2015/8/15

Gene Harris, 66, a Jazz Pianist Who Played Bebop and Soul ­ NYTimes.com

HOME PAGE

TODAY'S PAPER

VIDEO

MOST POPULAR

U.S. Edition

SUBSCRIBE NOW   Log In   Register Now   Help
Search All NYTimes.com

Arts
WORLD

U.S.

N.Y. / REGION

BUSINESS

ART & DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY

BOOKS

DANCE

SCIENCE

MOVIES

MUSIC

 
HEALTH

SPORTS

TELEVISION

OPINION

THEATER

ARTS

VIDEO GAMES

STYLE

TRAVEL

JOBS

REAL ESTATE

AUTOS

EVENTS INTERNATIONAL ARTS

Gene Harris, 66, a Jazz Pianist Who Played Bebop and
Soul

Advertisement

By BEN RATLIFF
Published: January 18, 2000

Gene Harris, a jazz pianist who plied a polished, mainstream and
agreeably bright brand of blues, soul and bebop, died on Sunday at
his home in Boise, Idaho. He was 66.

FACEBOOK

The cause was complications from kidney failure a month before he
was expecting a kidney transplant from one of his daughters, The
Associated Press said.

EMAIL

Born in Benton Harbor, Mich., Mr. Harris taught himself piano at
age 9. His primary influences were boogie­woogie players like Albert
Ammons and Pete Johnson. Later, when his playing became more
mature, he absorbed the refined style of Oscar Peterson. After joining
the Army in 1951 he played in the 82nd Airborne Division band, and
after his discharge in 1954 he toured the country with various band
leaders.

REPRINTS

TWITTER
GOOGLE+

SHARE
PRINT

In 1956 Mr. Harris formed his first band, the Four Sounds, which lost a member within a
year and became the Three Sounds. The band, featuring Mr. Harris, the bassist Andy
Simpkins and the drummer Bill Dowdy, soon gained a following as it began playing clubs
around the Washington area.
The Three Sounds made several recordings through the 1960's and 70's on the Blue Note
label. Mr. Harris also played on other records with groups led by Stanley Turrentine,
James Clay, Milt Jackson, Benny Carter and others.
MORE IN ARTS (1 OF 78 ARTICLES)

In 1977 Mr. Harris announced his semiretirement and moved to Boise. But his career took
Confronting Slavery at Long Island’s
Oldest Estates
on new life when he signed with Concord Records in the mid­80's. No fewer than 22
albums followed, the most recent being ''Alley Cats,'' a live recording from last year. His
albums ranged from solo performances, to sessions with groups like the Ray Brown Trio,
to big­band dates.

Read More » MOST EMAILED

His earlier recordings include ''Anita O'Day and the Three Sounds'' (Verve), ''The Three
Sounds'' (Blue Note) and ''Astral Signal'' (Blue Note). His album ''Tribute to Count Basie''
(Concord), featuring the Gene Harris All­Star Big Band, earned him a nomination for a
Grammy Award in 1988 in the category of Best Big Band Jazz Instrumental.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

1. ISIS Enshrines a Theology of Rape

2. DNA Is Said to Solve a Mystery of Warren
Harding’s Love Life
3. Devastation in Tianjin, China

He is survived by his wife, Janie; two daughters, Beth and Niki, and a son, Gene Harris Jr.
4. Are You Smarter Than Other New York
Times Readers?

Photo: Gene Harris (Associated Press, 1995)
FACEBOOK

TWITTER

GOOGLE+

EMAIL

SHARE

5. As Fire Smolders in Tianjin, Officials Rush
to Stanch Criticism
6. ‘Sesame Street’ to Air First on HBO for Next
5 Seasons
7. El Niño May Bring Record Heat, and Rain
for California
8. MATTER

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/01/18/arts/gene­harris­66­a­jazz­pianist­who­played­bebop­and­soul.html

1/2

 a Jazz Pianist Who Played Bebop and Soul ­ NYTimes. Panned Online. Former President Jimmy Carter Says He Has Cancer Log in to discover more articles based on what you‘ve read. What’s This? | Don’t Show   © 2015 The New York Times Company Site Map Privacy Your Ad Choices Advertise Terms of Sale Terms of Service http://www.2015/8/15 Gene Harris. Apologizes 10.nytimes. a ‘Paleo’ Diet Full of Carbs 9.com/2000/01/18/arts/gene­harris­66­a­jazz­pianist­who­played­bebop­and­soul. Tom Brady Sketch Artist. 66.html Work With Us RSS Help Contact Us Site Feedback 2/2 .com For Evolving Brains.