Running head: FIRST ACTIVITY

Using Technology to Teach the American Revolution: First Activity
Maureen Deming
EDU 625
Dr. Kathy Milhauser

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FIRST ACTIVITY

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Using Technology to Teach the American Revolution: First Activity
Sub-Topic and Technology
Using short informational text, students will identify important and supporting details
about England’s role in causing the Revolution. Students will create a mind map featuring four
important details and two supporting details for each. In the mind map, students will draw
relationship arrows to show similarities.
Mind mapping was chosen for this activity, because the target audience is familiar with
the activity, and because of its power to make relationships visible (Petro Jr., 2010). Students
who struggle to understand cause and effect relationships described in text alone need exposure
to the content in another fashion, such as video, audio, or images. Mind mapping allows students
to combine the text with colors, shapes, and images to organize thinking in a way that makes
sense to them. Since this activity is about causes, students can use relationships arrows, numbers,
or icons to give a visual representation of text-based content. Mind mapping will not only let
them show their understanding, but can help them make new connections between ideas (Petro
Jr., 2010).
Objectives
1. Given reading, notes, discussion, and Google Drawings, fifth grade students in Tier II
literacy intervention will create a mind map that identifies four important details
about England’s role in causing the Revolution.
2. Given reading, notes, discussion, and Google Drawings, fifth grade students in Tier II
literacy intervention will create a mind map that identifies two describing details
about each important detail.
3. Given Google Drawings, fifth grade students in Tier II literacy intervention will
create a mind map with two relationship arrows showing similarities between the
details about England’s role in causing the Revolution.

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4. Given Google Drawings and Google Images, fifth grade students in Tier II literacy
intervention will create a mind map with four appropriate images that support the
details about England’s role in causing the Revolution.
Instructions
1. Students need their reading notebooks, a copy of the text, and tools to mark the text
with their thinking (pencil, highlighter, sticky notes).
2. Teacher will model reading the text, thinking about England’s actions, and how those
actions might lead to a revolution. Teacher will mark or code the text to hold onto
thinking.
3. Teacher will guide students through the rest of the text, pausing after each paragraph
to discuss. Students continue to mark the text with their thinking.
4. Teacher will distribute laptops, and instruct students to log on and go to Google
Drawings. In previous lessons, students have learned to use this app, and are familiar
with the program.
5. Teacher will give expectations for the mind map (at least four important details from
the text, each with two describing details, at least two relationship arrows, and four
images).
6. Students create a mind map with the central node, “England’s role in causing the
Revolution,” and print when completed.
7. Mind maps are placed in the middle of the table for students to share and compare
their thinking. Teacher facilitates a discussion about the relationships and similarities
discovered in the reading.
8. Exit ticket: on their own mind map, students write a short summary (approximately
three sentences) of England’s role in causing the Revolution. Students tape the mind
map into their reading notebooks with the text, and return all materials.

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Example: Completed Activity

The text for this lesson can be retrieved from
http://www.readworks.org/sites/default/files/passages/820_colonization_and_revolution_introduc
tion_to_rev_0.pdf

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References
Readworks.org (n.d.) Colonization and the revolutionary war: Introduction to the revolutionary
war. Retrieved from
http://www.readworks.org/sites/default/files/passages/820_colonization_and_revolution_i
ntroduction_to_rev_0.pdf