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CLAREMONT MEETS, AND BEATS, WATER RESTRICTION GOALS/PAGE 3
Friday, August 14, 2015 u $1.50

Claremont

claremont-courier.com

Your lawn is dead...now what?

PAGE 12

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Plant Production Manager Antonio Sánchez attends to some
plants at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s Grow Native
Nursery. The nursery offers many species of drought-tolerant
plants that can be used for groundcover when replacing a lawn.
Lewisia Elise, shown at left, makes a host of colorful flowers in
addition to providing good groundcover in passive areas.

IN THIS EDITION

Get off the beaten
path and visit some
of Claremont’s
most unique

Get your kid a new backpack, then
visit claremont-courier.com.

BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
LETTERS/ PAGE 2, 7

OBITS/ PAGES 9, 10
CALENDAR/ PAGE 14

t

t

neighborhoods.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

READERS’ COMMENTS
CHS jazz band director
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Claremont, CA 91711
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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the
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one hundred and seventh year, number 33

Dear Editor:
Back in June, the Claremont
COURIER reported that Claremont High
School Jazz Band director, Mr. Rick
Melanson, was removed from his position pending a criminal court proceeding
on child annoyance charges.
I was therefore quite surprised when no
follow-up article was printed to inform
the community that on July 15, 2015 the
case against Mr. Melanson was dismissed.
Also, on August 6, 2015 the Claremont
Unified School District (CUSD) Board of
Education unanimously voted in support
of reinstating Mr. Melanson to his position, and that the State of California has
fully reinstated his teaching credentials.
In our country, individuals are innocent
until proven guilty. When Mr. Melanson
was accused of impropriety, the
COURIER made sure readers were made
aware of it. But when Mr. Melanson was
cleared of all charges, no mention was
made of this important development. I am
writing to encourage students, teachers
and parents to join with our school board
in fully supporting Rick Melanson’s welldeserved return to the classroom.
My son, Douglas, studied with Mr.
Melanson for nearly half of his 12 years
as a CUSD student. He considers Mr.
Melanson to be the single most positive
influence on his academic and musical
career. He credits Mr. Melanson with instilling in him a passion for jazz music
and the discipline needed to succeed—
not only in music, but in life.
As a direct result of Mr. Melanson’s influence, my son formed his own jazz
band combo with other CHS jazz students (Going Down Swingin’) and performed with friends at paid engagements

2

ADVENTURES

throughout Los Angeles and Orange
County during his senior year at CHS.
Sadly, Mr. Melanson never had the opportunity to see his senior students perform, as he was tied up with legal
proceedings to prove his innocence.
The lessons my son learned from Mr.
Melanson, and the disciplined approach
to the study of music that Mr. Melanson
brought to the classroom enabled Douglas to have the tools and the confidence
to audition and successfully secure a spot
in a NCAA Division I music program at
Texas A & M University this fall.
I have also worked closely with Mr.
Melanson during the past six years, during four of which I served as Instrumental
Music Booster president. I want parents
and students to know that Mr. Melanson
brings an extraordinary passion and
music background that is rare to find in a
high school level program. He is professional, talented, engaging and cares
deeply about his students as individuals
and collectively as an ensemble. He
works diligently to build their sense of
self as young adults both in and out of the
classroom and performance venues.
Claremont is fortunate to have a jazz director with his qualifications and character.
Sadly, despite the fact that the judicial
system ran its full and complete course,
and all charges against Mr. Melanson
were dismissed, there are still some in our
community who refuse to accept this
judgment. I encourage Claremont students, teachers and parents to pay them
no heed. Our students, our schools and
our music program have been, and will
continue to be, well-served by Mr. Rick
Melanson.
Debby Mendelsohn
Claremont

IN HAIKU

Berkeley and Baughman,
Clouds of pink and purple,
Rosy petals drift.
—Paula Pitzer
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.

GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
All Claremont commissions and the
council are on summer recess. Meetings will resume September 1.
Thursday, August 20
CUSD Board of Education
Kirkendall Center, 7 p.m.

READERS’ COMMENTS
Send readers’ comments via email to
editor@claremont-courier.com or by
mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA
91711. The deadline for submission is
Tuesday at 5 p.m. Letters are the opinion
of the writer, not a reflection of the
COURIER.
We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words Viewpoints should not exceed 650 words.
We cannot guarantee publication of
every letter. Letters will be published at
the discretion of the editor.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

3

Brown lawns evidence of city’s conservation efforts

Y

ou can’t drive down a Claremont
street these days without passing a
lawn or two that has succumbed to
the effects of the drought.
While many residents may long for the days of lush
green grass beneath their toes, others consider their
brown patch a badge of honor as they comply with the
state-imposed mandate of conserving water.
Regardless of your view, Claremont residents can
take comfort in knowing that for the second consecutive month, Golden State Water Company has exceeded
water conservation reductions mandated by Governor
Jerry Brown, with Claremont users decreasing water
consumption by a whopping 42 percent in June.
The governor issued the executive order this past
April, mandating a 25 percent cut statewide in urban
water use by 2016. Individual water districts, depending
on their level of water use, were ordered to reduce water
consumption between 4 and 36 percent with those districts with a history of heavy water use cutting more.
Claremont was hit with a 32 percent reduction from
water use in 2013 and has done well in meeting its
monthly conservation goal.
“We’re glad to see the residents complying with the
mandate,” Assistant City Manager Colin Tudor said.
“It’s important that everyone remain mindful of their
water usage. The earlier summer months tend to be
more mild, and we’re hopeful that residents will continue to conserve as the temperatures heat up in the
months ahead.”
In May 2015, Claremont water consumption decreased by 40 percent compared to May 2013 and with
a 42 percent decrease for June 2015 compared to June
2013, it appears residents are getting serious about their
conservation efforts.
Perhaps it’s because Claremont residents know that if
they don’t maintain at least a 32 percent reduction from
the 2013 numbers, they face the possibility of water rations and surcharges for each household from Golden
State Water Company. In June, the limit on lawn watering was two days per week and the district issued only
one warning and assessed no penalties. That’s an impressive track record.
Providing water to a population of 37,160, the Golden
State Water Company Claremont is part of the South
Coast hydrologic region that includes the cities of Ventura, Los Angeles, Santa Ana, Riverside, San
Bernardino and San Diego, among others.
In June 2015, Golden State Water Company Claremont distributed 239 million gallons of water, a sharp
decrease from the 415 million gallons provided in June
2013. Residential use made up 64 percent of total water

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger
Although the city gets high marks for water conservation efforts, evidence of the drought can be seen all over
Claremont. It’s easy to see brown grass covering soccer fields, baseball fields and playgrounds, including in
this photo from Padua Park.

consumed in the city, with each resident using on average 137 gallons of water a day—a number well above
the 97.7-gallon state average.
By comparison, residents in the city of La Verne used
an average of 160 gallons of water each day in June
2015, while Pomona residents used an average of 86
gallons per day.
As a whole, urban water districts used 27 percent less
water statewide in June 2015 than in 2013.
The next monthly update, with July water-use figures,
is due in late August.
Mandatory statewide water restrictions took effect in
May, limiting water to turf in city medians and parks to
two days per week. While many other cities have access to reclaimed or recycled water that they’re using
on their parks and medians, Claremont does not. Therefore, the city staff is working on alternative plans to deal
with the drought and the current restrictions.
The city is already moving forward with plans to relandscape Shelton Park, the Indian Hill Boulevard medians and Claremont City Hall to reduce turf. The
medians on Foothill Boulevard and First Street will have
the turf removed and replaced with mulch.
As previously reported in the COURIER, many of
the turf areas within city parks have become brown with
the reduction of watering to only two days per week,

sparking concern from residents who utilize the local
sports fields. While passive park turf areas will remain
on a two-day-per-week watering schedule, Golden State
Water Company recently granted the city one extra day
per week of watering to be applied to all athletic fields.
“It’s not for the entire park, just the sports fields,” Mr.
Tudor explained.
Just how the city’s additional water day will affect
July’s water-use figures is anybody’s guess.
“It may have a slight increase in the city’s water use
but we are also decreasing our watering at the more passive parks,” said Mr. Tudor. “We’re trying hard to find
a balance.”
The city is using water bags for city trees in the Village and encourages residents to deep-water their own
trees as well as city trees in the right of way, at least once
a week at the drip line, to ensure tree health during the
drought. Deep watering is done less often, but in a way
the soaks the roots of the tree slowly and with less
wasted water.
To report water wasting or water leaks, call Golden
State Water Company at (800) 999-4033. A representative is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com

City staff fast-tracks water conservation projects

P

hase One of the Indian
Hill Boulevard median
turf reduction project is
well underway, with construction crews working diligently to
install new river rock and
drought-tolerant landscaping in
the medians just south of Base
Line Road.

The project is one of several water
conservation projects the city has expedited in response to the current drought
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Work crews install rocks along the median of Indian Hill Boulevard in Claremont.

conditions and regulations passed down
from Governor Jerry Brown.
Per the governor’s executive order, the
city is no longer able to water turf medians as of May 11, 2015. In response to
the mandatory irrigation restrictions, city
staff proposed spending $40,000 to remove the turf on the Indian Hill Boulevard median, put down mulch and
retrofit the irrigation to ensure sufficient
water is being provided to trees in the island. City council rejected that idea on
June 9, 2015 with Councilmember Opanyi Nasiali calling it a “stop-gap measure” and instead agreed to move forward
with the previously-designed Indian Hill
Boulevard Median Turf Reduction Project, noting that the plans for the project
had already been completed.
TURF REDUCTION/page13

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

Firefighters
stand on
top of the
ridge
Wednesday
morning
looking for
any potential hot
spots.

Cool zones offer relief from
scorching heat this weekend

W

ith the mercury rising
to triple digits in Claremont this weekend, it’s
important for residents to take
precautions to stay cool and hydrated.
The City of Trees will offer several cooling
centers, aka “Cool Zones,” throughout the city
where both the young and the young-at-heart
can get a bit of respite from the searing heat.
Both the Alexander Hughes Community
Center and the Blaisdell Senior Center will
offer extended hours Friday, Saturday and
Sunday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. to help residents combat the heat wave hitting the southland. The Hughes Community Center is
located at 1700 Danbury Rd. and the Blaisdell Senior Center is at 440 S. College Ave.
The Joslyn Senior Center, located at 660
N. Mountain Ave., will also be open on Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The Claremont Library, located at 208 N.
Harvard Ave., will be open on Friday and
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and again

on Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, call (909) 399-5488.
For those who do plan to be outdoors, it’s
a good idea to avoid the sun from 10 a.m.
until 3 p.m. when the burning rays are
strongest.
If you are doing any type of physical activity during the day—especially at the
Claremont Hills Wilderness Park—make
sure to drink plenty of fluids, even if you’re
not thirsty. Always hydrate before, during
and after your activity or you may be at risk
for dehydration. 
Early signs of dehydration may include increased thirst, nausea, dry mouth, headache,
and reduced fluid output. Some moderate dehydration symptoms may include extreme
thirst, dry appearance inside the mouth and
lightheadedness.
Also, don’t forget to take care of your pets
that may be doing the physical activity with
you or may be outside all day. Their bodies
need water and shade just as much as you
during these hot summer days. 
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com

POLICE BLOTTER
Monday, August 3
Claremont police are searching for a
brazen thief who entered an AM/PM
during rush hour, stole an employee’s
wallet and fled the location undetected.
At 5:12 p.m. on August 1, the suspect
entered the Foothill Boulevard minimart, walked into a room and opened
the 21-year-old victim’s purse to remove her wallet. The thief placed the
wallet in his pants’ pocket and fled the
location. The victim’s Bank of America
debit card and another credit card were
later used in the cities of Brea, Pomona
and Diamond Bar without her consent.
The suspect is described as a Hispanic
male, 20 to 25 years old, with short
brown hair, a mustache and a goatee.
He was wearing a black T-shirt with a
the word “Ease” in white lettering,
green camouflage shorts and black
shoes with white shoelaces at the time
of the crime. Anyone with information
is encouraged to call Claremont Police
Department at (909) 399-5411.

investigation remains ongoing.
****
It was a birthday to remember for
one Pomona gal who went to get her
free Grand Slam at Denny’s and ended
up in the Claremont slammer. Marlo
Aguilar celebrated her big day with a
meal at Denny’s and then walked out of
the restaurant without paying her
$20.09 tab. At approximately 1:09
p.m., police were called to the scene
and found Ms. Aguilar nearby where
she admitted to her crime of defrauding
the restaurant. The 44-year-old Leo told
police she thought she was receiving a
free meal on her birthday and was confused when the waitress handed her the
bill. Denny’s staff confirmed she did receive a free meal, but ordered an additional $20 in food. Although Denny’s
declined to prosecute the birthday girl,
she wasn’t out of the woods just yet. A
records check by CPD revealed Ms.
Aguilar had an outstanding warrant and
she was placed under arrest.

