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RUBBISH
RE_CREATIONS
I{aking

tid

stuff'from

thmrarays and everyday itens

Ideas Collected
By Denise Krebs

Cover and
Book Binding

By

Grandville Community Education,

1993

Many thanks to XCBISfI''nlgEn


her editing skills.

for sharing

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1

the last few


I certainly enjoyed spending
enjoyed
you
have
days wittr- youl I hope
some
made
relcreating rubbish. We have
yet'
better
And
neat thing!, haven't we?
we
toys
on
hre have saved some money
the
save
to
didn't have to buy, helped
and made some neat friends while we
""itft,at it.
were
In this booklet you will find reminders and
iecipes for the things we have made' You
will also discover new ideas you can try at
list that will inspire
home and a supply
booklet ends
t;;; creating. Fina[v, this
you
to write
;ith some bl-ank Pages for re-creations'
your ohrn recycled rubbish
ile"s" share your good idea by sending to
of
r. tt " instrultionJatong with aindrawing
nsrt
the
ii- If I like it, I'11 Put it
booklet!

Re-creatinglY Yours,
Denise Krebs
4595 Sutton Place, S.W'

Grandville,

MI

49418

Re-creating rubbish is a process. You must


go through imagining, problem solving, trial

and error. Often you can enjoy the end


result when you come up with a good idea
that works. tet's look at juice can lids,
for an example. Here's a game you can
make with juice can lids:
LETIS FISH
This magnetic fishing game will
be lots of fun and will teach
little ones matching skills. You
will need pairs of fish
pictures. You can draw the

fish on plain stickers, just be


careful to make each Pair just
the same. (You will want to
have ten to twentY Pairs of
fish.) Then stick one fish
from each pair onto a Poster
board and stick each matching
fish on its own juice can UdTo make the fishing Pole, take
a piece of thin refrigerator

magnet (about a one-and-a-hdf


inch square) and attach it to a

string. Tie the string to a


stick. Throw the juice Ud
'rfish'r into a cooking pot
"pon{" and You're readY to
fish. As the fish are caught,
place them on the Poster board
in the matching Positions.
Make two sets for a
"cooperative" game for two.

B:';l?ir,,

Try some of these othet idus


using iuice can lids:
Give a stack to a babY for a
rattly baby toy. The babY can
stack them up and droP them
into a container.
Make a giant cher*q sef bY
painting or coloring them red
and black.
Punch holiday designs with

hammer and small


jute cord for

nail-

Decorate with

oId-f ashioned

an

Christmas

orttament-

Turn the lids into over-sized


coins for playing store, bY

decorating them with stickers


and drawings. Make a coin
bank by cutting a slot in the
plastic lid of a coffee can.

Write anything to be learned


on them for a unique tYPe of
flash cards.

Make Eold medals for a


O IYmPic s
nei ghb orh ood
competition.

Make lu-lu
page 10.
Make

pi*es-

See

a mobile. Decorate

lids

with pictures, drawings, or

stickers. Puneh a hole in the


top of each. Tie a string
through the hole. Tie the

other end of each onto a stick,


or wire clothes hanger.
Make nzrme pins and necklaces
for a party. Write the name of

each person on a juice Ud.


Tape a safety pin onto the
back for a pin. Punch a hole
and attach a piece of yarn for
a necklace.

Attach two or three lids loosely


with a nut and bolt to a stick
of wood so that the lids rattle
when you shake your noise
maker.

for paint
palette*-one for each coIor.

Use several

Make shoe taps by hammering


tr^ro holes on either side of the
lids and tying on a loop of
elastic.

Poke four evenly-spaced holes


near the edges of each. Tie

them together to make

an

armored rrest

Now, what else could you do


with juice can lids?
some of these juice Iid ideas vere
found in "The Tightvad Gazette," RR 1,
Box 3570, Leeds, ME 04263, Nov. 1991.

tl
1i

rr

for re-creating
just
a beginning.
rubbish--but these are

Here are some more ideas

You'll think of many more and better ideas!


