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UNI T P LA NN IN G TO O L: Unit Theme or Issue: Drawing technique → bodies in motion

27.B.3

Grade Level: High School

State Fine Art Goals: 25.A.3e, 26.A.3e, 27.A.2a,

Unit Objectives and Purpose:

Session

Title of Lesson

Historical/ Multicultural Exemplars

Sketchbook/ Artist’s Journal / Motivation

Dialogue

Media/ Process

Design Principles and/or Conceptual theme

Closure/ Assessment

Week 1

Contour line definition of all things

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Egon Shiele Kara Walker Toulouse Lautrec Henri Matisse Pablo Picasso Paul Gauguin Asian calligraphy Medieval books Architecture

"Do you see the world in terms of shapes, colors, or something else?" SKETCH

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"What is the first thing you see in a work of art?" "What is the difference between someone's handwriting and art style?" "How do you start a drawing? Why?" "Is there any way to avoid an outline visually?"


Using pencil, draw you hand and neighbor w/ blind contour Draw yourself w/ BC and color w/ water color Still life in pencil w/ contour

The contour line is the base for all visual forms. A shape cannot exist within a composition without creating a contour. Line variance Negative space Positive space Ways of seeing through hand/eye coordination

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"How did the blind contour effect your drawing strategy?" "Do you like how your BC drawings look? Why/why not?" "What was your favorite/least favorite part of this week's lesson?" "What styles/themes would effectively use contour?"

Week 2

Tonal drawings lighting the way for perspective and form

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Caravaggio Leonardo da Vinci Peter Paul Rubens Vija Celmins Käthe Kollwitz Sean Brice Modern B&W photography

"How does light effect the world we live in?" SKETCH Tonal gradient scale exercise

"The first art historian Vasari sided with Raphael and color over tone and line, if you had to choose what would it be?" "Is tone still important to abstract works of art?" "Is it possible to draw using only tone - no contour?"

Still life and model with charcoal Still life and model with charcoal -subtractive Reproduce a B&W photo from an ad Tone drawing of choice

Literally nothing can be seen and created without light - and nothing can exist within light without being effected by tone. Sfumato Chiascuro Subtractive drawing Ways of working backwards through a drawing - pulling out lights
This week focuses on combining the previous 2 week's principles Mark-making is an essential part of expressive drawing. As the name suggests, it is impossible to make art without making marks. It is an invaluable skill to have not only for sketch practice but also when applied to large scale drawings and paintings

"How do you feel about subtractive drawing? Easier or harder?" "Good tone is 75% of a good realistic painting" "Does an artwork need tone? Is it avoidable even with line drawings?" "What was your favorite/least favorite part?"

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Week 3

Combo, Mark making Bringing it all together

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Rembrandt van Rijn Albrecht Durer M.C. Escher Max Beckmann Oskar Kokoschka Alberto Giacometti Comics Illustrations

"Can you think of other ways of depicting tone than last week's gentle blending?" SKETCH Crosshatch, stipple, etc. exercise

"Obviously artist combine both the technique we've learned so far" "How does markmaking effect tonal relationships? More expressive? " "Is it okay for a final work to look like a sketch" "Mark-making gained popularity thanks to the printing press and etchings"

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Markmaking experiment sheet Outdoor sketching Creating a large drawing based on outdoor sketch Draw animals

"How do you use different markmaking styles to convey different textures and spatial relationships?" "Is there one style of drawing you prefer to the others?" "Do you enjoy drawing from nature?" "Favorite/Least favorite part?"


Week 4

Color finding purpose within drawing

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Titian Raphael Salvador Dali Francis Bacon Jeff Koons Laurie Hogin Giorgio Morandi

"How do • you feel when you see a black and white movie?" "Are you as • drawn to B&W art as color?" SKETCH

"Is color necessary when you've already put a lot of work into a nice tonal drawing?" "How does color function differently than tone?" "What meanings are associated with certain colors?"

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Still life in colored pencil Create a collage of photos then replicate with colored pencil Drawing of your choice

This week consists of a very brief overview of color theory - not just in general but as it applies to drawing practices. Drawings can be improved by the selective emphasis that color provides. Not to be used decoratively, but with real purpose.

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"Do you see a difference in how color functions in drawing rather than paints?" "What are the positives and negatives of color?" "How do we control color?" "Favorite/Least favorite part?"

Week 5

Mini animation simple motion to learn technology

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William Kentridge Disney Terry Gilliam

"What is your favorite cartoon and why?" "Does moving drawings take away from the fun like a movie takes away from a book?"

"Why do moving objects effect us faster than still images?" "Do you feel animation or movies are more straightforward than inanimate art?" "Is animation a good way to express ideas?" "What is your experience with animation?"

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Watch several example videos Overview of tech Mini animation to review tech skills and drawing needs

This week will largely be a technical experiment for students. Chances are both the drawing techniques and the computer software will be something entirely new to everyone. Through watching example videos and mimicking some of the ideas seen, they will have a strong foundation for the next few weeks.

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"What ideas did we get that can be used next week?" "Do any really stand out? What works?" "Any big tech questions I can help with?" "Anything you would like me to bring in next week? To watch or to help animate?"

Week 6

Big Animation Kentridge inspired film project - applying Week 5 technique (Part 1)
Week 7

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William Kentridge Susan Rothenberg

"If you could animate one problem in your life or community what would it be and how would you do it?"

"How does last week's hands on experience help you understand the examples?" "What kinds of subjects can be dealt with using animation? Are some better suited than others?"