Tuesday, August 4
Thieves continue to prey on Evey
Canyon visitors who leave their purse
in the car. According to Claremont
Lieutenant Mike Ciszek, officers responded to the hillside location following a call of two vehicles burglarized
between 9 and 11:30 a.m. The unknown perpetrators smashed the rear
window of a Toyota Corolla and took
the 29-year-old Chino resident’s purse
that was sitting on the floorboard in the
back seat. A Nissan Versa parked next
to the Corolla was also broken into,
with the thieves smashing the front passenger window and stealing the 23year-old Upland resident’s purse. The

Thursday, August 6
A transient was taken into custody
after refusing to cooperate with Claremont police. Antonio Mastas was riding his bike along Amherst and First
streets at 8:30 a.m. when police attempted to stop him for a traffic violation. The 19-year-old man refused
commands to get off his bike and a
struggle with officers ensued. Mr. Mastas was found to be in possession of
cable cutters and a small replica pistol.
He was arrested for resisting an officer
and possession of burglary tools,
booked at Claremont jail and held for
court.
****

4

COURIER
photo/Peter
Weinberger

Brush fire in Mt. Baldy;
25 acres burned
A 25-acre brush fire ignited at around 8 p.m. on Tuesday, August 11
near Mt. Baldy and Shinn Roads about a quarter-mile up the mountain,
according to the US Forest Service. By Wednesday, April 12, the Forest
Service had it contained.
The Claremont Police Department responded to the call just after 10
p.m on Tuesday night, according to Lt. Lori Davenport of the Claremont
Police Department. The US Forest Service crews, with assistance from
the LA County Fire Department, were already on-scene and did not request additional assistance from the police department.
According to CalTrans, Mt. Baldy Road at Mountain Avenue and
Shinn Road remained closed through Wednesday morning.
The cause of the fire is under investigation.
—Kathryn Dunn

The home of a Pomona College professor owned by the Claremont Colleges was burglarized while the tenant
was vacationing. At approximately
8:30 a.m., unknown thieves entered the
home on the 300 block of Harvard Avenue after prying open the lock on a
rear door. Property loss is unknown at
this time.
Friday, August 7
A Glendora man crossing the street
was struck by a vehicle and transported
to a local hospital as a result of his injuries. According to Lt. Ciszek, a 70year-old Pomona resident driving a
Dodge Caravan was traveling east on
San Jose Avenue at 12:52 p.m. when he
approached the intersection at Indian
Hill Boulevard. The senior driver proceeded to make a right turn and failed
to yield to a pedestrian who was walking in a marked crosswalk. The 56year-old victim was struck by the
vehicle and transported via ambulance
to Pomona Valley Hospital Medical
Center complaining of back pain.
****
Claremont police arrested a Pomona
man for vehicle theft following a highrisk traffic stop in San Bernardino
County. At approximately 5:30 p.m., a
stolen Dodge pickup was spotted by
CPD at Towne Avenue and Scripps
Drive. While conducting an Internet
check for the vehicle, an officer located
the truck traveling eastbound on the
210 freeway at Base Line Road. The
officer followed the truck until police
backup arrived and conducted a traffic
stop just south of the Mountain Avenue
exit in Upland. The driver, 48-year-old
John Boyer, was arrested for vehicle
theft, possession of stolen property and
driving on a suspended license. He was
later released on $25,000 bond.

editor@claremont-courier.com

Sunday, August 9
A report of a man lying on a Village
bench and exposing his buttocks wasn’t
all it was cracked up to be. Officers
were called to the Village Grille at approximately 2:17 p.m. and made contact with Michael London, who was
indeed on a bench but was fully
clothed. A records check revealed the
Montclair resident did have active warrants for his arrest and, in the end, the
34-year-old man was booked at Claremont jail and held for court.
Monday, August 10
Two thieves from the big city were
captured while driving a stolen vehicle
in the City of Trees. At approximately
1:05 a.m., Claremont officers observed
a blue Honda Accord, reported stolen to
Long Beach police on August 9, turn
westbound on First Street from Harvard Avenue. The officers followed the
Honda and conducted a high-risk traffic
stop. A search of the vehicle revealed
two syringes and numerous pieces of
mail with the names and addresses of
different people. Passenger Julian
Valdez, 31, from Los Angeles, admitted
to owning the syringes and was arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of stolen property and
lying to police after giving them a false
name. The driver, Los Angeles resident
Francisco Garcia Akaraz, 31, was
booked for a stolen vehicle, possession
of stolen property, being an unlicensed
driver and for having outstanding warrants.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

5

‘Tour’ offers a compelling visit with David Foster Wallace

T

he End of the Tour opens today at
the local Laemmle’s, offering literary buffs the chance to squeeze
into the diner booth with David Lipsky
and David Foster Wallace as they talk
about everything from depression to sex
to Alanis Morissette.

The movie hones in on five days in 1996 when Lipsky interviewed Wallace—then on a book tour promoting his epic novel Infinite Jest—for a Rolling
Stone article.
Wallace is considered by many to be among the
world’s greatest writers, if one of its more challenging
ones.
A New York Times obit described him as “a maximalist, exhibiting in his work a huge, even manic curiosity—about the physical world, about the much
larger universe of human feelings and about the complexity of living in America at the end of the 20th
century.”
If you’re unfamiliar with the writer, you should
know he has a couple of Claremont connections, one
boast-worthy and another merely sad. Wallace was a
professor at Pomona College for a time. And in 2009,
he hanged himself at his Claremont home at the age
of 46.
David Foster Wallace lives again in The End of
the Tour, with actor Jason Segel donning his trademark bandanna and channeling his unblinking insights and acrobatic wit. Jesse Eisenberg plays
Lipsky.
Mr. Lipsky was 30 at the time of the interview, and
more than slightly awed by Wallace’s talent and success. While he was press-wary, Wallace, then 34, welcomed Lipsky as a friend and roommate, at one point
insisting to the younger writer that, “Mi Pop Tart es
su Pop Tart.”
The close-quarters communion was a life-changing
experience.
“I had loved going on that trip, getting the chance
to talk to someone who was my favorite writer,” Mr.
Lipsky told the COURIER. “I had been reading
David and now I had this great chance to be sitting in
his house, seeing where he wrote and finding out
what he loved to read and what movies he loved.”
The Rolling Stone piece was cancelled but after
Wallace’s death, Mr. Lipsky took out the tape
recorder and returned to those hours of conversation.
The result is his 2010 memoir, Although Of Course
You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip
With David Foster Wallace.
A few people, out of churlishness or posthumous
concern for Wallace’s cherished privacy, insist the
book and subsequent movie are cynically trading in
on Wallace’s fame.
However, as Lipsky reminds Wallace in The End
of the Tour, he agreed to the interview. And most
readers view his account as a heartfelt and valuable
glimpse into the mind of a genius. On its release, the
Atlantic Monthly called the book “far-reaching, insightful, very funny, profound, surprising, and awfully human.”
Lipsky had his own qualms about discussing his
time with Wallace. The producer of NPR’s “All
Things Considered,” though, convinced him to join a
broadcast about David Foster Wallace that aired
shortly after his death.
“What the producer explained to me is that there’s
a real risk when someone dies [by their own hand]
that people will read their work looking for clues or
reasons why they committed suicide—that they’ll
read the work with gray glasses on,” Mr. Lipsky said.
“I know he’s an incredible person to read, completely
awake and electric.”
Like the book, The End of the Tour follows two

Jason Segel, left, plays former Claremont resident, Pomona College professor and author,
the late David Foster Wallace, in the film “The
End of the Tour.” The movie chronicles the five
days “the two Davids” spent together in 1996
when Mr. Lipsky was interviewing Mr. Wallace
for Rolling Stone. Actor Jesse Eisenberg, at
right in photo above, plays David Lipsky.

Photos courtesy of A24 Films

“I had loved going on that trip, getting the chance to talk to someone
who was my favorite writer,” Mr.
Lipsky told the COURIER. “I had
been reading David and now I had
this great chance to be sitting in his
house, seeing where he wrote and
finding out what he loved to read
and what movies he loved.”

men hanging out and talking, whether their exchanges
take place in a rental car, while loading up on junk
food at a convenience store, in a darkened theater
showing the explosion-heavy Broken Arrow or in
the food court of an overblown shopping mall. Despite lacking a blockbuster plot trajectory, the film beguiles as an account of what Mr. Lipsky calls “a really
smart person who has ruminated over…things and
then found a way to say it out loud.”
When director James Ponsoldt was casting the film,
Mr. Lipsky had a huge emotional stake in who was
selected to play Wallace. The decision to cast Jason
Segel worried some purists because the actor is best
known for comedic roles, with familiar endeavors including a longstanding part on the sit-com How I

Met Your Mother and a job acting alongside the
Muppets.
Mr. Lipsky, however, sensed it was a good choice.
He felt it was important that he and Wallace be played
by writers. He points out that Segel writes his own
movies and has even tackled a novel for kids, while
Jesse Eisenberg has two plays under his belt.
It wasn’t until the film was in the can, however,
that Mr. Lipsky realized how inspired the choice was.
“I was doing an interview with Jason on NPR and
they were playing the audio from when David and I
were driving around,” he said. “They began playing a
clip from the movie and my first thought was, that’s
when Dave and I were at Denny’s. Jason got his voice
and he also got the tremendous intelligence behind his
voice.”
Above everything, Lipsky is a fan of Wallace. A
professor at Cornell, he teaches Infinite Jest, helping
students get over the daunting fact that the book is
more than 1,000 dense pages and discover “that it’s
an extraordinary novel.”
Critics are hailing The End of the Tour as extraordinary as well. Mr. Lipsky is happy with the film, too.
“What I love about the movie is one of the things I
wanted to get in the book. It’s full of life,” he said.
Wallace was “fully awake,” Mr. Lipsky reiterated,
and when you are awake, it makes you “charming and
alive and electric to be with.”
And for a wordsmith, there’s nothing like the
chance to spend time with a literary hero.
“If you really love a writer, you wish you could call
them on the phone and ask them about everything in
the world. And all of a sudden, there I was.”
Showings for The End of the Tour, which opens
today at the Laemmle’s Claremont 5, are at 1:40,
4:30, 7:30 and 10:15 p.m. For information, call (909)
621-5500.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

6

Happy birthday, daughter
by Debbie Carini

W

hen she was born, 24 years ago
today, I wasn’t surprised. It
seemed inevitable that I would
have a daughter and not a son. I am the
oldest of four sisters; I was raised with
girls and didn’t think I would even begin
to know how to nurture a boy (though I
did get the opportunity, two years later).
From the beginning, she was headstrong in a way I
couldn’t comprehend—with 12 hours of labor followed
by a caesarean section‚ she was definitely on her own
schedule! In addition to having a stay-at-home mom,
pretty much at my disposal, I was raised on family fare
featuring Mrs. Cleaver, Mrs. Partridge, Mrs. Cunningham and Mrs. Walton, all moms who seemed to work
mostly in the kitchen (except Mrs. Partridge, who sang
in her family band and drove the bus).
But I was also born into a world where women were
just beginning to assert their rights. (Title VII of the
Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race or sex, was passed in
1964 and in 1972, Title IX of the Education Amend-

ments banned sex discrimination in schools—just in
time for me to get a new uniform as a member of the
Upland High School badminton team!) “That Girl”
Marlo Thomas and Mary Richards from “The Mary
Tyler Moore Show” had pretty interesting lives in my
estimation (with sophisticated jobs and great clothes,
apartments and boyfriends).
I’d always thought of myself as progressive, in terms
of being a woman. I graduated from college, became a
“junior executive” and kept my last name. So I don’t
know why it came as a shock that as soon as my
daughter had the coordination, she would pull the elaborate hair-bows my mother-in-law (matriarch of three
sons) purchased for her right out of her hair. She preferred overalls to dresses, spoke her mind (pretty much
from the age of nine months, when she first babbled A,
B, C, D from her perch in the car seat), and would politely, yet firmly, deny smooches to her Grandpa Carl

Invitation to Parliament

G

reetings from the incoming president of
the Claremont Interfaith Council. I am not a PK
(preacher’s kid), though I am a
PGK (preacher’s grandkid).
My grandfather, Rev. T.D. Williams,
was a Methodist minister in Wisconsin.
Among his books were Volumes I and II
of The World’s Parliament of Religions, published in 1893. The Parliament is the oldest, largest and most
inclusive gathering of people of faith and
religious traditions (see www.parliamentofreligions.org).
Chicago, Cape Town, Barcelona and
Melbourne have since hosted gatherings
in the 122 years since the first gathering.
The Parliament returns to the US this
year from October 15 to 19 in Salt Lake

More than a few
members of the
congregation are
puzzled and curious
at the Lord’s handling
of the world’s monumental problems.
And the Dodgers.

(“No, thank you,” she would reply when he would
query, “Can I get a kiss?”)
Over time, she conflated her independence and intelligence with a love of very high heels and her advanced
math skills with a need to have an extremely sticky
drawer filled with cosmetics. My own mother’s sage
advice to keep my hair brushed, my clothes ironed and
to learn how to type seemed lost on her, as did my frequent admonishments about the sad state of her bedroom; “How can you live like this?” I would shriek
when trying to find our cat or an important piece of
homework under the piles of clothes and other detritus
of a teenage girl’s life.
I’ve read that by the time a woman realizes her
mother was right, she has a daughter who thinks she’s
wrong. It took a long time for me to understand and appreciate the sacrifices my mother made for me (starting
with the fact that she was asked to leave her job when
she became pregnant with me—thanks to the US Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission, founded in
1965, that’s not a problem today). I’m not sure if my
daughter will ever make her bed, but I think she’ll
make her way—on her terms, in her time. So happy
birthday, daughter...and make sure to give Grandpa a
kiss next time you see him.

by the Rev. Ann Schranz

Inter-Faithfully SPEAKING
City. The organizers hope you will attend if you are concerned about war, terrorism and hatred; if you care for
creation and are worried about climate
change; if you are troubled by the
widening wealth gap and wasteful consumption; and if you care for religions
and nations working together in harmony for the good of humanity.
Religious leaders from the Claremont
area will be making a presentation in
Salt Lake City. While this presentation
is not formally sponsored by the Claremont Interfaith Council, the council is a
place where relationships of trust among
presenters developed and where collaboration readily occurs. You may wish to
check with the leader of your religious

community to see if it is represented on
the council. We welcome all traditions
serving residents of the Claremont area.
I have been a Unitarian Universalist
for 22 years and a Unitarian Universalist
minister for 10 years. I felt happy to
know that there was a strong Unitarian
connection with the first Parliament 122
years ago. Rev. Jenkin Lloyd-Jones was
a Unitarian minister based in Chicago,
and he worked long and hard to organize
the 1893 Parliament. Among other responsibilities, he and a colleague had
charge of one of the meeting halls.
The closing speakers in that hall included people from the United States,
India (including Swami Vivekananda),
Russia, Japan, China, England, Ceylon,

Africa and Spain. Alluding to the views
of some people who were skeptical
about the respect shown to non-Christians, Rev. Lloyd-Jones said, “I had
rather be a doorkeeper in the open house
of the Lord than to dwell in the tents of
bigotry. I am sufficiently happy in the
knowledge that I have been enabled to
be to a certain extent the feet of this great
triumph. I bid to you the parting guests
the godspeed that comes out of a soul
that is glad to recognize its kinship with
all lands and with all religions.”
My soul, too, is glad to recognize its
kinship with all lands and with all religions. Interfaith collaboration is vital to
help create and sustain a world where
dignity, love and peace can flourish.
Rev. Ann Schranz serves Monte Vista
Unitarian Universalist Congregation in
Montclair.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

Pomona master plan rebuttal

Dear Editor:
In a July 10 letter to the editor from
Pomona College’s Richard Fass—a response to the viewpoint previously submitted by me and John Neiuber—Mr.
Fass stated that the viewpoint “contains a
number of misstatements about the college’s previous master plans.”
He mainly objects to our statement, “A
2008 Pomona College master plan concept shows institutional buildings where
the Victorians are currently located [on
Harvard].” The date was incorrect. We
apologize. The date of the Master Plan
concept was 2003, but it makes little difference. We did not say that it was an
adopted master plan but that it was a concept, which Mr. Fass acknowledges.
Whether or not it was part of the 2008 update approved by the city is again a moot
point. Regardless of it being approved or
being official or whatever spin one puts to
it, the concepts portrayed in this drawing
appear to be coming true.
The rendering from 12 years ago shows
a new building footprint that is identical
to what is currently being presented for
the new Thatcher Music Building that will
replace the Montgomery Art Center and
the existing Thatcher building. Both are
planned to be demolished.
It shows a new building at the same location and with a similar footprint to what
is currently being proposed for the new art
museum on the west side of College Avenue between Second Street and Bonita.