ADI

Adi is a version of an ancient game


commonly known as mancala. The Arabic
word mancala meaning "transferring" is a
generic term for games that have been
ptayed in different regions of the world for
thousands of Years.
TO MAKE AN ADT BOARD

You need one egg carton and 48 small


stones or beans. Remove the lid of the egg
carton and cut it in half. Attach one half
of the lid to each end of the lower portion

of the carton. This

game

is for

two

players.

HOW

TO PLAY

tne object of the game is to accumulate the


most stones in your home pot. Players

by placing four stones in each egg


for their home pots. (See
except
cup
Play
begins as follows, with each
figure.)
begin

player taking a turn after one

has

completed a cycle.

Player 1:
Pick up all the stones in any pit on your
side, and distribute one in each egg cup,
moving in a counterclockwise direction.

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As you place the last stone in a cup, pick


up all the stones in that cup and continue
around the board in the same fashion,
landing one stone in each successive cup,
including your home pot. Do not place
stones in your opponent's home pot.
capture

If you land your last stone in an empty


cup on your side, you many "capture" your
opponentrs stones in the cup directly
across from yours by picking up all the
stones and placing them

in your

home pot.

Your turn is over when:


1) You make a rrcapturen OR
2) You land your last stone into an
empty cup on your side
and the cup directly
across is empty, also OR
3) You land your last stone into
your home pot.
Player 2:
Repeat the same procedures as above,
beginning by picking up all the stones in
one cup on your side.

If a player has no stones on her side when


it is her turn to play, she passes and .lets
her opponent take a turn.

To determine the winner:


The game is over when all the cups are
empty. The winner is the player with the
most stones in his or her home pot.

BEAN BAG TOSS


Cut through a cardboard box diagonally like
this:
\ here q.nd mqke lwol
or9

'ert*

,rrldt

,' ,!qlr.
Set the box hal.ves on the cut edges so that

they look like ramps. Cut holes for


throwing the bean bags through. Make a
target by painting or decorating it with
paper. Make bean bags by sewing fabric
scraps together in squares or circles
leaving a sma'l'l opening to fi1 with
aquarium gravel, smal'l buttons, or other
neat things you think of. Stitch the
opening closed after stuffing the bag.
(Beans or popcorn also work but will
become spoiled if they get wet.)
Instead of using a cardboard box, you can
make an easy bean bag toss from a plastic

flower flat. Mark number values in each


divider with a construction paper sign.
Stand back and throw the bean bags in.

ontt

BWBLE SOLUTION

4-L/2 cups water


L/2 cup Joy dishwashing liquid
L/4 cup glycerin
Prepare weeks, even months, in advance.
It improves with aBe. Makes 42 ounces.
(Glycerin is available at Perry Drugs and
other pharmacies.)

with a variety of "rubbish"


bubbleblowers Try toilet paper rolls,
thread spools, coffee cans with both ends
Experiment

removed, plastic six-pack

could you use?

rings.

CLOTHES PILLOW

What else

Sew closed all oPenings but one on a


favorite outgrown shirt or pants. Use the
remaining opening to stuff the pillow with
styrofoam peanuts or clean, worn out
pantyhose. Then stitch the opening closed.
Use it for a decorative pillow or to join
with others in a Pillow fight.

10

COYOTES AND RABBITS Make a game


board with twenty-five circleq" like the one
pictured below, using vrhatever "throwaway"
materials you wish. You also need twelve
pennies (rabbits) and one quarter (for the
coyote). Set up the coins as indicated.

CCOOC
CCOCO
CC@CO

ooeoc
oooo

One player controls all the rabbits and the


other controls the coyote. A rabbit or the
coyote may move one circle up, down or
across on each turn. To win, the rabbits
must corner the coyote, or the coyote must
capture all but one rabbit. The coyote
captures rabbits by jumping over them, as
in checkers. The coyote may make more
than one jump in a single turn if all the
jumps are ln a straight line. Instead of
pennies and a quarter, what ,,throwaways,,
could you use for markers?

