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Residential Lighting Design Guide

Best practices and lighting design to help builders


comply with Californias 2005 Title 24 energy code.
Presented by:

Michael Siminovitch, CLTC

Melissa Blevins, CLTC

Funding / Support Provided by:


California Energy Commission
ENERGY STAR - EPA
Pacific Gas & Electric
Sacramento Municipal Utility District
San Diego Gas & Electric / Southern California Gas Company &
Southern California Edison

The information and graphics used for this presentation


originated from the:

Residential Lighting Design Guide


Best practices and lighting design to help builders comply with
Californias 2005 Title 24 energy code.

Additional hard copies are available at local utilities and


can be downloaded at:
www.cltc.ucdavis.edu

The Guide provides a practical cook


book approach for lighting codes
compliance and design.
Includes:
- Detailed explanation of the code
- Technical and compliance information
- Lighting design examples
Guide simplifies and assists in developing
compliant, quality lighting designs.

The official code can be found


on the California Energy
Commissions website at:
http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24

Or you can contact:


916-654-5200

Todays presentation will include:


PART 1: Main lighting technologies that apply to Title 24
PART 2: Lighting Design Guide example applications of
lighting and control technologies in a room by room scenario

PART 1 - TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW


You will use three main technologies to comply with
the guide, they are:

These lighting fixtures are designed and built to operate only energy-efficient light
sources, such as fluorescent T8 lamps, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and high
intensity discharge (HID) lamps.

Occupancy sensors, vacancy sensors, motion sensors, and daylight sensors are all
devices that automatically turn off the lights in response to conditions that they
sense or see.

Dimmers, which are already common in many residential applications, allow the
room occupants to lower the room lighting (and thus the power used) as desired.

PART 1 - TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW


High-efficacy luminaires
In general, the following are high efficacy
luminaires:
Fluorescent and CFL fixtures with
electronic ballasts
Fixtures with high intensity discharge
(HID) lamps
In general, the following are NOT high
efficacy luminaires:
Any fixture with incandescent lamps
Any fixture with a screw base CFL

PART 1 - TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW


High-efficacy luminaires: What to specify
Specify the appropriate light output:
Rule of thumb: You should be able to lumen
match the incandescent fixtures by specifying
fluorescent systems that use one-third or onefourth as much power.

Specify the appropriate lamp wattage:


Depending on what lamp wattage is chosen
(with the same number of fixtures) you could
have a much brighter space or a much darker
space in comparison to an existing
incandescent space.
For example:
8 (65 watt) BR lamps
x 750 lumens per lamp = 7100 lumens
6 (26 watt) CFL lamps x 1300 lumens per lamp = 7800 lumens
10 (13 watt) CFL lamps x 600 lumens per lamp = 6000 lumens

Specify the appropriate color:


Warmer lamp colors (CCT = 2700-3000K) =
closest match to incandescent

PART 1 - TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW


High-efficacy luminaires: What to specify
For recessed fixtures in IC applications
look for:
Ballasts that are rated for higher operating
ranges
Fixtures configuration that limits heat to the
ballast

Specify electronic ballasts:


Mandated in all high-efficacy luminaires of
13 W or higher
Eliminates the flicker and hum associated
with some magnetic ballasts.

PART 1 - TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW


Fixture labels for compliance and quality
ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR definition of high-efficacy
has been changed to match Title 24
BUTno way to tell the old ENERGY STAR
fixtures fro the new ENERGY STAR fixtures
Has requirements to guarantee minimum
standard of quality

Title 24
Indicates compliance with high efficacy
requirements for Title 24
Label not required for compliance

Airtight label for fixtures in


insulated spaces
ASTM E283 label certifies airtight in
accordance with ASTM E283 testing &
Title 24.
If label does not specify ASTM E283
testing, additional documentation will
be needed to indicate the fixture has
been tested and certified in accordance
with ASTM E283.

NOTE: For complete airtight


compliance, the installation must
also be airtight with either sealed
gasket(s) or caulking. For more
information see the Residential
Compliance Manual, Chapter 6.10.

PART 1 - TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW


Occupancy/vacancy sensor anatomy & specifications
A compliant sensor must have all of the
following features:
Must be manual-on/automatic-off (can
also be turned off manually)
Time delay cannot be greater than 30
minutes
Cannot be locked in a permanent on
state (no on override)
Outdoor sensors can be automatic-on/off
but must also include a photocell that
keeps the lights off during daylight hours
Optional features to consider
when choosing an occupancy or
vacancy sensor:
Energy-efficient LED nightlight
Impact-resistant lens and switch

PART 1 - TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW


Dimmer anatomy & what to specify
Specify the correct load amount:
line voltage
low voltage
3 way dimmers (ex. hallway
applications)
Specify the aesthetic quality:
Various finishes & colors
Toggle vs. slide

Part 2 consists of floor plan examples and detailed


explanations of the code.
The examples will cover the following areas:
Kitchen
Bathroom (same requirements apply to garages, laundry room
and utility room
Other spaces (bedroom, living/dining room, attic & hallway)
Outdoor spaces
Multi-family common areas
Multi-family parking lot areas

