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COMPLETE REVISION

March 2007

Process Industry Practices


Machinery

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

PURPOSE AND USE OF PROCESS INDUSTRY PRACTICES


In an effort to minimize the cost of process industry facilities, this Practice has
been prepared from the technical requirements in the existing standards of major
industrial users, contractors, or standards organizations. By harmonizing these technical
requirements into a single set of Practices, administrative, application, and engineering
costs to both the purchaser and the manufacturer should be reduced. While this Practice
is expected to incorporate the majority of requirements of most users, individual
applications may involve requirements that will be appended to and take precedence
over this Practice. Determinations concerning fitness for purpose and particular matters
or application of the Practice to particular project or engineering situations should not
be made solely on information contained in these materials. The use of trade names
from time to time should not be viewed as an expression of preference but rather
recognized as normal usage in the trade. Other brands having the same specifications
are equally correct and may be substituted for those named. All Practices or guidelines
are intended to be consistent with applicable laws and regulations including OSHA
requirements. To the extent these Practices or guidelines should conflict with OSHA or
other applicable laws or regulations, such laws or regulations must be followed.
Consult an appropriate professional before applying or acting on any material
contained in or suggested by the Practice.

This Practice is subject to revision at any time.

Process Industry Practices (PIP), Construction Industry Institute, The


University of Texas at Austin, 3925 West Braker Lane (R4500), Austin,
Texas 78759. PIP member companies and subscribers may copy this Practice
for their internal use. Changes, overlays, addenda, or modifications of any
kind are not permitted within any PIP Practice without the express written
authorization of PIP.

PRINTING HISTORY
August 2000
Issued
March 2007
Complete Revision
Not printed with State funds

COMPLETE REVISION
March 2007

Process Industry Practices


Machinery

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines
Table of Contents
1. Introduction..................................... 2
1.1 Purpose .................................................. 2
1.2 Scope...................................................... 2

2. References ...................................... 2
2.1 Process Industry Practices ..................... 2

3. Definitions ....................................... 2
4. General ............................................ 3
5. Four Step Process.......................... 4
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4

Task Definition Step ............................... 4


Risk Assessment Step............................ 5
Recommendation Development Step..... 6
Resolution of Recommendations Step ... 8

Process Industry Practices

Appendix A Spare Parts


Management Guidelines
Worksheets
Appendix A1 - REEE005-F1
Task Definition Worksheet
Appendix A2 - REEE005-F2
Risk Assessment Worksheet
Appendix A3 - REEE005-F3
Final Parts Stocking Level Worksheet

Appendix B Spare Parts


Management Guidelines
Worksheet Examples
Appendix B1 - REEE005-F1
Task Definition Worksheet Example
Appendix B2 - REEE005-F2
Risk Assessment Worksheet Example
Appendix B3 - REEE005-F3
Final Parts Stocking Level Worksheet
Example

Page 1 of 9

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

1.

COMPLETE REVISION
March 2007

Introduction
1.1

Purpose
This Practice provides an objective, methodical process for identifying spare parts
needed for life cycle support of rotating equipment.
The intended users of this Practice are:
a. Persons who evaluate the need and develop recommendations for the acquisition
of equipment parts
b. Business and/or project managers who have the authority and accountability for
purchasing parts

1.2

Scope
This Practice describes the key factors used in identifying spare parts requirements
and quantities for rotating equipment. This Practice provides guidelines for
identifying needed spare parts, recognizing parts interchangeability opportunities,
identifying startup and maintenance parts, establishing locations and levels of parts
stocking. This Practice applies to new construction, expansion, or revamp projects;
maintenance; and stocking of rotating equipment parts inventory.
Comment: Spare part acquisition at the time of equipment purchase typically
results in lower overall pricing.

2.

References
Applicable parts of the following Practices shall be considered an integral part of this
Practice. The edition in effect on the date of contract award shall be used, except as otherwise
noted. Short titles are used herein where appropriate.
2.1

Process Industry Practices (PIP)


PIP REIE686 - Recommended Practices for Machinery Installation and Installation
Design

3.