READERS’ COMMENTS
It also shows two new institutional
buildings where there are currently four
historic Victorian houses on Harvard, and
a new institutional building where there is
currently parking where Harrison Avenue
was closed off. This is interesting from the
standpoint that Pomona College’s current
proposed master plan has been under development for over a decade and they
have slowly been undertaking the projects
shown in these early concepts, whether
part of an approved master plan or not.
There appears to be an underground, less
transparent, master plan at work here.
The other “misstatement” Mr. Fass objected to concerns the Claremont General
Plan map (Figure 2-3 Land Use Plan) that
shows the proposed site of the new museum listed as “institutional.” However,
this map describes the types of uses as
“existing and planned.” The site in question is currently zoned residential, and
Pomona College currently uses the residential-scale houses located there for institutional uses through an agreement with
the city. Locating an institutional building
here with the mass and scale as presented
by Pomona would destroy the historic residential feeling and be in direct opposition
to the community values that are outlined
in Claremont’s General Plan.
In addition, the parking, which is already impacted in the Village, will be-

come much worse, but the college has not
addressed this potential impact.
I also want to acknowledge something.
Claremont Heritage is not opposed to a
new museum—in fact, we welcome it!
We are only concerned with the proposed
location. Pomona College was part of
Claremont’s history from the very beginning and has been a major influence on
what our town is today.
Claremont’s history of preserving our
cultural, natural and architectural heritage
is what sets us apart from other communities. Pomona acknowledges these values by desiring to return its campus design
to the ideals that were originally planned
by noted architect Myron Hunt. This is
where there seems to be a disconnect of
sorts. By proposing a large-scale institutional building on the block between Second Street and Bonita on the west side of
College Avenue and moving the iconic
Renwick House from its historical location, Pomona will in effect destroy the historic residential feeling that is part of its
own legacy.
Please, Pomona College, do the right
thing for the Colleges, the community and
our heritage. Relocate the museum elsewhere.
David Shearer
Claremont Heritage
executive director

Our dried-up public spaces

Dear Editor:
About a year ago, my husband and I
sold our four-bedroom home in north
Claremont and purchased a townhouse in
the Village. We wanted to raise our two
small children in a pedestrian-friendly
neighborhood with lots of active, communal space nearby. We feel strongly
about the value of shared space due to its
community-building properties as well as
its overall efficiency. For the first couple
of months, we enjoyed walking to the

7

parks and hanging out around the Public
Plaza fountains to cool off. With the new
water restrictions, nearly all of these
places have become deserted and unwecoming.
The fountains were turned off and even
the grassy areas surrounding local playgrounds disappeared. I still walk through
the Village in the mornings and pass all of
the lush, green swaths of lawn, but I no
longer hang out in the parks or the Plaza
because it’s just not enjoyable for my kids
anymore. I guess I was expecting a city
that values its community space so much
as to rally behind preserving these spaces
while sacrificing our personal ones.
Clearly, I was wrong.
Nowadays, I pack up my two kids and
drive to neighboring cities to cool off and
relax. I never expected to have to leave
Claremont to seek out those places. Please
don’t get me wrong, I am all about water
conservation and have been for years.
The house we sold was completely
landscaped with drought-tolerant plants
well before it was trendy. “Brown is the
new green” is a motto I have touted on
countless occasions. However, I believe it
is important to preserve places that are
highly used and valued by the community.
One such place is the fountains in the Public Plaza. Like most other fountains, they
recycle water. By shutting them off completely, did we really save that much
water? Or were we doing so just to make
a point? Instead of walking two blocks so
my kids can cool off in a space used by
tons of kids, I am driving 10 miles so that
my kids can cool off at a splash pad elsewhere or filling up a baby pool at my
house that will have to be dumped out
after being used by just two kids.
Here is an idea: Can we get some local
businesses that seem reluctant to let go of
their lawns to “sponsor” lost spaces by removing their ornamental grass? The city
can then utilize the water for community
space. That would be something I would
expect from the Claremont I love.
Meg Compton
Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

Romelia ‘Rosie’ Miranda

9

OBITUARIES

Mother, friend, longtime Walter’s employee
Romelia Rosaria Miranda, a 30-year
employee of Walter’s Restaurant in
Claremont, died Monday, August 3,
2015. She was 55.
Born on August 8, 1959 in Los Angeles, Rosie was the oldest of six in a
large family, who all lived together in
Echo Park, California until around
1980. She married Juan Miranda in
1981 and, in 1983, joined the Walter’s
staff. The Mirandas have three children,
Emily, Johnnie and Randy. Many of
Rosie’s siblings, children, nephews and
nieces have worked at Walter’s and
contributed as members of the large
“Walter’s family in Claremont.”

Nangy and Fahima Ghafarshad,
owners of Walter’s, considered Rosie
their “right-hand employee” alongside
her husband, Chef Juan Miranda, who
has also been an employee at Walter’s
since 1978.
The Ghafarshad family writes,
“Rosie, our beloved friend and employee of over 30 years, will be missed
immensely. Those of you who have had
the pleasure of seeing her smiling face
and being warmly greeted with her
words of endearment know what a
pleasure she was. Her dedication to her
job and work ethic is rarely matched.
Her style of perfection, attention to de-

tail and reluctance to leave any job incomplete are qualities from which we
have all benefited and learned a great
deal. We all knew her as Rosie. She
was part of the Walter’s family and, especially, a member of the Ghafarshad
family.”
Funeral services will be held on Friday, August 14 at 10 a.m. at Sacred
Heart Church, 1215 S. Hamilton Blvd.
in Pomona. Burial will follow at Holy
Cross Cemetery, 444 E. Lexington Ave.
in Pomona.
A celebration of Rosie’s life will be
held Monday, August 17 from 5 to 7
p.m. at Walter’s Restaurant.

Ruvimbo Heather Zvobgo
Beloved daughter and sister, snack aficionado
Claremont resident Ruvimbo
Heather Zvobgo died of cardiac arrest
on July 31, 2015. She was 21.
Ms. Zvobgo, affectionally known as
Ru, was born on February 1, 1994 at
Avenues Clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe to
Chegetai Zvobgo and Kebokile DenguZvobgo.
When she was 8, the family moved
to Claremont. Ru attended schools with
strong special needs programs in neighboring cities and thrived in after-school
activities at AbilityFirst in Claremont.
At AbilityFirst, where she was a regular
from 2005 to the present, she enjoyed
swimming, field trips and working on
puzzles. Most recently, Ru attended a
post-high school transition program in
Glendora, where she participated in
sheltered work training at Edible
Arrangements and other businesses.
Ru made friends wherever she went.
Though she was non-verbal, AbilityFirst Director Julie Martin said she was
extremely expressive. “You could tell if
she was happy or sad or thinking of
things,” she said. “When she was
happy, she would clap her hands and
give a certain smile that said, ‘Everything is good. The world is a good
place.’”
That smile, she noted, was of the
100-watt variety. “It lit up the room,”
Ms. Martin said. “I used to say, ‘Ru,
you could be a supermodel.’ She was
one in a million, and we’ll miss her so
much.”
She will also be missed among the
congregation of the Salvation Army in
Pasadena. Ru and her sister Kelebogile,
called Kelly, are fourth-generation Salvationists. Their mother, Kebokile, is a
member of the Salvation Army
Pasadena Tabernacle Choir and regularly took Ru to rehearsals. She didn’t
pull any punches when it came to her
assessment of the singers’ performance.
“If she liked the music, she would clap.

If she didn’t, she’d be like, whatever,”
Kebokile said, mimicking her daughter’s unimpressed face.
Ru also made many friends at Pitzer
College, where her mom is associate
dean of International Programs. Some
people don’t know how to talk to people with developmental disabilities, Kebokile said. “It’s like they’re just
invisible.”
That was never the case at Pitzer.
“That’s the beauty of my colleagues,”
Kebokile said. “They included her in
everything.” One such colleague is
Michael Ballagh, who serves as associate vice president for International Programs at Pitzer College.
“Ru was an extraordinarily gracious
young woman. She was truly a global
citizen, not simply in her extensive
world travels with her family, but also
as a regular and welcome attendee at
most public events for international students on campus,” Dr. Ballagh
said. “From time to time, Ru would accompany her mum to work and would
sit happily (and quietly) in her office,
invariably with a broad grin on her
face. A gentle and beautiful soul, her
happy presence will be sorely missed at
Pitzer.”
Just in case Ru sounds like a saint,
her friends and family are quick to note
that she could also be a rascal. Kelly
jokes that it just wasn’t fair. “Ru was always mischievous and never got in
trouble,” she said. “I was never mischievous and always got in trouble.”
Ms. Martin recalls the time a staff
member returned to the AbilityFirst office with a large, frosty Coke. “Ru
snatched it and went into the bathroom
so fast and drank it in the stall, then
threw it in the trash like, ‘I’m done.’
She was a sweet girl, but very sneaky.”
Ru loved food and was known for
helping herself to snacks, which she
often stored in her purse. “A lady never

leaves home without her purse,” Kebokile laughed.
Kelly recalls Ru sleeping with her
purse when they shared a hotel room,
as if she didn’t trust her sister not to
steal the kettle corn she’d stored inside.
“If we ever had a natural disaster, Ru
would be fine with all of the supplies in
her purse,” Kelly said.
Along with making mischief, Ru
forged some wonderful memories with
the help of family and friends. Her 21st
birthday, celebrated with dinner at Tutti
Mangia and a cake from Some Crust,
was an unmitigated success. And immediately prior to her death, she took a
five-week trip to London with her mom
and sister, where they traveled to celebrate the 150-year anniversary of the
Salvation Army. Ru particularly enjoyed staying in hotel rooms and traveling on a motor coach, as well as feeling
the breeze atop those iconic double-

decker buses. Of course, she loved the
restaurant meals.
A memorial service held on August 7
at the Salvation Army Pasadena Tabernacle Corps—with Salvation Army officers/pastors Majors Darren and Mary
Norton officiating—drew 179 people,
including friends from AbilityFirst, the
Claremont Colleges, LA County Transition Program (Glendora site), the San
Gabriel/Pomona Regional Center and
the church congregation. Ru loved
bright colors, particularly green and
blue, so they had sunflowers at the funeral instead of something more
somber like white lilies. She was privately buried at Oak Park Cemetery.
At the memorial, Ru’s cousin Douglas Mupasiri gave a moving tribute,
which Kebokile paraphrased. “He said
she had an incredible effect on everyone who knew her. She let us all know
what was important—food, love, shelter and comfort—and let us know we
shouldn’t sweat the small stuff.”
“She also taught us to be patient and
kind,” Kelly added.
In this time of loss, Ru’s family is
taking comfort from their large support
system. So many friends have brought
food over to the house that Kebokile
hasn’t had to cook. They are also
helped by their faith.
“As they say in the Salvation Army,
Ru is not dead. She’s been promoted to
Glory,” Kebokile said. “Her body is
planted in Claremont but her spirit is
with the Lord.”
Ru is survived by her her mother,
Kebokile Dengu-Zvobgo, her father,
Chengetai Zvobgo, and her sister, Kelebogile Zvobgo. She also leaves behind
devoted family and friends.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made to The Salvation Army or AbilityFirst, 480 S. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711.

