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and each state insurance commission can be viewed
as a department of United Healthcare, Blue Cross
Blue Shield, Humana, AARP, and the few other
large health-insurance providers nationwide.
Finally, the U.S. Department of Education is
arguably an extension of the major foundations that
endow our universities, colleges, and elementary-
through-high-school systems through exhaustive
advisory on curriculum, textbook content, testing/
evaluation/outcomes, etc.
Make no mistake: Most legislation considered
and/or passed in the past two decades clearly
benefts the major players of each industry, whether
proft or not-for-proft, over any competitors and
over all taxpayers.
It is imperative for voters to make this
connection and cease the thinking that government
is somehow more benevolent than mega-
corporations. Government acts as an extension of
the oligopolies that operate with impunity in this
nation and are considered too big to fail, whether a
fnancial or manufacturing enterprise. Ultimately,
faith that Americans will continue to pay taxes to
fund whatever legislation is unleashed, ironically
provides the tacit approval legislators use to justify
spending without accountability.
Voters only need refect on the past two
decades of progressive policy in most of our larger
metropolitan areas. Consider the government
programming arising from the Department
of Education, or that of Housing & Urban
Development, and bear witness to the consistently
dismal results across the country. For years every
large U.S. metropolis has implemented every kind
of progressive policy in an efort to manage its low-
income populations, yet such programming has
proven to be an utter failure by every conceivable
measurement.
Because progressive policies are always top-
down, beginning at either the federal level or the
state, then trickling down to the counties and
cities, they are bloated at the top but anemic at
the bottom where it counts; are ill-managed from
conception; are nearly always corrupt, and impose
no enforceable incentive to contain costs.
It is also important to note that for every
government function, the fox is watching the hen
house. Tere is no accountability, other than to
government unions where government employees
are concerned. But the unions are no better; in fact
they are ofen worse.
Last December USA Today reported that
the average federal worker’s pay has soared
to $71,206 compared to $40,331 for the same
jobs in the private sector (USAToday.com/
news/washington/2009-12-10-federal-pay-
salaries_N.htm). Tere is an absurd gap in the
compensation for government employees as
compared with the same jobs in the private sector,
including economically irrational benefts and
retirement provisions that are contributing mightily
to an ever-burgeoning lack of future funds to pay
for such excesses.
Nor are legislators managing their own
lawmaking. Tere are hundreds, if not thousands,
of laws on the books that require timely reviews
whose deadlines are consistently missed, or whose
reviews are simply ignored, some for decades.
l
t is time for Americans to understand a key
political distinction between “progressives” as
they relate to both Democrats and Republicans.
Progressives are individuals from both parties who
commonly believe in social improvement through
government action. Traditionally, progressives are
thought to be liberal or Democrat in nature. Tis is
not accurate. Te frst progressives were actually a
splinter group from the Republican Party in 1912.
Today, it can be argued that most of our legislators
are progressive Democrats and progressive
Republicans, evidenced by the exhaustive
amount of legislation from both sides of the aisle
that perpetuates government’s ever-growing
involvement in American lives.
Te notion that a progressive agenda is strictly
that of liberals, Democrats, or socialists is a
misconception in desperate need of correction.
Te past century has shown us that any salient
diferences between the two parties have only
narrowed with each new administration and/or
legislature.
Most elected ofcials don’t want us to make this
distinction because it is very revealing. Te goal
of both parties’ leadership is to constantly remind
voters of perceived diferences between the two
ideologies to keep the fght alive and resources
fowing in. Most voters tolerate the illusion for lack
of a better solution. But tolerance is no longer an
option if America is to survive, let alone thrive.
Progressives, both Democrat and Republican,
are interested in control. Progressives in this
country are not only our legislators, but also our
largest corporate executives and shareholders, as
well as the leadership of the largest government-
sector unions and richly endowed foundations.
Progressives cross party lines, and enjoy a cabal
of public, private, not-for-proft, and union-under-
the-guise-of-labor infuence that, because of sheer
size in the marketplace and political arena, is now
moving into position to control most American
futures.
We would be wise to think of the U.S.
Department of Energy as one of the arms of Exxon,
BP, and the major utilities nationwide, including
the largest natural-gas producers. During the Bush
Administration, Ken Lay, CEO of Enron, was a
weekly visitor to the White House and advised
extensively on energy policy, much the same way
that Andy Sterns, president of Service Employees
International Union (SEIU), advises the Obama
Administration on matters of human services
(welfare) and union negotiations that endow SEIU
even more than it does its federal workers.
Similarly, the U.S. Treasury is heavily manned by
ex-Goldman Sachs employees while simultaneously
occupying positions within the Federal Reserve
Bank, which is privately owned by a consortium
of central banks around the world; the Federal
Communications Commission would be a
department of General Electric, Disney, Turner
Broadcasting, and Microsof, to name a few;
the U.S. Department of Agriculture would be
a subsidiary of Monsanto; the Food & Drug
Administration can be seen as the quality-control
faction of the big pharmaceuticals, including
Pharma, which alone gave $199 million to
campaigns from January through September 2009;
ßIurring the Line ßetween
0emocrats and RepubIicans
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
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sponsored legislation to repeal the state’s
Firearm Owner’s Identifcation Card. And
he has repeatedly introduced constitutional
amendments to do away with the State Board of
Education.
Sponsorship is only one aspect of a legislator’s
history. Voting records are ofen more important
and usually contain far more landmines.
Brady voted against a bill requiring a state
insurer to cover mammograms and pap tests,
probably because the coverage list also included
emergency contraception. He voted against the
statewide smoking ban.
He voted against a bill creating a physician
loan-repayment
program for doctors
who agreed to practice
in Illinois for at least
three years. Brady has
consistently voted
against increasing the
minimum wage. He
voted against a bill
to ban large-capacity
magazines in certain
guns.
A couple of years
ago, state Senator
Linda Holmes (D-
Aurora) was attacked
by the Republicans
for voting in favor of a few tax exemptions. An
exemption on certain vehicles was deemed a
“tax break for the rich so they can get deals on
their limos.” Tax exemptions for racehorses and
planes were portrayed in a similar manner. Like
Holmes, Brady voted for all three bills.
Te Quinn campaign believes they can easily
portray Brady as an out-of-touch, wealthy ultra-
conservative this fall.
To overcome this, Brady needs to make this
race essentially a rerun of the 1980 Carter-
Reagan campaign. Carter, afer all, was overjoyed
when the Republican Party nominated that
unelectable right-winger from California.
But Reagan’s strong personality, the tanking
economy, rising crime, Carter’s bumbling, and a
huge overreach by the Democratic congressional
majority – along with the twin international
embarrassments of the Iranian hostage crisis and
the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan – combined
to override the ideological divide. Democrats
voted for Reagan in droves.
If you substitute “Rod Blagojevich” and
“Scott Lee Cohen” for the USA’s international
humiliations of 1980, our current Illinois
situation looks eerily similar.
Late last week, Brady again proposed
permanently outlawing gay marriages and civil
unions. Tat sort of thing will be great for the
Republican base, but it’s time Brady started
learning to speak to everyone else.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and TeCapitolFaxBlog.com.
by Rich Miller
0
ne of the biggest doubts about state
Senator Bill Brady’s gubernatorial
campaign – assuming he survives a
potential recount of the Republican primary
– is whether he can transform himself from a
primary candidate into a serious general-election
candidate.
Like most members of the state House
and Senate, Brady has never once faced a real
general-election opponent.
Brady, of Bloomington, focused almost solely
on his Downstate base and barely campaigned
at all in the suburbs during his Republican
gubernatorial bid, so independent suburban
women might as well
be foreigners to him.
Since Illinois is such a
“blue” state, he’ll have
to convince thousands
of Democratic-leaning
voters to cross over for
him.
Afer almost two
decades of “speaking
Republican,” Brady
essentially needs to
learn how to speak the
language of a general
election.
One thing he’ll need
to do with that new
language is explain his voting record. My interns
Barton Lorimor and Dan Weber helped me
scour Brady’s legislative record last week. Here
are some of the results.
Many of the bills Brady introduced since
1993 show he can make a good case that he is a
reformer. He has sponsored legislation to limit
campaign contributions, for instance.
Brady sponsored a bill to prohibit state
contractors from contributing to legislative
campaigns. He put forward a bill to prohibit
any reimbursement for out-of-state travel if a
campaign fundraiser was involved in the trip.
He also sponsored a bill to shine some light
on the always-controversial legislative pork
program.
Brady sponsored several bills that will
probably appeal to independents. He was chief
sponsor of a House bill in 2005, for example,
that created an Illinois Conservation Corps for
young adults. Brady co-sponsored a bill (along
with Barack Obama) for seniors to make sure
they didn’t lose any benefts under the federal
prescription-drug program.
On the other hand, there are plenty of bills
and votes lurking in Brady’s record that could
hurt him this fall.
For instance, Brady sponsored legislation
that allowed pharmacists to refuse to dispense
emergency contraception based on their
religious beliefs.
Senator Brady is 100-percent pro-life, so
he sponsored legislation to ban the use of
state funds for stem-cell research. Brady has
Can ßrady Find a
0eneraI-£Iection Voice1
Afer almost two decades
of “speaking Republican,”
Brady essentially needs
to learn how to speak the
language of a general
election.
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package of new regulations proposed by
Democrats is getting a chilly response from
Republicans.
“It appears on the surface to be a bill
that would literally make it impossible
for corporations to participate by placing
onerous burdens on them,” said Senate
Minority Leader Paul McKinley (R-
Chariton).
Democrats said last week that they’re
trying to craf the strongest campaign law in
the nation regulating corporate spending.
“Iowa will continue its reputation for clean
politics,” said Senator Jef Danielson (D-
Cedar Falls). “We believe that transparency
and disclosure equal accountability in the
political process.”
Danielson said the legislation is even more
important given Iowa’s status of having the
frst-in-the-nation presidential caucuses.
“We tend to be a testing ground for these
new political activities. Tere’s a lot of
interest in Iowa politics,” he said. “And we
have to lead when it comes to strengthening
our laws so that the average, everyday Iowa
citizen’s voice can still be heard in that
process.”
Te bill in its fnal form is expected to:
• Prohibit foreign-controlled companies
from playing any role in Iowa elections.
• Require board, CEO, or stockholder
approval before a corporation can use funds
for independent expenditures.
• Require additional reporting of
receipts and independent expenditures
by corporations engaged in independent
campaign activities.
• Require disclaimers on advertisements
paid for by corporations.
• Bar collusion by corporate donors and
political candidates and prohibit them from
using the same consultants, advertising
frms, and campaign advisers.
Senate Majority Leader Mike Gronstal (D-
Council Blufs) said this legislation comes
afer Democrats consulted with Charlie
Smithson, director of the Iowa Ethics &
Campaign Disclosure Board, and Iowa
Attorney General Tom Miller. He said the
idea is to pass legislation that will withstand
any legal challenge.
“Te one bright spot in the Supreme
Court decision was it seems to strengthen
our hand in our ability to require disclosure,”
Gronstal said.
For an expanded version of this article, visit
RiverCitiesReader.com.
Tis weekly summary comes from
IowaPolitics.com, an online government
and politics news service. Reporter Andrew
Dufelmeyer and other correspondents
contributed to this report.
0
overnor Chet Culver’s proposed
budget for Fiscal Year 2011 exceeds
the state’s 99-percent spending
limitation and fails to address roughly $400
million in state costs, State Auditor David
Vaudt said last week.
“He’s actually spending $25 million more
than the expenditure limitation, rather
than the $61 million under the spending
limitation that he presents in his budget
document,” said Vaudt, a Republican. “Te
governor’s budget numbers just don’t add
up.”
Culver defended his proposed budget,
maintaining that it’s balanced and spends
less in his fourth year in ofce than when he
began his term as governor in 2007.
“Te bottom line is the budget I submitted
to the legislature was smaller than the one
that I inherited,” Culver said in an interview
with reporters. “So we are reducing the size
of government, we’re making it more lean,
we’re making it more efcient.”
Vaudt said Culver’s budget relies on $341
million in savings proposed by consultant
Public Works of Philadelphia, but a
nonpartisan analysis shows the savings will
be far less. Even if all of the consultant’s cost-
saving recommendations are implemented,
Vaudt said $83 million – or almost 25
percent – will have no impact on the state
general fund.
“You can’t include savings from other
funds in your calculation of what you’re
going to save in the general fund,” Vaudt said.
Vaudt declined to outline legal
ramifcations for violating the spending
limitation in state law, although he said he’d
be sharing the information with the attorney
general’s ofce. He pointed out that last year,
Culver had to revise his budget proposal afer
there was a change in state revenues.
Vaudt said Culver’s proposed budget
underfunds school aid, state-worker pay
raises, and unpaid leave days – which could
result in property-tax increases, additional
furloughs, and layofs.
Vaudt said it would cost the state
approximately $2.7 billion to fully fund
the 2-percent allowable growth in school
spending, but the governor only provides
$2.4 billion – about $270 million short.
“Tere is a very good likelihood that if the
schools can’t do additional cuts, ... we’ll see it
in the form of higher property taxes,” Vaudt
said.
Lawmakers Work to
ReguIate Corporate
Campaign Ads
Te Iowa legislature is moving quickly
to regulate corporate spending in elections
following the recent U.S. Supreme Court
ruling that allowed such spending, but a
$tate Auditor $ees
FIaws in CuIver’s ßudget
by Lynn Campbell, IowaPolitics.com
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Tool’s Maynard James Keenan Talks Blood Into Wine, Screening February 19-26 at the Capitol
7he Face of Arizona Wine
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
M
aynard James Keenan – the frontman
for prog-metal gods Tool, the co-leader
of A Perfect Circle, and the founder of
Puscifer – isn’t the type of person you’d expect to see
as the subject of a thorough documentary. He has
a reputation for being reclusive, and for jealously
guarding his privacy. As he says in the movie Blood
Into Wine, “I’m not much of a people person.”
Yet Keenan, along with his wine-making partner
Eric Glomski, is at the center of that documentary,
a freewheeling but thoughtful mix of wine primer,
underdog story, buddy picture, and sketch comedy.
Te movie is fun and gently didactic, and thankfully
it engages in little idolatry. (Tose hoping for a Tool
movie will be disappointed; although Blood Into
Wine doesn’t ignore Keenan’s music career, it’s at
best a tangent.)
Keenan ofen looks uncomfortable in the movie,
but that could be a function of once being flmed on
the toilet, and of being hectored by a pair of wine-
hating talk-show hosts. (More on those things later.)
But he is apparently committed enough to his cause
– fostering an Arizona wine country, and combating
the idea that the state’s climate and terrain can’t
produce good grapes and wine – that he’s willing
to subject himself to all these indignities, and the
public spotlight.
As Keenan told me in an interview earlier this
month: “Tis is an important thing we’re doing
up here. If we’re successful with what we’re doing,
it’s going to set up a future for more families than
we can number. ... If you plant vines in this valley,
they’re going to taste a certain way; they’re going
to be very specifc to where they’re from. It’s not a
business that you can move to Mexico or China. It’s
from here. Tis is the defnition of sustainable and
local.”
A 0ood $tory
Te Capitol Teatre in downtown Davenport
will be one of just a handful of sites premiering
Blood Into Wine on February 19. Tat screening will
include a tasting of Arizona wines made by Keenan
and Glomski, and the movie will also be shown
February 20, 21, and 26.
Tat Blood Into Wine exists is somewhat
surprising, given Keenan’s nature. Te project
was sparked by the rock star being interviewed
for Christopher Pomerenke’s 2009 documentary
Te Heart Is a Drum Machine, about the nature of
music.
But Pomerenke said earlier this month that
Keenan’s participation in the earlier flm remains a
bit of a mystery. “We weren’t entirely sure why he
said ‘yes’” to Te Heart Is a Drum Machine, he said,
“because we were aware that he’s pretty private and
doesn’t do a lot of interviews. We suspected that
maybe he liked my partner’s last flm [Moog, which
Wine co-director Ryan Page co-produced] ... .”
Not true. Keenan said in our interview that he’d
never seen Moog. “I went to some of the actors that
they’d been in contact with to see what they had to
say about them,” he said.
And Pomerenke said that afer Keenan was
interviewed for Drum Machine, he asked what the
movie was about.
Keenan’s willingness to do Blood Into Wine (and
promote the flm through interviews) makes a little
more sense: Te movie – scheduled for a May 4
home-video release, Pomerenke said – could do a
lot to build national interest in Arizona wine.
Keenan might be a reluctant face for Arizona
wine, but he recognizes that Arizona wine needs
a face: “It takes all the pieces of the puzzle coming
together to make it all work, in order for someone
to discover it,” he said in our interview. “You need a
good story, you need a great wine-maker, you need a
great farmer. And apparently you need buckets and
buckets of cash you dump down a black hole.”
Given the dominance of California wine in
American culture, selling the public on Arizona
wine requires that good story; it’s a difcult sales job.
One has to counter the prevailing wisdom that, as
one interviewee says in the movie, trying to make
wine in Arizona is like “trying to make wine on the
moon.”
Te idea for Blood Into Wine came from Drum
Machine, for which Keenan was flmed at his
Arizona vineyards. Page and Pomerenke pitched
Keenan the idea of a documentary about his wine-
making business, and “he at frst wasn’t really warm
to the idea,” Pomerenke said, adding that it took six
months to convince him. Keenan said he was merely
busy with his grapes and his wines.
Te flmmakers and Keenan and Glomski then
went about setting the ground rules for the movie.
Te subjects both wanted their personal lives lef