GOLF GAME

Take five clean tin cans of various sizes


and cover them with construction paper or
contact paper. Hook them together with
large paper clips. Attach a popsicle-stick
flag to the back of each can with a point
value written on each. practice putting
with a small ball and a stick or golf club.
11

TTAND

"SEEING" GNIE

Cut the toe half off of an old sock' Fit the


top half of the sock over the opening of an
oatmeal box. Tape the sock securely
"*pty
place.
You can then place a variety of
in
the "sock-can" and take turns
into
objlcts
things by feeling them with
the
"sieing"
your [ands. Can You guess what is in
lfrereZ Try to make it harder by placing
things thai are similar but have a slight
diffelence, such as a variety of geometric
shapes cut out of felt.
JIGSAW PUZZLE

Take a picture you like from a poster,


magazine, a piece of wallpaper' etc' Rubber
cement it to a piece of tagboard' Draw a
design like the one below over it and cut
out the Pieces along the lines'

I-ACING CARDS

On pieces of poster board draw or paint


pictirres, keeping them simple. Cut out the
and punch holes around the edges
"h"pes,
of itre picture. Use shoe laces or yarn to
wraP a Piece of
"setr." If you use Yarn,
it sturdy'
make
to
tape around the end
from the
cards
Yolu can also make lacing
you get
if
instance,
pictures on boxes. For
picture
on it'
has
a
tr", doll and the box
"you can cut it out and make a lacing card'
L2

LID NIIARBLESN
friend or two, begin collecting
with
a
Along
plastic milk carton lids and play a new
version of marbles. AIl you need is a

or linoleum floor.
kinds of PlaY.
for
different
rules
smooth sidewalk

Make up

LU-LU

This is a Hawaiian eounting game. (The


word lu-lu means "to shake.") Take four
round, flat objects--smooth stones, clay
pieces, shells, buttons covered with tape,
etc. The dice are then marked as follows:

ooo@

(Originally the dots were painted red.)


HOW TO PLAY

The player shakes the pieces in both hands


and tosses them down. A turn consists of
two tosses:
*If all four playing pieces fall face
up, the Player scores ten and tosses
them all again.

*If all four playing pieces do not fall


face uP, the PlaYer counts and
scores the dots of those that are face
up and then tosses onIY the facedown pieces a second time. The dots
showing on the second toss are
counted and added with those

first

of the

toss.

Continue play
such as 100.

up to an agreed-on
13

score,

T4ATH SIIAKE

This is a good dril1 for children learning


their basic facts. Use two buttons or two
marbles and an egg carton. With a marking
pen, print a number from zero to nine in
each of the egg cups. (Some numbers wiJI
be repeated.) Put the two buttons into the
carton and shake it up. Open the carton.
The two numbers that are marked with

buttons are then added together or


multiplied for math practice.

A variation

of math shake can be done with

subtraction or division. How would vou


create another version that would help you
or someone else practice subtracting or
dividing facts?
PNNT

I t. water
I t. dish washing liquid
L/2 t. food coloring
Mix and paint on paper or skin. It makes
beautiful, vivid colors. It can be a bit
sticky if you use it too thickty. Most
colors come out easily in the wash.
PLAY DOUGH

Mix together:
2-L/2 cups flour
1/2 cup salt
1 tablespoon alum

Stir in two cups boiling water until


blended. Add 3 tablespoons vegetable oil.
Knead well. Add food coloring and
peppermint oil (optional). Alum is a
preservative available in bulk in the spice
section of The Bulk Food Store.
14

RHYTpy. IISSTSTII{EIITS

out
a variety oi'tttv't'*-instruments Add
.""t:P''t'shells'
of paper rolls,.:;;;-"ttapistachio
noisy
smatl
t"p" them closed
'n"'"J"'-iitl
bottle caps' u"ttoi"t'
out of
"it'
tt'itt'*' sticksMake
and decorate' il;L i""n"t
a
1on5'
tvro sticks aUout-ia
circle
d"t
drum with an t"""i"'"r- "ltttrr'
a half" inches
ana
aliu-t1ne
tute
inner
of
tt'" carton and attach it

Make

Iarger around tn-* rubber band'


[if,Ii, ,ith a raree
ROLLED PAPER BEADS.