Every Friday in print. Every day online. claremont-courier.com • 621 4761

OBITUARIES

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

10

Keith ‘Casey’ Davis
World traveler, pilot, pinball wizard
Keith Charles “Casey” Davis, a Claremont resident,
was killed on July 26, 2015 when his small aircraft
crashed in Riverside. He was 52 years old.
He was born on July 30, 1962 and grew up in La
Verne, graduating from Bonita High School in 1981.
He earned a bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley and
an MBA from the London School of Economics.
Mr. Davis lived and worked in Tokyo and met his
wife Kumiko Shiga in Japan. He was fluent in Japanese and at the time of his death worked as a freelance
translator of technical and financial manuals and reports for Morgan Stanley and others.
He had lived in Claremont for the past 10 years and
had a passion for pinball machines, beginning at age
12, owning many vintage and late-model machines
that he played, shared, repaired, bought, sold and enjoyed throughout his life. Another hobby was brewing
batches of homemade beer, which Casey would serve
at blowouts hosted in his “man cave,” a storage unit he

had converted into a party space.
Mr. Davis traveled extensively and lived, worked,
visited and trekked through more than 80 countries.
Along with living in Claremont, he and his wife and
daughter lived in Japan and Hawaii. He was a pilot
and motorcyclist and enjoyed high-adrenaline activities. Casey was meticulous, safety-minded and a perfectionist who, in all of his many years of school,
maintained a perfect record of only As. He was funny,
adventurous, brave, intelligent and cared deeply for
the people closest to him.
He is survived by his wife Kumiko, daughter Maki,
mother Yvonne Davis of Claremont and father C.B.
“Bud” Davis of Nevada. He also leaves his sister
Stephanie Davis, brother Kirk Davis and nieces Maya
Davis and Asia Coffman, all of Claremont.
A service will be held Saturday, September 5 at 4
p.m. at the La Verne Church of the Brethren, located at
2425 E St. in La Verne.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

11

OUR TOWN
According to current health care sector data, Inpatient
Rehabilitation Facilities, such as Casa Colina, typically
win approximately 80 percent of their appeals before
ALJs. The ALJ appeal backlog means that HHS will
continue to retain funds that rightfully belong to the hospitals that treat Medicare beneficiaries. To date, HHS
holds more than $1.1 million in Casa Colina’s funds for
services already provided. This action has created a financial burden to Casa Colina that could threaten its
ability to provide much-needed patient care to the most
vulnerable Medicare beneficiaries.

Inaugural Claremont Art Showcase opens next week

Local kids “throw” Judo contest, bring home medals
A team of four members from Goltz Judo—which
holds its classes at Claremont’s Alexander Hughes Community Center—recently won several titles at the US
Judo Summer Nationals held in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Spencer LaMott, a 17-year-old brown belt from
Claremont, finished fourth, defeating several strong opponents and advancing to the bronze medal match.
Johana Forman, a 9-year-old blue belt from Upland,
won a gold medal, defeating all of her opponents by ippons (full points). Her 13-year-old sister Sadie Forman,
a purple belt, won a bronze medal in her division after
battling hard over the silver in her division.
Inez Torres, 18, a brown belt from Azusa, won both a
gold and silver medal in her divisions, contending with
a very tough black belt from Indiana.
Each of these young champions has been practicing at
Goltz Judo, which has been affiliated with Claremont
Human Services for over 25 years. To find out about
classes and registration, call (909) 399-5490.

Casa Colina files suit relating to
Medicare appeals
Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare filed
a lawsuit to require the US Department of Health and
Human Services (HHS) to resolve Medicare appeals
within 90 days of submission, as required by federal law.
The suit, which was filed in the US District Court for
the Central District of California, requests the court to
order HHS to address Casa Colina’s pending appeals,
which have been languishing for as long as two years.
“The lengthy delay in addressing our appeals could
threaten our ability to serve the rehabilitation needs of
Medicare beneficiaries in California,” Felice Loverso,
Ph.D., president and CEO of Casa Colina stated. “With
this suit, Casa Colina intends to hold Medicare to the
rules established by Congress.”
When the Medicare program denies payment for a
claim for services, the statute entitles providers and patients to a hearing before an administrative law judge.
The statute requires the judge to hold a hearing and issue
a decision within 90 days. HHS has routinely missed
this deadline. However, because it has permitted its auditors to review and deny hundreds of thousands of
claims without adequate oversight by HHS, the backlog
has become so extreme that HHS has stopped assigning
new appeals to administrative law judges for 28
months. 
Casa Colina’s experience with its past HHS appeals
shows that most of the claim denials are invalid.  During the appeal process, HHS recoups Medicare payments and holds them while providers often wait years
for their appeals to be heard instead of the 90-day requirement.

Local artists will share their works during the first
Claremont Art Showcase scheduled to be held at the
Alexander Hughes Community Center from August 19
through November 16.
A public reception for the artists will be held on
Wednesday, August 19 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Hughes
Community Center, located at 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont.
The exhibit will feature creations by Opoku Acheampong, Sandy Garcia, Kenneth Johnson, Jerry Owens,
Mervyn Seldon, Tom Skelly, Wendy Smith, Jeanne Steffan and Guan Zhi. A variety of two-dimensional works
will be on display, including a 23-foot-by-10-foot temporary mural that will be painted in the entertainment
lounge of the Hughes Center by Sandy Garcia and Arlene Moreno.
The Claremont Art Showcase exhibition is sponsored
by the city of Claremont in conjunction with the Claremont Museum of Art and Claremont Graduate University Art Business/Art Management Public Art Program.
For more information about the exhibit or the artists’
reception, please call (909) 399-5490 or visit the city’s
website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us.

Pilgrim Pacers take racing skills
to competition in France
According to renowned editor Judith Regan, the key
to successful aging is to pay as little attention to it as
possible. It’s an adage proves to be true for a group of
senior athletes known as the Pilgrim Pacers, who left
Claremont on August 2 to compete at the World Master
Athletic Championships in Lyon, France.
These 11 men and women prove that age is just a
number as they join more than 8,000 athletes from a
record 98 nations to compete in racewalking at the biennial track and field event held under the auspices
of World Masters Athletics. The Championships run
from August 4 through August 16, 2015 and are open to
individual competitors aged 35 years and older.
Racewalking is a sport contested in all levels in track
and field, from youth athletics to the Olympic Games.
The discipline requires the endurance of the long dis-

Photo courtey of Pilgrim Place
The Pilgrim Pacers—Back row: Paul Lawson, Lynn
Juarez, Sally Timmel, Jacqueline Chase, Anne
Stromberg, Bob Smith.Kneeling: Grace Moremen,
Carol Dyar, Charlene Tschirhart, Bill Moremen

tance runner, combined with the attention to technique
of a hurdler, as the athletes compete in events such as
the 10-kilometer and 20-kilometer race walk.
Although it is a foot race, racewalking is different
from running in that one foot must appear to be in contact with the ground at all times. Race judges will make
the assessment, making racewalking the most subjective of the disciplines in athletics.
The Pilgrim Pacers, aged 69 to 87, who made the
journey to France include 10 racewalkers and one runner—Jacqueline Chase, Carol Dyar, Lynne Juarez, Paul
Lawson, Bill and Grace Moremen, Sally Simmel,
Anelise Smith, Ann Stromberg, Charlene Tschirhart, and
Bob Smith. The group is led and trained by Pilgrim
Place resident Bill Moreman.
Comprised of both residents of Pilgrim Place and
members of the larger community, the Pilgrim Pacers
regularly compete in both local and regional racers. Several members hold national records, including Anelise
Smith, who set a national record for her age group in the
15K this past spring. Member Bill Moremen holds five
age-group national records and, until recently, one world
record. Grace Moremen, a noted author, is a three-time
recipient of the national Race Walker of the Year Award.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

12

COURIER photos/Steven Felschuneneff
Several varieties of ceanothus—including Diamond Heights, at the left, and Joyce Coulter—are available at the Grow Native Nursery at Rancho Santa
Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont. The nursery is currently closed but will be reopening in October near the best time to plant native species.

Taking cover:

RSABG horticulturalists weight in on turf replacement

W

ith the ongoing
drought and accompanying watering
restrictions, it seems like
everyone is pondering turf removal and replacement.
“It isn’t hard to do, but it does require thought,” April Garbat said.
Ms. Garbat, who is communications
specialist with the Rancho Santa Ana
Botanic Garden and a professional
landscaper, suggests residents first decide how much, if any, grass they want
to maintain.
You might easily stand to replace all
of your turf, given an attractive alternative. If you’ve got kids who play in the
back yard, however, or a dog that needs
a place to “do his business,” you might
want to retain a bit of turf.
Ms. Garbat recommends that beginners tinker with lawn replacement on a
smaller scale. You might, for instance,
start with the strip of grass bordering
your driveway. A measured approach
gives residents time to work with the
seasons and to experiment with attractive garden design.
Not every lawn is the same, Ms. Garbat notes. Killing Marathon grass requires little more than the cessation of
watering. Other species require a more
calculated approach.
Grasses like Bermuda or St. Augus-

Antonio Sánchez, plant production manager at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, displays Siskiyou blue fescue, a popular drought-tolerant plant that people
use to replace lawns.

tine call for a multi-step process that
can take as long as six weeks. It’s not
enough to stop watering hardy grasses,
Ms. Garbat said. You may need to
cover your lawn with plastic during the
summer, literally steaming the grass to
death.
If this sounds daunting, you may
want to attend Ms. Garbat’s upcoming
“How to Replace Your Lawn” workshop, set for Saturday, August 29 from
10 a.m. to noon at the Rancho Santa
Ana Botanic Garden (RSABG).

The timing of the workshop is good,
Ms. Garbat said, because there will still
be several weeks of hot weather left.
As for replacing your lawn, fall and
winter provide a much better atmosphere for establishing fledgling plants,
according to Antonio Sánchez, production manager at the Garden’s Grow Native Nursery.
“In June and July, you’re looking at
14-hour days, which can really dehydrate new plants,” he said. “In December, you’ve got only eight or nine hours

of sun, and you might get some rain.”
Sometimes in their rush to create a
mature-looking yard, people make the
mistake of investing a bunch of money
in larger plants. Starting smaller, however, poses less of a gamble.
“If you buy a $5 plant and it fails, it’s
not the same as losing a 10-gallon plant
that cost $50,” Ms. Garbat said. “Plus,
there’s a better transplant rate. Larger
plants can get root-bound and it’s easier
for them to go into shock.”
The Grow Native Nursery is closed,
but will reopen on Saturday, October 3.
It stocks many plants that cost $5 or
less and that are youthful enough to roll
with the punches.
The COURIER recently stopped by
the RSABG to talk about which native
plants make for good groundcovers.
The following are a few of the turf-alternatives recommended by Ms. Garbat
and Mr. Sánchez.
At 36” to 48,” Pozo Blue salvia—a
heat- and drought-tolerant sage hybrid—makes for a taller groundcover.
Come spring, its lavender blossoms add
color to your yard. Siskiyou blue fescue
is an ornamental grass that grows in
mounds of 8 to 12 inches tall and wide.
Lawn-lovers find it appealing because
its blades mimic those of less waterwise grass. It likes full sun and looks
great when massed and paired with an
accent or hardscape.
Dune sedge, another groundcover
TAKING COVER/next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

TAKING COVER/from previous page

TURF REDUCTION/from page 3

that looks lush with minimum watering, is cost-effective because it spreads
underground. Its glossy leaves grow to
a height of 10 to 12 inches.
California fuschia likes partial shade
but, given a touch more water, can
thrive in full sun. It’s a particularly
stunning plant come summertime,
when it bursts into flowers that can
range from white to deepest red. “I’ve
been dive-bombed by hummingbirds
planting them,” Ms. Garbat said.
Both horticulturalists heartily recommend several different types of
ceonothus as a groundcover. The Diamond Heights Carmel Creeper is a
ceonothus that grows to about a foot
high, has spring green leaves striped
with darker portions and does better in
partial shade. “These are kind of like
the redheads of the plant world,” Ms.
Garbat explained. “Variegated species
can’t be in full sun or they’ll get sunburned.”
Another ceonothus, the Ray Hartman Wild Lilac, can grow as tall as 18
feet and can handle plenty of sunshine.
Its blue blooms, which appear in
spring and winter, provide added color
to a garden.
Coyote brush is a groundcover that
is “good for people who are addicted
to green,” according to Ms. Garbat. It
ranges from four to eight feet tall, but
can also be cropped close to the
ground.
One plant Ms. Garbat and Mr.
Sánchez recommended is something a
lay-person would never even consider
as a groundcover. Woodland strawberries, which can grow to be a foot in diameter and height, are an effective way
to cover a space. With small, sweet
berries and pretty white flowers,
they’re also charming. Another surprise is that manzanita, which is more
well-known as a tree, can be an effective groundcover. Carmel Sur, a prostrate manzanita that can reach a foot
high and four to six feet wide, is one
such species.
One of the hardiest native groundcovers you can employ is yarrow, according to the RSABG staffers. You
can walk on yarrow and it will still
thrive. You can crop it close to the
ground, mowing it like grass, or allow
it to grow to a height of up to two feet.
Its flowers, Ms. Garbat notes, serve as
excellent platforms for butterflies.

T
Siskiyou blue fescue shown with a cactus for contrast is a possible plant pairing when planting a drought-tolerant
garden.