out, and Keenan wanted the movie to focus on
wine rather than the music career of the celebrity
wine-maker. Keenan owns Caduceus Cellars and
Merkin Vineyards (in northern Arizona’s Verde
Valley), and Glomski makes the wines, with the
Tool singer essentially working as his apprentice.
Te pair co-owns the Arizona Stronghold Vineyard
(in the southern part of the state), and Glomski has
his own vineyard and winery (Page Springs) in the
Verde Valley.
Keenan also said he didn’t want to participate in a
dry flm. “One of the things that I was pretty specifc
about is I didn’t want it to be a PBS special, either,”
Keenan said. “If we’re going to do it, let’s do it as
artists would do it.”
He said that although he was given signifcant
input into the flm, he didn’t dictate what was in
it. “For us to be in control of the fnal cut would
compromise their vision ... ,” he said. “It’s their flm.
It’s not my flm. It’d be like having some producer
come in and tell me how to fnish the record.”
“We defnitely shared with those guys diferent
versions of the edits as they were coming to us ... ,”
Pomerenke said. “Tey were kept in the loop how
the story was developing. I wouldn’t say there was
veto power, but we’re gentlemen. We are artists. Tis
is our flm. We’re telling their story like we want
to tell it. ... [But] we’re people as well, and we want
those guys to feel like it was accurately representing
them.”
Te co-director was quick to point out, though,
that “we challenge those guys pretty strongly ... .”
7ruth 7hrough $taging
“Challenge” is probably too direct, but it’s
undoubtedly true that Blood Into Wine is irreverent
and not at all interested in maintaining the dignity
of wine, wine culture, or even its subjects.
Te movie opens with Focus on Interesting Tings,
an improvised fake talk show with Keenan as the
guest and Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim (of
Tim & Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!) playing the
moronic hosts. Keenan is clearly in on the joke and
has dabbled in comedy, including with Puscifer, but
the hosts are so immediately insulting to Keenan,
his wine, and wine in general that Pomerenke said
the Tool singer got “punk’d” a bit. Even knowing it
was staged and a joke, it’s hard to imagine not taking
the assault at least a little personally.
“We didn’t necessarily want to hurt Maynard’s
feelings,” the flmmaker said. But “we didn’t
know that Interesting Tings was going to get so
venomous.” Keenan sometimes appears to be
smiling – slightly – but he wears a dumbfounded
look most of the time, like he’s been ambushed and
doesn’t know how to react. It’s hard to tell from the
flm what’s acting and what’s befuddlement.
Pomerenke said Keenan was a good sport:
“Maynard was laughing, and he didn’t walk of set.”
Although some people who’ve seen the movie have
said Focus on Interesting Tings is “mean-spirited,”
Pomerenke said he doesn’t know whether Keenan
was as mifed as he appears. “I’ve never discussed it
with him,” he said. “Maynard is a man of few words.”
Pomerenke said the goal of starting the
documentary with this comedy bit was to knock
Keenan of a pedestal and debunk any Arizona
pride – “attacking that right of the bat.”
Continued On Page 18
Keenan on music: “I’m not going to abandon my brothers. I
just think we have to re-think what the healthy steps are.”
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8
VoI. 17, No. 746
Feb. 18 - March 3, 2010
532 W. 3rd St.
Davenport IA 52801
RiverCitiesReader.com
(563)324-0049 (phone)
(563)323-3101 (fax)
Publishing since 1993
The River Cities’ Reader is an independent newspaper
published every other Thursday, and available free
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(classifeds@rcreader.com): 10 a.m. Monday
PUBLISHER
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EDITOR
Kathleen McCarthy
EDITORIAL
Managing Editor: Jef Ignatius • jef@rcreader.com
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by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
C
onsidering that the
ensemble’s front man is the
director of programming
and education for Davenport’s
River Music Experience, the
decision to instead perform the
Ellis Kell Band’s forthcoming 20th-
anniversary concert at the Moline
live-music venue Rascals might
seem like an odd one. As Kell
himself explains, however, it’s not.
“We hadn’t played there for a
long time, but that’s kind of where
we owned it,” says the blues vocal-
ist/guitarist, who will jam with
present and former bandmates on
Saturday, February 20. “We played
our frst gig as the Ellis Kell Band
on February 3, 1990, at Rascals. And before
that, most of us that make up the band
started playing there as the ‘& Friends’ part
of ‘Jim Schwall & Friends.’”
But Kell says that when blues guitarist
Schwall moved to Madison, Wisconsin, in
1989, “I told the other guys, ‘I don’t want
to do the cover-band thing anymore, you
know? I want to start a band, and write
some original stuf and record, and just do
the blues. For however long I’ve got lef to
do this, I want to do it the way I think it
should be done.’ And everybody said, ‘Hey,
let’s do it.’”
So began the Ellis Kell Band, the local
blues favorites who have shared stages with
the likes of Willie Nelson, Bo Diddley, John
Lee Hooker Jr., and Edgar Winter during
the group’s two decades of performance.
Originally founded by Kell, John Bur-
chett, Rick Stoneking, Dennis “Shineboy”
Hancq, and Jef Clark, the group performed
locally for three years prior to the release
of its frst CD, 1993’s Down to the Levee,
which boasts 13 tracks featuring music and
lyrics by Kell and Stoneking. It was followed
by 2000’s Ellis Kell Band & Friends, and in
August of last year, the compilation CD
Moondances Chapter One. (As Kell says with
a grin, “I try to do one at least every seven
years.”)
Kell says that the band’s current lineup
– which fnds Kell joined by bassist Bur-
chett, keyboardist Stoneking, harmonica
player “Detroit” Larry Davison, and drum-
mer Terry Hanson – continues to work on
new songs and covers of established blues
hits, even though adding untried mate-
rial to the band’s repertoire “has been a
challenge in the last few years. We’ve added
The Ellis Kell Band’s 20th-Anniversary Concert, February 20 at Rascals
0o the ßIues
new things, and we’re always on the lookout
– we probably add, I don’t know, maybe a
half a dozen, 10 songs a year. Not as much
as we used to, but then again, we don’t get
together as much as we used to.
“We’re all doing diferent things,” says
Kell. “Terry Hanson has his jazz trio [the
Terry Hanson Ensemble] and he teaches.
Larry plays with the Avey Brothers. Every-
body’s busy with work. So we all have dif-
ferent things, but we all come back together
when we can. And we sort of rehearse by e-
mail. I’ll e-mail Rick and say, ‘Hey, what do
you think about doing this Little Feat song
... ?’ And he’ll e-mail and say, ‘Okay, yeah,
cool, I’ll go back and listen to that ... .’”
Te band’s namesake adds that while he’d
like to have more time and opportunities to
add to the repertoire, he still truly enjoys
playing the songs – such as fan favorites “I
Ain’t Got No Blues Today,” “Lucky Dog,”
and “Sticks ’n’ Stones” – that audiences
already know and love.
“You’re up there to entertain people,” says
Kell. “You’re up there to play what they want
to hear. If you can throw in something new
along the way, cool, but frst and foremost,
you’re there to entertain. So I like playing
[our band’s] old songs.”
Especially since, as the musician says,
the band’s set lists are rarely performed the
same way twice. “I think one of the key
features of our band is that we’re always
spontaneous,” says Kell. “I don’t rehearse a
set to death. I don’t say anything negative
about the folks who do, and I’m all for hav-
ing a polished show, but I also appreciate,
like, what Bob Dylan does. He pisses people
of sometimes, because he doesn’t always
play ‘All Along the Watchtower’ or ‘Blowin’
in the Wind’ the way it originally went, but
he plays it the way he feels it that
night. I like that.”
Despite the group’s local suc-
cess, however, Kell insists that
he never had any real interest in
touring with his outft.
“We’ve been up around Chi-
cago,” says Kell, “and have played
a couple diferent private things.
We went and played in Des
Moines. One time we played a big
convention in Tempe, Arizona.
But I never liked the idea of liv-
ing out of a suitcase. I like going
home at the end of the night.”
Kell’s disinterest in traveling,
though, certainly hasn’t kept him,
or his bandmates, from meeting
and sharing stages with some of music’s
most legendary fgures.
“Te last time we opened for B.B. King
at the Adler,” says Kell of his band’s May 31,
2008, engagement, “he invited me out on
stage at the end of the show – not to play,
but just to come out and take a bow. And
I walked up to him, and we shook hands,
and nobody in the Adler Teatre took a
picture of it. I mean, I asked people, ‘Didn’t
anybody get a picture of this?!’ You know, it’s
like a once-in-a-lifetime thing ... . But hey, I
know it happened.”
Yet despite the thrill in performing
alongside musical legends, Kell says that he’s
just as excited about jamming with former
and present Ellis Kell Band members during
February 20’s Rascals event, the frst public
reunion of past and present members since
2005’s 15th-anniversary celebration at the
River Music Experience.
“When you play with musicians for
years,” says Kell, “things happen. People’s
egos get wounded. But I’m happy to say that
all the people that have ever been part of the
Ellis Kell Band, we’re all as good of friends
now – if not better – as we’ve ever been. We
have a great mutual respect, and everybody
always looks forward to these things. So I
think it’s gonna be a riot.
“I’ve been very fortunate with all the guys
that I’ve played with,” Kell adds. “Tey’re
good without having to drill 20 rehearsals
to get it.”
Te Ellis Kell Band plays its 20th-anniversary
concert at Rascals in Moline (1414 15th Street)
on Saturday, February 20, from 9 p.m. to
midnight. For information on the evening, call
(309)797-9457 or visit RascalsMoline.com.
Ellis Kell
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tenderness. Troughout most of the play,
though, Rudy was a loud and bumbling
guy who stutters in the presence of Nora
and ofers clever one-liners as responses,
and while White’s comedic timing was
usually spot-on, his character seemed too
eager for audience laughs. (Afer a long
argument about the meaning of the word
“signage,” with Rudy saying something to
the efect of,
“Fine, then,
I’m going to
go get the car-
age!”, I felt as
if I should be
straining my
ears to hear a
rimshot.)
Michaels
efectively
used the
theatre-in-
the-round
space
– a square,
in Richmond
Hill’s case
– during the apartment scenes. I was
always able to see the actor’s expressions,
and it felt like they had room to move in
the space without being hindered by set
pieces. Conversely, when the characters
were in the tiny plant shop and sitting
in the “bleachers” at the baseball game,
I was stuck looking at the their backs
throughout the duration of both scenes.
While I liked the idea of Nicol White
and White sitting in the stands with
the audience, this would’ve been better
executed if the actors had found seats
a few rows up, in the seating section
under the theatre’s technical booth;
more people would’ve seen them. (And
design-wise, it was an interesting choice
to paint the plants in the shop white, yet
I’m curious to know whether this was
made for practical and fnancial purposes
– fresh plants aren’t cheap – or merely to
symbolize that the scene occurred in the
past.)
Foster’s Wrong for Each Other is a
multi-dimensional study of a relationship
with unique quirks and universal,
relatable qualities. Sure, the script’s
gender roles – tentative businesswoman
meets afable working-class bufoon
– were ones that have been portrayed a
lot lately (and more crassly) in movies
such as Knocked Up. But watching this
particular couple traverse the rocky
terrain toward love and marriage felt
pleasantly familiar, rather than tedious.
For tickets and information, call (309)944-
2244 or visit RHPlayers.com.
7
he opening scene of Norm Foster’s
Wrong for Each Other at Geneseo’s
Richmond Hill Barn Teatre had
me worried that I was in for a fufy,
surface-level relationship comedy in
which a divorced man and woman reunite
afer reminiscing about the happiest
moments of their shared past. Tankfully,
Wrong delved under that fimsy comedic
surface and let
viewers in on
the arguments
and
unfortunate
familial
circumstances
that
steered the
relationship
of Rudy
Sorenson
(Chris White)
and Nora Case
(Jessica Nicol
White) toward
an inevitable
separation.
And while Wrong panders with a
predictable ending and plenty of witty
banter between the real-life newlyweds,
the script felt the most natural, the most
right, when its characters stopped putting
so much efort into entertaining the
audience, and focused on each other.
At the play’s beginning, Nora and
Rudy run into each other at a restaurant
three years and nine months afer their
divorce, and afer agreeing to share a meal
together, progress through a series of brief
fashback scenes that include their initial
encounter at a plant shop, their frst date
at a baseball game, and their frst kiss,
sexual encounter, and argument. Director
Craig Michaels’ decision to cast the White
duo as the endearing house-painter Rudy
and the tough-shelled, workaholic Nora
was a clever one. Te Whites had such
organic conversational and physical
chemistry during the opening-night
performance that, despite their characters’
faws and infdelities, I was always pulling
for Rudy and Nora to end up together.
Nicol White’s best moments were when
she shed her character’s reserved nature
and allowed her emotions to control her
body language. Her portrayal of Nora’s
rage while she prepares to leave her
marriage was especially afecting; the
performer’s hands were trembling, and
the blood rose in her face as she gestured
violently and let her dialogue fy.
Meanwhile, White’s interpretation
of Rudy succeeded best in his quieter
moments, and his fnal monologue was
delivered with genuine, sof-spoken
Promises, Promises
Wrong for Each Other, at Richmond Hill Barn Theatre through February 21
By Jill Walsh
Chris White and Jessica Nicol White
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10
Davenport Junior theatre Mainstage Co.
Ramona
Quimby
Saturday Feb. 20 - 2:00 PM & 7:00 PM
Sunday Feb. 21 - 2:00PM
Saturday Feb. 27 - 2:00 PM & 7:00 PM
Sunday Feb. 28 - 2:00 PM
k0Ih0ߦ 8f8£¥£ßLf0L£kßf 0ßkNkIIZ£08fL£ßJ£ß8Iß
0aveuporl Parks & Recrealiou 0eparlueul www.cilyoídaveuporl.cou º 563·326·7812
PARKS &
REC
R
E
A
T
I O
N
D
E P A R T M E N T
C
IT
Y
O
F
D
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T
Tickets are only $5
for anyone 3 and up
Annie Wittenmyer Complex
2816 Eastern Ave. Davenport, IA 52803
563-326-7862
www. DavenportJuni ortheatre. com
Every Kid Receives a Free Book!
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DEAR JOHN
Since no one’s been pressing a gun to my
head, I haven’t read Nicholas Sparks’ Dear John,
which concerns a pair of star-crossed lovers
whose romance is derailed by the young man’s
Army tenure. I have, however, seen director Lasse
Hallström’s screen version, which apparently
follows the novel’s blueprint faithfully (albeit with
an altered ending), so permit me a question: Does
Sparks have absolutely no shame?
Once you discover that this saga begins in the
spring of 2001, and that
the titular John (played
here by Chaning Tatum)
only has to serve one
more year overseas
before returning to
his beloved (Amanda
Seyfried’s Savannah),
it’s pretty easy to grasp
what Sparks is up to. But
while the specter of 9/11
hovers throughout Dear John’s early scenes, I’ll
admit to being surprised – shocked, really – that
this wasn’t enough potential romantic anguish
for the creator of Te Notebook and Nights in
Rodanthe; miraculously, Sparks also fnds room
for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, battlefeld
injuries, infdelity, cancer, autism, a stroke, and
the stinginess of health-insurance companies.
(I’m presuming it was only the author’s deadline
that prevented his adding chronic lateness and the
heartbreak of psoriasis into the mix.)
Needless to say, if you’re not a dyed-in-the-
wool Sparks fanatic, Dear John should be all but
unendurable. So help me God, though, the movie
works. With screenwriter Jamie Linden given the
unenviable task of adapting Sparks’ prose, the
dialogue may be hopelessly stilted, but no one
seems to have informed Tatum and Seyfried of
this; their screen chemistry and intensely likable
performances here feel disarmingly genuine.
Every time you roll your eyes at the convenient
plotting and indie-pop montages, Hallström
comes through with lovely, recognizably human
touches, such as Henry Tomas’ shy yearning for
best pal Seyfried, or an enraged Tatum banging his
fsts against his steering wheel and inadvertently
turning on the windshield wipers. And just when
you’re absolutely, 100-percent positive that this
baldly manipulative tearjerker will not, not, jerk
your tears, you’re given a hospital-bedside scene
between John and his dad (the expert, wonderfully
moving Richard Jenkins) that turns both Tatum
and you into blubbery wrecks. Against all logic
and good judgment, I have to admit that I enjoyed
Dear John. I’m thinking of pressing a gun to my
own head.
VALENTINE’S DAY
If you’re a casual moviegoer who’s never been
entirely certain which performer is Jessica Alba
and which is Jessica Biel, director Garry Marshall’s
Valentine’s Day will fnally clarify matters: Alba
is the gorgeous, mediocre actress who plays
Ashton Kutcher’s fancée, and Biel is the gorgeous,
mediocre actress who plays Eric Dane’s publicist.
And that, I’m afraid, is the extent of the flm’s
usefulness. Obviously inspired by the romantic-
comedy touchstone Love Actually – with “obviously
inspired by” a kind way of saying “a blatant rip-of
of ” – the movie features 21 above-the-title stars
dovetailing through roughly a dozen subplots. Not
one, however, is a storyline I had any interest in
returning to; despite serviceable-or-better work
from Julia Roberts,
Anne Hathaway,
Topher Grace, and a
few (but not many)
others, Marshall’s
cynical, grab-the-
holiday-weekend-cash-
and-run outing is a
decidedly unfunny, un-
romantic waste of time
and talent. (I wouldn’t be surprised if, at the end
of a day’s flming, the Oscars owned by castmates
Jamie Foxx, Kathy Bates, and Shirley MacLaine
actually snickered at them.) Valentine’s Day is
too restless to be outright dull. But the only true
entertainment I found came from waiting, in vain,
for former TV co-stars – Tat 70’s Show’s Grace
and Kutcher, Grey’s Anatomy’s Dane and Patrick
Dempsey, Alias’ Jennifer Garner and Bradley
Cooper – to share a scene, and from jokes that I’m
not sure were meant to be jokes, such as Twilight’s
Taylor Lautner insisting, “I’m a little uncomfortable
taking my shirt of.” Yeah, whatever, kid.
THE WOLFMAN
Despite the severed heads and gnawed-of
limbs and Anthony Hopkins hamming it up to
high heaven, director Joe Johnston’s Te Wolfman
is just about the last thing you’d expect it to be:
boring as sin. To be sure, the movie – set in 1891
England, and adapted from 1941’s horror classic
– is impeccably designed; the Victorian decay has
a rich, evocative seediness, and Shelly Johnson’s
moonlit cinematography lends an expressive
gloom to the proceedings. Unfortunately, it’s also
the only gloom here that’s the least bit expressive.
Benicio Del Toro, as a classical-actor-turned-
lycanthrope, glowers and mopes, Emily Blunt
enacts varying degrees of “tremulous,” random
townsfolk and gypsies make blandly menacing
pronouncements about Te Evil in the Woods,
and you sit there staring at your watch until
the next tooth-and-claw attack. Or rather, you
would, if Johnston’s unimaginative staging and the
pedestrian efects were of any greater interest. (Te
werewolf transformations are only slightly more
convincing than the flm’s CGI grizzly bear, which
looks like a frst cousin to the polar bears in those
holiday commercials for Coke.) All told, it’s visually
handsome but a chore to sit through, and proves
there’s actually very little that separates a Wolfman
from a really big dog.
Ll$7£N 70 MlK£ £V£RY FRl0AY A7 9AM 0N R0CK 104·9 FM Wl7H 0AV£ & 0ARR£N
$parks, and No $parks
Channing Tatum and Amanda
Seyfried in Dear John
Movi e Revi ews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Movi e Revi ews