from
p'p"t -t:11191""paPer'
Cut out long' ttti"'ir'i"i *"9""'1'"

brightlv

"ototea,

$?#:'k".nJl.,'l,i:til:'";:'^"1"'x"3""fiE
slfi;;."*1,

;;;' ;;"eri
::: 3ff:":i;;
or the PaPsr.as-Youlou
:'ff *#tiI"?;
to drv'
tn" t*1ipi"t'"tiaa alow
it. slip out
or
ribbon
String the U""at onto
-the
-,1n,,
embroiderv'n'l?ll
embroidery t1:'=:*:^,,
..t:y.."::^
beads
,i
use ?fitn"lli
use
coutd
You
How

il;e;-a;.
your own ea:r*ss?
\i-iux"

6\\a
tsa)
tquor box Tg^Y::"'.:
caraooaia
-d;-J""tie"r

-:::.::.:::

i"1. T:rl:"fi
?
fi;i
:lffi"'t"T;i;=
lT[H:
I
outside
"-;i:*":::

Y:

;*""':: ":' ;F"* l:i::


X*"
li:*l"*r"
Xi3;'fr:'*"i':io";i
:l:
""'j3*[otliT
":L":fl
..* '-^orJ'.,
3#""1
edge or ".#oli
:l:
the
f"tf
115";,,,ti',?.,T
into
g.ft balls
ramp. Roll tenl
.

dividers.

15

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RTTBBER STANIPS

Using scraps of rubber from o1d rubber


boots, inner tubes, (or whatever) cut out

designs, letters, or your name. (Donrt


forget to cut out the letters backwards, so
they'Il stamp forwards.) Rubber cement the
pieces onto a block of r.rood. (Backwards
for words!) Use them with ink pads to
stamp out messages and pictures6
1
1

SIDEWALK CIIALK
eggshells

t. flour
t. very hot tap water

strip of paper

to$/el

dry the eggshells. Grind them


outdoors on clean, smooth concrete with a
clean, smooth rock. Grind and grind until
you get fine eggshell powder. Sweep it up
with your hands and put it into a dish.
Pick out any big pieces of eBgshell and
throw them away. Measure the flour and
hot water lnto another dish. Stir until you
get a paste. Add 1 tablespoon of the egg
shelt powder. Mix and mash until it all
sticks together. Shape and press the
mixture firmly into a chalk stick- Roll it up
tight in the strip of paper towel. Let it
diy for three days. Your sidewalk chalk
will get rock hard. Tear the paper off one
Wash and

end. Write with the chalk, erase with your


shoe. Sidewalk chdk should be used orrly
on the sideuralk, not blackboards.

fhe Stdevalk chalk recipe is frou e book called


Concocclons, by Loryi Prlce and trtarllm tJrooskey'
publlshedby E.P. Dutton and Co., NY' 1976. It has a
lot of lnterestlng reciPes, and you can checl it out
fron the Grandville LibrarY.

16

SODA CI'AY

1 cup baking soda


L/2 cup water
L/2 cup cornstarch
In a saucepan, mix together all ingredients.
Cook over low heat until mixture becomes
very thick. Add food coloring if desiredCool and knead until smooth. Model into

figures. Let dry and paint, if

desired.

Spray on an acrylic sealer.

Make a memorv game using soda claY


pieces. Using the recipe above, roll out
and cut a bunch of small round circles-being careful to maintain uniform size and
shape. Let them dry completely. Paint
them in pairs with bright colors and spray
on an acrylic sealer.
What else could you make with soda

ciay

STICK PUZZLES
Lay out several ice cream sticks (or tongue

depressors) side-by-side and tape them


together with one piece of tape. Draw a
picture on the stick platform, making sure
part of the picture touches each of the
sticks. Remove the tape and you have a

pvzzle. If you wish, while still in tact,


turn the puzzle over and with a second

color scheme draw another picture on the


second side. This is a good practice puzzle
for memoriziag a Bible verse or poem. Just
write a phrase on each stick. You can also
glue a picture to the sticks and ask an
adult to cut each stick apart with a razor
blade.