It is hugely beneficial for people
who are redoing their yards to consider
some of the elements of design. “I tell
people, “Don’t get one of every plant.
Repeat,” Ms. Garbat said.
Mr. Sánchez demonstrated, placing
several plants of one species together,
then adding a cactus to the grouping.
Next, he jumbled together a wide and
disparate variety of plants.
“If you see five plants at a time, it
calms you,” he said. “Thirty different
plants is chaos. It’s like a family of
kids at Chuck E. Cheese.”
However you arrange them, Ms.
Garbat believes native plants are the
best choice, and not just for their
water-wise ways.
“These plants, we do next to nothing
for them,” she said, motioning to
species growing near the entrance to
the RSABG. “Native plants provide
more insects and more birds and they
are in balance. You might get a lot
caterpillars and freak out, and then the
birds come and eat them. All of that activity is much more refreshing.”
Mr. Sánchez recommends that before shopping at the Grow Native
Nursery, guests take a walk through
the 86-acre garden. When visitors see a
plant they like, they can snap quick
picture to show the Grow Native staff.
“We may not have the same plant,
but we can get ideas—she likes a fourfoot plant with a flower, or he’s looking for a hedge,” he said.
The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden is located at 1500 N. College Ave.
in Claremont. For information, visit
www.rsabg.org.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

he plans were designed to not
only focus on creating an attractive yet climate-appropriate
landscape in the approximately 36,000
square feet of planting space in the medians between Foothill Boulevard and
Base Line Road, but to also be reflective of Claremont’s character while retaining all of the city’s 50-year-old
Sycamore trees already in place.
The Claremont City Council approved the design, plant palette and
specifications of the Indian Hill Boulevard Median Turf Reduction Project in
January 2015. Council awarded the
construction contract to Kasa Construction in June after they came in
with the lowest bid at $253,828 to
complete the project.
To help offset the cost, the city applied and received approval for a turfreduction rebate through Metropolitan
Water District valued at $63,000.
While the reconstruction of the medians on Indian Hill Boulevard is taking place, the city will continue to
water the trees in the medians twice a
week. Watering these trees will help to
prevent drought stress during the construction phase of the project as the
median islands are re-landscaped with
drought-tolerant plantings and new
drip irrigation.
The Indian Hill Boulevard Median
Turf Reduction Project will be completed in two phases. Phase One of the
project is anticipated to take 60 working days, with an estimated completion
in October 2015.
Phase Two, consisting of the median
areas located on Indian Hill Boulevard

13

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
The city of Claremont is removing grass
from many of the medians within the
city replacing it with rocks and drought
-tolerant plants.

between Arrow Highway and the 10
freeway, is anticipated to begin in Winter 2015.
The end result is expected to have a
variety of benefits including reducing
water consumption by 50 percent, lowering maintenance costs and the need
for pesticides and chemical fertilizers
and reducing nuisance water on the
roadways.
If not for the urgency of the water
conservation mandates, projects such
as the Indian Hill Boulevard Turf Reduction Project would have been added
to the city’s large list of capital improvement projects and workloads.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

Friday, August 14 through Saturday, August 22

CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

August
Friday

14

DAVID FOSTER WALLACE
BIOPIC A film, starring Jesse Eisenberg and Jason Segal, based on
Rolling Stone reporter and novelist
David Lipsky’s five-day interview
with acclaimed novelist David Foster
Wallace. Visit laemmle.com for
showtimes of the movie The End of
the Tour.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Enjoy free
live music throughout the Village
from 6 to 9 p.m.
POETRYPALOOZA
Featuring
poets, artists, music and an open mic.
with Rick Stepp-Bolling, Chris Alex
Penalber,
Rick
Stepp-Bolling,
Michael Ian Churchman, Scott
Nichols, Christine Marie Bryant and
Andrew Turner. Free to the public.
6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Buddhamouse Emporium, 134 Yale Ave., Claremont.
(909) 626-3322.

August
Saturday

15

STAMP YOUR HEART OUT Joan,
the former owner of Stamp Your Heart
Out is hosting a charity rubber stamp
fundraising event. This gigantic sale
will feature hundreds of rubber stamps
(booth wood mounted and acrylic), ink
pads, card stocks and scrapbooking papers, glitters, flues, tools, ribbons, magazines, die cut machines, handcrafted
greeting cards, storage units and more.
All items are value packaged and
priced to sell. Proceeds will be donated
to the Breast Health Centers at Pomona
Valley Community Hospital Medical
Center and City of Hope. 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. in the arcade at 141 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont.
TEACHER OPEN HOUSE Free garden admission for schoolteachers and
administrators and their immediate
family (with ID). Explore school tour
and program displays; reserve field
trips. Spring reservations fill up quick.
Bring your calendar to schedule a fun

Nightlife

Crossword puzzle

Lou Santini to perform
stand-up comedy next week.

Check out this week’s puzzle
by Myles Mellor.

Page 16

Page 17

and educational trip for your students.
9 a.m. to noon. Rancho Santa Ana
Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave.,
Claremont. (909) 625-8767.

August
Sunday

16

THEATER Over a dozen luxurious
bass and baritone voices will gather to
celebrate the glory of their unique
sound in a dinner concert. Guests will
hear heroes, villains, fathers and soldiers—men in their most extreme moments—in operatic selections ranging
from Verdi’s The Masked Ball to
Mozart’s The Magic Flute. There will
also be popular favorites such as They
Call the Wind Maria and There Ain’t
Nothing Like a Dame, with the grand
finale featuring all the men together
booming out the Song of the Volga
Boatmen. The extraordinary Brian Farrell will be at the piano. As a first prize
winner in the Yamaha Keyboard Competition, he has given numerous recitals
throughout the US and Europe and
brings his considerable talent and ex-

14

pertise to his role as musical director.
Included in the decadent evening is
Chef Erle Saunders’ delicious Italian
salads, pastas and desserts. One performance. School age and older are invited. 5 to 7 p.m. $40 each, $320 for a
table of eight. First Christian Church of
Pomona, located at 1751 N. Park
Ave., Pomona. For more information,
call (909) 230-4949 or email lizbethlucca@gmail.com and visit repertoryoperacompany.org.

August
Monday

17

MONDAY NIGHT CONCERTS LCR
performs at 7 p.m. at Memorial Park, 840
N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont.

August
Tuesday

18

BLUE STAR MUSEUM DAYS Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden (RSABG)
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page

August

is a participant in the National Endowment for the Arts’ Blue Star Museums
program, which offers free admission
for active-duty military and their families between Memorial Day weekend
and Labor Day. Complimentary admission will continue through Monday, September 7 and includes all
active-duty US military personnel
and/or up to five of their immediate
family members. RSABG is also extending the free garden admission to
veterans (admission fees still apply for
veterans’ family members). 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. daily. 1500 N. College Ave.,
Claremont. (909) 625-8767.

Saturday

August
Wednesday

19

DRIVERS LICENSE STUDY SESSION The Upland Library is offering
drivers license self-study sessions. Library staff will provide resources to
help you pass the DMV written exam.
The California Driver Handbook,
sample test materials and online access to practice tests will be provided.
The sessions are free and will be held
downstairs in the Carnegie Cultural
Center from 1 to 4 p.m. Requirements: Upland Library card with Internet access and must be 18 years of
age or older. Call the literacy office at

15

22

HENNA BODY ART Henna has been
used for celebrations, times of transition and personal adornment since ancient times. Come celebrate the
transitions in your own life, or treat
yourself to a beautiful, natural henna
design. Walk-ins are welcome, and the
smallest designs start at just $5. You
can choose from the pattern book, or
allow the artist to create an original
piece of art for you. Drop by at any
time from 2 to 6 p.m. Buddhamouse
Emporium, 134 Yale Ave., Claremont.
(818) 913-3294.
COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger
Hikers take advantage of the cooler morning temperatures as they walk around the
five-mile loop trail at the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park. Temperatures through the
weekend are going to be down right hot. Highs will easily reach over 100 degrees,
with lows only going down to the 70s. The good news is the air will be dry, with little
wind, which is always good news for avoiding potential fires.

(909) 931-4211 to register. Carnegie
Cultural Center is located at 123 E. D
St., Upland.

August
Thursday

6 to 9 p.m. Come by, enjoy a flight of
specialty beers and meet the St. Archer
Brewing Company’s reps. 202 Yale
Ave., Claremont. (909) 624-5431.

20 August
Friday

TAP TAKEOVER Pizza N Such will
be tapping four specialty beers by
Saint Archer Brewing Company from

21

FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Enjoy free
live music throughout the Village from
6 to 9 p.m.

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Contact calendar@claremont-courier.com

CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS:Fill
out the “List Your Event” form at
ClaremontCalendar.com. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week
before publication. There is NO
guarantee that items submitted will
be published in print or online.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $2. (909)
624-2928 or folkmusiccenter.com.
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont
Packing House. 18 and over. Show times: Friday at 8
and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and Sunday
at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door.
—Friday, August 14: Chinedu from The Mindy
Project. 8 and 10 p.m.
—Saturday, August 15: Chinedu from The Mindy
Project. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
—Sunday, August 16: Claremont Comedy Contest
with David Angelo. 7 p.m.
—Thursday, August 20: Thirsty Thursdays at 8 p.m.
and Open Mic Auditions Show at 10 p.m.
—Friday, August 21: Lou Santini from Rooftop
Comedy. 8 and 10 p.m.
—Saturday, August 22: Lou Santini from Rooftop

NIGHTLIFE
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight,
Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and
Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909)
445-8875.
—Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
—Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
—Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week.
Meet the brewer the first Wednesday of every month.
—Thursdays: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music.
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave.,
Claremont Village.
—Open mic night, the last Sunday of every
month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances

16

Image special to the COURIER
Lou Santini will headline at Flappers on August 21 and 22.

NIGHTLIFE
continues on the next page

RESTAURANT ROW

17

COURIER CROSSWORD
Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #328

NIGHTLIFE
continued from the previous page

Comedy. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
—Sunday, August 23: Claremont Comedy Contest
with Ramy Youssef. 7 p.m.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday
until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21
and over after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30
p.m. (909) 625-4808.
—Friday, August 14: Public Fortune (rock). 10 p.m.
—Saturday, August 15: Jonny Come Lately

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015
36. Animal house?
67. Two-door car
37. PBS science show
68. An Untouchable, Elliot ___
1. Wear
38. Hang around, do nothing
69. Mystery Nepalese
6. Uncommon ____, new organic
40. Whiff
70. Put in a stake
store in Claremont
43. Alum
10. Court order
Down
44. Arab bigwig
14. Tree with catkins
1. Droop
45. Flip pages
15. Miami Vice role
2. Alka-Seltzer sound
47. Baking term
16. Mark's replacement
3. Polecat's defense
48. Hindu princess
17. Dolt
4. Spring planting activity
49.
He
plays
Sir
Andrew
in
18. Last month, abbr.
5. Clover
Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night,"
19. DOL part
6. Insect larva
performed at Pomona College
20. Manufactured home e.g.
7. Lamp type
52. Lady of pop
22. Rouse
8. Book size
54.
Bard's
preposition
24. A long time
9. Accomplish
55.
Introduction
25. Old stringed instrument
10. Puny person
57. Absolute maximum
26. Movie shown as part of the
11. Cartoonist fist name
60. "The Blue Danube," e.g.
Family Movies in the Park
12. Inflexible
61.
Oktoberfest
need
series with the Claremont
13. Pile of rocks
63.
Zeus's
blood
Police Department
19. ___-tzu
65. Top of the heap
31. Sewed up
21. Karenina and Kournikova
66. Buffet
35. Rodney ___, NASCAR
23. Triumph
Answers to last week’s puzzle #327 26. Vault jumper, perhaps
27. Fragrance
28. Siphon
29. Winner's cry
30. Warbler's sound
32. Reef material
33. Sidestep
34. Puff of rap
39. Naval escorts
41. Honorarium
42. Side of a many sided object
46. Countertop composite
49. Computer letters
50. Northerner
51. New conservative, for short
53. Cutting tool
55. Spike
56. Shade makers
57. Tropical fruit
58. Folded up
59. Toss back more than a few
60. Sickly
62. Bolt down
64. Blushing brightly
66. First word of 'America'

Across

(Latino/rockabilly/soul).
—Sunday, August 16: Sunday piano with Amy Rowe
at 6 p.m. followed by Time (classic/northern soul/DJ)
at 9:30 p.m.
—Tuesday, August 18: King Trivia Night. 9 p.m.
—Wednesday, August 19: Joe Atman (piano/ballads).
9:30 p.m.
—Thursday, August 20: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band
(jazz) at 10 p.m. and DJ Spy See Man Go at 11 p.m.
—Friday, August 21: Mick Rhodes and the Hard
Eight (rock). 10 p.m.
—Saturday, August 22: Groove Session (jam band).

PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and
Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8
p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with
student ID). (909) 547-4266.
—Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with
the band.
—Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic
or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka
Rockstars. 9 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 14, 2015

18

Adult school fitness, art classes to lose state funding

Claremonter James Croghan uses the rowing machine during an exercise and fitness class at CHS.
This class and the circuit training class held at El
Roble will no longer get money from Sacramento under the new rules for adult education.

B

eginning next year, some of the
classes taught through the Claremont Adult School will be managed by a new consortium of local adult
education providers under the direction of
Assembly Bill 86, passed two years ago.
Sacramento has yet to give individual districts the
word on how the new consortiums will be managed,
however, CUSD Coordinator of Alternative Education

Maria Ortega works on her arm strength and coordination during fitness class at CHS. The class runs
Monday through Thursday at 7 p.m. and costs $50 for
a 10-week session.

COURIER photos/Steven Felschuneff
Phoebe Deville works on her balance with the assistance of instructor Mike Lepore on Wednesday during an
exercise and fitness class at CHS. Ms. Deville credits the course, which is offered through Claremont Adult
School, for helping her lose 40 pounds.