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JUST FER KI DS
H
ey, everybody! Guess who’s coming to
Davenport? (Here’s a hint: Her name
is in blue and red letters right next to her
picture there.)
That’s right! It’s everyone’s favorite grade-
school troublemaker, Ramona Quimby!
You’re probably familiar with the character
from Beverly Cleary’s popular children’s
books, but now you can see her live on
stage in a brand-new show produced by
Davenport Junior Teatre!
Based on several stories in the author’s
series, Ramona Quimby fnds our third-
grade heroine getting into all sorts of
trouble – fghting with her sister, Beezus,
aggravating her teacher, disrupting a
wedding, and much more! But while
her adventures are funny, Ramona also
learns important lessons about family and
friendship, and realizes that while siblings
may not always agree, they sure can be
good to have around!
Junior Teatre’s one-act presentation
promises to be loads of fun, and you’ll not
only get a ticket for your $5 admission
price; you’ll also get a book – every child
who attends will receive a copy of one of
Cleary’s Romona Quimby tales to take
home with them!
To prepare for this exciting family
entertainment, try to fnd the names of
12 of the show’s characters in this word-
search. Te answers can be found on page
20 ... but no cheating!
Ramona Quimby runs February 20
through 28, with performances at 2 and 7
p.m. on Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays.
For more information, call (563)326-7862
or visit DavenportJuniorTeatre.com.
Comedy
Jennifer Coolidge
Penguin’s Comedy Club
Friday, February 19, and Saturday,
February 20
M
y guess is that you saw the photo
accompanying this piece and
immediately thought one of three
things: (1)
“Oh ... it’s
Jennifer
Coolidge!
I love her!”
(2) “Oh ... it’s
that actress
from Legally
Blonde
and those
Christopher
Guest
movies! I
love her!” (3) “Holy crap! Stifer’s mom!
I freakin’ love her!!!”
No matter your response, you’re
right ... though if you leaned toward
response three, you really should
get to the cineplex more ofen. Since
her iconic turn as American Pie’s
modern-day Mrs. Robinson, Coolidge
has been one of Hollywood’s most in-
demand and adored comic actresses,
contributing to 33 movies (plus 18
TV series) since 2000. Yet as a former
member of the Los Angeles-based
comedy troupe the Groundlings,
she’s also an accomplished stand-up
performer, which local audiences
will quickly glean during Coolidge’s
February 19 and 20 sets at Penguin’s
Comedy Club.
Still, you just know some audience
member is going to welcome her to the
Davenport stage with a hearty “Stifer’s
mom!!!” So to avoid being Tat Guy,
match these Jennifer Coolidge flms
with her roles in them, and counter
that inevitable Penguin’s greeting with
a more original one.
A) Genevieve McDonagh
B) Amber Cole
C) Fiona Montgomery
D) Paulette Bonafonté
E) Sherri Ann Ward Cabot
F) White-Faced Women
G) Roz Fockyerdoder
A n s w e r s : 1 – D , 2 – A , 3 – G , 4 – F , 5 – C , 6 – E , 7 – B . A n d i f y o u h a d n o c l u e a b o u t
e i t h e r o f t h o s e l a s t t w o , I ’ m a f r a i d w e ’ r e n o l o n g e r o n s p e a k i n g t e r m s . S o r r y , M o t h e r .
1) Legally Blonde
2) Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans
3) Date Movie
4) Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events
5) A Cinderella Story
6) Best in Show
7) A Mighty Wind
Jennifer Coolidge performs at Penguin’s on Friday at 8 p.m., and on Saturday
at 7:30 and 10 p.m., and tickets are available by calling (563)324-5233 or visiting
QCFreightHouse.com/penguinsComedyClub.upcoming.php.
What’s Happenin’
Musi c
Rascal Flatts and Darius Rucker
i wireless Center
Saturday, February 20, 8 p.m.
Bryan Adams
The Capitol Theatre
Tuesday, February 23, 8 p.m.
“T
ell me about the frst dream,
Mike.”
“Tis was a strange one, doctor. It was
just me and my gang in Mayberry, talkin’
about fast cars and freedom and prayin’
for daylight. I felt unstoppable here. But
my wish was to be a winner at a losing
game, bless the broken road, and embrace
this everyday love. I shouted, ‘What hurts
the most is that while you loved me, I’m
movin’ on these days! Why?!’”
“Let me stop you, Mike. I think you
were dreaming about the multi-platinum-
selling country band Rascal Flatts. You just
referenced 15 of the group’s hit songs.”
“But then, a man walked up to me,
making sounds like an owl and holding a
blowfsh. I gave him a strange look, and
he said, ‘Don’t
think I don’t
think about it.
But it’s alright.
It won’t be like
this for long. It’s
actually history
in the making,
and ... .’”
“I’m going to stop you again, since you
just mentioned four hit singles by Hootie
& the Blowfsh frontman Darius Rucker.
Obviously, you’re thinking about writing
a piece on February 20’s country-music
spectacular at Moline’s i wireless Center
– the Unstoppable Tour 2010 – where
Rucker is opening for Rascal Flatts. I
understand that the show starts at 8 p.m.,
and that tickets are available by calling
(800)745-3000 or visiting iwirelessCenter.
com.”
“Wow ... that makes perfect sense!”
“So what was
your other dream,
Mike?”
“Tis one was
even weirder, doc. I
was dreaming that it
was a few days from
now – February 23, I
think – and I was at
Davenport’s Capitol
Teatre. It was about 8 p.m., and the lights
dimmed, and then Grammy- and Oscar-
nominated rocker Bryan Adams appeared
on stage! It was nuts! He sang all of his
hits: ‘Cuts Like a Knife’ and ‘Summer of
’ 69’ and ‘(Everything I Do) I Do It for
You’ and ‘Open Road’ and ‘Can’t Stop Tis
Ting We Started’ and a whole bunch
more. Ten he yelled to the crowd, ‘For
tickets to shows at the Capitol Teatre, call
(563)326-8820 or visit TeCapDavenport.
com!’ And then I woke up. What do you
think that one means?”
“I honestly have no idea.”