Definitions
Consequence and Likelihood Factor (CLF): The product of two factors that define in relative
terms the results of an equipment failure and the probability of the failure occurring. The
resulting value is used to identify the parts and the quantity of those parts that should be
available as spares.
consignment stock: A parts supplier stocks the parts on the owners premises. The parts
supplier owns the stock, and the facility owner only pays for what is used. Stock levels are
determined by mutual agreement. Parts suppliers usually consign only items that are used
frequently.
construction/start-up parts: Replacement parts used before acceptance of the equipment by
the owner for commercial operations

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Process Industry Practices

COMPLETE REVISION
March 2007

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

consumables: Parts such as filters, belts, gaskets, etc., that are expected to wear out or
deteriorate under normal operating conditions. These conditions include system cleaning,
testing, inspection, and operation.
insurance parts: Parts such as high alloy components, compressor, steam and gas turbine
rotors, etc., that have long life expectancies or long lead times, but are required to avoid
unacceptable production losses while waiting for parts delivery. Parts may have long life
expectancy that would usually not justify stocking. However, lead times for these parts may
be long, producing an unacceptable probability of production interruption if they failed
unexpectedly.
MTBF: Mean Time Between Failure is the number of pieces of equipment divided by the
number of failures per period. For example, 100 pieces of equipment with 4 failures in a
month. MTBF = 100/4 = 25 months.
maintenance parts: Parts such as bearings, seals, couplings, impellers, wear rings, etc.,
required for routine and scheduled maintenance to replace parts subject to damage, wear,
or deterioration following acceptance of the equipment for commercial operation
parts supplier-dedicated stock: A parts supplier stocks parts that may only be used by one
facility owner. Stock levels are determined by the owner, and the parts are guaranteed to be
available when needed. A fee or a requirement to purchase within a certain period is often
associated with this service.
parts supplier stocking: A parts supplier stocks parts that may be used by other customers of
the supplier. There is no guarantee that the parts will be available to the facility owner when
needed, but the supplier is expected to maintain an adequate supply to prevent frequent out of
stock situations. No fee is usually associated with this service.
Comment: Capital parts or components are characterized by price, taxation, and
depreciation considerations that can be unique to each facility owner.
Therefore, this term is not used in this Practice.

4.

General
4.1 Spare parts are a part of cost effective equipment management from preliminary design
through decommissioning and disposal. The availability and quantity of equipment parts
contribute to the ability of a facility to produce beneficial output.
4.2 This Practice provides a four step process for selecting and managing rotating
equipment spare parts. The four steps that are explained in more detail later in this
Practice are:
a. Task Definition
b. Risk Assessment
c. Recommendation Development
d. Resolution of Recommendations
4.3 Managing spare parts may change according to the Task Definition step, but the
components of the Risk Assessment step will be similar regardless of the Task
Definition. Once the Risk Assessment step is completed, the Recommendation

Process Industry Practices

Page 3 of 9

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

COMPLETE REVISION
March 2007

Development step identifies parts and information to be used in the final


recommendation. The Resolution of Recommendations step is the process whereby the
owner and parts supplier come to an agreement on the scope of supply.
4.4 The four step process applies throughout the life of a piece of equipment. It should be
applicable to the acquisition of parts for a new equipment installation and to the review
of spare parts during an inventory reduction process.
4.5 The four step process can be applied to any task associated with establishing parts
requirements and developing stocking and supply procedures. The process is equally
applicable to new parts acquisition for a project or to review existing warehouse
inventories.
4.6 Factors and multipliers established to quantify spare parts can be varied for different
users or tasks. However, this process is consistent and repeatable.

5.

Four Step Process


5.1

Task Definition Step


5.1.1

The initial step should be to define the task deliverables and objectives.

5.1.2

Deliverables can range from parts lists to completely stocked warehouses of


parts.

5.1.3

Several immediate and potentially conflicting objectives are possible, such as


minimum investment, maximum availability, minimum lead time, and
maximum interchangeability.

5.1.4

The intent of the Task Definition step is to document the following


information:
a. Purpose definition (e.g., documentation of spare parts recommendations,
spare parts acquisition, inventory reconciliation)
b. Spare parts objectives (e.g., minimum investment, maximum availability,
etc.)
c. Equipment or component identification (e.g., asset number and
description)
d. Process functions of equipment
e. Operational alternatives available (e.g., temporary reduction in plant
throughput)
f.

Degree of risk acceptable to task originator

g. Spare parts budget


5.1.5

Page 4 of 9

Appendix A provides a Task Definition Worksheet, PIP REEE005-F1, and


Appendix B provides an example.