Felipe Delvasto expects to know by the beginning of
2016.
Under AB 86, either the local community college
would manage the consortium or it would remain
under the management of local school districts. Either
way, there should be little difference in the classes offered here in Claremont, according to Mr. Delvasto.
What will change is that students who approach
Claremont Adult School about programs offered in
other districts within the pool, such as those in nursing, could enroll in Claremont and then attend classes
at the other school.
Claremont will be part of the Citrus College consortium, which also includes the cities of Glendora,
Azusa, Monrovia and Duarte.
“In the past we had to tell them we didn’t offer
that,” Mr. Delvasto said.
Affected are type I, or basic skills classes, such as
those leading to a high school diploma, GED and
English as a second language. Classes for disabled
adults are also affected.
Type II, or community enrichment classes, will not
be covered under the new arrangement but must continue to be self-sustaining. These classes, including
fine arts and exercise courses, must meet minimum
enrollments in order to continue.
Paying for the instructor accounts for the main expense of enrichment classes, however, there are also
facility costs. Some classes such as ceramics require
an additional materials fee. There is some risk that
these classes could be eliminated if enrollment declines, however, that same risk exists now.
An exception to the current structure has been the
exercise and circuit training classes taught by Mike
Lepore. Initially the exercise program was for district
employees only but in the early ‘90s Mr. Lepore
asked then head of adult education Chris Ulrich if the
class could be offered to the public. Ms. Ulrich agreed
and was able to secure state funding as it was classified as an applied public health class.
For over 10 years the class was offered free of
charge, with money coming from Sacramento based
on attendance, much like K-12 education. But that all
changed with budget cuts associated with the recession. Since then, participants have paid $50 for a 10-

week session, with money from the district and
fundraising campaigns making up any shortfall. However, that is set to change.
In about a year, the two classes will have to become
self-sufficient, which means that enrollment will need
to double to avoid raising the cost, according to Mr.
Lepore.
“Because we have so many seniors on fixed incomes I did not want it to be a hardship, so I was insistent that the cost stay at $50,” he said.
Retired teacher Phoebe Deville has been coming to
the evening class since having surgery in October
2013 and seeking exercise to speed recovery. “I have
lost 40 pounds and can go 10 to 15 minutes on the
bike,” she said during a brief break from her Wednesday night workout.
“These are the nicest people ever, they all work
hard and encourage each other,” she said. “And Mike
knows what he is doing, so it is safe.”
Local realtor Mike Ramirez has been attending for
nine years and credits the class for turning his health
around. “I have type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure
and high cholesterol, but since I started here all my
levels are down and I’ve lost 39 pounds,” he said.
Mr. Lepore estimates that he will have to bring enrollment up to 60 or 70 students from the current 35.
He hopes to get a boost from a booth at Village Venture and will be actively pursuing a corporate sponsor.
Mr. Delvasto confirmed that the exercise classes
would not receive state funding under the new consortium, but emphasized that he would like to continue to
offer the program.
“We understand it is a process, we will talk to the
community, reach out to organizations as a district to
figure out what going to do to support those classes,”
said Mr. Delvasto, acknowledging that there is a significant senior population counting on those classes.
Overall Mr. Delvasto is looking forward to the new
consortium mainly because he will be able to offer a
wider range of programs.
Asked if he was excited he said: “Absolutely. We
have been hit by budget cuts in previous years. The
new [program] will be better than we have offered
for awhile.”
—Steven Felschandneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

Friday 08-14-15

19

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals........19

Rentals

Rentals

Employment

Marketplace

Animals

legals...........20

House for rent

Townhome for rent

Internships

Antiques

Animal Shelters

THREE bedrooms, two bathrooms, fenced yard, carpeting, central air and heat. 9074
Surrey
Ave.,
Montclair.
$1,900. 626-327-8436.

THREE bedrooms, two-anda-half bathrooms, 1900 sq. ft.
Two-car garage, central heat
and AC. $2,000 monthly.
WSPM 909-621-5941.

MARKETING interns needed.
Must be familiar with social
media and advertising and be
a capable writer for press releases and email blasts. Experience with photography is a
plus. References requested.
Positions offer plenty of great
opportunities for résumé. Perfect for students looking for college credit. Call 626-388-6248.

A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls.
Refinishing too! 909-593-1846.
Kensoldenoddities.com.
La Verne.

Inland Valley
Humane Society
909-623-9777
Upland Animal Shelter
909-931-4185
H.O.P.E Upland
1-800-811-4285
West End Animal Shelter
909-947-3517

services......22
real estate....24

THREE bedrooms, one bathroom with fireplace, hardwood
floors,
detached
garage, pool, quiet cul-desac. Walk to Village, Colleges. $1,995. 909-624-6547.

Office space for rent
VILLAGE office space. Exceptional building. Utilities, waiting
room, parking. 419 Yale Ave.
Weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Real Estate
House for sale

Student ads
NORTH Claremont pool
home. Three bedrooms, two
bathrooms, 1626 sq. ft.
Needs TLC. $579,900. Tarbell, Realtors Antoinette
Gower 626-893-2378.

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify,
revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The
Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after
the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

RESPONSIBLE and reliable
student to care for pets, children
and house sitting. Has experience and can provide references. Chynna, 909-764-9088.

All new accounts and
Garage Sale ads must be
prepaid. Payment by
cash, check. Credit cards
now accepted.
Sorry no refunds.

Number One!
See what’s happening in Claremont!

The COURIER Claremont Calendar is the most
comprehensive, popular, online source for Claremont events.
Got an event? List it with ClaremontCalendar.com for free!
Our state-of-the-art website will walk you through the steps to
create your own listing to promote your event.

Just go online to ClaremontCalendar.com to list your event.

For sale
ALL apartment contents
must go, now! Sofa, bed, tables, chairs, bookcases, TV,
appliances, utensils, etc.
Any reasonable offer for any
item. Village location. 603256-8350.

Coyote sightings
ONE coyote was spotted
resting in the shade of a residential front yard in the 500
block of Baughman Ave. at 4
p.m. on Tuesday, August 11.

DEADLINES

PRICING

Classified:
Wednesday
by noon

Classified:
1-16 words $20.00,
each additional word $1.25

Real Estate:
Tuesday by 5 pm

Display Ad:
$10 per column/inch,
3 column minimum
Service Ad:
Please call for pricing.

Service Pages:
Tuesday by 5 pm

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:
WILLIAM JAMES GALLAGHER
CASE NO. BP165386
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent
creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the WILL or estate, or both of WILLIAM
JAMES GALLAGHER.
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by
JEFFERY GALLAGHER in the Superior Court of
California, County of LOS ANGELES.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JEFFERY GALLAGHER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer
the estate under the Independent Administration of
Estates Act . (This authority will allow the personal
representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal
representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or
consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless
an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A HEARING on the petition will be held in this
court as follows: 09/09/15 at 8:30AM in Dept. 9
located at 111 N. HILL ST., LOS ANGELES, CA
90012
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition,
you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance
of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate
Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or
personal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult
with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If
you are a person interested in the estate, you may
file with the court a Request for Special Notice
(form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account
as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the
court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner
LESLIE E. RILEY
VARNER & BRANDT LLP
3237 E GUASTI RD #220
ONTARIO CA 91761-1243
8/14, 8/21, 8/28/15
CNS-2783951#
CLAREMONT COURIER

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No. 1219022 APN: 8303-002-030 PURSUANT TO
CIVIL CODE Section 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED
TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE
RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT
BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED
TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A
SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN
THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE
IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST
DATED 9/1/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT
MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF
YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE
NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to
the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check
drawn on a state or national bank, check
drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a
check drawn by a state or federal savings and
loan association, or savings association, or
savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the
Financial Code and authorized to do business
in this state will be held by the duly appointed
trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and
interest conveyed to and now held by the
trustee in the hereinafter described property
under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but
without covenant or warranty, expressed or

implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal
sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of
Trust, with interest and late charges thereon,
as provided in the note(s), advances, under the
terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon,
fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for
the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount
may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor:
SERGIO BRIZUELA, A SINGLE MAN
Duly Appointed Trustee: Law Offices of Les
Zieve Deed of Trust recorded 9/10/2004 as Instrument No. 04 2325575 in book -, page - of
Official Records in the office of the Recorder
of Los Angeles County, California, Date of
Sale: 9/4/2015 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: BY
THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC
CENTER PLAZA POMONA, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other
charges: $295,211.45 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the
total debt owed, it is possible that at the time
of the sale the opening bid may be less than
the total debt owed. Street Address or other
common designation of real property: 1017
OCCIDENTAL DRIVE CLAREMONT, California 91711 Described as follows: AS
MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID
DEED OF TRUST A.P.N #.: 8303-002-030
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address
or other common designation, if any, shown
above. If no street address or other common
designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within
10 days of the date of first publication of this
Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL
BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand that
there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee
auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on
the property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 14, 2015

property. You should also be aware that the
lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien.
If you are the highest bidder at the auction,
you are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off,
before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens
that may exist on this property by contacting
the county recorder's office or a title insurance
company, either of which may charge you a
fee for this information. If you consult either
of these resources, you should be aware that
the same lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale
date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee,
beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to
Section 2924g of the California Civil Code.
The law requires that information about
trustee sale postponements be made available
to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those
not present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been postponed,
and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and
date for the sale of this property, you may call
(714) 730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site
www.servicelinkasap.com, using the file
number assigned to this case 12-19022. Information about postponements that are very
short in duration or that occur close in time to
the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the
Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 8/6/2015 Law Offices of Les
Zieve, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite
450 Irvine, CA 92606 For Non-Automated
Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale
Information: (714) 730-2727 www.servicelinkasap.com Stephanie Islas, Trustee Sale
Officer THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO
COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED
FOR THAT PURPOSE A-FN4538191
08/14/2015, 08/21/2015, 08/28/2015

20

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015204731
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as 1.) VOICE WORKS STUDIOS, 2.)
VOICE WORKS, 743 W. Baseline Road,
Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Micah
K. Dahlberg, 743 W. Baseline Road, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name
or names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement
is true and correct.
/s/ Micah K. Dahlberg Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles
County on 08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision
(a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5)
years from the date on which it was filed in
the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920,
where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant
to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. A
new Fictitious Business Name Statement
must be filed before the expiration. Effective
January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by
the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious
Business Name in violation of the rights of
another under federal, state, or common law
(see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September
4, 2015

CAL-SCAN
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Let us
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Call the
COURIER at

621-4761
to update your
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Discover the path to happiness. New members receive
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Coyote Sightings
REPORT your coyote sightings! Contact Jessica at (909)
621-4761 or classified@claremont-courier.com.

Don’t leave us
in the dark!

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015169580
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as LAMBERTO’S MEXICAN FOOD #2, 894
W. Manchester Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90044.
Registrant(s): LAMBERTOS MEXICAN
FOOD MANAGEMENT LLC, 11289 Baseline
Rd., Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730.
This business is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Juan Francisco De La Torre Title: President
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 06/26/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et
seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: July 24, 31, August 7 and 14, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015180642
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
COVER YOUR ASSETS INVESTMENT
CLUB, 4135 Oak Hollow Road, Claremont, CA
91711. Registrants: 1.) Beverly D. Davis, 4135 Oak
Hollow Road, Claremont, CA 91711. 2.) Elissa Finerman, 209 N. Louella Road, Palm Springs, CA
92262. 3.) Richard Finerman, 209 N. Louella Road,
Palm Springs, CA 92262. 4.) Michelle Mistri, 5321
Aquamarine, Alta Loma, CA 91701. 5.) Adalberto
Mistri, 5321 Aquamarine, Alta Loma, CA 91701. 6.)
George Ondo, 32931 Avenida Olivera, San Juan
Capistrano, CA 92675. 7.) Sharon Ondo, 32931
Avenida Olivera, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675.
8.) Kenneth Flory II, 75863 Camino Cielo, Indian
Wells, CA 92210.
This business is conducted by a General Partnership.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
03/04/2010.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Richard Finerman Title: Partner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
07/09/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally
expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address of
a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of
Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: July 24, 31, August 7 and 14, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015197665
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
1.) D&K SERVICES, 2.) BUTT LOVER BBQ,
2141 Edinboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Kristine M. Ronchetti, 2141 Edinboro
Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Daniel J. Ronchetti,
2141 Edinboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by a Married Couple.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 09/01/2013.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Daniel J. Ronchetti Title: Husband
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 07/29/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2015

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA15-665441-BF Order No.: 150084407-CA-VOI
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED
OF TRUST DATED 1/16/2007. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR
PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE
PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public
auction sale to the highest bidder for cash,
cashier's check drawn on a state or national
bank, check drawn by state or federal credit
union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association,
or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the
Financial Code and authorized to do business in
this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee.
The sale will be made, but without covenant or
warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title,
possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by
the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges
thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances,
under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest
thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the
Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount
may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN
THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s):
JACQUELINE A CROWL, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Recorded: 1/23/2007 as Instrument No. 20070135128 of Official Records
in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale:
8/21/2015 at 10:30AM Place of Sale: Near the
fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza
Pomona, California 91766 Amount of unpaid
balance and other charges: $497,374.37 The
purported property address is: 381 NORTH
MOUNTAIN AVENUE, CLAREMONT, CA
91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8311-023-007
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you
are considering bidding on this property lien,
you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will
be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself.
Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and clear
ownership of the property. You should also be
aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a
junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the
auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that
may exist on this property by contacting the
county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of these
resources, you should be aware that the same
lender may hold more than one mortgage or
deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO
PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown
on this notice of sale may be postponed one or
more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of
the California Civil Code. The law requires that
information about trustee sale postponements be
made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has been
postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled
time and date for the sale of this property, you
may call 888-988-6736 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web
site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file
number assigned to this foreclosure by the
Trustee: CA-15-665441-BF . Information about
postponements that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled sale
may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any
incorrectness of the property address or other
common designation, if any, shown herein. If no
street address or other common designation is
shown, directions to the location of the property
may be obtained by sending a written request to
the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first
publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee
is unable to convey title for any reason, the
successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy
shall be the return of monies paid to the
Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have
no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for
any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled only to a return of the deposit paid.
The Purchaser shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the
Mortgagee’s Attorney. If you have previously
been discharged through bankruptcy, you may
have been released of personal liability for this
loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real
property only. As required by law, you are
hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted
to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the
terms of your credit obligations. QUALITY
MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT
AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED
WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date:
Quality Loan Service Corporation 411 Ivy
Street San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For
NON SALE information only Sale Line: 888988-6736 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711
Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.:
CA-15-665441-BF
IDSPub
#0087268
7/31/2015 8/7/2015 8/14/2015