Theat r e
The Glass Menagerie
Galvin Fine Arts Center – St. Ambrose University
Friday, February 19 through Sunday, February 21
“W
here are you going, Tom?”
“I’m going to the movies, Mother.”
“Tat’s right, now that you’ve had us make such fools
of ourselves! Go to the movies! Go! Don’t let anything
interfere with your selfsh pleasure!”
“Te more you shout about my selfshness to me, the
quicker I’ll go! And I won’t go to the movies!”
“Go, then! Go to the moon, you
selfsh dreamer!”
• • •
“I didn’t go to the moon. I
went much further. I went to St.
Ambrose University, where the
school’s theatre department was staging Te Glass
Menagerie. I went to Tennessee Williams’ classic
memory play about an overbearing mother and a
frustrated son, and a damaged daughter named Laura
who collected fgurines made of glass. I walked into
the Galvin Fine Arts Center and watched Corinne
Johnson’s direction of students Katie McCormack,
Nathan Scheetz, Monique Vos, and Dan Hernandez. I
listened as they delivered some of the most beautiful
and memorable lines in American theatre. I laughed
and I cried and I thought of my family, and for a brief
moment I was the recipient of truth in the pleasant
disguise of illusion, and the world was lit by lightning.
So blow out your candles, Laura – and so goodbye ... .” *
Te Glass Menagerie will be performed February
19 and 20 at 7:30 p.m. and February 21 at 3 p.m., and
tickets are available by calling (563)333-6251 or visiting
http://Web.SAU.edu/galvin.
* With apologies to Mr. Williams, who would’ve made
something far more poetic out of this piece.
Rascal Flatts
Bryan Adams
Darius Rucker
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13
JUST FER KI DS
H
ey, everybody! Guess who’s coming to
Davenport? (Here’s a hint: Her name
is in blue and red letters right next to her
picture there.)
That’s right! It’s everyone’s favorite grade-
school troublemaker, Ramona Quimby!
You’re probably familiar with the character
from Beverly Cleary’s popular children’s
books, but now you can see her live on
stage in a brand-new show produced by
Davenport Junior Teatre!
Based on several stories in the author’s
series, Ramona Quimby fnds our third-
grade heroine getting into all sorts of
trouble – fghting with her sister, Beezus,
aggravating her teacher, disrupting a
wedding, and much more! But while
her adventures are funny, Ramona also
learns important lessons about family and
friendship, and realizes that while siblings
may not always agree, they sure can be
good to have around!
Junior Teatre’s one-act presentation
promises to be loads of fun, and you’ll not
only get a ticket for your $5 admission
price; you’ll also get a book – every child
who attends will receive a copy of one of
Cleary’s Romona Quimby tales to take
home with them!
To prepare for this exciting family
entertainment, try to fnd the names of
12 of the show’s characters in this word-
search. Te answers can be found on page
20 ... but no cheating!
Ramona Quimby runs February 20
through 28, with performances at 2 and 7
p.m. on Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays.
For more information, call (563)326-7862
or visit DavenportJuniorTeatre.com.
What’s Happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
MUSI C
Friday, February 19 – Artimus PyIe.
Legendary Lynyrd Skynyrd drummer
in concert. Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway,
Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $10-$15. For tickets
and information, call (800)843-4753 or visit
Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Friday, February 19, and $aturday,
February 20 – 0reat River $how Choir
lnvitationaI. Presented by the music
departments of Davenport Central and
Davenport West, 12 regional high schools
and seven middle schools deliver dazzling
dancing, costumes, music, and family
entertainment. Adler Theatre (136 East
Third Street, Davenport). Friday: middle-
school competition 5 p.m. Saturday: high-
school competition 8 a.m., awards 6:50
p.m., fnals 7:30 p.m., Grand Champion
announcement 11 p.m. $5-$16. For
information, call (563)322-3660 or visit
GreatRiverOnline.com.
$aturday, February 20, and $unday,
February 21 – Morning Light & Evening
Rest. Concert with the Nova Singers,
featuring Brahms’“Warum ist das Licht
gegeben”and Ligeti’s “Morning & Night,”
and a performance by saxophonist Kevin
Malle. Saturday – Galesburg’s First Lutheran
Church (364 East Water Street, Galesburg).
Sunday – Moline’s First Congregational
Church (2201 Seventh Avenue, Moline).
Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 4 p.m. $10-$15,
students free. For tickets and information,
call (309)341-7038 or visit http://deptorg.
knox.edu/novasingers.
Continued On Page 20
What £Ise
ls Happenin’
F L M S U Z E E B T
M O R R A M O N A M
A R S P S R W M T R
E O Q A N K M G Y S
B L U U E Y E I M G
T D I L I N B M U R
N M M T W M A S P I
U A B D O N B S E G
A N Y R H P I Y U G
R E P E E K P O H S
WORD SEARCH
Ramona
Beezus
Mr. Quimby
Mrs. Quimby
Mrs. Griggs
Mrs. Kemp
Aunt Bea
Susan
Howie
Tammy
Old Man
Shopkeeper
Find these
characters:
Theat r e
The Glass Menagerie
Galvin Fine Arts Center – St. Ambrose University
Friday, February 19 through Sunday, February 21
“W
here are you going, Tom?”
“I’m going to the movies, Mother.”
“Tat’s right, now that you’ve had us make such fools
of ourselves! Go to the movies! Go! Don’t let anything
interfere with your selfsh pleasure!”
“Te more you shout about my selfshness to me, the
quicker I’ll go! And I won’t go to the movies!”
“Go, then! Go to the moon, you
selfsh dreamer!”
• • •
“I didn’t go to the moon. I
went much further. I went to St.
Ambrose University, where the
school’s theatre department was staging Te Glass
Menagerie. I went to Tennessee Williams’ classic
memory play about an overbearing mother and a
frustrated son, and a damaged daughter named Laura
who collected fgurines made of glass. I walked into
the Galvin Fine Arts Center and watched Corinne
Johnson’s direction of students Katie McCormack,
Nathan Scheetz, Monique Vos, and Dan Hernandez. I
listened as they delivered some of the most beautiful
and memorable lines in American theatre. I laughed
and I cried and I thought of my family, and for a brief
moment I was the recipient of truth in the pleasant
disguise of illusion, and the world was lit by lightning.
So blow out your candles, Laura – and so goodbye ... .” *
Te Glass Menagerie will be performed February
19 and 20 at 7:30 p.m. and February 21 at 3 p.m., and
tickets are available by calling (563)333-6251 or visiting
http://Web.SAU.edu/galvin.
* With apologies to Mr. Williams, who would’ve made
something far more poetic out of this piece.
Midwest Writing Center’s
February - April
Workshops, Readings & Contests