Process Industry Practices

COMPLETE REVISION

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

March 2007

5.2

Risk Assessment Step


5.2.1

Availability of spare parts minimizes the consequences of equipment


failures. To identify the insurance parts required, a risk assessment should be
performed that addresses consequences and likelihoods of equipment or
component failures.

5.2.2

Three levels of potential consequences should be defined in accordance with


Table 1.
Table 1 Consequence Factors
Consequence

5.2.3

Description

Factor

Critical

Process unit is down with failure,


limited or no alternatives.

Functionally
Important

Process unit is at risk with failure. Unit


may operate with reduced capacity.

Non-essential

Production is not affected or viable


alternative is available.

Three levels of likelihood should be defined in accordance with Table 2.


Table 2 Likelihood Factors
Likelihood

Description

Factor

High

Occurrence is more often than desired;


MTBF is less than desired.

Moderate

Occurrence is about as expected.

Low

Occurrence is less often than


expected; MTBF is equal to or greater
than desired.

5.2.4

By multiplying values of consequence and likelihood, a Consequences and


Likelihood Factor (CLF) value can be determined for each item of
equipment.

5.2.5

CLFs provide a ranking for equipment that can be used to develop spare parts
recommendations.

5.2.6

Possible combinations of consequences and likelihood factors and resulting


CLFs are shown in Table 3.

Process Industry Practices

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COMPLETE REVISION

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

March 2007

Table 3 Possible CLF Values


Consequence

5.3

Likelihood Factors

CLF

Critical (2)

High (3)

Critical (2)

Moderate (2)

Critical (2)

Low (1)

Functional (1)

High (3)

Functional (1)

Moderate (2)

Functional (1)

Low (1)

Non-essential (0)

Any

5.2.7

Values of consequence and likelihood should be assigned on the basis of


operating experience, including consideration of documented mean time
between failure (MTBF).

5.2.8

If no objective MTBF data are available, subjective values of likelihood


should be assigned on the basis of known failure rates for existing equipment
or on the basis of industry or parts supplier statistical data for new
installations.

5.2.9

Appendix A provides a Risk Assessment Worksheet, PIP REEE005-F2, and


Appendix B provides an example, for tabulating values for consequence,
likelihood, and resulting CLF to assist in summarizing risk assessments and
identifying and prioritizing parts that should be readily available as spares.
The data summarized in this worksheet support decisions on which parts
should be defined as essential spares and the optimal stocking locations for
storage.

Recommendation Development Step


5.3.1

The spare parts recommendation consists of quantities of parts and stocking


locations.

5.3.2

The quantity can range from zero to multiple.


4.3.2.1 Zero indicates that no spares are required.
4.3.2.2 Numbers larger than zero can be based on the number of identical
installed parts and/or the expected or historical failure rate.

5.3.3

Stocking locations may include plant warehouse, part suppliers warehouse,


or other agreed location.

5.3.4

The following steps should be followed to define the recommended types and
quantities of spare parts and the optimal stocking locations:
a. Similar equipment items should be grouped by manufacturer using
equipment identifications developed in the Task Definition step.
b. Spare parts listings and recommendations including the following
information should be requested from appropriate parts suppliers:
1) Equipment description
2) Model number and serial number

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Process Industry Practices

COMPLETE REVISION

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

March 2007

3) Recommended spare parts lists for construction, startup, and


maintenance, including consumables
4) Cross sectional drawings and specifications
5) Spare parts interchangeability lists (e.g., unique part numbers cross
referenced to asset descriptions)
6) Complete parts description including materials of construction,
special requirements, reparability status
7) Recommended quantities of spare parts
8) Stocking location options parts supplier stocking, distributor,
on-premises
9) Normal equipment manufacturer or distributor on-hand quantities
10) Parts supplier-dedicated stocking and/or on-premises consignment
stocking options
11) Price and delivery times for spare parts
12) MTBF data
13) Repair or new economics and feasibly information
c. Using the above information, the parts supplier-recommended types and
quantities of spare parts should be reviewed, and the parts usage history,
MTBF data, parts availability, etc., should be evaluated.
d. Recommended quantities of spare parts should be developed from parts
suppliers recommendations, CLF values, historical experience, or a
rationalization of these considerations.
e. Recommended quantities of spare parts should be adjusted in accordance
with the total quantity of identical parts that exist in the owners
facilities. The adjusted quantities of spare parts should be summarized
using the Final Parts Stocking Level Worksheet, PIP REEE005-F3, and
example, provided in Appendices A and B. The final recommendation
should be determined from this assessment, considering needs,
availability, and budgets.
f.