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Begin final animation project Draw capture change slightly capture etc. SAVE OFTEN

Students will get a little more reinforcement from video examples before taking the plunge into their own large animation. They will largely be working independently or in their small groups while I float around to assist with questions.

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"Do you feel like you're prepared enough to get started?" "What problems do you foresee?" "Let me know as you go if the time limit is too much to complete" KEEP WORKING

Big Animation work week (Part 2)

None - Used as a work week

WORK

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"How is everything going?" "Have you run into any technical problems I can help with?" SAVE OFTEN

KEEP WORKING

WORK

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"What are you going to have to work on next week?" "What can I do to help speed up your process?" BE PREPARED STAY ON SCHEDULE

Week 8

Big Animation - work week (Part 3)

None - Used as a work week

WORK

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"How is everything going?" "Have you run into any technical problems I can help with?" SAVE OFTEN

KEEP WORKING

WORK

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"What are you going to have to work on next week?" "What can I do to help speed up your process?" BE PREPARED STAY ON SCHEDULE

Week 9

Big Animation - the screening (Part 4)

None - Used to wrap up any last minute tech/editing issues and then screening/crits from Wed-Fri

WORK WATCH CRITIQUE

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"Any last minute things I can do to help?" "Is everyone able to export their animation to a .mov file?" "Are you having any sequencing problems?" "Sound problems?" "What can we bring in for the Wed-Fri animation screenings?" "Would you like if I got other classes involved in our screening?"

Wrap up work from previous 4 weeks Prepare for the animation screening

This week is really for the students. For them to tie up any last minute loose knots and then to enjoy all the hard work they put into their animations. After each screening we will have a brief discussion/critique about what was effective and what could be improved Every video will be compiled onto a class DVD for each student.

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"How did your animation turn out?" "Do you like your story?" "Do you like how it looks visually?" "Did you enjoy the technological aspect of the project?" "What would you change if you did it again?" "Favorite/Least favorite part?"

Unit Plan Instructions: A Curriculum Unit is made up of multiple individual sessions that work together in order to form a meaningful, in-depth exploration of our experiences through art. Units of time should be stated depending upon the setting/context. This unit results in a high quality, well crafted, fully developed art project that centers on a universal or culturally specific theme that is relevant and meaningful to students. A theme is the center around which all learning activities should be fashioned. In the context of a unit, a theme should be informed by the study of historical, multicultural, and contemporary exemplars; by examination of the power of imagery in everyday experience; and by consideration of social, aesthetic, and perhaps spiritual interpretations of the nature and quality of human existence. Explorations of content, media, processes, and design strategies and orientations emanate from these thematic reflections on human experience and aspirations. In accordance with national and state standards, exemplars selected for study MUST be gender and ethnically inclusive. Each of the following areas or components inform your unit plan, and these areas of focus will be addressed in individual sessions according to your individual lesson plans. For this part of your Unit Plan, please describe (in the spaces below) as fully as possible each of the following components and how you will include them in your unit and relate them to your theme. Some of these components will become the focus of particular individual sessions that make up the 5-week unit. Individual sessions should focus on areas of importance that you determine according to your general artistic aims. Focus within sessions on specific media, craftsmanship, design and composition, multicultural inquiry, social issues, themes, or writing and dialoguing will enable students to gain competence and greater depth of understanding. In individual sessions, a brief reference to the theme and previously taught content and historical/ multicultural exemplars is helpful. Discuss your Theme/Issue(s): and how it relates to reflections on the nature and quality of human existence; reflections on the aesthetics of experience; or individual, social, communal, or spiritual concerns or aspirations. How will Historical/ Multicultural Exemplars be used to both relate to your theme and to teach specific content (such as media, processes, and design)? What Media, techniques, and creative artistic processes will students engage, and how will you help them both develop competence and skill as well as engage creative, intuitive processes of exploration? What Design Principles or Conceptual Themes are most central to this unit and how will you make sure students learn these? How will you use Artists’ Journals/ Sketchbooks to engage students in sustained inquiry, reflection, skill building, and creative exploration? Artists’ Journals/Sketchbook time Your unit must have students involved in developing their artists’ journal/sketchbook on a regular basis. After giving time for free exploration your should ask students to use their sketchbooks to plan, explore, experiment, write, and sketch ideas in preparation for specific sessions and relating to your unit theme. These journal/sketchbook assignments should guide students to think about the project themes, compositions, and ideas specific to the unit. Sometimes “sketchbook/journal time” may be completely open, for student-selected exploration. Students should learn to use their artist’s journal/sketchbooks just like many artists often do. Be sure to include a writing component several times during the journal/sketchbook time of an individual session. Writing component Teaching students to write is mandated for all teachers in Illinois schools, regardless of their subject area. We support a “writing across the curriculum” approach, and believe that writing complements and supports our artistic/aesthetic goals for students. There are many exciting ways to engage students in writing processes: narrative, descriptive, persuasive, creative writings engage students in critical and reflective thinking and help them organize their ideas. Several times during the unit, you should involve students in writing. The journal should be used to have students write about their thoughts, goals, and feelings about aspects of their work, thoughts about the exemplars you are sharing with them, or experiences that relate to the unit theme. Sometimes the writing component may be at the end of assignments as a self-critique, or a reflection on their work. Sometimes the writing may take place during the middle of the project as a way to reflect and plan further. Sometimes they may write a story or narrative about the work. This narrative may accompany the finished piece in an exhibit. Be creative in planning your writing activities!