February
Iron Pen 24-hour Writing Contest 5 p.m. Feb 19 to
($10/submission) 5 p.m. Feb. 20
22nd *Beat Poetry @ Mojo’s (River
Music Experience)
6-8 p.m.
25th *Out Loud Poetry & Prose 7-9 p.m.
26th *Iron Pen Awards Night 7 p.m.
April
15th *“Nature of Childhood” with
John Price
1-3 p.m.
26th *Beat Poetry @ Mojo’s (River
Music Experience)
6-8 p.m.
29th *Out Loud Poetry & Prose 7-9 p.m.
March
6th Pen-in-Hand Conference
(Marketing, fiction, poetry,
publishing & middle school
poetry workshops)
8:30 a.m. -
5:00 p.m.
20th “Why Can’t You be an
Extraordinary Writer?” with
Cecil Murphey ($20/person)
1-3 p.m.
20th Literary Awards Banquet @
Davenport Outing Club ($35/
person)
6-9 p.m.
25th *Out Loud Poetry & Prose 7-9 p.m.
29th *Beat Poetry @ Mojo’s (River
Music Experience)
6-8 p.m.
All events occur on-site at the Midwest Writing Center
unless listed otherwise. (*)Indicates free event
-All programs are partially sponsored by the Riverboat
Development Authority & the Illinois Arts Council-
225 E. 2nd Street, Suite 303
Davenport, IA 52801
563.324.1410
View website for all 2010 programs
www.midwestwritingcenter.org
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14
Presented by
Saturday, March 13 • 8pm
ADLER THEATRE - DAVENPORT
800-745-3000
Tickets available at the Adler Theatre Box Office, ticketmaster.com
and all outlets.
Discounts for groups! call 563-326-8555
a
presentation
Great Seats Still Available!
works by Mozart, Ravel, Beethoven
featuring the
Oberlin Trio
David Bowlin VIOLIN
Amir Eldan CELLO
Haewon Song PIANO
Sunday, Feb. 28 at 4 p.m.
wallenberg Hall
Augustana College, rock Island
TICKETS at the door $12 • $5 students
INForMATIoN 309 797-0516
www.chambermusicqc.com
2009–10 SEASON
David Bowlin, Artistic Director
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Ballet Quad Cities’ Love Stories
Preshow reception with BQC to NYC
choreographer Deanna Carter at
the Capitol Theatre • February 13th
Photos: Jeremy Ford/River Cities Weddings
11th Annual Make-a-Wish Foundation
of Iowa Riverbend Gala at the River-
Center in Davenport • February 6th
Photos: Louis Brems/River Cities Weddings
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YGUNN
jbs
4.86 x 5.44
ATT000115B 2/3/2010
Customer Service
ATTREG006 1
RIVER CITIES READER
Time to broaden your view of telecomm careers. Welcome to
AT&T. Deeper product base. Broader career options. Together at
last. Join us as a CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE at our
Davenport Call Center.
Apply online at www.att.jobs/QuadCities.
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Employer. © 2010 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved.
AT&T, AT&T logo and all other marks contained herein are trademarks
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more experience
more passion.
paired with
Experience’s “Fire,” and then a sterling
showcase for anguished yet eloquent
guitar noise that would make Neil Young
proud. What’s most impressive is the
concision, that the band has mined and
polished the gold from what one imagines
are expansive jams.
Mondo Drag seemed to have some
sense of a destiny beyond the Quad
Cities. It’s been together for three years,
and it spent its frst six months working
on its songs and the next six months
working on an album. It was signed to
Alive based on a demo (and a relationship
with the Iowans of Radio Moscow, also on
Alive), and Cluney said the band hasn’t
played much in its hometown, building a
regional base ahead of a local one.
Afer it closes its current tour at the
River Music Experience, the band will
embark on another tour in March that
includes a handful of dates at South by
Southwest. All of this will be to support
the record, and Cluney said the band
plays much of the material from New
Rituals.
Given the number of overdubs, he
admitted that it’s impossible to replicate
the album. “We’d have to have 20 people
on stage,” he said. “We just do what we
can.”
Mondo Drag will perform at the River
Music Experience’s Performance Hall
(131 West Second Street in Davenport)
on Saturday, February 20. Te show
starts at 7 p.m., and the bill also includes
Maylane and the One Night Standards.
Tickets are $5. For more information, visit
RiverMusicExperience.org.
For more information on Mondo Drag,
visit MondoDrag.org or MySpace.
com/holyrocks. To listen to the band’s
Daytrotter session, visit Daytrotter.com/
dt/mondo-drag-concert/20031140-111852.
html.
W
hen
Mondo
Drag
drummer/singer
Johnnie Cluney
says that “we’re
kind of bringing
in more of a pop
element” to the
band’s new songs,
take that with a
giant rock of salt.
Te Quad Cities-
based band released
its full-length
debut, New Rituals,
on the Alive
Naturalsounds
Records label last month, and it’s a
hazy, sludgy afair – bluesy psychedelia
borrowing heavily from the 1960s and
recalling the contemporary sounds of
Dead Meadow.
Yet there are indeed hints of accessible
melody in the massive rifs and thick
keyboards. “Love Me” hides on its
downslope a compelling ascending
chorus with heavy vocal emphasis on the
downbeat. Calling it poppy is a stretch,
but it opens the door to the remainder
of the song. “True Visions” has a similar
late revelation, with moaning layers of
keyboards and guitars as its extended
coda.
Te quintet – celebrating the release
of New Rituals on Saturday at the River
Music Experience’s Performance Hall
– has begun to build a national profle.
Te band had its Daytrotter.com session
released last week, and even though that
Web site is based in the Quad Cities,
it certainly doesn’t play favorites with
hometown bands.
And while Alive Records might not
be a big outft (even by independent
standards), Cluney said it’s a “cult-y label”
with a devoted following: “Anything they
release people will buy.”
Its catalog includes the debut albums
of the Black Keys and Two Gallants, and
Cluney admits that Mondo Drag doesn’t
exactly ft into the label’s aesthetic, harder
and weirder than its other groups. “I
defnitely think we’re the odd band out,”
he said. “I’m surprised he [label founder
Patrick Boissel] wanted to put it out.”
Tat’s not really too much of a mystery.
One can hear elemental echoes of the
Black Keys, but more importantly one can
hear a confdent band willing to take risks
and good enough to make them work.
“Fade Out” isn’t even two and a
half minutes long, but it’s two songs: a
funky rocker (for a minute) that would
be at home next to the Jimi Hendrix
0dd ßand 0ut
Mondo Drag, February 20 at the River Music Experience
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
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18
And he sees parallels between making music
and wine. “It’s just a matter of perception, and
how you perceive the world around you,” Keenan
said. “Te whole listening process and the whole
responding process.”
Both involve “getting out of the way and
allowing things to occur. Of course, nudging them
along with your personality and your perceptions
in the world. ... You’re allowing this terroir, or this
site, or this grape to speak for itself, and then you
nudge in the direction that you think it should go,
but you let it speak to you frst.”
Blood Into Wine will be screened at the Capitol
Teatre (330 West Tird Street in Davenport) on
Friday, February 19; Saturday, February 20; Sunday,
February 21; and Friday, February 26.
Te February 19 screening will be followed by a wine
tasting of Arizona Stronghold wines. Te flm will be
shown at 7 p.m., and tickets are $12 and available
from TeCapDavenport.com.
Te February 20 and 26 screenings will be at 7
p.m. Te February 21 screening will be at 2 p.m.
Admission is $5, and Arizona Stronghold wines will
be available for purchase.
For more information about the movie, visit
BloodIntoWine.com.
7he Face of Arizona Wine
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
Tis opening does announce that the movie
shouldn’t be taken too seriously, but it also casts
minor doubt on the authenticity of the “real” bits.
To be fair, there’s a pretty bright line between
the genuine and the fake. Te staged bits are ofen
absurd. Beyond Interesting Tings, Bob Odenkirk
contributes a ridiculous closing-credits skit. And the
reveal that one of Keenan’s responses was delivered
while on the toilet – the singer claimed the idea in
our interview – ofers some jokey context for his
awkwardness.
And it’s clearly sincere when Keenan begins to
cry talking about his mother, who died in 2003; her
ashes were scattered on the vineyard, and “she gets
to travel the world now” through the wine, he says
in the movie.
But there are moments of uncertainty, as when
Pomerenke and Page tell Keenan that they’ve
been approached about doing a reality-TV series
featuring him. Pomerenke insists the ofer was real,
but it doesn’t play that way in the flm. (Keenan’s
response: “Fuck no.”)
“We’re not real orthodox documentarians,”
Pomerenke said. “We like the idea of things that are
somewhat staged if it can get to a deeper meaning or
reveal some sort of truth through the staging.”
ßringing 0ut the Land
Keenan moved to Arizona in 1995 and said
he met Glomski – who returned to Arizona afer
working in the California wine industry, ascending
to co-wine-maker at David Bruce Winery – in 2002
or 2003. Teir joint wine endeavors started shortly
thereafer.
While Blood Into Wine’s subjects aren’t pioneers
– Keenan guessed that contemporary vineyards in
Arizona date back at least a dozen years – they are
likely essential to building a market for Arizona
wine.
Keenan’s fame is the obvious impetus for the
movie, which will expose a lot of people to the
idea that the state has a lot to ofer wine and wine
consumers. And his fnancial resources are also
critical. “You spend $10 million to make one”
million dollars in the wine business, Keenan told
me. “I’m defnitely not out of the hole by any stretch.
I believe in this thing so much that I’ve dumped
everything into it.”
Te wine-makers have had to deal with rough
climate. Despite Arizona’s reputation as a baked
desert, “we have more problems with cold than we
do heat,” Keenan says in the movie.
Tere are also critters that can destroy crops.
And there are bureaucratic obstacles, from water
rights to branding. Although it’s not in the movie,
Keenan said he’s now battling the federal Alcohol
& Tobacco Tax & Trade Bureau, which regulates
how wines are presented. “Tey’re still trying to
fght me on the name of my wine, although they’ve
approved every one of my labels,” he said. Tey
want him to change his name and logo – the snakes
and staf of caduceus are ofen confused with the
medicine-related Rod of Asclepius – “having let me
develop this brand. … Tey say I’m implying that it’s
medicine.”
But there are also the basic challenges of wine-
making. Finding grapes that will grow well in
Arizona, Keenan said, has been a “crapshoot.” Tey
looked for hardy fruit and have planted varieties
from “Bordeaux,
Italy, southern Rhone,
northern Rhone,
Spain – just because
the terrain here
mimics some of that.
So we’ve planted pretty
much everything you
can think of.”
It’s critical to
understand that
Keenan and Glomski
aren’t interested
in trying to make
California-style wines
in Arizona. Tey think
the land gives the
grapes and therefore
the wine a unique
character.
When they were
getting started,
Keenan said, they
brought out experts
from California, but
they weren’t very
helpful. “Tis ground
has nothing to do with
that ground,” he said.
Expressing the
land, he added, is “the
most important part.
… It’s something that we’re missing [as a culture],
the connection to the ground.” Te core of the flm,
he said, is “connecting with where you are.”
“My wines are an expression of a place that I call
home,” Glomski says in the movie.
Much mass-produced wine, Keenan said, does
not meet that goal, with favors achieved through
processing rather than viticulture. “What they’re
doing to it has nothing really to do with the wine,”
he said. “Tere are things that are outweighing
what’s happening in the bottle. ... It could be made
anywhere. So as a business model, great, but as a
sustainable product ... .”
Bringing out the characteristics of the soil,
climate, and farming techniques – collectively
known as a wine’s terroir – will take a long time.
Keenan gave the example of Cabernet grapes
grown with a 900-foot diference in elevation, with
one vineyard on fat land and one on a slope in a
diferent part of the state. “It’s going to take us a few
years to really fgure out what the unique profle
for the grapes are up here in northern Arizona. ...
,” he said. “Tere’s two Cabs and they taste similar.
Why do they taste similar? Tey should be polar
opposites just based on the elevation and the
temperature swings on those two sites.
“Two diferent parts of the state are defnitely
presenting two diferent styles of wine,” he
continued. “Tat they are not diferent enough in
characteristic might just be because we treated them
in a similar way in the wine-making process. Maybe
we should have used diferent kinds of yeast.”
Keenan has produced fve vintages of Caduceus,
with 10 red-wine styles and one white. Prices range
from $18.99 to $100 a bottle.
For the time being, Keenan is having “custom
crushes” done for him at Glomski’s winery, but he
has almost fnished his own winery, at which he
hopes to “dabble” this year.
“Te biggest, most important step for me in the
wine-making process is going to be to make a lot of
mistakes,” he said. Glomski will continue to make
most of the Caduceus wines, while Keenan will
experiment with “small batches that I just assume
I’m going to screw up.” Glomski’s role will be “saving
it from the brink when it’s about to go horribly
wrong, but allowing me to make mistakes.”
Keenan also said that Glomski will be his
primary wine-maker for the foreseeable future. “I’ve
got crazy ideas that he would never explore,” Keenan
said. “I’m kind of like ... Curly to his Larry and Moe.”
0etting 0ut of the Way
Keenan’s passion for wine-making is evident
both in the movie and over the phone. When he
talks about music, however, you might fear that
you’ll never have another album from Tool or A
Perfect Circle. Te singer clearly wants no part of
contemporary celebrity culture.
“You’ve seen how popular reality TV is,” he said.
“People don’t care about the person. Tey want
to see them self-destruct. And that’s partly what
it is with the entertainment industry. ... Unless it’s
tragic, who cares?”
People might like music and enjoy the songs,
he said, but fundamentally “they want to see you
overdose. Tey want to see you self-destruct and
come apart. ... I’m not a martyr. I have no intention
of sacrifcing myself for the evening news.”
But while there are no imminent releases
from any of his bands, Keenan said he hasn’t
given up music for wine. “If it’s a positive, healthy
experience, then it’s always going to be a part of
my life,” he said. “I’m not going to abandon my
brothers. I just think we have to re-think what the
healthy steps are.”
Continued From Page 7
Keenan on wine:
“If you plant
vines in this
valley, they’re
going to taste
a certain way;
they’re going to
be very specifc
to where they’re
from. It’s not a
business that
you can move to
Mexico or China.
It’s from here.”
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19
1uIy 23, 2008 1uIy 23, 2008 February 18, 2010 FL0RAL ARRAN0£M£N7
February 4 Answers: Page 20 Edited by Justin Lynn Morris
ACR0$$
1. Ten-speed
5. Fable in London
11. To’s partner
14. Takes a chance
19. “To a Skylark” et al.
20. Western capital
21. Hawaiian volcano Mauna _
22. Reading matter on the Web
23. Her address in the 1990s was
“Melrose Place”
26. Deck of cards
27. Was a candidate
28. _ mater
29. Belief
30. East, West and Gulf
31. Not easy to grasp
33. Snowstorm aftermath
36. Fix dinner
37. Woodwind instrument
38. Nonsense!
40. Gunowner’s org.
43. Bird sanctuary
46. Oil-feld silhouettes
47. Gotcha!
48. Pond surface, perhaps
49. Big books
50. Decompose
51. Genetic marker
52. Fastener
53. Carmen’s aunt
54. Six women, so-called in 1989 flm title
60. Make unhappy
64. “There you are!”
65. Rouge or blanc
66. Shoe feature
67. Actress Hasso
68. Guard
71. _ Moines
72. Misrepresent
73. Kind of missile
75. She was married in Dogpatch in 1952
79. Classical lead-in
80. Numismatist’s pride
81. Beseech
82. Sister
83. Geometry subject
85. Signal with the eye
86. Sat. preceder
87. Fill to the max
89. Ignores the limit
90. Supply for a blast
91. Keep him away from refecting pools!
94. Missing at roll call
95. Make diverse
96. Tall and slim
97. Column
100. Black-ink item
103. Family member
104. English title
105. Prof.’s degree
107. Sorceress in the “Odyssey”
108. She invited everyone to her house
113. Tatum, for one
114. Needs paying
115. Cough drop
116. Henri’s head
117. Very recently
118. AARP mbrs.
119. Smooched
120. Makes lace
00WN
1. 1975 Nobel physicist
2. Inventor’s need
3. Actor Reeves
4. Superlative conclusion
5. “To a Skylark” poet
6. Designated, as with a word
7. Jar
8. _ Speedwagon
9. Letter abbr.
10. Asian ox
11. Heavyset
12. Wander
13. Scull propeller
14. Captured again
15. Fisherman Walton
16. Knights
17. Sheepshank, e.g.
18. Movie backdrops
24. Those with intense dislikes
25. Speech defect
30. Chanel of fashion
32. Aberdeen hillside
33. Maliciousness
34. Sawmill arrival
35. Preceding downs, sometimes
36. George M.
39. Dance with a kick
40. College-sports org.
41. Sen. Feingold
42. Sound booster
43. “_ boy!”
44. Homecoming author
45. Mature insect
46. By memory
48. Asian religion
50. Host’s request
51. Valley
55. Sins
56. Reasonable judgment
57. UMW member
58. Once _ lightly
59. Cotton fber
61. Bad sign in business
62. Cools down
63. No problem
67. Hunt for
68. Pisces, for one
69. Marksman’s calculation
70. Trafc sign
72. GI’s frst training
73. Fever
74. European deer
75. “_ What Comes Natur’lly” (Irving Berlin)
76. “_ Misbehavin’”
77. Wed
78. Nervous
80. Hundred lbs.
83. Space program, 1961 to 1975
84. Dickens heroine
86. Cabbie’s request
87. Common ID
88. Summer mo.
89. Eddied
91. To be specifc ...
92. Crocuses
93. Mail enclosure: inits.
94. Geronimo, for one
95. Spoken
98. Sleep phenomenon
99. Scarlett’s Butler
100. Church painting
101. Muses or Mets
102. Hands
103. Whiskey _
104. Flemish painter Jan van _
106. Indigo and henna, e.g.
108. Rtes.
109. Peak: abbr.
110. 100 square meters
111. Big bird of fable
112. Mel of the Giants

