of lots on offer has steadily increased since 1996: more than 20 lots were on offer in
2013, however the rate of unsold work has increased comparably since 2008.

Evolution of the
number of lots
Evolution of
revenue
Evolution of the
average value of lots

30
20
10
0

1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

$1m

$0.5m

$0m

1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

$15m
$10m
$5m
$0m

1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

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AMA Newsletter 172 26

2 October 2014

Art Analytics

Juan Muoz

Regarding country of sale, it is in the United Kingdom where the majority of the artists works
have been on offer at auction (47%) with a significant proportion represented also in the
United States and Spain. Concerning the turnover, the United Kingdom represents 62% of the
total; the remaining 38% is distributed across the United States (37%) and Spain.

Distribution of lots by
medium and revenue
Distribution of lots by
country and revenue

The rate of unsold work is relatively high at 30%.

5%
11%

8%
6%
37%

47%

62%

39%
84%

98%

Sculpture

Drawing

Painting

United Kingdom
Spain

United States
other

Rate of sold/unsold lots

0%
10%

12%

Distribution of lots by auction


house and revenue

30%

14%

39%
30%
61%

70%
36%

sold

bought in

Sothebys

Rate of unsold lots by price of works

Christies

> $250k

$100-250k

$100-250k

$50-100k

$50-100k

25
21
25
37

$20-50k

$20-50k

$10-20k

$10-20k

26

< $10k

27

< $10k

sold

25%

50%

75%

other

Total sales by price of works

> $250k

0%

Phillips

100%

$0m

$5m

$10m $15m $20m $25m

bought in

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AMA Newsletter 172 27

2 October 2014

Art Analytics

Juan Muoz
Muoz

100%
75%
50%
25%
0%

1990

1992

1994

1996

1998

2000

2002

sold

2004

2006

2008

2010

2012

bought in

The rate of unsold work has increased significantly since 2008, rising proportionately with the
number of lots at auction.

Evolution of unsold rate

Works created in 2001, the year of the artists death, generated an important percentage of his
turnover.

Number of lots presented, and


sales figures by year of creation

40

$8m

30

$6m

20

$4m

10

$2m

1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001
lots

$0m

turnover

Until 31 October the artists work is on display at The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg,
Russia, as part of the European Biennial of Contemporary Art exhibition Manifesta 10.

Auctions results from Artprice.com

Until 12 October his work is also on display at the IVAM - Institut Valenci d'Art Modern, Valencia,
Spain, as part of the group exhibition Coleccin Del Ivam. XXV Aniversario.

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AMA Newsletter 172 28

2 October 2014

Interview
Passion and ambition:
an interview with Ulrich Delpe of Artsuggest

Manager of the Society of Friends of the Muse National dArt Moderne - Centre Pompidou, of the
Society of Friends of the Muse dArt Moderne de la Ville de Paris and President of the Friends of
FRAC Aquitaine, Laurent Dassault has turned his passion for art into a full-time career. As well as the
30-plus positions he holds, the grandson of Marcel Dassault and the son of Serge Dassault is currently manager of the auction house Artcurial and co-manager of Artcurial Investement. Since 2009
he has also helped develop two galleries which both specialise in contemporary drawing, based in
Beijing and Hangzhou, with his two associates Hadrien de Montferrand and Olivier Hervet.
Art Media Agency met Laurent Dassault to talk about his career as well as his personal and professional ambitions.

Can you present your collection to us?


Every collection has a story. My collection comes from my grandfather, Marcel Dassault, who was
what I call a collector of walls! He only collected that which he could integrate into his interiors.
He loved Impressionist works, which he discovered when he was young. As for my parents, brothers
and sisters, they were never really drawn to collecting.

The Artcurial auction house


Paris

The creation of a collection is the story of one's life, and the work of one's life is the creation of a
foundation. The success of a lifetime is in creating a structure to accommodate ones collection. I
hope to be able to do this one day.
Rather than say collection, I prefer to call it a universe of pleasure. When I was young I dreamed of having a painting by Chagall, a Egon Schiele, a Bacon, a Basquiat, a Magritte or a Freud. Rather than having
ten paintings by the same artist, I would rather have one by each artist; but a good one at that. Suffering
and dreams are both themes which I am drawn too when collecting. I tend to impulse buy works by
French painters, such as Garouste, who is a favourite of mine. I also like the work of Bernar Venet.
A collection isnt built on its own. Im lucky enough to have a wife gifted with a real eye for works; she
helps me build my collection around contemporary art. My first purchase was a piece by Van Riesenberg,
which I acquired at Artcurial, which at the time was the LOral gallery, on the avenue de Matignon.
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AMA Newsletter 172 29

2 October 2014

Interview
Passion and ambition:
an interview with laurent dassault of artcurial

Which development model for Artcurial : External growth.

My first wife was more interested in older art, in furniture and paintings from the 18th century, before we got into contemporary art. As for my second partner, she had already built a collection with
her previous husband. It was her who introduced me to contemporary art, even though at the time
I already often visited Daniel Templon and Yvon Lambert galleries.
I am against accumulation and keeping works in storage. I prefer to keep my collection moving; I
like renewal. For example, Im currently selling a Lalanne sculpture. I dont want to collect for collections sake, without being able to use a space.
Your have a project to create a foundation how is this currently developing?
The advantage of creating a foundation is that in itself it is a work of art. The moment you see the
Guggenheim in Bilbao, it's as if theres nothing inside; people go to see the building itself.
Im no longer actively working on it, its too early. I think maybe you have to be more avant-garde
than I am. When I see the works in the Palazzo Grassi in Venice, the carpeted walls go over my head.
I am skeptical. I find it goes a bit too far.
In regard to Artcurial, what is the structure of the shareholding?
The Dassault group has the majority. The auctioneers have been with us since the beginning, along
with with Michel Pastor, who sadly passed away last year.
What do you see in the future of French auction houses?
There are two worldwide auction houses, and smaller houses, who each have their niche and their
clientele. For Artcurial, our niche is classic cars, Art Deco, comic books, street art, jewellery, watches
and wine. We have our clientele and image, and there is room for everyone.
A collection of moderate importance wont go to Sothebys or Christies, it will come to us. An exmistress of Picasso came to see us with around ten drawings because we are the most suitable
people to sell these kind of objects.
Do you think that there is room for everyone on the French market? You, Drouot, etc?
Drouot is compromised by the recent controversy surrounding the house. The art market is based
on trust and it is through this that Artcurial has really found its place; Drouot has lost theirs, which
is a real shame as its an exceptional auction house.
If were looking to analyse our success, I think that our space accounts for 50% of it. The other 50% is accountable to the teams technical knowledge. I, for example, am not an auctioneer, I wouldnt know how to sell
classic cars, but Herv Poulain is is a world expert in this field, which naturally brings classic car collectors to us.
What is Artcurials development model for the future?
External growth. We will need, one day or another, to open sales rooms in New York and Hong Kong,
whether it be by forming an alliance with a family-owned society similar to us, or independently.
For now, were opening offices in Milan, Brussels and soon in Vienna, which is easier. Its about
opening representative spaces where we can present works which will be sold in Paris, and where
we can look for new stock to bring to Paris. But the future is definitely in New York and Hong Kong.
If we dont develop, we will stagnate, then die. Our turnover in the first semester of 2014 was 105
million, an increase of 14.6% from 2013. In 2013 it was 178.1 million, a figure which was an increase of 25% compared to 2012. We hope to double our turnover in the next six years.
It is now key for us to get a second wind, for us to grow internationally. It is this challenge that were
waiting for. What is great, is that with the exception of Remy Le Fur, who has chosen another path,
all the original team is there to carry out the work. The work of our President Nicolas Orlowski is
remarkable no matter how you look at it.
Do you see potential for other forms of development?
That depends a lot on the opportunities! Theres always the desire to develop internally, but once
again, Artcurial delivers a service; what should be our driving force and what should remain at the
heart of our concerns is the goods that we offer.