The final recommended spare parts list should include the following
supporting information:
1) Parts suppliers priced recommended parts list
2) Completed Risk Assessment Worksheet, PIP REEE005-F2
3) Completed Final Parts Stocking Level Worksheet, PIP REEE005-F3
4) Parts suppliers spare parts interchangeability list
5) Comments as required

Process Industry Practices

Page 7 of 9

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

5.4

COMPLETE REVISION
March 2007

Resolution of Recommendations Step


5.4.1

The spare parts recommendation details should be agreed upon and


approved.

5.4.2

The Resolution of Recommendations step evaluates the risk of rotating


equipment failures and whether the spare parts recommendation is
appropriate to the risk and the spare parts objectives for support of plant
operation.

5.4.3

The following steps should be followed to obtain final resolution of the spare
parts recommendations:
a. Appropriate owner personnel (e.g., facility maintenance specialists,
engineering, purchasing) should be consulted to review and approve the
recommendations.
b. Owner reviews should consider the following:
1) Risk Assessment Worksheet, PIP REEE005-F2
2) Clearing and disassembly time estimates for the rotating equipment
3) Availability of storage and warehouse space, climate controlled
environment, spare parts personnel
4) Spare parts budget
5) Owners facilities locations, proximity to equipment parts and
service
6) Company business objectives
7) Operating, process experience
8) Existing spare parts inventory
9) Local parts suppliers familiarity with the owners facilities
10) Computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) selected
and established
11) Training requirements
12) Stocking locations and consignment stocking arrangements for spare
parts
c. Once the recommendations are resolved, the following details should be
completed as required:
1) Purchase order with a completed Final Parts Stocking Levels
Worksheet, PIP REEE005-F3, of required parts, part numbers,
quantities, shipping instructions, and prices
2) Storage requirements (see PIP REIE686)
3) Quality assurance and testing requirements
4) Instructions for deletion/disposal of existing inventory not approved
for continued storage

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Process Industry Practices

COMPLETE REVISION

PIP REEE005
Spare Parts Management Guidelines

March 2007

5) Special packaging for shipment requirements


6) CMMS update

Process Industry Practices

Page 9 of 9

Appendix A Spare Parts Management Guidelines Worksheets


Appendix A1 - REEE005-F1 Task Definition Worksheet
Appendix A2 - REEE005-F2 Risk Assessment Worksheet
Appendix A3 - REEE005-F3 Final Parts Stocking Level Worksheet

ASSOC. PIP
REEE005

TASK DEFINITION WORKSHEET

REEE005-F1
PAGE 1 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

NO.

DATE

REVISION DESCRIPTION

BY

CHECKED

MINIMUM INVESTMENT
OVERALL PHILOSOPHY:

MAXIMUM AVAILABILITY

INDIVIDUAL OBJECTIVES:

MINIMUM LEAD TIME

PROPOSED PARTS BUDGET:

MAXIMUM INTERGHANGEABILITY

APPROVED PARTS BUDGET:

OPERATIONAL ALTERNATIVES

AVAILABLE STORAGE FACILITY:

DEGREE OF ACCEPTABLE RISK


SPARE PARTS BUDGET

NO.

ASSET NO.

DESCRIPTION

PROCESS FUNCTION

DISPOSITION

APPROVED

ASSOC. PIP

TASK DEFINITION WORKSHEET

REEE005

REEE005-F1
PAGE 2 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

MINIMUM INVESTMENT

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

MAXIMUM AVAILABILITY
MINIMUM LEAD TIME
MAXIMUM INTERGHANGEABILITY
OPERATIONAL ALTERNATIVES
DEGREE OF ACCEPTABLE RISK
SPARE PARTS BUDGET

NO.

ASSET NO.

DESCRIPTION

PROCESS FUNCTION

DISPOSITION

ASSOC. PIP
REEE005

RISK ASSESSMENT WORKSHEET

REEE005-F2
PAGE 1 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

NO.

DATE

REVISION DESCRIPTION

BY

CHECKED

CONSEQUENCE
LIKELIHOOD
CLF

NO.

ASSET NO.