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F L M S U Z E E B T
M O R R A M O N A M
A R S P S R W M T R
E O Q A N K M G Y S
B L U U E Y E I M G
T D I L I N B M U R
N M M T W M A S P I
U A B D O N B S E G
A N Y R H P I Y U G
R E P E E K P O H S
Wor d Sear ch Answer
February 4 Crossword Answers
Continued From Page 13
What £Ise ls Happenin’
$unday, February 21 – YL MaIe Voice
Choir. A Hancher Auditorium presentation,
featuring the noted 65-voice ensemble in
concert. Iowa City West High School (2901
Melrose Avenue, Iowa City). 2 p.m. $21-$35.
For tickets and information, call (319)335-
1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.
edu.
Wednesday, February 24 – Lotus.
Instrumental rockers in concert, with an
opening set by Family Groove Company.
The Capitol Theatre (330 West Third Street,
Davenport). 7 p.m. $15-$18. For tickets
and information, call (563)326-8820 or visit
TheCapDavenport.com.
7hursday, February 25 – Let’s Rock:
Decades of Rock ’n’ Roll. Cabaret concert
featuring performances by the theatre’s
performing wait staf, the Bootleggers, and
cast members from the current Joseph & the
Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and 2008’s
production of Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story.
Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third
Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $10-$12. For
tickets and information, call (309)786-7733
extension 2, or visit Circa21.com.
Friday, February 26 – 7he $pinners.
Concert starring the beloved Motown
singers of “I’ll Be Around,” and “Could It Be
I’m Falling In Love.” Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway,
Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $20-$25. For tickets
and information, call (800)843-4753 or visit
Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
$aturday, February 27 – Spend a
Night with Ray: A Tribute to Ray Charles.
Concert featuring internationally-acclaimed
musician Ray Blue and his New York Band.
Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center
(1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m.
$20-$50. For tickets and information,
call (800)843-4753 or visit Bettendorf.
IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
$aturday, February 27 – FIatfoot
56. Chicago-based musicians performing
Celtic punk and folk-tinged hardcore.
The Redstone Room (129 Main Street,
Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $10. For tickets and
information, call (877)326-1333 or visit
RedstoneRoom.com.
THEATRE
7hursday, February 25, through
$aturday, March 6 – Tired American
Dream. Workshop performance of David
Childs’ debuting rock musical, directed by
Tristan Tapscott. Harrison Hilltop Theatre
(1601 Harrison Street, Davenport). Thursday-
Saturday 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $10. For tickets
and information, call 563-449-6371 or visit
HarrisonHilltop.com.
EXHI BI T
$aturday, February 27, through Monday,
May 31 – Visions of Iowa: Arthur Geisert,
Country Road ABC. Exhibit featuring sketches
and drawings form the award-winning author
and illustrator of 22 children’s books. Figge Art
Museum (225 West Second Street, Davenport).
Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thurdsday
10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunday noon-5 p.m. Free with
museum admission. For information, call
(563)326-7804 or visit FiggeArt.org.
EVENTS
7hursday, February 18, through $unday,
February 21 – 2010 0utdoor $how. Four-
day event for fshing professionals and lovers of
the outdoors, showcasing boats, tackle, decoys,
gear, and more. QCCA Expo Center (2621
Fourth Avenue, Rock Island). Thursday 4-9 p.m.;
Friday noon-8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.-8 p.m.;
Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $1-$6. For information,
call (309)788-5912 or visit QCCAExpoCenter.
com.
Friday, February 26, and $aturday,
February 27 – 0ravity $Iashers FreestyIe
Motocross 7our. Stunt show featuring aerial
acrobatics including Clifhangers, Sterilizers,
Tsunamis, Hart Attacks, and many more. i
wireless Center (1201 River Drive, Moline). 7:30
p.m. $15-$30. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or
visit iwirelessCenter.com.
$aturday, February 27 – Hope for Haiti
ßeneñt Concert & Art Auction. Disaster-relief
fundraiser featuring a silent art auction and
musical performances by local artists including
Lord Green, Centaur Noir, and Chad Gooch. For
ages 21 and older. The Blackhawk Room (417
15th Street, Moline). 6 p.m. $5. For information,
call Nick Mielke at (309)507-1140 or Jon Burns
at (309)912-5024.
R£AL £$7A7£
R£N7AL$