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA14-651794-CL Order No.: 130131342 YOU
ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF
TRUST DATED 12/22/2006. UNLESS YOU
TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR
PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE
PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public
auction sale to the highest bidder for cash,
cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank,
check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a
check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan
association, or savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial
Code and authorized to do business in this state,
will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale
will be made, but without covenant or warranty,
expressed or implied, regarding title, possession,
or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal
sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust,
with interest and late charges thereon, as provided
in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the
Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and
expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at
the time of the initial publication of the Notice of
Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below.
The amount may be greater on the day of sale.
BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS
THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE.
Trustor(s): KAMALINI H TISSERA, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Recorded: 12/29/2006 as
Instrument No. 06 2895171 of Official Records in
the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES
County, California; Date of Sale: 8/28/2015 at
11:00 AM Place of Sale: By the fountain located
at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766
Amount of unpaid balance and other charges:
$953,705.07 The purported property address is:
2117 BONNIE BRAE AVE, CLAREMONT
CA, CLAREMONT, CA 917110000 Assessor’s
Parcel No.: 8671-043-041 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering
bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a
trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not
on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle you
to free and clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being auctioned
off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible
for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the
property. You are encouraged to investigate the
existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens
that may exist on this property by contacting the
county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust
on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY
OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice
of sale may be postponed one or more times by
the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court,
pursuant to Section 2924g of the California
Civil Code. The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be made
available to you and to the public, as a courtesy
to those not present at the sale. If you wish to
learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time
and date for the sale of this property, you may
call 714-730-2727 for information regarding
the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site
http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file
number assigned to this foreclosure by the
Trustee: CA-14-651794-CL . Information about
postponements that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may
not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best
way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the
property address or other common designation, if
any, shown herein. If no street address or other
common designation is shown, directions to the
location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10
days of the date of first publication of this Notice
of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title
for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and
exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies
paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder
shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set
aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit
paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee,
or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you
may have been released of personal liability for
this loan in which case this letter is intended to
exercise the note holders right’s against the real
property only. As required by law, you are hereby
notified that a negative credit report reflecting on
your credit record may be submitted to a credit
report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your
credit obligations. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY
INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED
FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan
Service Corporation 411 Ivy Street San Diego,
CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or
Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality
Loan
Service
Corp. TS
No.:
CA-14-651794-CL IDSPub #0088161 8/7/2015
8/14/2015 8/21/2015

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 14, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015179866
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as 1.) LA SOLE FLAMENCO, 2.) INTERNATIONAL PERFORMING ARTS
ACADEMY, 20628 E. Arrow Hwy, #3, Covina, CA 91724. Mailing address: 7081 Almeria Ave., Fontana, CA 92336. Registrant(s):
Yvette Garcia, 7081 Almeria Ave., Fontana,
CA 92336.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement
is true and correct.
/s/ Yvette Garcia Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles
County on 07/09/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a)
of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of five (5) years
from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided
in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts
set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before
the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity
Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious
Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see
Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2015
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF JACQUELINE A. CROWL
Case No. BP163829
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both,
of JACQUELINE A. CROWL
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed
by Joelle A. Green in the Superior Court of
California, County of LOS ANGELES.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests
that Joelle A. Green be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
THE PETITION requests the decedent's will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate.
The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority
will allow the personal representative to take
many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important
actions, however, the personal representative
will be required to give notice to interested
persons unless they have waived notice or
consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be
granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause
why the court should not grant the authority.
A HEARING on the petition will be held
on Sept. 2, 2015 at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. 5
located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA
90012.
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state
your objections or file written objections with
the court before the hearing. Your appearance
may be in person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file
your claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by the
court within the later of either (1) four months
from the date of first issuance of letters to a
general personal representative, as defined in
section 58(b) of the California Probate Code,
or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority
may affect your rights as a creditor. You may
want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for
Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of
an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or
of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special
Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for petitioner:
SUZANNE M GRAVES ESQ
MARY E IRELAND ESQ
LAW OFFICES OF
SUZANNE M GRAVES INC
1317 W FOOTHILL BLVD STE 245
UPLAND CA 91786
CN913982
Publish: August 7, 14 and 21, 2015

21

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015204898
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as GOLDEN AGES SENIOR CARE, 2186 N.
Orange Grove Ave., Pomona, CA 91767. Registrant(s): H & Y ELDERLY CARE CO., 1731
Shenandoah Drive, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
07/25/2012.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Hui Zhang Title: President
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2015

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015205535
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as THE CENTER FOR FINANCIAL
STUDIES, 2389 W. Silver Tree Road, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: P.O. Box
518, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s):
Michael J. Fontanetta, 2389 Silver Tree Road,
Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business
under the fictitious name or names listed
above on 01/01/2015.
I declare that all information in this statement
is true and correct.
/s/ Michael J. Fontanetta Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles
County on 08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a)
of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of five (5) years
from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided
in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts
set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must
be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity
Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious
Business Name in violation of the rights of
another under federal, state, or common law
(see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September
4, 2015
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2015205540
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
1.) WATERWISE LANDSCAPE COMPANY,
2.) WATERWISE LANDSCAPE SERVICES,
8221 Windmar Road, Oak Hills, CA 92344, San
Bernardino County. Registrant(s): John W. Cook,
Jr., 8221 Windmar Rd., Oak Hills, CA 92344.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ John W. Cook, Jr. Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
08/06/15.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after
any change in the facts set forth in the statement
pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in
the residence address of a registered owner. A new
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed
before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 14, 21, 28 and September 4, 2015

Friday 08-14-15

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in
acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and
drywall
repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

AC/Heating

SAME DAY SERVICE
Free service call with repair
Only $69.50 diagnostic fee
without repair
•We repair all brands
•SCE quality installation
approved
•Great prices
•Friendly service
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830

STEVE’S HEATING
& AIR CONDITIONING

1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Chimney Sweep

Complete fireplace,
woodstove installation,
service and repair.
Spark arrestor supply
and installation.
Call 909-920-6600
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland

Concrete
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.

Art Lessons
ONE-ON-ONE art lessons
with Jordan. The Colony at
Loft 204 gallery and store.
For more information email
jords.kelly@gmail.com.

THE Wood Dr. Specializing in termite and dry-rot
repairs. Fascia boards,
eves, patios, decks. 909262-8649.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

Bathroom Remodeling

Veteran
New and repairs.

Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243

Contractor

909-599-9530

CAREGIVER and housekeeping available week nights
and weekend mornings. 14
years experience. Great references. 909-297-6385.

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
finish remodeler. Kitchens,
porches, doors, decks, fences,
painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck-mounted cleaning
units. Expert carpet repairs
and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency
water damage service.
Please call 909-621-1182.

Ironing

Kendall Restoration

Impeccable Ironing. Affordable, professional, diligent.
Pick-up and delivery optional.
Est. 1968. 909-620-5945.

909-982-8910
909-767-0062

A FICTITIOUS Business Name
Statement (D.B.A.) is required
if you're in business. You are
required to file and publish a
DBA in the local newspaper.
You must renew your FBNS
every five (5) years. You must
file and republish if any
changes have been made to
your business. If your business
is located in LA COUNTY, The
COURIER will help you file
your FBNS with L.A. County
Clerk, publish the statement
and provide you with proof of
publication. Fees start at $26
to the County and $95 to the
Courier. Notary Public available
to help notarize your Affidavit
Of Identity for your FBNS for
an additional fee. Claremont
COURIER: 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont.
Call Vickie, 909-621-4761.

* Senior Discount *
Lic.359145

Furniture Restoration

THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA
Lic.742776. Please call 909816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

Electrician
Hayden’s Services Inc.

Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell 626-428-1691

Caregiver

Handyman

Gash Chimney Sweep

Quality Fireplace
& BBQ
Chimney sweeping.

Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
REX ROMANO
BUILDERS
Excellence in building
and customer satisfaction.
Kitchen and bath.
Remodel.
Best of Houzz 2015.

Lic.763385

909-626-3019
WENGER Construction. 25
years experience. Handyman
Services. Cabinetry, doors,
electrical, drywall, crown
molding. Lic.707381. 951640-6616.
PPS General Contractor.
Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows,
electrical and plumbing.
Serving Claremont for 25
years. Lic.846995. 951-2371547.

KOGEMAN
CONSTRUCTION
Room additions.
Kitchen/bath remodeling.
Custom cabinets.
Residential/commercial.
909-946-8664
Lic.B710309
Visit us on Facebook!

22

Fictitious Name

Drywall

Dust free chimney cleaning.
Repairs, chimney covers,
dryer vent cleaning,
masonry and dampers.
BBB. Please call
909-467-9212.

Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
financing. Senior discounts.
Lic.744873
909-985-5254

A Bath-Brite
authorized dealer.
Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

CONTACT US

Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
Old home rewiring specialist.
24-hour emergency service.

CALL Lou. Flush lights, service
changes, repairs, service calls,
outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909241-7671, 909-949-8230.
SPARKS ELECTRIC
Local electrician for all your
electrician needs!
909-946-8887
Lic.922000

KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
Courier readers complete
restoration needs since 1965.
La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Gardening

909-367-8282
• Home Improvement Projects
• Carpentry/Painting
• Landscaping/Garden Boxes
• Trash Removal/Hauling
HOME Repair by Ken. Electrical, plumbing, lighting, irrigation, tankless maintenance.
Local and experienced. 12
years. 909-374-0373.
A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
large, home, garage, yard.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.

Hauling
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Same Day
One call does it all!
Garage, yard, home,
moving!

909-599-9530
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
909-382-1210
626-383-1442
sameday-haulaway.com

House Cleaning

Serving Claremont
Since 1995. Residential,
Commercial.
Recessed lighting and
design, breaker replacement,
service panel upgrades,
ceiling fans, troubleshooting,
landscape lighting, rewires
and LED lighting. Free
estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

909-900-8930
909-626-2242
Lic.806149

Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$2 sq. ft. rebate*
Garden Maintenance
Hand-pull weeding, mowing,
trimming, sprinkler work,
monthly service, cleanups
and junk removal.
Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583

MOR ELECTRIC &
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates
and senior discounts.
909-989-3454
909-767-0062
Residential * Industrial *
Commercial. We do it all.
No job too big or small!
24/7 emergency services.
Reasonable and reliable.
Lic.400-990
30 years experience.

I'M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands.
Senior, pet, house sitting.
Jenny Jones, 909-6260027, anytime!

Fences & Gates

Handyman

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

Claremont
Handyman Service

Veteran
New, repairs.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Girl Friday

20 YEARS experience. Free
estimates. Excellent references.
Tailored to your individual
needs. Senior care, day or
night. Call Lupe, 909-236-2236.
TERESA'S House Cleaning.
Honest, reliable, experienced,
deep cleaning. References
available. Free estimates. 909621-0896 or 909-762-3198.
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning
Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate.
Licensed. 909-277-4215.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential.
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-803-0074
CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning.
Family owned for 26 years. Licensed, insured. Senior rates.
Professional services including: cleaning, windows, senior care, fire damage, move
in/out, closet organization. 10
percent discount to Claremont College faculty. Check
us out on Angie’s List. Robyn,
909-621-3929.
Established, upbeat,
licensed house cleaning
service. Organic
cleaning supplies used.
26 years of experience.
Jeanette 909-224-1180,
909-803-0074.

Irrigation
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691

Water Saving
Irrigation Service
Please call for a free
consultation. Affordable
prices. Thank you.

909-837-1745
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!

24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Expert Repairs
Retrofit Experts
Ask us how to save water.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the area
since 1983.

SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

909-621-5388

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design.
Claremont native specializing
in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting.
Artistic solutions for the future.
Over 35 years experience.
Call: 909-225-8855, 909-9825965. Lic.585007.

Dale's Tree &
Landscape Services
Drought tolerant planting
and design. Drip irrigation.
Maintenance specials.
Over 30 years experience.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381

GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770

DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers/drip installed, repaired.
Lawn removal. Cleanup,
hauling. Drought landscapes,
planting, sod, lighting,
drainage. Insured.
References. Since 1977.
Lic.508671.

Please call 909-989-1515.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 14, 2015

Landscaping

Painting

Plumbing

Tree Care

Your Ideas +
Our Proven Designs=
Dramatic Water Savings!
dt at Taylor Landscape
909-519-4027
Lic#541078

ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.

RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs, HVAC,
new installation, repairs. Prices
to fit the working family’s budget.
Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

MANUELS Garden Service.
General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming,
general maintenance, tree
trimming and removal. Low
prices and free estimates.
Please call 909-391-3495 or
909-239-3979.

Sunset Gardens Landscaping

C-27Lic.#373833.
John Cook- Specializing in
Desert Landscaping.
Designed
Installed
Maintained

909-231-8305
Drought tolerant and
California native design.
Water conserving irrigation.
Lighting and maintenance.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the area
since 1983.
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243

Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$2 sq. ft. rebate*

COLLINS Painting &
Construction
Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and
commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.

STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING

Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552

Please call
909-989-9786

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.

Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.

909-982-8910

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small.
20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-228-4256.
www.vjpaint.com.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.

STEVE’S PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates. All plumbing
repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection,
water heaters.Your local
plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured,
Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *

Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992

WALLPAPER
hanging and
removal by
Andrea. Environmentally
friendly.
30
years local experience. Free estimates.
Lic.844375. 951-990-1053.

Mark 909-996-2981

Sprinklers & Repair
WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran,
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs.
Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.

Plastering & Stucco

Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell: 626-428-1691

PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.

DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,
repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.

Tile

Plumbing
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995

MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree
care needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.836027. Matt Gray-Trask.
Call 909-946-7444.

Custom Construction
Reroof Specialist
All types of roofing.
Dry rot, flat roof,
tile repairs.
Insured and bonded.
Lic.630203.

Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243

Pet Sitting, Dog Walking,
Yard Cleanup and More!
(909) 451-8211
PetServiceSolutions.org
info@PSSpets.com

TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since 1974.
Free estimate. 909-629-6960.

Wallpaper

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691

Pet Services

Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist.
Pruning and removals.
Drought tolerant planting
and design. Maintenance
specials. Over 30 years
experience.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381

Roofing

GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all
types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976.
909-944-3884.

Professional, Local, Affordable!

Painting

Hayden’s Services Inc.

* Senior discount *
Lic.359145

Learn Japanese

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at
the Claremont Forum in the
Packing House. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday afternoons/evenings. All levels welcome. Excellent brain exercise
for seniors! 909-626-3066.

FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATES
Free Leak Detection,
$49-Drains, $199-Water
Heaters, $499-Slab Leaks
Insurance Approved Contractor
24-7 Emergency Service
All Credit Cards Accepted
CALL TODAY 909-466-6237

REGROUT, clean, seal, color
grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.
MASTER tile layer. Quick

and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray,
909-731-3511.