DESCRIPTION

PROCESS FUNCTION

REMARKS

APPROVED

ASSOC. PIP

RISK ASSESSMENT WORKSHEET

REEE005

REEE005-F2
PAGE 2 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

CONSEQUENCE

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

LIKELIHOOD
CLF

NO.

ASSET NO.

DESCRIPTION

PROCESS FUNCTION

REMARKS

ASSOC. PIP

FINAL PARTS STOCKING LEVEL WORKSHEET

REEE005

REEE005-F3
PAGE 1 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

NO.

DATE

IDENTICAL PIECES OF EQUIPMENT

REVISION DESCRIPTION

BY

CHECKED

APPROVED

RESOLUTION/

INITIALLY

APPROVED

ESTIMATED

REMARKS*

RECOMMENDED

QUANTITY

COST

EQUIPMENT IDENTIFICATION:

(CLF = 6 - 4) =
(CLF = 3 - 2) =
(CLF = 1 - 0) =
NO.

PART

PART NO.

NO. OF IDENTICAL PARTS


CLF --->

SEE SECTION 4.4 FOR RESOLUTION OF REQUIREMENTS.


* INSURANCE PARTS ARE IDENTIFIED IN REMARKS COLUMN.

6-4
CRITICAL

3-2
1-0
FUNCT'L UNLIKELY

TOTAL
NO.

ESTIMATED TOTAL COST:

ASSOC. PIP

FINAL PARTS STOCKING LEVEL WORKSHEET

REEE005

REEE005-F3
PAGE 2 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

NO.

PART

PART NO.

NO. OF IDENTICAL PARTS


CLF --->

SEE SECTION 4.4 FOR RESOLUTION OF REQUIREMENTS.


* INSURANCE PARTS ARE IDENTIFIED IN REMARKS COLUMN.

6-4
CRITICAL

3-2
1-0
FUNCT'L UNLIKELY

TOTAL
NO.

RESOLUTION/

INITIALLY

APPROVED

ESTIMATED

REMARKS*

RECOMMENDED

QUANTITY

COST

ESTIMATED TOTAL COST:

Appendix B Spare Parts Management Guidelines Worksheet Examples


Appendix B1 - REEE005-F1 Task Definition Worksheet Example
Appendix B2 - REEE005-F2 Risk Assessment Worksheet Example
Appendix B3 - REEE005-F3 Final Parts Stocking Level Worksheet Example

ASSOC. PIP

TASK DEFINITION WORKSHEET EXAMPLE

REEE005

REEE005-F1
PAGE 1 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

NO.

DATE

REVISION DESCRIPTION

BY

CHECKED

MINIMUM INVESTMENT
OVERALL PHILOSOPHY:

MAXIMUM AVAILABILITY

INDIVIDUAL OBJECTIVES:

MINIMUM LEAD TIME

PROPOSED PARTS BUDGET:

MAXIMUM INTERGHANGEABILITY

APPROVED PARTS BUDGET:

OPERATIONAL ALTERNATIVES

AVAILABLE STORAGE FACILITY:

DEGREE OF ACCEPTABLE RISK


SPARE PARTS BUDGET

NO.

ASSET NO.

450-27603

MFR. A, MDL. 3000

DESCRIPTION

1ST STG FEED PUMP - W

DISPOSITION

450-27604

MFR. A, MDL. 3000

1ST STG FEED PUMP - E

INSTALLED SPARE

450-27645

MFR. A, MDL. 3000

2ND STG FEED PUMP - W

UN-SPARED

450-27662

MFR. B, MDL. 20EFG

BOTTOMS RECIRC PUMP

450-27665

MFR. B, MDL. 2x12 ABMDL. 2x12 XY

2ND STG BTMS TR PUMP - E

450-27666

MFR. B, MDL. 2x12 ABMDL. 2x12 XY

2ND STG BTMS TR PUMP - W

450-27693

MFR. A, MDL. 3000

2ND STG FEED PUMP

450-27730

MFR. C, MDL. ABC

NH3 STRIPPER FD TRANS PUMP

450-27731

MFR. C, MDL. ABC

NH3 STRIPPER FD TRANS PUMP

10

450-27735

MFR. D, MDL. 4x6 JKL

NH3 STRIP REFLUX PUMP - W

11

450-27736

MFR. D, MDL. 4x6 JKL

NH3 STRIP REFLUX PUMP - E

12

450-27737

MFR. A, MDL. 4000

25 HP BOTTOMS TRANSFER PUMP

PROCESS FUNCTION

INSTALLED SPARE

INSTALLED SPARE

INSTALLED SPARE

APPROVED

ASSOC. PIP
REEE005

RISK ASSESSMENT WORKSHEET EXAMPLE

REEE005-F2
PAGE 1 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

NO.