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AMA Newsletter 172 30

2 October 2014

Interview
Passion and ambition:
an interview with Laurent Dassault of artcurial
You have also helped Hadrien de Montferrand establish his galleries in China.
Without Artcurial, I would certainly not have been able to take part in this adventure. Thats how the
story goes. I went to China, where the Dassault group sells wine and planes, but also because it's a
country that fascinates me. Before venturing into the Chinese market, Hadrien worked for Artcurial,
which he left for the Ullens foundation in Beijing. Hadrien told me about his wish to open a gallery
in Beijing; he asked for my help, and I said yes.
Since then the gallery has seen a lot of success; in 2013 we opened a second space in Hangzhou.
We will almost certainly open a third gallery. Commercial success is really happening.
Another advantage of opening this gallery is that we have direct access to artists, the opportunity
to visit their workshops and to buy straight from them.
On a personal level, do you also buy contemporary Chinese art?
Most certainly. With Hadrien, I was lucky enough to go to very unusual spaces, where you would think
you were in the 19th century instead of in the middle of these huge factories. We visited workshops, and
upon doing so, we discovered some incredible artists. The renewal of talent in Chinese art is marvellous.
Youre also a member of the council for the ADIAF (Association for the International Circulation
of French Art) how did you get involved in this?
One of my friends, a Swiss banker called Lombard Odier, patron of the Marcel Duchamp prize (since replaced
by Lazard Gestion), introduced me to the ADIAF and asked me if I would be able to let them use the hotel
Marcel Dassault for the dinner of the prize, during the FIAC, when all the big collectors from around the world
are in Paris. I think it was one of the most amazing private events Ive had the opportunity to participate in.
This network of collectors is one of the best organised in the world
Funnily enough I think so too!
Do you see any more areas for the ADIAFs development?
Im still too new to the ADIAF to be able to put forward my ideas, but I think Im getting more and
more involved. Its a melting pot! There are so many different kinds of people in the organisation;
that is, for me, what gives it its originality and force.
What is your opinion on the French market in general?
France is a country of creation, a country which has a powerful culture and history with artists. Its a
country of heritage just as much it is a country of passion. I have met many marvellous people here
and I am convinced that the French market has a very bright future!

From left to right:


Laurent Dassault
Portrait of Laurent Dassault
by Zeng Fanzhi

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AMA Newsletter 172 31

2 October 2014

Auctions

Article of the week


Highest ever total for a mid-season contemporary sale for Sotheby's New York
On 24 September 2014 Sotheby's New
York's Contemporary Curated Featuring
Works From The Collection Of Joni Gordon
Of Newspace Gallery was sold for a total of
$28,267,065, soaring over the pre-sale estimate of $15.8/22.7 million with 80% of lots
sold. Sotheby's reports strong participation
from Asia and Latin America as well as the US,
whilst 10% of bids were made online.
Highlights of the sale included: 18th and
Highland, National City by John Baldes-

sari with a pre-sale estimate of $180 to


250,000, selling for $509,000 (hammer
price); Philip Gustons Magician's Table
sold for $653,000 (hammer price) almost
doubling its upper end pre-sale estimate
of $350,000 and an Untitled by Keith Haring from 1988 sold for $2,741,000.
These results prove to be the highest ever
total for a mid-season contemporary sale
for Sotheby's New York; Alexander Rotter,
Co-Head of Sothebys Worldwide Contem-

porary Art Department, commented: Todays


result shows that the global collecting community will go to great lengths to secure museum-quality works from artists or periods
that rarely appear at auction. This hunger
was seen with the extraordinary result of the
Joni Gordon Collection. The Los Angeles gallerist used her brilliant vision and personal
friendships with artists to build a formidable
personal collection, works from which continually exceeded expectations.

commission
Christies takes further 2% commission
Christie's have added a 2% commission to lots that
meet or exceed their high estimate.
In the UK, currently between 10% and 15% commission is paid on lots worth under 60,000. Commission is then paid on a sliding scale between 8%
and 2%, based on the final hammer price; once the
hammer price reaches 3 million, the commission
is as agreed. Sellers fees are much more flexible
and commission may be relinquished entirely. This
new commission charge means that Christie's is
guaranteed to make money from sales which do
well. Christie's head of communications Paddy
Feeny told The Art Newspaper, The purpose is to
incentivise and reward high performance that exceeds consignors' expectations. This move will
encourage specialists to keep estimates low, after
complaints that recently high estimates have unnecessarily pushed up prices.

sotheby's london leads


London leads sales for Sotheby's
Sales at Sotheby's London have outperformed all
other regions for the company so far this year.
Sotheby's posted sales of $1.37 billion at auction
in London as of 22 September, constituting 39.9%
of the global total. The second largest region for
Sotheby's was the United States (New York), which
made up 35.9% of sales, bringing in $1.23 billion.
The US was followed by Asia, which added another
$488.4m (14.2%) to the total, with branches in continental Europe making $344.1 million (10%). The total global sales at Sotheby's so far this year are thus
$3.44 billion.
UK sales are generally performing better than
those in the US: the UK achieved 99.7% against its
combined high estimate for the period, compared
to the 80% achieved in the US.
The figures do not include auction after-sales, private sales, dealer sales or cancelled sales. Sotheby's full report of third quarter sales is likely not to
be released for a few weeks.

