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Children Below Poverty 1

CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

Children Below Poverty Level by Race and Hispanic Origin: 1980-2007


Exercise #3 Annotated Graphs
Amanda Powe
Social Work 300-01
J.L. McArthur
February 6, 2010
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CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

Abstract

This paper will take a look into the world of poverty in children. Children living below the

poverty level will be examined by race and origin. The problem when dealing with the

subject of poverty is finding out exactly how proportioned the matter is across the United

States racially. The data table used to research the different categories of race by

percentage and number will identify a particular race as the highest number of cases

varying by year. The data table is provided by the U.S. Census Bureau. The findings will

be produced by analyzing the data table and considering the Census's obstacles in

collecting the data.


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CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

Magnitude of the Problem – Figure 1

Descriptive Discussion- Figure 1

The data supplied by the “Children Below Poverty Level by Race and Hispanic Origin:

1980 to 2007,” looks closely at the children that are affected by living below poverty level

identifies all races as participating. Blacks are affected the most and had extremely high

numbers from 1980 to 1997. The numbers and percentages started to work their way

down after this but still remained high.

Interpretive Discussion- Figure 1

The table shows that just as the numbers went down for other races the same was true for

Blacks but not at the same magnitudes. In 2007 there was a 1.3 change in the graph but

the question remains if the way in which these numbers are changing is due to death birth

and any other factors. The graph shows that below poverty levels are not distributed even.
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CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

Scope of the Problem – Figure 2

Descriptive Discussion- Figure 2

Though the data used does not specify children I found that it would be useful to identify

where these caretakers and parents may have classified themselves. The information

contained in the data table was extremely useful for finding out the locations of these

children. Although I am being led by possibility I feel that my tactic is very resourceful

given the data that I was able to find.

Interpretive Discussion-Figure 2

The graph shows 2008 information, and I chose to quote only the data used for 2007

because the original data was quoted up until the year 2007. The data in this table

concludes that there are a number of areas that are affected and blacks could be in any

number of places identified on the the graph.


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CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

Changes In the Problem – Figure 3

Descriptive Discussion-Figure 3

On the data table produced by the NCCP.org there were absolute changes that developed

in the way that the United States Government measures poverty. The graph will show

that overtime the numbers are stable the reason could be related to the way in which it is

measured. The data table found on the website is looked at for only a brief knowledge on

calculations. The variables include persons in family and an income standard.

Interpretive Discussion-Figure 3

In 2008 there was a average of a .1 percent change to a 1.4 percent change in some

areas. The way in which the data was compared looked at both 2007 and 2008 to subtract

and come up with the total change. The percentages were very small and could possibly

pose ome issues for children living below the poverty level and their families. The

question of the graph becomes how does this information effect poverty levels?
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CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

Disparities in the Problem – Figure 4

Descriptive Discussion- Figure 4

The data contained in the two graphs above give a description of the number of days that

children with certain health care needs miss during a school year. The circle graph on the

left indicates 2005-2006 and to the right it represent 2000-2001. The two graphs look at

the amount of days ranging from 0-11 or more days. The health care needs show that

student below poverty level are effected in more than one way.

Interpretive Discussion-Figure 4

The data contained in both graphs proves that children without adequate health care miss

school anywhere between 0 and 3 classes a year. The data provides a small but large

enough number of students that don't make it to school due to illness. The graph

interprets these findings and demonstrates the need for healthier conditions for children.
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CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

Summary and Conclusion

In terms of race the problem of living below poverty plagues the Black community. Yes,

there are other races that are hit by this issue, but the fact that there are such large

numbers on the data tables may make on think about the causes. The data table that has

been produced by kidsdata.org, recognizes that there is a need for the problem. The data

collected used in this study does not look at people with different disabilities or genders.

Information contained in the table does prove that there are a number of problems that

will cause these issues. The graph recognizes that there are a number of areas in the

United States that have 0-11days missed from school because of poverty. The issue then

becomes how can one prevent these issues. Without the proper amount of health care and

access to the nutritious food choices, there may be a growing disparity in the area of

children below poverty level. The data was looked at from the years 2000 to 2006 and

may remain evident in the year 2007 and on. The use of disability, sex, and sexual

orientation was not identified but can only be assumed with the use of region and race.

Race was found to be the number on problem that the data compiled showed. Blacks are

affected by poverty and even more important children. The data used for this section

shows the ways in which the information can be used to make predictions for these

children and their families.


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CHILDREN BELOW POVERTY LEVEL BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN: 1980-2007

References

Bishaw, A., & Kenwick, T. J. (2009). Poverty:2007 and 2008. In American Community

Surveys (Sept. 2009, p. 4). Retrieved from

http://www.census.gov/prod/2009pubs/acsbr08-1.pdf

Fass, S. (2009, April). Measuring Poverty in the United States Fact Sheet. National Center

for Children in Poverty p.1. http://www.nccp.org/publications/pdf/text_876.pdf

Impact of Special Health Care Needs on Children and Families [Fact Sheet]. (n.d.).

Retrieved January 27, 2010, from Impact of Special Health Care Needs on Children

and Families Kidsdata.org Web site: http://www.kidsdata.org/cache/pdfs/Kidsdata-

Overview_Impact-on-Children-and-Families-(State-and-U.S.).pdf

US Census Bureau "Children Below Poverty Level by Race and Hispanic Origin: 1980 to

2007". Retrieved January 27 2010.