Kitchen: As defined by the California Energy Commission, a room or


area used for cooking, food storage and preparation, and washing
dishes, including associated countertops and cabinets, refrigerator,
stove, ovens, and floor area.
50% of the overall wattage MUST be
fluorescent
The first switch no longer has to be a
fluorescent light fixture
Fluorescent and incandescent light
fixtures MUST be controlled separately
Nook lighting must be on a separate
switch in order to be counted as an
other space and not part of the kitchen
Lighting that is part of an appliance is
not regulated by the code

The quantity of light fixtures is


not regulated by the code, just
the wattage (wattage applies
to kitchens only!)
If a fixture can accept various
lamp wattages, its wattage for
the sake of code compliance is
the highest relamping rated
wattage designated by the
manufacturer on a permanent,
factory-installed Underwriters
Laboratory (UL) label (peel-off
labels are not permitted).

Bathroom: As defined by the California Energy Commission, a room


containing a shower, tub, toilet, or a sink that is used for personal
hygiene.
The first switch no longer has to be a
fluorescent light fixture

The quantity of light fixtures is


not regulated by the code.

Fluorescent and incandescent light


fixtures MUST be controlled separately

The maximum time delay to


turn off is 30 minutes after the
last detected motion. (may
feature a grace period which
will allow the lights to
automatically turn back on
within 30 seconds after they
have been automatically
turned off.

Occupancy sensors must be manual


on/off and automatic off.
Sensors cannot have an override
allowing the light fixture to be
continuously on.

Each and every permanently installed


fixture must comply with the
standards, by means of being highefficacy or controlled by a manual-on
occupancy sensor.

Bedrooms
Fluorescent and incandescent light
fixtures MUST be controlled separately
Occupancy sensors must be manual
on/off and automatic off
Switched outlets (half-hots) do not
require special controls
Ceiling fans with incandescent light kits
need one switch for the fan and one
dimmer/occupancy sensor for the
lights. (fluorescent - only one switch is
needed, two is shown for flexibility)

Each and every permanently installed


lighting fixture must comply with the
standards, by means of being high efficacy,
controlled by a manual-on occupancy
sensor, or controlled by a dimmer.

Living & Dining Room


Switched outlets (half-hots) do not require special controls
For a more decorative option use
incandescent light fixtures and
dimmer(s)
Ceiling fans with incandescent light kits
need one switch for the fan and one
dimmer/occupancy sensor for the
lights. (fluorescent - only one switch is
needed)

Each and every permanently installed


lighting fixture must comply with the
standards, by means of high efficacy,
controlled by a manual-on occupancy
sensor, or controlled by a dimmer.

Attic
Warning: If an occupancy sensor can
not see the entire attic; the occupant
could be left in the dark!
Occupancy sensors must be manual
on/off and automatic off

Enclosed patio
An enclosed (unconditioned) patio is
considered an other space. Each
fixture must meet the code
requirements. (high efficacy, dimmer,
occupancy sensor)
Fluorescent and incandescent light
fixtures MUST be controlled separately

Each and every permanently


installed lighting fixture must
comply with the standards, by
means of high efficacy,
controlled by a manual-on
occupancy sensor, or controlled
by a dimmer.

Hallways
Occupancy sensors must view the
entire space (this application may
require three way switched as
shown)

Each and every permanently


installed lighting fixture must
comply with the standards, by
means of high efficacy,
controlled by a manual-on
occupancy sensor, or
controlled by a dimmer.

This part of the code covers all exterior


lighting EXCEPT landscape lighting that
is not attached to the building and
residential parking lots or garages for
eight or more vehicles.
Outdoor motion sensors much have:
- Automatic on/off operation
- Photocell to keep lights off during
daylight hours
Outdoor sensors also must comply with
the maximum 30 minute shut off
requirement
Sensor must view the space that is
illuminates

Each and every permanently


installed fixture must comply
with the standards, by means of
being high-efficacy or controlled
by a outdoor motion sensor.

Benefits of fluorescent lighting fixtures


Lights can be left on for an extended
period of time
Do not need to be concerned with where
to place the motion sensor

Do not have to worry about motion


sensor lights turning on and off at
undesired times

Benefits of incandescent/photocell motion sensor


Automatically turns lights on/off, lights
are not left of unintentionally

Added security to areas around the


home

Responds to motion

Use standard incandescent lamp

Common areas of low-rise residential buildings


with four or more dwelling units
Low-rise = 3 or less stories
Compliant high efficacy lighting
(preferably with a photocontrol or time
clock):
-Fluorescent
-Metal halide
-High pressure sodium
Occupancy sensor must be directly on
the walkway and/or view the entire
space

Each and every permanently


installed fixture must comply
with the standards, by means of
being high-efficacy or controlled
by a occupancy sensor.

Residential parking lots for eight or more vehicles


Must meet the power density limits for
non-residential lighting standards (for
more information see 2005
Nonresidential Manual, section 147)
Light fixtures must be controlled be a
photocontrol or an astronomical time
switch that turns lights off when
daylight it present
Fixtures with lamps rated over 175
watts shall be designated as cutoff;
limiting light emitted upwards
Uniform lighting is desired to help
eliminate shadows in corners and
provide a sense of safety