2 ßR Apt. ßettendorf $450 per month +
utilities, water paid. Non smokers only, no
pets. deposit required. Call M-F 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. - 563-355-5722.
2 ßR Apt in 0ewitt.
Rental Assistance available.
All utilities paid.
On-site Laundry.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
563-212-0205.
0owntown 0avenport Apartments-
Efciency & 1 Bedrooms available.
$340-$430 per month. MOVE-IN DISCOUNT
- 20% of 1st month’s rent.
$15.00 discount each month for timely rent
payment. Appliances furnished,
water/sewer paid, on-site laundry, of street
parking available, secure entry, no pets.
311 W 3rd St, Davenport. 563-323-7737.

KimberIy Park and CoIoniaI Court have
apartments for rent! Call us for our monthly
specials, 563-445-7535! Voted #1 in the River
Cities Reader Best of the Quad Cities poll!
10ß$
£MPL0YM£N7
0rivers: C0L-A, 07R Postions AvaiIabIe.
OTR: Home 3 out of 4 wknds/mo. Regional:
2 out of 4 wknds/mo. All 48 states. Benefts!
Jamie: 800-596-6433. Only 5 openings! Call
a company that you?re a person, not a truck
number!

0rivers: C0L-A, 1 yr £xp. System 2x4-
$0.33cpm. Regional 3x4-$0.35cpm. P/T-
$0.41cpm. Benefts and Great Hometime!
Jamie: 800-593-6433.
07H£R

£V£N7$

7rivia Night Fundraiser @ Davenport
Masonic Center February 26, 2010
@ 7pm Contact Audrey Adamson @
audreyadamson@augustana.edu or @
309-236-6804 for more info or to make
reservations.

07H£R
H£AL7H $£RVlC£$

Massage 7herapist now booking events
for February, March & April. Weddings,
Birthdays, Fundraisers, Benefts, etc. 563-
340-8120. Gift Certifcates Available.

Massage RoIIback to $35
from $50 for February.
Tell yourself, tell a friend
but call today.
Joetta Engels, massage
563-340-8120
Dr. Lisa Jost, chiropractor
563-322-8736
Traci Malone-Jones, esthetician
563-323-5897
Visit us at 506 E Locust St,
Davenport.
Gift Certifcates Available
0PP0R7UNl7l£$

Did you know that you can run ANY
cIassiñed ad onIine for free at www.
rcreader.com? Just email it to classifeds@
rcreader.com and we’ll get it posted online.
Send a picture or two along and we’ll
include those, too. Make sure you include all
pertinent contact information in the body of
your classifed ad. Check out what’s already
there at www.rcreader.com/classifeds. We
reserve the right to edit all classifeds.

Augustana PubIic Radio Information
Service (APRIS) at WVIK needs volunteers
to read from local newspapers live over
the radio to those who are visually and
physically impaired. To volunteer, please call
Diane at 309-794-7560.

Volunteer at the Mississippi Valley
Regional Blood Center. Many
opportunities to help. Please call 563-
823-4146 or visit www.bloodcenter.org/
volunteer/jobs.htm
CALL TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY!
(563) 324-0049 or visit
RiverCitiesReader.com/cIassiñeds
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Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) - The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust, Davenport, IA
Smooth Groove - Martini’s On the Rock,
4619 34th St, Rock Island, IL
Spatterdash - Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.,
Bettendorf, IA
Split Lip Rayfeld - Mad Monks - Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St, Iowa City, IA
The Andrew Landers Project - The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St, Davenport, IA
The Bucktown Revue - River Music Experi-
ence, 129 Main St, Davenport, IA
The Chris & Terry Show - Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St., Davenport, IA
TheHorde- Helmsplitter - TheFifthDawn
- Hal’s Wagon Wheel, 1708 State Street,
Bettendorf, IA
Tronicity - 11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th
St, Davenport, IA
Upper RoomCofeehouse - First Christian
Church of Davenport, 510 E 15th St,
Davenport, IA
2010/02/20 (Sat)
Area Code - Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22, Riverside, IA
August Zimbal - The Post Mortems - Dyn-
oride - Hal’s Wagon Wheel, 1708 State
Street, Bettendorf, IA
Bee All UCan Bee Karaoke & DJ - Crabby’s,
826 W. 1st Ave., Coal Valley, IL
Beneft for Russell Karkowski: The Reclin-
ers - Acoustic Mayhem - The Mill, 120 E
Burlington, Iowa City, IA
Brother Trucker - The Redstone Room, 129
Main St, Davenport, IA
Caught intheAct - GB’s Sports Bar, 655Main
St., New Liberty, IA
Cosmic - Go Fish Marina and Bar, 411 River
Dr., Princeton, IA
Carrie Newcomer - CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103
3rd St SE, Cedar Rapids, IA
Dani Lynn Howe Band - Blueport Junction,
6605 W River Dr, Davenport, IA
DJ Night - Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St., Blue Grass, IA
Evolution - Route 61 Bar & Grill, 4320 N.
Brady St., Davenport, IA
Friday Fest w/ Dwyer & Michaels and
Just Cuz - Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St, Bettendorf, IA
Funktastic Five - Rascals Rock Memorabilia
Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
Gray Wolf Band - Jumer’s Casino & Hotel,
I-280 & I-92, Rock Island, IL
John Wesley Harding - Dag Juhlin -
CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE, Cedar
Rapids, IA
Karaoke Night - Old Stardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th St, Moline, IL
KaraokeNight - Sneaky Pete’s, 207Cody Rd.
N., LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night & Contest - Toucan’s Grille-
n-Cantina, 2020 1st Street, Milan, IL
KASS DJ Night - Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St., Moline, IL
Lee Blackmon & The Gamblers (6:30pm)
- Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St, Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Ren Estrand (noon) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
Mr. Whoopie - One More Round, 209-211
E. 2nd St, Muscatine, IA
New Odyssey (7 & 10pm) - Dennis Albee
(8:30pm) - Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22, Riverside, IA
NINE-1-1 - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust,
Davenport, IA
Quad City Flute Association Membership
Recital - First Congregational Church,
101 W Pearl St, Geneseo, IL
Rebel City Outlaw - Shenanigan’s, 303 W.
3rd St., Davenport, IA
2010/02/18 (Thu)
Black Hawk College Jazz Ensemble
(6:30pm) - Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St,
Rock Island, IL
ChicagoUndergroundDuo- Koplant No-
The Mill, 120 E Burlington, Iowa City, IA
Euforquestra - Clean Living- Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St, Iowa City, IA
Live Lunch w/ Chris Dunn (noon) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
New Karaoke - Hal’s Wagon Wheel, 1708
State Street, Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night - The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St, Davenport, IA
Strange Arrangement - RIBCO, 1815 2nd
Ave., Rock Island, IL
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring
JimmieLeeAdams - Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
TroyHarris, Pianist (6pm) - RedCrowGrille,
2504 53rd St., Bettendorf, IA
Velvet Davenport - Viking Fuck - Florida
- Parade in the Old Country Sky
- The Picador, 330 E. Washington St.,
Iowa City, IA
2010/02/19 (Fri)
Area Code - Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22, Riverside, IA
Artimus Pyle - Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway,
Bettendorf, IA
Battle of the Bands, Round 4 - Wild Card
- RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave., Rock Island, IL
Bee All UCan Bee Karaoke & DJ -Commo-
dore Tap, 2202 w. 3rd St, Davenport, IA
Brighton MA - Bright Giant - The Ted-
dy Boys - The Mill, 120 E Burlington,
Iowa City, IA
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Live Music
Continued On Page 22
20 Saturday
18 Thursday
19 FRIday
FOR RENT
:
Great Spaces in Bucktown
Davenport Riverfront!
Ofce & Warehouse. High-Speed Internet, Loading Docks, Parking, River Views.
$2 to $10 per square foot – www.admospheres.com
Contact Todd McGreevy, Owner: 563-322-4864 or sales@admospheres.com
301 E 2nd Street, Davenport, IA 52801(aka Peterson Paper Building)
1550 sf ofce – up to 10,000 sf warehouse
308 E River Drive, Davenport, IA 52801 (south of Peterson Paper)
1500 sf ofce – up to 5000 sf warehouse
225 E 2nd Street, Davenport, IA 52801 Bucktown Arts Center
4th Floor Loft Condo – For Sale or Lease
3000 sf – Warm Shell – #1 River View in Quad Cities
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Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Live Music Live Music Live Music Live Music
Dani LynnHoweBand- Plamor BowlingAl-
ley, 1411 Grandview Ave., Muscatine, IA
David Zollo & the Body Electric - Exposed
Fiction - Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St, Iowa City, IA
DJ Night - Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St., Blue Grass, IA
FatimaBlush- Aural Resuscitation- Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
Gray Wolf Band - Jumer’s Casino & Hotel,
I-280 & I-92, Rock Island, IL
JoBu - Bent River Brewing Company, 1413
5th Ave., Moline, IL
JoeDife- HazzardCounty- OrpheumThe-
atre, 57 S. Kellogg St., Galesburg, IL
Karaoke Night - McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave, Moline, IL
Karaoke Night - Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Caman-
che Ave, Clinton, IA
Marmaduke- HawkeyeTap, 4646Cheyenne
Ave., Davenport, IA
Minus Six - RI BCO, 1815 2nd Ave. , Rock
Island, IL
Mommy’s Little Monster - Route 61 Bar &
Grill, 4320 N. Brady St., Davenport, IA
Mondo Drag - Maylane - The One Night
Standards - River Music Experience, 129
Main St, Davenport, IA
New Odyssey (7 & 10pm) - Kathy Ogden
(8:30pm) - Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22, Riverside, IA
NINE-1-1 - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust,
Davenport, IA
OpenMic Night - Cofee Dive, 230 W. 3rd St.
2nd Floor, Davenport, IA
Rascal Flatts - Darius Rucker - i wireless
Center, 1201 River Dr, Moline, IL
Regan (6:30pm) - Pleasant Valley High
School, 604 Belmont Rd, Bettendorf, IA
Salsa Dancing - Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St., Moline, IL
SinCityOrchestra- Toucan’s Outdoor Grille-
n-Cantina, 2020 1st Street, Milan, IL
Smooth Groove - Martini’s On the Rock,
4619 34th St, Rock Island, IL
The Ellis Kell Band: 20th Anniversary
Celebration - Rascals Rock Memorabilia
Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
The Knockofs - Fargo, 4204 Avenue of the
Cities, Moline, IL
The Lovedogs - Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr., Bet-
tendorf, IA
Tronicity - 11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th
St, Davenport, IA
2010/02/21 (Sun)
Breille - The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618 W.
Locust St., Davenport, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pmbrunch
performance) - TheLodgeHotel, Spruce
Hills & Utica Ridge, Bettendorf, IA
Strangely Familiar (2pm) - Riverside
Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway
22, Riverside, IA
The Avey Brothers - Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
The Awful Purdies (5pm) - The Mill, 120 E
Burlington, Iowa City, IA
The Terry Hanson Ensemble (10am) -
Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC
Plaza Hotel, Davenport, IA
TroyHarris, Pianist (11:30am) - Bass Street
Chop House, 1601 River Dr, Moline, IL
YL Male Voice Choir (2pm) - Iowa City
West High School, 2901 Melrose Ave,
Iowa City, IA
2010/02/22 (Mon)
KaraokeNight - TheOldStardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th Street, Moline, IL
Universityof IowaJazz Performance- The
Mill, 120 E Burlington, Iowa City, IA
2010/02/26 (Fri)
Battle of the Bands, Round 5 - Finals -
RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave., Rock Island, IL
Bee All UCan Bee Karaoke & DJ - Commo-
dore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St., Davenport, IA
BlueCollar Band- 11thStreet Precinct, 2108
E 11th St, Davenport, IA
BuddyOlson(5pm) - Missipi Brew, River Dr,
Muscatine, IA
Deja Vu Rendezvous - Rose ‘n’ Thorns
- The Redstone Room, 129 Main St,
Davenport, IA
DJ Night - Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St., Blue Grass, IA
I amGhost - Modern Day Escape - We Are
theBecoming- Distance- MiseryLoves
Comfort - River Music Experience, 129
Main St, Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night - Old Stardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th St, Moline, IL
Karaoke Night - Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody
Rd. N., LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night & Contest - Toucan’s Grille-
n-Cantina, 2020 1st Street, Milan, IL
KASS DJ Night - Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St., Moline, IL
Liveat theLounge - St. AmbroseUniversity,
518 W. Locust, Davenport, IA
Marmaduke - Hal’s Wagon Wheel, 1708
State Street, Bettendorf, IA
NINE-1-1 - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust,
Davenport, IA
Orquesta Alto Maiz - The Mill, 120 E Burl-
ington, Iowa City, IA
Phyllis &theSharks - Martini’s Onthe Rock,
4619 34th St, Rock Island, IL
RetroRon(5:30pm) - Mojo’s (River Music Ex-
perience), 130 W 2nd St, Davenport, IA
OpenMicNight w/ SteveMcFate(6:30pm)
- Cool Beanz Cofeehouse, 1325 30th St.,
Rock Island, IL
“Tennessee,” That Nashville Cat (noon)
- Open Mic Night (7pm) - Mojo’s (Riv-
er Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
The Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -
The Mill, 120 E Burlington, Iowa City, IA
TheChris &Wes Show- MoundStreet Land-
ing, 1029 Mound St., Davenport, IA
TheCraigBentleyTrio - Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
2010/02/25 (Thu)
Bl ack Hawk Col l ege Jazz Ensembl e
(6:30pm) - Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St,
Rock Island, IL
Catie Curtis - CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St
SE, Cedar Rapids, IA
JazzJamwiththeNorthScott JazzCombo
- River Music Experience, 129 Main St,
Davenport, IA
Liferuiner - No Wings to Speak of - Reap-
ing Asmodeia - When Forever Ends
- The Challenge - Faces Turned Ashen
- Revive the Fallen - Of Flesh Unseen
(5pm) - The Picador, 330 E. Washington
St., Iowa City, IA
Live Lunch w/ Dave Maxwell (noon)
- Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St, Davenport, IA
New Karaoke - Hal’s Wagon Wheel, 1708
State Street, Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night - The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St, Davenport, IA
Pictures of Then - Modoc - The Efects -
RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave., Rock Island, IL
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring
JimmieLeeAdams - Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
TroyHarris, Pianist (6pm) - RedCrowGrille,
2504 53rd St., Bettendorf, IA
Live Lunch w/ Randy Arcenas (noon) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight - The Mill, 120 E
Burlington, Iowa City, IA
2010/02/23 (Tue)
Bryan Adams - Capitol Theatre, 330 W. 3rd
St., Davenport, IA
J. Elliot - The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191
19th Street, Moline, IL
JustinTownes Earle- JoePug- TheMill, 120
E Burlington, Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night - McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave, Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Jonathan Turner (noon)
- Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St, Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen - Bi er
Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St, Dav-
enport, IA
Ray Blue (6:30pm) - Fairmount Street
Li br ar y, 3000 N. Fai r mount St . ,
Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show - Rascals Rock Mem-
orabilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
2010/02/24 (Wed)
Dave Ellis of the Fry Daddies - Bier Stube
Da v e n p o r t , 2 2 2 8 E 1 1 t h S t ,
Davenport, IA
Dubskin featuring Corey Eberhard of
Pretty Lights - Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St, Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night - Old Stardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th St, Moline, IL
Lotus - Capitol Theatre, 330 W. 3rd St.,
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night - The Old Stardust Sports
Bar, 1191 19th Street, Moline, IL
Carrie Newcomer @ CSPS Legion Arts - February 19
22 monday
23 tuesday
Continued From Page 21
21 sunday
26 FRIday
25 Thursday
24 wednesday
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LiveLunchw/ SteveCouch(noon) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W2nd St,
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen - Bier Stube
Davenport, 2228 E 11th St, Davenport, IA
The Chris &Wes Show- Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
2010/03/03 (Wed)
DaveEllisof theFryDaddies- Bier StubeDaven-
port, 2228 E 11th St, Davenport, IA
Fred Eaglesmith - The Ginn Sisters - CSPS/Le-
gion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE, Cedar Rapids, IA
Open Mic Night - The Old Stardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th Street, Moline, IL
“Tennessee,”That Nashville Cat (noon)
- Open Mic Night (7pm) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd
St, Davenport, IA
TheChris &Wes Show- MoundStreet Landing,
1029 Mound St., Davenport, IA
The Craig BentleyTrio - Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
The Nadas- The Mill, 120 E. Burlington Iowa
City, IA
2010/03/04 (Thu)
BlackHawkCollege Jazz Ensemble (6:30pm)
- Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St, Rock Island, IL
Live Lunch w/ Rose ‘n’ Thorns (noon) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
NewKaraoke - Hal’s Wagon Wheel, 1708 State
Street, Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night - The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd
St, Davenport, IA
Summercamp Battle of the Bands - Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St, Iowa City, IA
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuringJim-
mieLeeAdams - Rascals Rock Memorabilia
Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) - Red Crow Grille,
2504 53rd St., Bettendorf, IA
2010/03/05 (Fri)
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ - Commo-
dore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St., Davenport, IA
Dani Lynn Howe Band - Edje Nightclub at
Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy
92, Rock Island, IL
Dawn’s Cofeehouse (5pm) - Dawn’s Hide
& Bead Away, 220 E Washington St,
Iowa City, IA
Deanna Swoboda ( 3pm) - Deer e-
Wiman Carriage House, 817 11th Ave.,
Moline, IL
DJ Night - Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St., Blue Grass, IA
Gray Wolf Band - Martini’s On the Rock,
4619 34th St, Rock Island, IL
Henhouse Prowlers - Porchbuilder -
Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St, Iowa
City, IA
Karaoke Night - Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody
Rd. N., LeClaire, IA
KASS DJ Night - Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St., Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Ren Estrand (noon) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
Rude Punch - Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.,
Bettendorf, IA
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) - The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust, Davenport, IA
Tea Leaf Green - The Giving Tree Band
- The Redstone Room, 129 Main St,
Davenport, IA
The Chris & Terry Show - Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St., Davenport,
IA
W-900 - Route 61 Bar & Grill, 4320 N. Brady
St., Davenport, IA
Dani Lynn Howe Band - Mulligan’s Valley
Pub, 310 W 1st Ave, Coal Valley, IL
DeathShips- Datagun- OliviaRoseMuzzy
- Vagabonds - TheMill, 120E Burlington,
Iowa City, IA
DJ Night - Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St., Blue Grass, IA
Elysion Fields - Searching for Security
- Cricoris - Moral Belief (5pm) - River
Music Experience, 129 Main St, Dav-
enport, IA
Flatfoot 56 - The Redstone Room, 129 Main
St, Davenport, IA
FunktasticFive- Martini’s OntheRock, 4619
34th St, Rock Island, IL
GrayWolf Band- Toucan’s Outdoor Grille-n-
Cantina, 2020 1st Street, Milan, IL
Hope for Haiti Concert: Lord Green - Cen-
taur Noir - Chad Gooch (6pm) - The
Blackhawk Room, Downtown Moline,
next to the Bier Stube, Moline, IL
House Arrest - Rumors, 1415 Grandview
Ave., Muscatine, IA
Karaoke Night - McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave, Moline, IL
Karaoke Night - Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Caman-
che Ave, Clinton, IA
Mommy’s Little Monster - Mound Street
Landing, 1029 Mound St., Davenport, IA
NINE-1-1 - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust,
Davenport, IA
OpenMic Night - Cofee Dive, 230 W. 3rd St.
2nd Floor, Davenport, IA
Orangadang! - Bent River Brewing Com-
pany, 1413 5th Ave., Moline, IL
Richie Lee - Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22, Riverside, IA
RiverCity6 - Rhythm City Casino, 101 W.
River Dr., Davenport, IA
Salsa Dancing - Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St., Moline, IL
Secret Squirrel - Jersey Grille, 5255 Jersey
Ridge Rd, Davenport, IA
Richie Lee - Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22, Riverside, IA
RiverCity6 - Rhythm City Casino, 101 W.
River Dr., Davenport, IA
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) - The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust, Davenport, IA
Smile (noon) - Bettendorf Public Library,
2950 Learning Campus, Bettendorf, IA
Stoopifunk - Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.,
Bettendorf, IA
Tapped Out - Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St, Bettendorf, IA
The Spinners - Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway,
Bettendorf, IA
Tony Hoeppner (noon) - Mojo’s (River Music
Experience), 130 W 2nd St, Davenport, IA
Trampled by Turtles - The Boomchucks
- Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St, Iowa
City, IA
Tronicity - Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino
and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92, Rock Island, IL
Unexpected - Route 61 Bar & Grill, 4320 N.
Brady St., Davenport, IA
2010/02/27 (Sat)
Acoustic JamSession w/ Steve McFate - Cor-
ner Tap, 4018 14th Ave., Rock Island, IL
BeeAll UCanBeeKaraoke&DJ - Crabby’s, 826
W. 1st Ave., Coal Valley, IL
BigFunkGuarantee- AmandaMiller andthe
SmokingSextion - Iowa CityYacht Club, 13
S Linn St, Iowa City, IA
Buzzkill - Zed - Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar,
1414 15th St., Moline, IL
Community Drum Circle (10:30am) - Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St,
Davenport, IA
Cosmic - 11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St,
Davenport, IA
Crossroads - Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St,
Bettendorf, IA
Spend the Night with Ray... a Tribute to
Ray Charles - Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway,
Bettendorf, IA
Trash Martini - Uptown Neighborhood Bar
and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr., Bet-
tendorf, IA
Tronicity - Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and
Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92, Rock Island, IL
Who Cares - Tommy’s, 1302 4th Ave, Mo-
line, IL
WickedLiz &theBellySwirls - Route61Bar &
Grill, 4320 N. Brady St., Davenport, IA
Wicked Nature - Hal’s Wagon Wheel, 1708
State Street, Bettendorf, IA
2010/02/28 (Sun)
Breille - The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618W. Locust
St., Davenport, IA
Buddy Olson (2pm) - Riverside Casino and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22, River-
side, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch
performance) - The Lodge Hotel, Spruce
Hills & Utica Ridge, Bettendorf, IA
Sunday Afternoon Social Dance w/ the Ken
Paulsen Quartet (3pm) - Viking Club of
Moline, 1450 41st Street, Moline, IL
The Avey Brothers - Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St., Moline, IL
The Red Stick Ramblers - CSPS/Legion
Arts, 1103 3rd St SE, Cedar Rapids, IA
TroyHarris, Pianist (11:30am) - Bass Street
Chop House, 1601 River Dr, Moline, IL
Valli to Valli: ATribute to the Jersey Boys
- Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184
Highway 22, Riverside, IA
Whoozdads (10am) - Brady Street Chop
House, Radi sson QC Pl aza Hotel,
Davenport, IA
2010/03/01 (Mon)
Daytrotter Presents: LauraVeirs - Huckle-
berry’s, 223 18th St, Rock Island, IL
KaraokeNight -TheOldStardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th Street, Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Randy Arcenas (noon)
- Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St, Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight - The Mill, 120 E
Burlington, Iowa City, IA
2010/03/02 (Tue)
J. Elliot - The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191
19th Street, Moline, IL
Pictures of Then @ RIBCO - February 25
Live Music Live Music Live Music Live Music
27 Saturday
28 sunday
4 thursday
Get Your Gig or Venue
HIGHLIGHTED
Advertise in the Reader.
Call 563-324-0049
5 FRIDAY
1 monday
2 tuesday
3 wednesday
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Over half of Metro’s fleet runs on clean burning Compressed
Natural Gas—keeping our skies blue while providing safe,
reliable transportation for thousands of Quad Citians.
www.gogreenmetro.com
IN OUR WORLD
BLUE
ISTHE
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