t7

STORY STICKS

Draw objects on the ends of tongue


depressors--a snohrman, a sun, a nowerr"an
crgam cone, a chiid, a bathtub,
i:"
Use the sdcks to tell a story. etc.
instance, r'In the warm sun, Timmy,s For
ice
cream cone melted all down his arms, so he
jumped in the bathtub to clean off.i, you
can also drarrr the pictures on circles of
tagboard and glue them to popsicle sticks.
TELEPTTONE TTi|NES

Call a friend and play songs over the


phone. (Be sure to play songs only
when
your phone is connected to someone else's
line or you may end up galling
"Outer Bombaloobee.")

nold tlacDonald"
6-6-6-7-8-8-7
9-9-0-0-4
4-6-6-6-7-8-8-7
9-9-0-0-4

"Happy Birthday"
L-t-2-L-#-6
L-t-z-L-tt-3
1-1-/I-lt-8-4-1
It-lt-6-4-2-L
rrAmggicar

"Old Folks at

5-5-6-1-5-9
0-0-9-0-8-4
8-4-2-4

Home"

(Swanee River)

3-2-L-3-2-r-tt-4-5
6-t-4-2
3-2-L-3-z-L-tt-L-4
6-5-4-2-2-4

"Oh Susannat
4-8-6-9-9-tt-8-7
4-8-/t-lt-8-1-8
4-8-6-9-9-#-8-7
4-8-6-6-0-0-4

Telephone tunes are taken froo Readerrs


Digest.
Practlcal probleu Solver, 1991.

1B

3-D PICTTTRES
Experiment with drawing your own 3-D
pictures. Using light red and light blue
markers or crayons, draw a picture. Using
3-D glasses look at what yourve drawn.
How do you make the drawings look 3-D?
Experiment hrith overlapping and doubling

images. You can make your own 3-D


glasses by renovating an old pair of toy

sunglasses. Put red cellophane in one lens


and blue cellophane in the other lens. Or
send for a free 3-D book and glasses from
Tanimura and Antle, P.O. Box 4070, Salinas,
California 93912.) Try this: draw a scene
using red or blue for each illustration.
You can make creatures and features
disappear by looking at the drawing one
eye at a time.
TICKLER WI{ISTLE
Take a sheet of used paper, 8-L/2 inches X
11 inches, and begin rolling it diagonally
into a tube from the corner. Roll it About
as tight as a thick pencil. Tape the roll in
place. On one end, cut two slits to form an
arrow. (See illustration.) To use, suck
into the whistle and let the "arrow" vibrate
up against the tube for a "tickly" noise.

TIN CAN STILTS


Use two clean, large juice cans. Poke two
holes in either side of the top of each can
about a half inch from the edges. Run a
six-foot cord in one hole, through the can
and out the other hole on each can. Tie
the ends of the cords together. Stand on
the cans, holding the cords in your hands.
Keep the cords taut when you take a step.
19

j\
.t!1'

$u
5ncL{
into I

";)

WATER GLASS MUSIC

a musical scale with \^rater glasses.


FiU eight glasses (the same style) to
various levels, as in the illustration.
Gently tap out some tunes with a spoon.

Make

You'll need to use rhythm and imagination


to get the songs to sound "right".

ffiH

HHH

Try these on your hlater


trl,Iary Had a

Little

glasses:

Lambn

3-2-1-2-3-3-3
2-2-2
3-5-5
3-2-L-2-3-3-3
3-2-2-3-2-L
'Row, Row, Row Your Boatn
1-1-1-2-3
3-2-3-4-5
8-8-8
5-5-5
3-3-3
1-1-1
5-4-3-2-L
Uacer glass uusic is taken froo The Reader's Diqest

Practlcal Problen Solver, 1991.

20

ilTATERIALS

What might

stuff?