Burning Plane (1965)


Vija Celmins
Property From The Collection Of Joni Gordon Of Newspace Gallery
Est $900,000/1,200,000
Sold for $3,413,000 at Sotheby's

coming soon
united states
Rare Van Gogh still life to appear at Sotheby's
Vincent Van Gogh's Still Life, Vase with Daisies and Poppies (1890) is to
appear as part of Sotheby's New York's Impressionist and Modern art sale
on 4 November 2014.
With a large estimate of $30 to 50 million, it is described by Sotheby's
as the most important still life by Van Gogh to appear at auction in
more than two decades. The work was painted mere weeks before the
artist's death and followed his release from the St.-Rmy-de-Provence
asylum. It is one of the few pieces that the artist managed to sell during
his short lifetime.
The painting was initially sold to Impressionist collector Gaston-Alexandre Camentron who then sold it to the Paul Cassirer gallery. It has since
travelled through the hands of several private collectors and galleries. The
auction record for Van Gogh at auction is $82.5 million, achieved by Portrait of Dr. Gachet at Christie's, New York in 1990.

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Still Life, Vase with Daisies and Poppies (1890)


Van Gogh
Sotheby's NY, 4 November 2014, estimation : 30/50 M$

AMA Newsletter 172 33

2 October 2014

Fairs & festivals

Article of the week


Frieze announces new director
Current director of Frieze Masters Victoria
Siddall has also been appointed director
of fairs Frieze London and Frieze New York.
Frieze founders Amanda Sharp and Matthew Slotover are stepping down to pursue
new projects for the organisation.
Siddall will begin her new role from Frieze
London 2015 along with two artistic directors. Speaking about her appointment, she

said, Having worked on the contemporary


fair from 2004 until 2010 Im excited to be
focusing on Frieze London and Frieze New
York now as well as Frieze Masters. The
fairs and the amazing cities that host them
have such individual characteristics, however all three are united by a sense of discovery and a fresh and innovative approach.
They all put the art first.

Joanna Stella-Sawicka, who has been with


Frieze since 2011, will take the position
of artistic director in London and will be
responsible for liaising with galleries within Europe, Middle East, Russia and Africa.
A second artistic director in New York will
manage relationships with galleries in Asia
and the Americas.

launch

cancellation

Art Basel Miami Beach launches new art history sector


This year's edition of Art Basel Miami Beach, taking place
between 4 and 7 December, has announced the addition of a
new art history sector entitled 'Survey' to its programme.
'Survey' will comprise 13 mini art historical presentations,
including 9 solo exhibitions and 4 thematic shows and will
feature galleries including: Galeria Bergamin, So Paulo, presenting the work of Brazilian painter Alfredo Volpi; Galerie
Georges-Philippe & Nathalie Vallois, Paris, with two sculptures
by Niki de Saint Phalle; Garth Greenan Gallery, New York, with
a selection of paintings and sculptures by Paul Feeley and
Galleri Bo Bjerggaard, Copenhagen, with the work of Danish sculptor Poul Gernes, co-curated by Gerness youngest
daughters; amongst others. Other highlights include Charim
Galerie, Vienna's group show featuring work by Actionists
Andrei Monastyrski, who played a key role in late soviet and
post-soviet conceptual art; Valie Export, the pioneer feminist experimental filmmaker; and Alfons Schilling, considered one of the early representatives of Action Painting; including rare vintage prints, a selection of objects by Andrei
Monastyrski, conceptual photographs by Valie Export, and
two rare spin paintings by Alfons Schilling.
'Survey' presents precise art-history projects including solo
presentations by individual artists, group exhibitions and thematic exhibits from artists representing a range of cultures, generations, and artistic approaches.

Festival international dart de Toulouse 2015 cancelled


The Festival international dart de Toulouse slated to take place in
May 2015 has been cancelled.
The reason for the cancellation lies in funding cuts to the budget
provided by the Toulouse city council, who slashed the 1.5 million
budget by ten percent and offered to turn the fair from a yearly event
to a biennial. This budget is the main source of funding for the fair.
Whilst the fair was still very much in the first stages of planning, parts
of the project were already underway and artistic director Jean-Marc
Bustamante described the decision as a coup.

Line up
Exhibitors list revealed for ADAA Art Show 2015
The complete exhibitors list for the The Art Dealers Association of America's annual New York Fair has been revealed.
This, the 27th edition, is to take place between 4 and 8 March
2015 at the Park Avenue Armory and will feature 72 galleries.
Website Art in America reported that dealers pay between
$26,000 and $28,000 for a booth at the fair. Exhibiting
galleries include: 303 Gallery; Acquavella Galleries, Inc.;
Marianne Boesky Gallery; Marian Goodman Gallery; Lehmann Maupin; David Nolan Gallery; Pace Gallery; Meredith
Ward Fine Art and David Zwirner; as well as newcomers:
Thomas Colville Fine Art, New York; Greg Kucera Gallery,
Seattle; Dominique Lvy Gallery, New York; Marc Selwyn
Fine Art, Beverly Hills; Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami; and
Meredith Ward Fine Art, New York.
Solo exhibitions include: Wade Guyton at Petzel Gallery,
New York; Tracey Emin at Lehmann Maupin, New York and
Nam June Paik at Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati.
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AMA Newsletter 172 34

2 October 2014

coming soon
colombia
10th anniversary of ARTBO, Bogot
This year Colombia's international art
fair ARTBO in Bogot is to celebrate its
10th anniversary, taking place between
24 and 27 October 2014.
The fair is to feature the participation of
66 galleries from almost 30 global cities
in its main section, with 14 artists' design
projects and a new section entitled Reference. This year the main section of the
fair saw a 30% increase in applications
from galleries from the previous year
and includes galleries such as: Galerie
Christian Lethert from Cologne; Galerija
Gregor Podnar from Berlin and Ljubljana;
Galeria Luciana Brito, Galeria Luisa Strina
and Galria Millanfrom Sao Paulo; MaisterraValbuena and Travesa Cuatro from
Madrid; Espaivisor from Valencia; Nogueras Blanchard from Barcelona; P420 from
Bologna; OMR from Mexico City; Ruth
Benzacar Gallery from Buenos Aires; Annet Gelink Gallery from Amsterdam; and
Jose Bienvenu from New York.
The fair will also feature a section entitled
Forum, a space for learning and discussing
contemporary art-related topics, in which
important art world personalities participate, such as curators, art collectors, academics, artists and directors of museums
and institutions, amongst others.

france
3rd Biennale de Belleville
Running from 25 September until 26 October 2014, the third edition of the Biennale de Belleville is to take place in the north eastern region of Paris. Entitled
"La piste des Apaches" (The trail of the Apaches) this year's event will focus on
walking, drifting, the trails forged in the area, featuring a series of walks led by
participants of the biennale.
The event will also feature performance projects in public spaces, gallery exhibitions, a library and l'artothque a platform aiming to lend and circulate works
of art, as well as talks and guided visits.
The Biennale de Belleville was created in 2010 by Patrice Joly, Emmanuelle Lequeux, Claire Moulne, Judical Lavrador, Aude Launay, Muriel Enjalran and Gilles
Drouault; its mission is to distance art from the market and to reappropriate it in a
socially engaged context. Belleville, a traditionally working class area of the city,
has long been known for the artistic communities who reside there, and the omnipresence of ambitious and striking street art.
spain
SWAB International Contemporary Art Fair, Barcelona
The SWAB International Contemporary Art Fair 2014 is being held from 2 until 5
October at Barcelona's Italian Pavillion.
The fair aims to break with the elitist and hermetic idea that often surrounds the
contemporary art scene, making it more accessible to the general public. They
also aim to support young galleries and emerging artists, offering new collectors
access into the market.
Over 60 galleries are exhibiting at the fair, including: Victor Lope Arte Contemporneo,
Barcelona; Granville Gallery, Paris; Savina Gallery, St. Petersburg; Kevin Kavanagh, Dublin and Klmn Maklry Fine Arts, Budapest. New to this years fair is "SWAB Thinks:
Ideas, words, networks;" a program of lectures, debates and round table discussions
organised by the Independent Studies Program (PEI) of the Museum of Contemporary
Art of Barcelona (MACBA). Three new prizes will also be presented: the Fundaci Llus
Corominas Prize, the DKV Seguros Prize and the Visione Future Foundation Prize.

13 nov 2013
Marc Domage/Paris Photo

ARTBO

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