23

Weed Abatement
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in an
environmentally safe manner.
To receive loads of quality wood
chips. Please call 909-2146773. Tom Day Tree Service.

ADVANCED
DON DAVIES

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care
service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal
hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house
keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are
available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance.
Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114
Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.

909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691

Window Washing
PROFESSIONAL window
cleaning. Serving Claremont/Upland since 1989.
Over 4,000 repeat customers.
100 percent guaranteed.
Dave, 909-920-0606. Empire
Window Cleaning.

SUNLIGHT Unlimited. Window and solar panel cleaning
team. Since 1979. Mike and
Greg 909-753-9832.
NACHOS Window Cleaning.
For window washing, call nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Number one in LA
County.

909-621-5626

909.621.4761

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

24

Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot
Friday 08-14-15

REAL ESTATE

July 2015
Number of Homes Sold
Number Sold > $750,000
Number Sold < $750,000
Number of Short Sales
Highest Sale Price
Lowest Sale Price

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
Saturday, August 15
2-4 p.m. 492 Norwich Drive, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty.

Sunday, August 16
12-2 p.m. 228 Pomello Drive, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty.
1-4 p.m. 936 Peninsula Ave., Claremont. Lynn Gianakos, Century 21.
2-4 p.m. 1430 Ashland Ave., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty.
2-4 p.m. 542 Charleston Drive, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty.
2-5 p.m. 683 W. 12th St., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty.
3-5 p.m. 909 Deep Springs Drive, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty.

COMING SOON
Rarely available three bedroom plus loft home with
two-and-a-half bathrooms in the prestigious gated
Griswold's Townhome community. Beautiful Mediterranean architecture with 2312 sq. ft. of living space
and a very private, spacious, covered patio area. Culde-sac location close to sparkling pool and spa. Convenient to high school, Village, Colleges, restaurants,
markets and shopping. Priced in low $600,000s.

Gail Sparks, Broker Associate

909-524-9252

gail.sparks@camoves.com
BRE 00963648

Average List Price of Homes Sold
Average Sold Price
Average Days On Market

2015

46
8
38
3
$1,650,000
$330,000
$658,671
$643,314
60

2014

Change From Previous Year

42
10
32
0
$1,600,000
$330,000
$675,135
$665,423
54

+10 percent
-20 percent
+19 percent
+3 percent
0 percent
-2 percent
-3 percent
+11 percent

Prices have taken a bit of a dip in July. While sales numbers were actually stronger than expected,
the majority of the homes that are selling are under $750,000. In speaking with several of my colleagues around the conference room table, we all agreed that homes in the $750,000-plus category took a bit of a slide in prices the past month. When you compare July with June of 2015, the
average list price of homes sold went down by nearly $100,000 and the days on market went up
by 19 days. Oddly enough, July of 2015 looked very similar to July 2014, but with a slight dip in
prices reflected there as well. As the industry keeps a close eye on interest rates, it will be interesting to see if they rise any time in the near future. That is the buzz we have been hearing…

Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty.
Contact Ryan at ryan@rrzimmerman.com or call 909.447.7707.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 14, 2015

25

Would you like to know what
your home is worth? Visit:
ClaremontCAHomeValues.com.

(909) 260-5560
madhups@aol.com
www.callMadhu.com
BRE#00979814

Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor
in the COURIER’s Best of the Best Contest

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com
The recent sale of our Claremont home presented some very
unique challenges. Carlos and Pat handled my former home
as if it were their own. They kept me informed,
responded with professionalism and reassurance, and made
sure that as their customers, my ex-husband and I were their
top priority. The house ended up selling for higher than
asking price. I recommend Carlos and Pat Samuelson with
complete confidence and a heart full of gratitude.
— Janet Price, Claremont

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034
Read what my clients are saying.Visit
www.MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials,"
or find me on www.Yelp.com.

Mason is an excellent realtor. We commend him
for his diligence throughout the entire process of
selecting and purchasing our new property. We're
sure with his thoughtfulness and kindness he will
do very well in his chosen field of endeavor.
—Garry & Dorothy L.

CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
Do you want to know what your home is
worth today? Visit our website at:
CarlosandPatSamuelson.SmartHomePrice.com
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616

Residential – Investment – Historical – Green – Short Sales

Your trusted resource as you transition
through the new stage in your life...
Pamela Bergman-Swartz
REALTOR®, Transition Living Consultant,
Seniors Real Estate & Certified Probate Specialist

8311 Haven Ave. Suite #180, Rancho Cucamonga
pamelabergman@ymail.com

(909) 636-2744
BRE#01899295

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 14, 2015

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

26

REALTORS! Place your ads in the most widely read real estate section in
the area. Call Jessica at 621-4761. Claremont COURIER.

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
1041 COLLEGE AVE., CLAREMONT
Rare, 1938 Village duplex in a prime location. Near Claremont Colleges and Village.
Built as a duplex but it could easily be converted to a single-family residence or live in
one unit and rent the other. Spacious living
room with fireplace and library with French
doors to the brick patio. A formal dining room
adjoins the kitchen which has a cozy breakfast area. There is a second entrance and
staircase in the rear for the upstairs. Wonderful backyard, 3-car garage and 2 uncovered parking spaces. $1,195,000. (C1041)

573 WAYLAND CT., CLAREMONT
Enjoy Claremont living in this affordable Claremont PUD. This home has 2
master suites, one with a walk-in closet
and half bathroom downstairs. Open
floor plan, vaulted ceilings and a cozy
rock fireplace. Living area leads to a
patio with small yard. Newer carpet and
paint. Two-car attached garage with direct access. This complex has only 35
units and has been recently renovated
on the exterior. Walking distance to
Claremont Village, Colleges, MetroLink
and pooch park. $335,000. (W573)

119 CASTLETON DRIVE,
CLAREMONT
Live in Claremont and walk to the Village at an affordable price! This beautiful and immaculate 3 bedroom, 3
bathroom home is located in a wellmaintained and peaceful complex
featuring a sparkling pool and convenient location. $399,900. (C119)

Carol Curtis, Broker

Sales Associates: Irene Argandona, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,
Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

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1-877-323-4442

250 W. First St. #100 Claremont CA 91711
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UPLAND Immaculate, remodeled, Lewis-built home with double door entry, vaulted ceilings and open floor plan. Dual-pane
windows and plantation shutters throughout. The kitchen has
been updated with granite countertops, double oven and
cooktop plus recessed lighting. Breakfast bar and nook, overlooking the spacious family room with fireplace and wet bar.
One bedroom and bathroom downstairs. Beautiful master
suite with custom his/hers closet and ceiling fans. Resort-like
backyard with patio. RV parking, storage shed and three-car
garage with built-ins. $539,000. (C1529)

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ALTA LOMA This exquisite home located in the prestigious
gated community of King Ranch offers elegance and pride of
ownership. Crown moldings, custom ceilings, sophisticated
lighting, custom drapes and shutters throughout. Kitchen with
granite countertops, Sub Zero refrigerator, Wolf oven and
range. Fireplace in family room with wood beam ceiling, wet bar
with refrigerator and wine chiller. Master suite with Jacuzzi tub,
fireplaces, wet bar and covered patio. Resort-like backyard with
pool/spa. Rear patio with entertainment center and natural gas
BBQ. $1,500,000. (E5053)

CLAREMONT Beautiful Olin/Lewis-built home. Charming three
bedroom, one full, one 3/4 and one half bathroom home. Built
circa 1956 with 1820 sq. ft. on a 10,134 sq. ft. lot. Brick front
porch leads to tiled entry. Kitchen features tile counters, gas
stove, double oven, dishwasher, breakfast area and lots of cabinets. Master bedroom with wall-to-wall mirrored closet and ceiling fan. Beautifully refinished original hardwood floors throughout
the home. Gorgeous swimming pool. Fully enclosed backyard
with block wall and grassy areas. Large covered patio with builtin brick BBQ. $565,000. (M1562)

Coldwell Banker
Town & Country
Welcomes

Eric Kang
Efrain Paiz

UPLAND One of the largest plans in Upland Colonies community. When you enter the front door, you will be instantly
amazed by the size of everything this house has to offer including the living room, family room, kitchen, guest bedrooms,
master bedroom, game room and the four-car garage. Quality
upgrades include custom built birch bookshelves in family
room, custom crown mouldings and plantation shutters. The
master bedroom has walk-in his and hers closets, spa tub,
shower and a desk with mirror. The backyard is surrounded by
trees and affords the utmost privacy. $770,000. (P1763)

Who Recently
Joined Our Office

COSTA MESA Charming three bedroom, two bathroom
home. Just one mile from the pacific coast in the heart of Orange County. Situated on a quiet and well established cul-desac street. Enjoy wonderful ocean breeze, the OC airgrounds
and award winning schools. House features spacious living
room area and cozy fireplace. High ceilings and ceramic tile
throughout. Large backyard is perfect for entertaining. Easy
access to freeways and much more! $599,000. (P2136)

CLAREMONT Wonderful Claremont Club condo. Beautiful two
bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom home. Approximately 1668
sq. ft., built in 1987, per assessor. Spacious living room with
tiled fireplace, hardwood floors, vaulted ceiling and recessed
lighting. Kitchen with tiled flooring and counters, ample cupboards and pantry, newer dishwasher and cozy breakfast
nook. Master suite with new carpeting, tiled fireplace and balcony. Upgrades include freshly painted interior, retextured ceilings, Chinese red oak flooring and new carpeting. Two-car
attached garage with laundry. $399,900. (C869)

LA VERNE Gardner's paradise! Beautiful four bedroom, 1
3/4 bathroom home built in 1971. Lush, tropical entry over a
meandering stream with bubbling waterfall. Upgraded
kitchen features granite counters with tile backsplash, gas
stove, microwave and stainless refrigerator. Master bedroom
with walk-in closet, ceiling fan and sliding door to back patio.
Front and back yards with exquisite flowerbeds and foliage,
raised brick planters, winding paths, grassy area and miniature railroad system with buildings and trees. Large covered
patio. Three-car garage. $625,000. (C4752)

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CLAREMONT This beautiful north Claremont home is nestled on
a quiet cul-de-sac adjacent to gorgeous mountains, lush parks
and popular trails. Expansive vaulted ceilings, walls of glass and
a spacious floor plan. Upgraded chefs kitchen features newer
stainless appliances, granite counters and a center island with a
breakfast bar area. Family room offers an entertainment area,
media center, tech station and a beverage bar. Four bedrooms
upstairs including a master suite with retreat area, master bathroom, walk-in closet and a balcony. Backyard features a deck,
basketball court and pool. $729,000. (A424)

Top Listers
July 2015

Top Producer
July 2015

Charlene Bolton
& Collette Albanese

Paul Lazo

500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont
596 Pine Knot Ave., Big Bear Lake
Paul Steffen, Broker Owner
Open 7 Day a Week to Serve You

NEW LISTING - OPEN SUNDAY 2-5PM

NEW LISTING - OPEN SUNDAY 2-4PM

683 W. 12TH STREET, CLAREMONT - $675,000
Old Claremont village ranch-style.
Custom built home recently boasts a
remodeled kitchen. Prime locale.
Geoff Hamill
geoff@geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500
NEW LISTING

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4PM

1430 ASHLAND AVENUE, CLAREMONT
Certified Green CHERP #45.
3 bed, 2 bath, 1,939 sq. ft.
Condit Elementary, close to the Claremont Colleges.
Bernadette Kendall
bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717
NEW LISTING

143 NEW BEDFORD AVENUE,
CLAREMONT - $595,000
Sharp single-story with formal living,
dining and three-car garage.
SallyTornero
sally.tornero@sothebysrealty.com - 909.455.3203

909.624.1617
909.878.5500
BRE 00528670
wssir.com

542 CHARLESTON DRIVE, CLAREMONT
Entertaining all offers.
Two-story light filled floor plan. 6 bed and 4 bath.
Mother in-law quarters downstairs. Pool and spa.
BJ Nichka
bj@bjnichka.com - 909.973.5582
NEW LISTING

167 SEQUOIA COURT, CLAREMONT - $750,000
Northeast Claremont pride of ownership.
Fantastic guest quarters downstairs.
Over 1/3 acre cul-de-sac lot.
Geoff Hamill
geoff@geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

423 MONTECITO STREET,
SANTA BARBARA – $795,000
Charming condo two blocks from the beach.Two master
suites. Living/dining with cathedral ceilings and fireplace.
Sharon Fagundes
sharon.faundes@sothebysrealty.com - 949.233.0799

149 BROWN STREET, CLAREMONT - $434,900
4 bed, 2 bath, 2 separate entrances/driveways. Ideal for
extended family or roommate. Claremont schools.
Bernadette Kendall
bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717

ALAMOSA GROVE ESTATE - $2,488,000
7 bed, 7 bath, 5,151 sq. ft., pool, spa.
6 garages, stables, orange grove, on 1.25 acres.
Bernadette Kendall
bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717

JUST SOLD

507 W. 11TH STREET, CLAREMONT - $998,500
Impressive Spanish revival in old Claremont Village.
Absolutely gorgeous residence in a picturesque setting.
Geoff Hamill
geoff@geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

Gloria Alvarez
909.670.0322

B.J. Nichka
909.625.6754

Susan Emerson
909.447.7710

Jeannette Ewing
909.670.0322

Sharon Fagundes
909.447.7701

Diane Fox
909.447.7709

Sue Gold
909.447.7714

Geoff Hamill
909.621.0500

Heather Petty
909.447.7716

Mason Prophet
909.447.7708

Madhu Sengupta
909.260.5560

Lisa Sheasby
909.447.8158

Maria Silva
909.624.1617

Coleen Smouse
909.539.7512

Rose Ishman
909.624.1617

Rob & Amy Titus
909.450.7415

Bernadette Kendall
909.670.1717

Sally Tornero
909.447.7718

Cheryl Knight
909.447.7715

Ryan Zimmerman
909.447.7707

Nicholas Neece
909.447.7706

Paul Steffen
Broker/Owner