IIST

you create with some of this

ten-gallon ice cream cartons (ask ice cream


shops to save them for you)
crayon stubs - use for candle dye, melt in
muffin tins for making round
crayons, and decorate Easter eggs by
grating crayons into a jar of boiling
water--dip the egg in and remove it,
as it is taken out the melted crayon
wax will cling to it.
stSrofoam trays (from produce and meat)
rubberbands ( from produce and
newspapers)
worn-out, clean pantyhose
frozen juice can lids
popsicle sticks or tongue depressors (save
if possible, but both are available for
sale in craft stores)
margarine tubs (and other similar sturdy
containers, Ready-to-spread frosting
containers are particularly good) - to
store game pieces, homemade paints
and play dough
toilet paper and paper towel rol1s
plastic film csnisters
"dead" tennis balls and racquet balls

old sheets - paint a bullseye on one for


water balloon throwing
fabric scraps

felt

scraps

ribbon, lace and trim scraps - good for

making collages and decorating things


diaper wipe containers - for bean Uig toss,
storage containers

2t

glass jars
old white window shades - use for a play
mat or as a canvas for painting a
picture

rubber things (old balls, inner tubes,


galoshes, rubber gloves) - use to

prevent items from slipping, making


rubber stamps, a half of a ball might
be a helmet for Halloween
egg cartons - use for Wari, coin toss, paint
palette

magazines

contact Psper
carpet and linolesn samples
wallpaper samples
upbolstery fabric samples

tagboard (poster board or any thin


cardboard. The most "recyclingest"
way to get it is by using cereal box
sides, package inserts, gift boxes,
etc.)

paint and Formica samples (from decorator


and paint stores) make a color
match game, make colorful paper
jewelry
cartons of any size (plastic milk jugs,

eardboard milk cartons, 6-sided

muffin Uner boxes, any cartons that

look interesting) - make a set of


building blocks for a younger sibling

by covering some of the cartons vrith


contact paper, I0eenex boxes can be
converted into Barbie furniture, make
an interesting set of dice from muffin
liner boxes--just add a number to

each side.
empty thread spools

- use to blow bubbles


and string on yarn like giant beads
22

tin cans
cans with plastic lids (like nut cans,
racquet and tennis ball cans, and
coffee cans)
old stuffed animals - make them into
bookends--open the bottom, replace
part of the stuffing with marbles and
re-stitch. Then glue on a piece of
rubber to prevent slipping. Other
uses for stuffed animals: turn them
into puppets, or take them apart and
use the body parts to create new and
exciting species, use the excess for
fabric scraps
Ietter and number stickers (unused ones
that come with blank videotapes)
greeting card fronts
OTT{ER THINGS TO COLLECT

anything that looks fun that is otherwise


going into a lsnflfill - you can always
throw it out later. An old mailbox
can become a great backyard bird
house or a garage for trucks in the
sand box. Before your parents throw
out a mattress why not ask if you
can use it for a trampoline for a
while.

yard sale stuff


giveaways from your parents place of
emplo5rment

broken toys that can be remade or parts


used from them
anything that you use, have, or throw a\rray
a lot of
anything free that you might use for
something

23

DON'T MISS
ODDS AITD ENDS FOR

LITTLE

FRIENDS

This distribution center is a non-profit


business dedieated to linking you up with

stuff from area businesses and


""ut
manufacturers. Most items are sold in
Uutt--ES.00 for a large grocerv bag -fY{'
An optional membership is available which
lets iou shop at discount prices' Stop in

wfreri you have time to dream about making


great toys, games, puzzles, gifts,- crafts"'for

i".y fiitte.

It is sponsored by

West

l,ti.t ig"tt Association for the Education of


Youn! children and loeated in the Creative
Learnlng Center Store, 2901 Breton, S'E',
Grand RaPids, MI (616) 243-3551'
LIBRARY BAOKS

There are hundreds of books available at


Grand Rapids area libraries that r'rill give
you all kinds of ideas on making your own
iubbish re-creations and other neat stuff'
Cheek out books in the non-fiction section'
Start with these call numbers:
J745.5 (Crafts)

J363.7 (RecYcling)

There are also good books in the adult


section with the same call numbers'

24

The followtng

pages

'

are for yaur rubbtsb

re-creations:

I
I

[ 't,

r
I

t
I

t
I
I

25

26

27

&
Rfir,yr,tfr

pfil/lrlr,E

xr-t/sf

,Ind

RE-r,REATE

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