DATE

REVISION DESCRIPTION

BY

CHECKED

CONSEQUENCE
LIKELIHOOD
CLF

NO.

ASSET NO.

450-27603

DESCRIPTION
MFR. A, MDL. 3000

REMARKS

PROCESS FUNCTION
1ST STG FEED PUMP - W

450-27604

MFR. A, MDL. 3000

1ST STG FEED PUMP - E

450-27645

MFR. A, MDL. 3000

2ND STG FEED PUMP - W

450-27662

MFR. B, MDL. 20EFG

BOTTOMS RECIRC PUMP

450-27665

MFR. B, MDL. 2x12 ABMDL. 2x12 XY

2ND STG BTMS TR PUMP - E

450-27666

MFR. B, MDL. 2x12 ABMDL. 2x12 XY

2ND STG BTMS TR PUMP - W

450-27693

MFR. A, MDL. 3000

2ND STG FEED PUMP

450-27730

MFR. C, MDL. ABC

NH3 STRIPPER FD TRANS PUMP

450-27731

MFR. C, MDL. ABC

NH3 STRIPPER FD TRANS PUMP

10

450-27735

MFR. D, MDL. 4x6 JKL

NH3 STRIP REFLUX PUMP - W

11

450-27736

MFR. D, MDL. 4x6 JKL

NH3 STRIP REFLUX PUMP - E

12

450-27737

MFR. A, MDL. 4000

25 HP BOTTOMS TRANSFER PUMP

APPROVED

ASSOC. PIP

FINAL PARTS STOCKING LEVEL WORKSHEET EXAMPLE

REEE005

REEE005-F3
PAGE 1 OF X

SPARE PARTS MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

MARCH 2007

FACILITY NAME:

PROJECT NO.:

LOCATION:

UNIT OR BUILDING NO.:

NO.

DATE

REVISION DESCRIPTION

IDENTICAL PIECES OF EQUIPMENT


(CLF = 6 - 4) =

(CLF = 3 - 2) =

(CLF = 1 - 0) =

NO.

PART

EQUIPMENT IDENTIFICATION:

BY

CHECKED

APPROVED

RESOLUTION/

INITIALLY

APPROVED

ESTIMATED

REMARKS*

RECOMMENDED

QUANTITY

COST

API CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS SUPPLIER MODEL 2345, SIZE 3 X 6 X 13

MATERIAL OF CONSTRUCTION: CARBON STEEL ASTM A216 WCB

PART NO.

NO. OF IDENTICAL PARTS


CLF --->

6-4
CRITICAL

3-2
1-0
FUNCT'L UNLIKELY

TOTAL
NO.

COMPLETE PUMP

00-560-2378957-01

ROTATING ASSEMBLY

00-560-2378968a

00-560-2378968b

CASE
HEAD (CASE COVER,
STUFFING BOX)

00-560-2378968c

BEARING BRACKET

00-560-2378968d

SHAFT

00-560-2378968e

IMPELLER

00-560-2378975

WEAR RINGS

00-560-2378975a

24 HR MFG.

24 HR MFG.

BEARINGS, BALL

01-480-574856-7115a

SUPPLIER LOCAL STOCK

10

BEARINGS, JOURNAL

01-480-574857-7405b

SUPPLIER LOCAL STOCK

11

BEARINGS, THRUST

01-480-574858-7405b

SUPPLIER LOCAL STOCK

12

MECHANICAL SEAL

02-29384756-711a

SUPPLIER LOCAL STOCK

13

SHAFT SLEEVE

0100-281-228-8290

SUPPLIER LOCAL STOCK

14

SEAL GLAND
SHIMS, GASKETS,
CLOSURES
FLIINGER, OIL RINGS,
ETC.

PART OF CARTRIDGE SEAL

SUPPLIER LOCAL STOCK

00-560-2378957-01GSAB

15
16

SEE SECTION 4.4 FOR RESOLUTION OF REQUIREMENTS.


* INSURANCE PARTS ARE IDENTIFIED IN REMARKS COLUMN.

ESTIMATED TOTAL COST: