SOUL JAZZ

SCHOLARLY ARTICLES BY PETER FRITZ WALTER

THE LAW OF EVIDENCE

THE RESTRICTION OF NATIONAL SOVEREIGNTY

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AND WELLNESS TECHNIQUES

CONSCIOUSNESS AND SHAMANISM

CREATIVE PRAYER

SOUL JAZZ
SOUL JAZZ
RECOGNIZING AND REALIZING
YOUR SOUL VALUES

by Peter Fritz Walter
Published by Sirius-C Media Galaxy LLC

113 Barksdale Professional Center, Newark, Delaware, USA

©2015 Peter Fritz Walter. Some rights reserved.

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About Dr. Peter Fritz Walter
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About the Author

Parallel to an international law career in Germany, Switzer-
land and the United States, Dr. Peter Fritz Walter (Pierre) fo-
cused upon fine art, cookery, astrology, musical perform-
ance, social sciences and humanities.

He started writing essays as an adolescent and received a
high school award for creative writing and editorial work for
the school magazine.

After finalizing his law diplomas, he graduated with an LL.M.
in European Integration at Saarland University, Germany, and
with a Doctor of Law title from University of Geneva, Switzer-
land, in 1987.

He then took courses in psychology at the University of Ge-
neva and interviewed a number of psychotherapists in Lau-
sanne and Geneva, Switzerland. His interest was intensified
through a hypnotherapy with an Ericksonian American hyp-
notherapist in Lausanne. This led him to the recovery and
healing of his inner child.

After a second career as a corporate trainer and personal
coach, Pierre retired as a full-time writer, philosopher, and
photographer.

Pierre is a German-French bilingual native speaker and
writes English as his 4th language after German, Latin and
French. He also reads source literature for his research works
in Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, and Dutch. In addition, Pierre
has notions of Thai, Khmer, Chinese and Japanese.

All of Pierre’s books are hand-crafted and self-published,
designed by the author. Pierre publishes via his Delaware
company, Sirius-C Media Galaxy LLC, and under the imprints
of IPUBLICA and SCM (Sirius-C Media).
Our inner world is reality, reality even more real than
the apparent world; to call fantasy or fairy tale what
merely seems illogical means that one does not un-
derstand nature.

—MARC CHAGALL

The author’s profits from this book are being donated to charity.
Contents

What is Soul Power? 9

Soul Reality and Autonomy 17

Freeing Your Minotaur 25

What is Soul Reality? 37

Soul Development 43
Garbage Removal 43
Defining Your Values 52

Soul Values are Creative 55
What are Soul Values? 58
Soul Values v. Social Values 61
Patterns of Living 66
Walking Your Talk 72
Soul Values and Jazz Ballads 75
Soul Marginality 78

Glossary 83
Terms 83
SOUL JAZZ

Brain and Mind Research 83
Cartesian Science and Worldview 85
Continuum 86
Emotional Intelligence 88
I Ching 88
Inner Selves 90
Intuition 95
Self 95
Soul Power 96
Synchronicity 96
Zen 98
Personalities 100
Berne, Eric 100
Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama 101
Descartes, René 102
Einstein, Albert 103
Freud, Sigmund 104
Gandhi, Mahatma 105
Jackson, Michael 106
Jagger, Mick 107
Jung, Carl Gustav 108
Krishnamurti, J. (K) 108
Lennon, John 111
Mandela, Nelson 113
McCartney, Paul 114
Picasso, Pablo 115
Warhol, Andy 117

BIBLIOGRAPHY 119

Personal Notes 139

8
What is Soul Power?

I define as soul power, primary power or
self-power the natural and non-abusive power
of a basically sane human being.

Soul power is the natural power that the
sane child develops when allowed to grow
into autonomy and self-reliance.

This is namely the case when the postnatal
primary symbiosis between mother and child
during the first eighteen months of the new-
born was a positive experience for both
mother and child, and when the mother can
allow the infant to gradually grow into auton-
omy as the child widens the grasp and per-
ception of the environment and thus gradually
leaves the condition of primary narcissism.
SOUL JAZZ

The development of soul power is however
inhibited in case that the primary symbiosis
was impaired and/or the mother is narcissisti-
cally fixated and projects on the child an an-
cestor or living parent, so as to incarnate in
the child a phantom spirit or split-self, thereby
obstructing the child’s bioenergy flow and the
flowering of the child’s own individuality and
intrinsic selfhood.

All growth starts in the womb, but that
doesn’t mean we have to get back in the
womb every time we want to grow; it doesn’t
mean we should remain inquiring into the
good or bad of our childhood. It only means
that a regard upon our childhood may explain
certain behavior patterns that otherwise might
seem very strange or outlandish. But that is
about all such a regard can bring. It cannot
bring an immediate healing, just by remem-
bering one’s difficult childhood. But the

10
WHAT IS SOUL POWER?

awareness of the pattern that was built in that
early period in life is a good thing to start your
journey of self-transformation and spiritual
growth.

The work for dissolving the pattern is not
work on the pattern itself, but on your soul
values; what has been blocked through your
huge unfulfilled need for attention and self-
validation is awareness of your soul values.

That sounds a bit convoluted but it’s really
how it is. A child who grows up in a warm and
loving setting where their needs are met and
where they get attention and care has a natu-
ral connection with their destiny, with their
soul values, or what might be called their life’s
mission.

Whereas a child who grows in an environ-
ment of neglect or abuse will be more or less
alienated from that awareness. Needless to

11
SOUL JAZZ

add that I myself was among the latter vin-
tage, for otherwise I would not have written
this book and all the others, and I would not
today want to serve others who went through
similar trauma when they were small and more
or less helpless.

Now first let us inquire what soul values
are, and soul reality. Soul reality is not per-
sonal reality in the same way as soul coaching
or spiritual coaching is not personal coaching,
and soul power is not personal power.

The terminological change was not moti-
vated by a desire for fanciful expressions, but
is linked to how I define my own role as a fa-
cilitator. The term ‘personal’ is after all forged
from the Greek word persona which means
mask. Do you want to further elaborate your
social mask, or do you want to realize your
soul reality?

12
WHAT IS SOUL POWER?

After having answered this key question for
yourself, you may look, and look carefully,
what kind of coach you choose, because that
choice determines the choice of the coaching
method to be applied to your self-discovery
quest. I have been myself in a value conflict
through the reality of today’s personal power
coaching. This was a creative challenge that
actively encouraged me to position my own
niche in coaching.

I simply had to find out where and why I am
different from the personal power tanks. The
solution came as a surprise. After long reflec-
tion and observation of that huge business
called personal power training, I saw myself
exclaiming one day:

—But the hell, the soul is missing in all
that!

13
SOUL JAZZ

And that triggered a new insight that
helped me get where in hindsight I was al-
ready: my own continuum or soul reality. ‘The
soul was missing in all that?’ I pondered, then
down-to-earth and curious. ‘What does that
mean, in fact?’

The answer came as a flash back in time. I
remembered information I had stored away in
my mind long before, and it seemed to be a
whole mountain of information. And it was not
new to me as already as a child I have pos-
sessed that knowledge. Then, tidbit by tidbit, I
scrambled it up again from my memory, and
puzzled it together to some kind of coherent
whole. Like one finds lost jewels after a long,
long search. This is why I do not speak of
coaching, or of power training, but of soul
power and I do not call myself a life coach. I
may have grown into a shaman, in the mean-
time. I do not know. My role is to be a facilita-

14
WHAT IS SOUL POWER?

tor for helping catalyze the soul development
of those who read my books or listen to my
audio books.

15
Soul Reality and
Autonomy

Realizing your soul reality without auton-
omy is impossible. What is autonomy? Is it
self-reliance, independence, that is the ab-
sence of dependence or codependence? It
seems it is all of this, but more. Let us get into
this more deeply.

It seems that there is a natural striving for
autonomy built into every growing life. When
autonomy is withheld, self-realization is im-
possible.

Realizing your soul reality needs a sufficient
amount of distance, of non-attachment, of in-
dependence from any other current reality
you perceive. Thus, for example, naturally a
SOUL JAZZ

child of three years of age needs to have
more autonomy than a child of fifteen months
of age. A toddler of eighteen months needs
more autonomy than an infant of five months.

Many parents ignore that babies, toddlers
and pre-schoolers, already before reaching
the age of primary school, need to develop
autonomy.

What is essential to retain in this context is
that we learn the basic movement into auton-
omy during our first year of life, and not later
on during adolescence or when we turn into
that magic world of adulthood.

This is how it should. Of course it doesn’t
go that way in our culture, which is why I am
doing what I am doing.

And if I thought that once a life is spoilt in
childhood, it’s spoilt forever, as 1970s child
psychology believed, I would not write this

18
SOUL REALITY AND AUTONOMY

and other books to help people develop
autonomy and soul reality. I am convinced that
you can build autonomy later on in life. I have
done it. I never had the chance to do it during
childhood or adolescence. I was hopelessly
codependent with my mother, as a child and
even as a youngster. And I have been emo-
tionally and physically abused all over my
childhood and youth. So if I could do it, you
can do it.

Often we observe that especially adoles-
cents who have rather repressive and posses-
sive parents get onto the obnoxious track and
really push it through for every millimeter of
increased autonomy. There is a logic in every
behavior and adolescents who put high stress
on autonomy have a reason to do so. The rea-
son is rooted in much earlier years, in the
years of babyhood.

19
SOUL JAZZ

When we talk about behavior, we always
talk about two things, the actual behavior and
the way the individual deals with behavior, or
put differently, the way behavior is learnt, un-
learnt, and relearnt.

This is why babyhood is so strongly mark-
ing us. It’s not that we could not change our
behavior later, it’s because the patterns of be-
havior acquisition, the way of learning, un-
learning and relearning behavior are im-
printed upon our memory interface as early as
in babyhood.

To give an example. When I have learnt in
babyhood that developing autonomy is a
matter of distress, fight and humiliation, I have
not only acquired a codependent behavior
pattern for the rest of my life, but also a nega-
tive imprint about behavior learning. Accord-
ingly, for you to learn autonomy later on is not

20
SOUL REALITY AND AUTONOMY

all: you also need to learn how to learn new
behaviors.

That negative imprint is the fact that you
experienced learning behavior as humiliating
and scary, and the result of it is that later on in
life, you will be at pains with changing behav-
ior. So you will tend to be stuck in certain be-
haviors that are impeding you from realizing
your potential, that are enclosing you in a
shell pattern, that are keeping you low profile,
that are counterproductive to your growth, or
that are simply destructive for any form of
human relations.

When this happens, and it has happened in
my life, then changing this unfavorable condi-
tioning is not easy; for people with a lesser
amount of persistence, it may be impossible.
But I am not superman. I have done it and
therefore believe everybody can do it.

21
SOUL JAZZ

There is nothing more regrettable than
human beings who are limited in their poten-
tial simply through a track on which they have
been glued to in childhood and that they are
unable to get away from. Many of our histori-
cal human tragedies can be retraced to early
childhood learning that was taking place in an
atmosphere of constant anxiety, intimidation,
humiliation, violence and depression.

You may suffer from one of the following
irregularities, and if you do, this is an indica-
tion that you have a problem with autonomy
or that you have not developed sufficient
autonomy for fully realizing your soul reality:

• Clinging behavior;

• Pain and depression to let go of relationships;

• Few strongly symbiotic attachments;

• Addiction to certain people;

• Fear of being alone;

• Anxiety in public places (agoraphobia);

• Recurring destructive relationships;

22
SOUL REALITY AND AUTONOMY

• Constant hurt experienced in relationships;

• Strong and recurring feelings of powerlessness;

• Strong and recurring feelings of worthlessness;

• Problems with parents and/or children;

• The feeling of being dominated by others;

• Insomnia over extended periods of time;

• Recurring nightmares;

• Recurring panic attacks;

• General anxiety (life angst);

• Anxiety to be sexual with others (auto-eroticism);

• Urges to humiliate and subdue others;

• Urges to rape and sexually assault others;

• Strong timidity and inhibitions;

• Split of your loves in sexual and emotional;

• Drug dependency and suffering from it;

• Alcoholism and suffering from it, etc.

When you recognize some of your prob-
lems, or some of your children’s problems in
at least three of the foregoing lines, then you
might want to take the opportunity and apply
some of the advice I give in this book.

23
Freeing Your Minotaur

The inner voices we disown work against
us. When you are blocked in expressing your
most cherished thoughts and feelings, you are
far from realizing your soul reality. You need
courage and a good deal of civil disobedi-
ence to get there.

Most of us are blocked against the carefree
expression of our intimate thoughts and feel-
ings. Our cultural conditioning has strongly
emphasized that it was necessary to suppress
intimate thoughts or feelings entirely, or to at
least hide them in front of others. What most
of us learnt in the art class at school was to
draw something recognizable, something re-
lated to the visible reality; thereby implicitly
SOUL JAZZ

declaring worthless or inexistent our inner re-
ality.

That’s how our soul values are shunned by
a materialistic society that hasn’t understood a
bit of the real, and therefore is caught in end-
less illusions. This is so much the more gro-
tesque as children naturally live in different re-
alities, the visible, touchable reality perhaps
being the least important among them. Chil-
dren intuitively know that invisible realities ex-
ist and that beyond, there are parallel realities
that we may be able to enter during altered
states of consciousness. Children do not ex-
press this in verbal language, but it can clearly
be seen from their dreams and their drawings.

Repressing children’s natural and expres-
sive emotionality is still today the prevalent
attitude in in the majority of all public schools;
it is damaging the soul, and only renders chil-

26
FREEING YOUR MINOTAUR

dren apt to fit into the standards of consumer
society. Consciousness-based education is dif-
ferent; it recognizes soul values. Fortunately
today, there is a growing awareness of our
need for a holistically structured permissive
education, both in Kindergarten and higher
schooling.

Most people in our culture deny the exis-
tence of an inner reality, although their child-
hood experience was telling them an entirely
different story. But even the remembrance of
such experiences, which is of course the best
evidence you can get, most people have re-
pressed it. It was the price they paid to survive
in an inhuman mechanistic society! They have
acted like Faust and sold their soul to the
devil! However, there is another level of con-
sciousness and there is a world not less real
than the one our five senses can grasp. We
only have to project our inner images into the

27
SOUL JAZZ

outside world to let them grow into a new and
better reality.

Everybody can do that; everybody is born a
creator. Marc Chagall affirmed:

Our inner world is reality, reality even more
real than the apparent world; to call fantasy
or fairy tale what merely seems illogical
means that one does not understand na-
ture.

The first thing to do is to let go, and give
up control. Mental control stands in the way
when we want the universe to help direct our
lives. Our hand, guided by the universal spirit
will produce marvels! There is no need to in-
terpret the images, forms, symbols or colors
that are going to be the result of spontaneous
art work. The therapeutic effect is directly
triggered by the free and harmless expression
of your subconscious images and emotions.
Repressed images haunt us only as long as
they are kept in silence, but they lose their de-

28
FREEING YOUR MINOTAUR

structive energy once they are expressed and
humanized in language. All that comes to the
surface of consciousness will lose its negative,
harmful energy and transform itself toward
positive expression of our whole being.

To say the truth, our ego, with its dualistic
moralism, has a tendency to let our shadow or
Minotaur imprisoned in the depth of our sub-
conscious ocean.

However, if we liberate the Minotaur, its
destructive energy will be channeled into con-
structive outlets. This energy will not be lost; it
will henceforth be at the disposition of posi-
tive and constructive goals in our life. This is
what Freud called the sublimation of our aso-
cial instincts. Freud only rediscovered what
the ancient sages, the healers, hierophants
and shamans, the poets and astrologers, the
alchemists knew since the earliest times of

29
SOUL JAZZ

humanity. It is what in myths and popular tales
is referred to as ‘the call’.

We are called upon liberating our shadow.
The Minotaur, in the old myth of King Minos,
represents our sadistic desires that are fed by
stale, negative bioenergy. The desires are not
the problem; it is the inhibition of pleasure
that causes the obstruction. It is the shadow
that contains the pent-up energy that has de-
structive potential. Where does violence and
our need for violence come from? This is one
of the key questions. Neurological research
and sociology clearly came to the insight that
pleasure and violence represent mutually ex-
clusive energetic reactions in the human brain.
When pleasure goes down, violence goes up,
and vice versa.

The inner controller, as transactional analy-
sis calls that instance in us, is not a natural part

30
FREEING YOUR MINOTAUR

of our psyche. It is part of the secondary drive
structure, a result of our individual and social
neurosis. It locks us in a moralistic frame of
reference, which drives us to belittle, turn
down, deny and condemn in self and others
all expressions of natural pleasure. Function-
ally speaking, moralism is perversion in that it
turns natural life processes upside down. This
denial of pleasure is the reason of our vio-
lence—and this not only on a personal level
but also on a collective scale, on the societal
and cultural level. The denial of the pleasure
function brings about an almost unbearable
destructive rage, a fact we can observe in
emotionally lively children when denied a
candy or a promised walk or a gift they were
supposed to obtain. This primal reaction of
the brain is not a function of age or maturity. It
takes place in adults in exactly the same way.

31
SOUL JAZZ

When you practice some form of sponta-
neous art for handling your repressed emo-
tions, the original rage that is at the basis of
sexual violence, and that was at the beginning
not sexualized but pure revolt, pure rage, pure
anger, becomes activated and gets a chance
to be expressed in both a non-sexual way and
a way that is not hurting anybody.

It usually happens that this snake which is
curled in a deep slumber inside of us sud-
denly raises up and fills us with a burning
stream of hate that we might experience as
both frightening and pleasurable. The fright
comes from the fact that we do not normally
allow us to exteriorize extreme forms of nega-
tive emotions; the pleasure comes from the
bioenergetic discharge that the awakening of
the snake brings about. This hate, this ex-
treme anger, this unbearable rage can then be

32
FREEING YOUR MINOTAUR

expressed in a non-harmful way by heavy
strokes of wax crayon on drawing paper.

The colors may be extremely vivid with a
heavy dose of red, yellow or black, and the
crayon may get into pieces from the violence
we put into the activity. After the rage has
been exteriorized that way, a natural state of
calm and inner balance usually arises, like a
Phenix from the ashes. And even extremely
violent sexual fantasies, such as rape or lust
murder fantasies, have been transformed into
fantasies of mutually consenting sex or they
have halted altogether for a certain time. So
far for the practice of spontaneous art in order
to heal our power center.

The process of adaptation to the norms
and social rules of society, is a dialectic one.
Only by accepting yourself and by putting
yourself first, which means accepting your

33
SOUL JAZZ

shadow as a part of you, you can prepare
yourself for getting onto a new track. It is nei-
ther by liberating the Minotaur suddenly and
let him devour all the young boys and girls he
can get, nor by imprisoning him for lifetime
that we will find the way out, but only by feed-
ing the Minotaur in such a way that he gradu-
ally transforms into a tame animal that later
serves us humbly yet powerfully with its vi-
brancy and abundance of vital energy.

Or, to use less mythological and more psy-
chological terms, complete adaptation would
result in conformity and dissolve our individu-
ality: we would become robots. Total refusal of
adaptation, however, would result in asocial
and destructive actions and a lifestyle full of
extremes. Extreme action however always re-
sults in karmic drawbacks. It is thus only the
midway between the extremes, that I call

34
FREEING YOUR MINOTAUR

flexible adaptation, that is constructive both
for the individual and society.

The healthy ego is typically able to bring
about flexible adaptation to circumstances, no
matter where and when. Neither extreme re-
pression nor a total and unguarded acting out
of our desires would lead to an integration of
those desires. The midway, however, can real-
ize this difficult transition because it bears
elements of wisdom. Therefore, the midway is
the fastest and most effective way of soul de-
velopment and, with that, to happiness, har-
mony and balance in your whole life process.
It is the key to supreme creativity and a life full
of riches and love.

35
What is Soul Reality?

I reached the insight that all human devel-
opment basically focuses upon reality, and
this in a twofold way: coping with perceived
reality and aiming at building a certain form of
personal or individual reality that differs from
the reality that is perceived.

When I look at childhood and education
today with this insight in mind, I note the fol-
lowing: there is an overweight and focus upon
perceiving reality and a marginal or at best in-
tellectual focus on building individual reality.

To put it in more relaxed terms: we are
taught to consume reality as we consume
goods and gods, and at the same time are
lacking the most basic information about the
SOUL JAZZ

essential in life, that is how to cope with our
perception of reality, and how to construe and
bring about on the daily level our own cus-
tomized and unique reality despite of the real-
ity we perceive. I say despite of because typi-
cally the reality we are going to build, if we
build one at all, is different from the reality we
perceive, or even fundamentally opposes that
reality. Genius is marked by exactly that char-
acteristic.

Gandhi would probably never have built his
grandiose vision of a free and democratic In-
dia was he not, as a lawyer and journalist, par-
ticularly exposed to perceiving the political
reality in India at that time. Edison would not
have invented the light bulb had he not per-
ceived the reality of living in a home with can-
dle or petroleum light as dim, dull or fade.
Karl Marx would not have pondered about a
more egalitarian society had he not been par-

38
WHAT IS SOUL REALITY?

ticularly exposed to perceiving the reality of
capitalism at his lifetime in the form of ex-
treme social injustice.

The human base setup, and this is proved
by neurological science in the meantime, is
built around the constant gain of pleasure
combined with a constant striving to avoid
displeasure. When ascetically-minded people
still today, and despite all scientific evidence,
defend a morality-based worldview, they fail
to pay their tribute to the destruction their be-
lief system brought about in five thousand
years of moralistic patriarchy!

If it is true that pleasure brings about pain,
as Buddha, Krishnamurti and most other
sages from India said, then why do we run for
pleasure? An orgasm, in some way, as a
maximum amount of pleasure, is a certain
form of pain. That does however not engage

39
SOUL JAZZ

me in avoiding that sweet pain of orgasm, but
in the contrary lets me search after it again
and again. In addition, sages argue that all we
are searching for constantly renders us ad-
dicted and thus encloses us in a vicious circle
of dependence. From this rigid point of view,
all sexuality could be seen as a trap and in last
resort a debasement.

This is, in fact, the point of view of most re-
ligions, even more apparently tolerant ones
such as Buddhism. And yet it is a point of view
that is profoundly contrary to life and life’s
creational patterns of sexual union, joyful in-
teraction, the melting of opposite forces and
total communication through total copulation
in the form of an ecstatic cosmic dance. Do
what you will, you cannot really argue away
the fact that life proceeds by the up-and-
down of pleasure, by charge and discharge,
by rock and roll, in a sort of tidal movement,

40
WHAT IS SOUL REALITY?

and not by a linear form of nirvana boredom. I
do not want to eat soup or pizza every day.
This is so evident that nobody really questions
it. And yet this simple fact says all about life
and creative living, and about the necessity
for human life to provide pleasure on a con-
stant basis.

This being said, I have to explain what I
mean with the expression ‘soul reality.’ What is
that reality I am speaking of? Why do I find
soul reality to be important to realize for every
human? Is this reality afar from our every day
life – a sort of mysterious personal nirvana? To
give the answer straight ahead: it is none of
this. It is not a reality that is afar from daily life
and it is not an artificial nirvana. It is our own
individual continuum, the reality created by
our finest talents and gifts and their realiza-
tion. It is the reality of our soul. When I

41
SOUL JAZZ

achieve living my soul values on a daily basis, I
am living my personal reality.

42
Soul Development

After this introduction, let me give you an
overview over the work techniques you may
apply for yourself so as to trigger the realiza-
tion of your soul values in daily life. I would
like to emphasize two basic steps for liberat-
ing your soul, and discuss them below more in
detail, garbage removal and defining your
values.

Garbage Removal
The first phase or stage in realizing soul re-
ality is what I call garbage removal. It is devel-
oping awareness of your conditioning, your
status quo, your limitations. How did you be-
come the person that you are now?
SOUL JAZZ

Are you aware of your cultural, social and
intellectual conditioning, and further the indi-
vidual or filial conditioning you suffered? In
this first stage we are not working on chang-
ing anything in this condition that represents
your now-reality. We only try to get an utmost
level of clarity about what makes out this now-
reality and what were the factors, all the fac-
tors that contributed to your being what you
are—now!

The good thing about consciousness is
that it is self-cleaning. Once you gain con-
sciousness about what has to be considered
as soul-garbage, this garbage is instantly
burnt and destroyed by the laser beam of
consciousness. Here, you also deal with the
influence of the media and how it affects your
self-image, or rather, how it contributed to the
building of your self-image when you were still
a child?

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SOUL DEVELOPMENT

If you think that only adults are affected by
the destructive influence of the media, you
only have to read some research to convince
you of the contrary. In fact, it has become
widely acknowledged by now that the media,
especially television, and here more specifi-
cally the children’s cartoons have a highly de-
structive and aggressively conditioning influ-
ence upon the child’s mind and psyche.

You may say that you have no power to act
counter to such influences as they are collec-
tively approved forms of entertaining children.
But better than revolting and coming up with
value judgments, you can go one step ahead
and ask why children have to be entertained
at all?

If entertainment, the highly non-creative
and passive form of audiovisual consumption
is obviously not fostering constructive growth

45
SOUL JAZZ

in adults, how can we ever let our children be
immersed in such frivolous soul garbage pro-
duction?

In my coaching work with children I have
invariably observed that children who are
regularly watching children’s cartoons in the
morning right after getting up and in the eve-
ning, right before getting asleep—when their
minds are especially receptive—display with-
out exception the following behavior abnor-
malities:

• Insomnia;

• Hyperactivity;

• Extended bedwetting;

• Clinging behavior;

• Agoraphobia;

• Aggressiveness;

• Lack of cooperative behavior;

• High level of selfishness and egotism;

• Lack of creativity and highly imitative behavior;

• Lack of sensual and sexual expression;

46
SOUL DEVELOPMENT

• Lack of sparkling expression (dullness);

• Lack of spontaneity and gentleness;

• Laziness, obesity, vulgarity, frivolity;

• Sadistically blocked and dormant sexuality;

• Emotional blockage;

• Low emotional and erotic intelligence;

• Low level of creativity.

The best method for changing the pattern
of media dependency is a total media diet.
However, this cure does not work when you
impose it upon your children and yourself
continue to be a media rat. It only works when
you show the example and yourself go
through a media consumption catharsis.

Stop your self-imposed television terror for
one month, for yourself and your whole family,
including parents, siblings and grandparents.
Whoever does not want to follow is free to
leave your house.

47
SOUL JAZZ

I do not say you have to apply such drastic
methods for your whole life and become a
civilization hater and forest hermit, beware! I
say ‘one month’ and I mean it. This month will
be for most of you a terrible experience, but
also a terribly important period of learning.

And if you say, you will do it, but only re-
garding the entertainment stuff but still watch
the news, you overlook that there are no news
in this world, that nothing is new that you get
served in tee-wee, because if there is really
novelty in any respect, it will surely not appear
in tee-wee as it will be filtered out from
broadcasting.

There is no purity in news production, there
is no value-free information, there is no objec-
tivity in any media production, also if it arro-
gantly comes over as scientific and objective
or what you want. All in the media world is as-

48
SOUL DEVELOPMENT

sembled, composed and produced by highly
biased human minds, in all media production
studios and tee-wee stations over the world,
wherever you go.

The other trap is searching for what some
gurus call ‘the reality,’ as if there was only one
reality. The very idea of one single reality is as
fundamental a distortion of perception as is
the idea of one single god. If there was only
one rigid dominant one-party reality, personal
reality would be an illusion, and personal
freedom would be utopian.

What we face in mass media production
today is a level of denial of complexity that
borders insanity. Life is unendingly complex,
but media life, the artificial mirror of it, is a re-
ductionist soup that suggests to the media
consumer reality was flat, easy and linear, a
matter of plugging in to the right channel.

49
SOUL JAZZ

When we talk about the mass media,
worldwide news and mass entertainment, we
talk about manipulation and indoctrination.
We do not need to even think of personal
freedom and individual expression while these
mass media pay constant lip service to these
values, in much the same way as the Church
did when it preached universal love and at the
same time persecuted, tortured, raped and
burnt beautiful little peasant girls it labeled as
witches.

What we should develop is not an anti-
attitude against the mass media, or a medie-
val or retarded mindset, or sectarian opinions,
but watchfulness, alertness, an attitude that
just observes the undermining influences
around us, without judging them as good or
bad. This, then, is also the best way to edu-
cate your children!

50
SOUL DEVELOPMENT

See, when you apply extreme solutions
over a longer time, say you want to buy your
kids into a zero-diet media consumption, you
baffle the human nature and risk to cash in the
opposite result.

Before doing something as foolish as that,
apply it first to yourself and see how long you
can stand the torture! Always heed the advice
that only the middle way pays in the long run
while extreme approaches lead to a drawback
at the end of the day, and produce rather un-
desired results. Your kids are most probably
going to watch all those violent movies with
the families of their schools friends, and with-
out you ever knowing about it; at the end of
the day you will have less control over them,
and you may be less connected with them. So
the whole process needs to be initiated by a
firm decision that is carried out with constancy
and equanimity, and subtle understanding.

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SOUL JAZZ

I hope I have been clear enough until here.
When I suggest you, for you and your family,
trying out the media diet I am proposing, this
is only meant as a first step in a larger and
much more encompassing consciousness
opening process that is by no means meant to
restrict your basic freedom.

Defining Your Values
The second phase or stage is to fill the
vacuum of conditioning with new content,
content that you create for yourself, instead of
taking values over from others or the meta-
group. Now you are going to define your own
values. It may sound surprising for you to have
a power for defining your values independ-
ently of the values of the culture you are living
in.

And yet, this is what really is understood by
personal reality. And not group reality. As we

52
SOUL DEVELOPMENT

talk about a personal soul, and not a group
soul. As a Japanese, you will probably contra-
dict me here. And in fact, most Asians will
contradict me here and perhaps gently tell me
‘Sir, but this, you see, is really Western teach-
ing or philosophy, and not directly applicable
for Asians’. And I know that you are right, but
that I am not wrong. This is the Western part
of my teaching, but it is balanced out by many
elements that are intrinsically Eastern and that
I have woven into my unique soul develop-
ment approach.

Soul reality without following your soul val-
ues is impossible. You may never have pon-
dered about this. It may seem even outlandish
to you to ask such a question. So, in the next
paragraph, then, let us go directly in medias
res and ask:

‣ What, in general, are soul values?

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SOUL JAZZ

‣ What are the values you wish to abide by in
your life?

‣ How are soul values going to sustain your
soul reality?

‣ How are you going to find these values?

‣ What are the base patterns in your soul uni-
verse?

54
Soul Values are Creative

Most of the time most of us are not or only
half conscious of their soul values, while these
values may well drive us, unconsciously, and
they may be even fundamental for our lives.

Soul values drive us even when we are not
conscious of them; the moment you render
them conscious, you begin to consciously in-
tegrate them in your decision making.

That means you are going to make better
decisions, as they will be more in alignment
with what you really want, on the level of your
soul. What happens is that from this moment,
your soul values become really creative.
SOUL JAZZ

It’s like with dreams. Everybody dreams.
Everybody has soul values, if conscious of
them or not. When you are not remembering
your dreams, you are still driven by those un-
conscious images; but when you render them
conscious you can deliberately use all the
creativity and the information your dreams
provide you with on a daily basis!

To give an example. Let’s say that freedom
of thought is for you a fundamental social
value. What flows out from this social or con-
stitutional value? Does it affect your overall
behavior? Does it make you being an activist?
Does it make you become a social fighter for
safeguarding personal freedom?

When you look at it closely, you see that a
social value per se does not push you to take
any specific action, but rather forges in you a
certain attitude, or an overarching behavior

56
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

structure. Thus, when freedom of thought is
one of your fundamental social values, this
does not mean that you will become an activ-
ist or street fighter for personal freedom. But
it well means that you are firmly convinced
that without freedom of thought we are not
living in what we call a democracy.

Thus, we can conclude so far that, in gen-
eral, values bring about convictions and a sort
of overall attitude that builds an overarching
pattern for all our actions; on the other hand,
we found that soul values do not trigger ac-
tions without our willpower coming in and
playing its part.

You can also say that social values construe
a certain base structure in society upon which
people build their social plans and achieve-
ments for the sake of all. And you see, while
social values and soul values are of course two

57
SOUL JAZZ

different pairs of shoes, the process is not dif-
ferent for soul values. I will discuss the follow-
ing topics about soul values here, not exclud-
ing that there are more:

‣ What are Soul Values?

‣ Soul Values v. Social Values

‣ Patterns of Living

‣ Walking Your Talk

‣ Soul Marginality

‣ Living Your Soul Reality

What are Soul Values?
Now, let’s say you accept that you have
soul values set for your life, while you may not

58
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

be conscious of them, or not conscious of all
of them. Can you find out about your soul val-
ues, and how? And after you have found out
about them, can you change them, erase old
ones and install new ones, just like handling
computer software? Yes, this is so, I say, and
let me point out why.

The first process you are going to engage
in is find out about your values. I can help you
catalyze this process, but I cannot find the
soul values valid for your life – only you can.
This is a consciousness process that is highly
individual and creative; it’s, to paraphrase
Krishnamurti, like a flame without smoke.

Consciousness can help you maintain the
flame burning, for a certain time. But please
be aware that you yourself are going to build
that awareness of your soul values, and that a
facilitator cannot do that for you. I had to

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SOUL JAZZ

build it regarding my own soul values. And in
my case it was a matter of thirty years of time
to build that awareness, which is partly why
today I’m a writer. It’s because I was an ex-
tremely conditioned, alienated, co-dependent
and emotionally and physically abused child
and had to go a long way to get back to my
soul, and find my soul values. And I had to suf-
fer much violence that was used by the adults,
and also some of the children around who
tried to mold me according to their social be-
havior patterns. All that created a lot of fear, a
sort of constant angst, and feelings of unwor-
thiness, and it took me many years to cope
with that hangup. And yet, while for me it took
thirty years, it is not excluded that you achieve
the same result in thirty days only – or less. It
all depends on how much society alienated
you from yourself through what we call educa-
tion and which is for most people in our soci-

60
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

ety, unfortunately, a rather traumatic experi-
ence.

Finding out about your soul values can be
done as a sort of meditation or inner dia-
logue, or else through dialogue with me in a
coaching relation. And my role in our ex-
change is of course to hold back completely
with my own values and instead mirror to you
what you are expressing not only verbally but
through your whole being.

Soul Values v. Social Values
Your soul value mix may not be coherent.
There may be a hair in the soup, a bug in the
system, a foul egg somewhere in the kitchen.
As you never consciously made up your soul
value catalogue, this is something rather
common to happen.

What am I talking about? Let me give an
example. One of your fundamental soul val-

61
SOUL JAZZ

ues may be the natural equality of women, but
for some reason you acknowledge, share and
endorse the social value of ‘male supremacy’;
evidently the two values cannot go together
without one value getting the overhand and
crushing the other. Thus, in every daily situa-
tion where a question about these values
arises, you will experience a value conflict.

In such a situation, you need to decide
which of the two contradictory values you wish
should prevail, the soul value or the social
value?

One you have to let go. This can be a diffi-
cult decision to make, but please bear in mind
that doing this work triggers an enormous
consciousness boost. It is not a waste of time,
but in the contrary a wise investment of time
and energy to reach clarity about your soul
values and do away with cultural, social, men-

62
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

tal, moral, racial or other values that conflict
with your soul values. If the decision is diffi-
cult, then accept this inner conflict until you
see the end of the tunnel.

I once befriended a woman who lived a
very interesting, even intriguing and quite
eroticized relationship with her little daughter.
And I saw that, as for this woman creative liv-
ing and constant renewal was as natural as
eating and drinking, her daughter grew into a
real creator person, a child who was constantly
busy creating things, changing things, de-
stroying things, and questioning things, a
child who was hardly ever interested in taking
her meals as she was really immersed in her
creative reality. And then it became clear to
me that what I wished to realize as my major
professional goal was helping people to live
creative lives so that they are really immersed
in their own soul reality. And I saw that when I

63
SOUL JAZZ

was able to help a parent get there, quite
automatically the child would have the privi-
lege to go the same way, as all education
mainly is teaching by example.

After this shift of focus, my soul develop-
ment work was much more exciting than be-
fore, and much more meaningful! I think that
often we found our endeavors upon secon-
dary values because we do not see the larger
primary values hidden behind them. And
these primary values, if we know this or not, if
we are conscious of it or not, are invariably
soul values.

When you see that developing your soul
reality is a continuum that without interruption
goes from birth to death and beyond death
over several or many life cycles, which is an in-
sight that karmic astrology gives us, then natu-

64
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

rally you will work with both children and
adults without a predilection.

What is the difference between child and
adult other than a question of degrees of de-
velopment? Most adults who live alienated
from their soul reality, and who are deeply
molded and manipulated by the mainstream
consumer paradigm, are actually on the de-
velopmental level of small children. And a
child as conscious as a genius, a Mozart, Ein-
stein, Picasso or Rachmaninov is an adult al-
ready before reaching the age of six. This is so
because these children live in total clarity
about their soul reality and their life’s destiny,
and because they are immersed in this reality
on a daily level, and can by no means be
turned away from it.

This example helps you realize that often
when we complain about lacking clarity in our

65
SOUL JAZZ

professional or private lives, we lack clarity
about our soul values. Once we have done
our home work and made a value check, we
often see the light and can go to where the
break is coming from.

Patterns of Living
People change and with changing, their
soul values may change as well. They also may
obey to other than soul values so as to free
themselves from the inner conflict of soul val-
ues contradicting social or cultural values.
Changing a professional career often goes
along with, or is the result of, changing the
values this career was based upon. When you
think that values is but theoretical fuss, stuff
invented by psychologists or coaches and
nothing tangible, you are perhaps not aware
to which extent your particular mindset, values
and beliefs are impacting upon your reality,

66
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

thereby constantly creating reality, and chang-
ing reality.

Our mindset is composed of both beliefs
and values; the difference between them is
that beliefs are rigid and in most cases unpro-
ductive or counterproductive to creative living
while values are living things and subject to
change and renewal. While beliefs are holding
us firmly bound in a limiting framework of
opinions, values are moving with life’s changes
and reflect our being bound by essential truth,
which is the reality of our soul. You can say
that beliefs are basically garbage while soul
values are productive assets for growth. You
want to get rid of beliefs as much as possible,
but you want to inquire into and develop your
soul values and grow in awareness of their ex-
istence and functionality.

67
SOUL JAZZ

Soul values are not an outcome of judg-
mental thinking or a moralistic life philosophy.
The good thing about soul values is namely
that they are part of any possible mindset.

They are like salt in the soup. A soup is not
defined by the salt it contains. Even without
salt, a soup is still a soup. But surely, a salted
soup tastes much better than an unsalted
one. Why are charismatic leaders so attrac-
tive? Why are film stars and great musicians so
popular?

Why are pop singers more interesting than
your grandmother? It’s because these people
have strong soul values to share with a lot of
people. What they do in their lives and ca-
reers is to condense certain soul values and
incarnate them through their art and media
presence.

Think only of Michael Jackson.

68
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

—See my post on Medium: ‘Greater Amplitude:
Michael Jackson and Charlie Chaplin.’

https://medium.com/manifesting-the-self/great
er-amplitude-39b1dd447fcb

You may or not share his soul values. But
that he incarnated strong soul values and that
many young people shared in these soul val-
ues is without a doubt. The same is and was
true for people like Mick Jagger, Paul
McCartney, Elvis Presley, James Dean, Andy
Warhol, or Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr. or
Nelson Mandela.

You may think that only certain chosen
people among the mass of uncreative nerds
have the right to display their soul values and
invite others to share into them. My answer is
that choice is well the secret, but the choice
comes from the person herself. There are no
chosen people, true, but there are self-chosen
people. You are chosen because you choose

69
SOUL JAZZ

yourself as your sole leader and king in your
universe.

You can be a star tomorrow if you wish to.
But you also have to be ready to cash in the
other side of the medal; to be a media star, to
be famous means to be hyper-vulnerable and
you have to put up your defenses to avoid the
worst.

As a star, you are sitting on the toilet in a
bathroom without walls! It needs great cour-
age to live the life of a star and it is in my view
not at all an easy life.

But it is also true that being popular is a
unique opportunity for promoting your soul
values worldwide. It’s a privilege, but it has a
price tag! When you observe the life stories of
stars, especially in film and show, you see that
they are almost addicted to their soul reality,

70
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

to a point they may overlook their daily reality
completely.

Love is one of the greatest soul values you
can set for your life. And love surely is a living
thing and nothing you can put in a book, in
words and phrases, in greeting cards and
birthday wishes, nothing you can accumulate
and store away, or to keep frosted for the next
generations.

Love is fluid, and volatile, and yet ex-
tremely powerful. Like water. Like a mountain.
Like the shine of the moon that so many peo-
ple today overlook and call a romantic fancy,
because they have lost the perfume of life and
think they can store away love, accumulate
love and conserve love in the rose and blue
colors they paint their children’s rooms with.
And when you begin to put love in drawers
and label it good, bad or perverse, you are

71
SOUL JAZZ

surely on the track to hell. Because then you
lost the meaning of what love really is. Never
mind that more than ninety percent of your
neighbors today are on that track, or even
your whole nation. It’s nonetheless so. When
many are deaf, deafness is not becoming a
virtue. When a whole nation is deaf, deafness
is not for that matter to become a sanctified
human condition.

Walking Your Talk
Soul values are seated in your heart, and
they are part of the continuum of your heart.
This means they are not intellectual ideas or
productions of your mind. Soul values are sub-
ject to intuition, not to reasoning.

Hence, you cannot gain awareness of your
values by thinking about them, but only by re-
ceiving them in your intuitive mind in a state
of quiet meditation.

72
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

Typically, when you have found a value that
your soul has integrated, you feel for a mo-
ment a deep joy, a joy so wonderful and light
as if you were, for that blessed moment, in
heaven. What makes the lives of great crea-
tors, artists, musicians and media stars so vi-
brant is their strong focus on their soul values!
They do not need to go out for value-fishing,
so to say, but have put their fish safely in a
box, to talk with the I Ching.

I do not search, I find, said Picasso, and he
did. He created the foundations of what today
we call modern art and which has become a
concept while in Picasso’s life modern art was
moving energy, living soul reality expressed by
constant creation, constant renewal, constant
finding new forms to express what cannot be
expressed.

73
SOUL JAZZ

When Andy Warhol created his unique art
and personal style, he was labeled a porno-
graphic artist. Today Warhol is represented in
the most conservative art galleries all over the
world, and nobody finds his art obscene.

I want to say that if you think your soul val-
ues are squared clean little bugs with neat la-
bels that you can store away in your clutter
box, you are misunderstanding this book. You
walk your soul values, as you walk your talk.
And when you don’t, you are not letting your
soul reality emerge but remain fixated in what
I call a second-hand life, which is about the
worst that can happen to you. It means you
are among the millions of dead people in this
world, people who do not know when they
died and believe they are alive because they
consume!

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SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

Soul Values and Jazz Ballads
I suggest you to listen to a group of good
jazz musicians playing a jazz ballad, and you
intuitively feel what I am talking about. The
ballad or standard is an old soup, an old long-
forgotten song originating from one or the
other musical, one or the other film or just a
popular Hollywood tune. When you read the
standard in the fake book, let’s say For
Heaven’s Sake, you begin to yawn. It contains
basically the same jazz harmonies as any other
standard, a lot of alterations, 2-5 modulations,
13th chords that put the salt in the soup, and
the piano technique uses a mix between
stride style and swing, and a lot of locked-
hand passages.

So now, then, is what I just described the
soul of that jazz ballad? The hell not. And
when you hear that ballad played by gifted
jazz musicians, you are amazed at every turn

75
SOUL JAZZ

of harmony, at every little detail of their per-
sonal rendition of the ballad.

The rendition is the essential thing, not the
fact that a ballad contains 2-5 walks without
end. The rendition is called rendition because
it renders something, it renders the soul of the
music. The ballad is a jewel in the lotus, art-
fully wrapped in technical reality, sixths, sev-
enths, repeated 2-5 modulations and endless
styles, published in a fake book in coded lan-
guage that basically only jazz musicians can
read and set out in living chords.

With your soul values it’s the same as with
playing jazz ballads. You are not opening your
soul’s fake book and show people the page so
that they are going to decipher the code. You
are the one who is supposed to do this work
and what you present to the outside world is a
rendition of your soul’s reality. This is what I

76
SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

call ‘walking your values.’ You set your values
out like a Renaissance musician sets out the
Basso Continuo in a Cantata, or a jazz musi-
cian sets out the harmonies written in a fake
book.

You interpret the code of your life and pre-
sent it to the world like a complete score, a
perfect piece of music. And not only that. You
also play that music, the music of your soul, to
the world. Thus, you are the first and most im-
portant performer of your reality music. And
that means, to stay with the example, that
over time you will assemble around you a
whole orchestra, people who come to walk in
your trail, and who feel attracted by your soul
values because they, consciously or not, have
chosen similar soul values for their cosmic life
cycle.

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SOUL JAZZ

Soul Marginality
Many people worry about the fact that
their soul reality might be considered as mar-
ginal from the point of view of most of their
contemporaries, or at least the ones they
know. Of course, all is marginal that is not
mainstream.

But the question is, do you wish to be
mainstream? Do you consider big boring de-
fault as the right software setup for you? If yes,
please don’t worry. But don’t work with me
then and don’t use my books. Because I’m not
running on that spur and will mislead you from
your comfortable main road.

My soul work is destined for those who are
at pains with society, whose soul values con-
tradict the values of present mainstream con-
sumer society, those who are as it were on the
side road of creative marginality. This side

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SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

road of today inevitably will become the main
road of tomorrow.

Let’s see how much power mainstream has
over you. Three percent of the total world
population spend seventy-five percent of all
planetary energy resources. Okay. But in
number they represent a tiny minority.

And the majority of the tiny three percent
represent what we call ‘mainstream.’ While
they have much economic power, their posi-
tion in the world is rather vulnerable. Among
them nine hundred billionaires, most of which
are residents of the United States of America,
dominate or hold in their hands the biggest
part of the world markets. Nine hundred peo-
ple in five billion, a tiny fraction.

Surely, these people have their hand in the
magic media box that defines mainstream
values all over the world. So, is that appealing

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SOUL JAZZ

to you as a bunch of values or rather pseudo-
values, when you only look who represents
these values and how they came about? And
second, when you see the reality of that main-
stream world, do you really think it has much
power over you – if not you yourself grant it
that power?

Perhaps this helps you realize that margin-
ality is quite a nice thing, and not an ugly out-
landish garbage bin, and you may begin to
appreciate and embrace your marginality,
your non-mainstream values, your healthy
criticism, your lucidity when unveiling the web
of lies behind most of that mainstream propa-
ganda about a pretendedly clean and nonvio-
lent world that in reality is governed by highly
unclean and violent governments. Do you
think you can create a paper box when you
have glue at your fingers?

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SOUL VALUES ARE CREATIVE

When you let mainstream values regulate
your life, you are dead before you have even
started out to live your life. Most people in
one or the other way are not totally abiding by
mainstream values but let a backdoor open in
their mind for escaping when things go too
much contrary to their own value system. But
they are afraid to admit it. Westerners espe-
cially consider values as a matter of privacy
and keep their value box sealed. Of course,
they talk about their values with close friends,
but typically not in public or with strangers.

There is a strange fear around revealing
personal identity and values in Europe, and I
am convinced that this fear originates from
the times of the Church’s Inquisition and the
brutality with which it has suppressed, for cen-
turies, the European intelligentsia. We are still
recovering from this first and largest holocaust
in human history.

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SOUL JAZZ

For becoming whole inwardly and in our
lives, we need to embrace simplicity, and im-
perfection. Living in a robotic culture, we can
resist becoming robots by embracing the ul-
timate truth that we are always imperfect.

82
Glossary

Terms

Brain and Mind Research

Latest consciousness research strongly sug-
gests that mind and brain are not the same,
but that the brain is something like an inter-
face for the mind, and that, therefore, mind
is the larger notion, and bears an essential
connectedness with the whole of the uni-
verse and creation.

This holistic view of the brain-mind replaces
the former view that saw mind and brain as
separated and that gave an undue impor-
tance and exclusiveness to the human brain
in explaining cognition. Typically, this scien-
tific residue paradigm was unable to ex-
plain extrasensorial perception (ESP) and
generally, psychic phenomena.

Besides, this general agreement, systems
research has shed a particularly important
light upon the relationship between mind
SOUL JAZZ

and brain. Fritjof Capra explains in his book
The Web of Life (1997) that still back in 1994
the editors of an anthology titled Con-
sciousness in Philosophy and Cognitive
Neuroscience stated frankly in their intro-
duction: ‘Even though everybody agrees
that mind has something to do with the
brain, there is still no general agreement on
the exact nature of this relationship.’

He then explains that science was held by
Descartes’ assumption that mind is a thing,
the ‘thinking thing’ (res cogitans).

However, systems research has brought to
daylight that mind is not a thing but a
process—the process of cognition, which is
identified with the process of life itself. Ca-
pra then explains that the brain simply is
the structure through which this process of
cognition operations. The relationship be-
tween mind and brain, therefore is one be-
tween process and structure.

Capra finally adds that the entire structure
of the organism participates in the process
of cognition whether or not the organism
has a brain and a higher nervous system.
(Id., 175-176).

—David Bohm, Wholeness and the Implicate
Order (2002) and Thought as a System (1994),

84
GLOSSARY

Gregory Bateson, Steps to an Ecology of Mind
(2000), Fritjof Capra, The Turning Point (1982/
1987), The Web of Life (1996/1997), The Hidden
Connections (2002), Stanislav Grof, Beyond the
Brain (1985) and The Holotropic Mind (1993),
Michael Talbot, The Holographic Universe
(1992), Amit Goswami, The Self-Aware Universe
(1995), Dean Radin, The Conscious Universe
(1997), Lynne McTaggart, The Field (2002),
Hameroff et. al, Consciousness: 20 Scientists
Interviewed, DVD (2003).

Cartesian Science and Worldview

A Cartesian or Newtonian worldview is a life
philosophy marked by a dominance of de-
ductive and logical thinking to the detri-
ment of the qualities of the right brain such
as associative and imaginative thinking, and
generally fantasy. It’s also a worldview that
tends to disregard or deny dreams and
dreaming, extrasensorial, multisensorial
perception and ESP faculties, as well as
genuine spirituality.

The term Cartesian has been coined from
the name of French philosopher René Des-
cartes. While nature is coded in energy pat-
terns, Cartesian scientists deny the cosmic

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energy field as a ‘vitalistic theory’; they have
split mind and matter into opposite poles.

Historically, and philosophically, it was not
René Descartes who has been at the origin
of this schizoid worldview, but the so-called
Eleatic School, a philosophical movement
in ancient Greece that opposed the holistic
and organic worldview represented by the
philosophy of Heraclites; but it was through
the affirmation and pseudo-scientific cor-
roboration of the ancient Eleatic dualism
that in the history of Western science, the
reductionist approach to reality, which is ac-
tually a fallacy of perception, became the
dominant science paradigm between ap-
proximately the 17th and the 20th centuries.

We are right now at a point in time where
this limited worldview is gradually being
overcome and replaced by the novel in-
sights of quantum physics, systems theory,
and a new holistic science paradigm that
connects us back to the oldest of wisdom
traditions.

Continuum

The continuum concept is an idea relating
to human development proposed by Jean
Liedloff in her book The Continuum Con-

86
GLOSSARY

cept (1977/1986). According to Liedloff, to
achieve optimal physical, mental and emo-
tional development, human beings, espe-
cially babies, require tactile closeness, the
kind of experience to which their species
adapted during the long process of their
evolution.

Liedloff suggests that when certain evolu-
tionary expectations are not met as infants
and toddlers, compensation for these
needs will be sought, by alternate means,
throughout life, resulting in mental and so-
cial disorders. For example, the infant
should be placed immediately in the
mother’s arms at birth, and physical close-
ness and eye contact should be maintained
with the infant until he or she begins creep-
ing, then crawling on his/her own impulse,
usually at six to eight months.

Another requirement explicitly stated in her
book is the co-sleeping between parents
and small children, as well as prolonged
breastfeeding, surpassing in duration the
obligatory 3-months that pediatricians to-
day recommend to mothers. Last not least,
the continuum also requires that caregivers
immediately respond to the body signals of
the infant, without judgment, displeasure,
or invalidation of the child's needs, yet

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showing no undue concern nor making the
child the constant center of attention.

Children who are raised within their contin-
uum will not be worshippers of chemical
drugs, fast food and most of this society’s
artificially created gadgets and tactile com-
pensations.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence is one of the four
types of intelligence, which are logical-
rational intelligence, emotional intelligence,
graphical-spacial intelligence and tactile
intelligence. Emotional intelligence is espe-
cially active when it goes to understand re-
lationships, human affairs, and the psycho-
logical implications within them.

—Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
(1995).

I Ching

The I Ching or Book of Changes is the old-
est of the Chinese classic texts. A symbol
system designed to identify order in what
appear to be chance events, it describes an
ancient system of cosmology and philoso-
phy that is at the heart of Chinese cultural

88
GLOSSARY

beliefs. It is based on the alternation of
complementary energies called Yin and
Yang, which are developmental poles that
by their alternation trigger inevitable
change. It is also based on the old integra-
tive philosophy of the five elements that is
part of many other esoteric science tradi-
tions. The philosophy centers on the ideas
of the dynamic balance of opposites, the
evolution of events as a process, and ac-
ceptance of the inevitability of change.

The I Ching consists of 64 hexagrams. Each
hexagram or kua is an energy pattern that is
a unique mix of the two base energies, yin
and yang, represented symbolically by
lines. Yang is represented by a solid line, yin
by a dotted line. Each hexagram is com-
posed of six lines, and two trigrams consist-
ing of three lines each. The lower trigram
deals with matters that are in their begin-
ning stage, from the start of a project until
about half of its realization. The upper tri-
gram deals with the culmination and the
end of processes or projects, positively or
negatively.

The I Ching has been a book for divination
and relief, and for spiritual learning for
many great and famous people such as
Confucius, Hermann Hesse, John Lennon,
Carl Gustav Jung, and many others. I per-

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sonally consult the I Ching on a regular ba-
sis since 1990, as well as Astrology and the
Tarot since the 1980s.

—Richard Wilhelm, The I Ching or Book of
Changes (1967), Helmut Wilhelm, The Wilhelm
Lectures on the Book of Changes (1995), Hua-
Ching Ni, I Ching: The Book of Changes and
the Unchanging Truth (1999), Alfred Huang, The
Complete I Ching (1998), Richard Wilhelm &
Charles Baynes, The I Ching or Book of
Changes (1967), John Blofeld, The Book of
Changes (1965), Thomas Cleary, The Taoist I
Ching (1986), R.L. Wing, The I Ching Workbook
(1984).

Inner Selves

GENERALITIES

Inner Selves are energies in our psyche that
form part of our total and integral whole-
ness. In the ideal case, they should be bal-
anced and in harmony with each other. This
means that all inner selves ideally should
work in sync, as a sort of inner team, in
which all members are fully awake and
communicate with each other. In most peo-
ple’s psyche, however, the inner child is
somnolent or asleep, and either the inner

90
GLOSSARY

parent or the inner adult dominate the psy-
che. While the truth about our inner selves
goes back to Antiquity, the insight in mod-
ern times has been made fruitful for psy-
chiatry through Eric Berne in 1950, the
founder of Transactional Analysis (TA).

He recognized three essential inner selves:
Inner Child, Inner Parent and Inner Adult. In
my own research and work with the inner
dialogue, I encountered the presence of
additional entities such as the Inner Con-
troller or Inner Critic as the instance in the
psyche that represents the societal, cultural
and moral values that we have internalized
through education and early conditioning. If
the Inner Critic hijacks the psyche, we are
unable to realize our love wishes, nor can
we be creative. In addition to these inner
selves, I encountered an entity of superior
wisdom that I called Lux and a shadow en-
tity I called Sad King and which embodied
repressed emotions that had turned into
sadistic drives.

INNER CHILD

Inner Child is a psychic entity, part-
personality, or psychic energy, created be-
tween our 7th and 14th year of life, and that
is part of our inner triangle. Positively, the
inner child energy is primarily emotional

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and wistful, predominantly creative. It is the
motor of every human being’s creativity. It
can be said to be the creative motor, the
very source energy in humans that makes
that we can be spontaneous, creative and
sometimes a little mad, to go beyond the
limiting framework of the rational and re-
petitive mind. Negatively, the inner child is
either mute or cataleptic so that its energy
cannot manifest, or else its energy is domi-
nant in the psyche or turned upside-down
which makes an inner child that is rebel-
lious, capricious, willful or overbearing,
producing the ‘clochard’ personality, the
‘hippie’, the ‘anarchist’, the ‘eternal student’
and abuser of the social system.

INNER ADULT

Inner Adult is a psychic entity, part-
personality or psychic energy that repre-
sents our logical thinking, our reason, our
maturity. Positively, it makes for our bal-
anced decisions, our down-to-earth attitude
and our sense for daily responsibilities.
Negatively, the inner adult manifests as the
intellectual nerd or through emotional fri-
gidity, cynicism or an obsession to measure
human relations on a scale of reasonable-
ness or straightness without considering the
emotional dimension. The dominant inner
adult energy plays a major role in modern

92
GLOSSARY

education where it results in devastating
damage on the next generations’ emo-
tional integrity. The dominant inner adult
also produces the ‘professional skeptic’, the
obnoxious ‘total rationalist’ who considers
ten percent of the human nature as pre-
dominantly important, flushing the other
ninety percent down the toilet!

INNER PARENT

Inner Parent is a psychic entity, part-
personality or psychic energy that repre-
sents our inner value standards, our moral
attitudes, our caring for self and others, but
negatively also our judging others, our I-
know-better attitude or blunt interference
into the lives of others without regard for
their privacy. The dominant inner parent
energy plays a recurring role in tyrannical
and persecutory societal, religious and po-
litical systems.

INNER TRIANGLE/INNER TEAM

The term inner triangle or inner team is an
expression that denotes two things. First, it
is a summary of the main inner energies,
the inner child, inner adult and inner parent
who can be seen to be in a triangular rela-
tionship. Second, the expression also sug-
gests that there should be balance or har-
mony between these inner entities so that

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neither of them dominates the psyche and
that they react flexibly, not in a stiff manner,
to any events that arise, or in communica-
tions with the outside world.

INNER DIALOGUE

The inner dialogue is a technique to get in
touch with our inner selves through relaxa-
tion or self-hypnosis and subsequent dia-
logues with one or several of our inner
selves, in a state of light trance. The state of
light trance can be self-induced, with no
facilitator needed, and outside of a psycho-
therapy. The inner dialogue should ideally
be fixed on paper, at least in the beginning,
because the voices that come up are very
soft and writing down the dialogues helps
to keep focus. The technique is also called
Voice Dialogue, for example by Stone &
Stone, in their book Embracing Our Selves
(1982). However, the expression could mis-
lead novice users as the ‘voices’ are not
really voices of course, as they are not to be
heard with our ears, but something like
flashes of intuition, or sudden precisely
formulated thoughts that seem to come
‘from nowhere.’

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GLOSSARY

Intuition

Intuition is inner knowledge that typically
manifests spontaneously and that is all-wise
and non-judgmental, broad in scope and
wistful; typically, intuition is transpersonal in
intent, not ego-based, thus manifesting
something like cosmic intention. In the old
wisdom traditions, intuition was more highly
valued than in modern consumer culture; it
was typically called ‘the knowledge of the
heart.’

Self

It is important to clarify the notion of Self,
which is ambiguous, used in different ways
by different people, and by different relig-
ions. To begin with, the Self needs to be
distinguished from the ego. While it is gen-
erally true that the ego isolates and suffo-
cates human creativity in an ego-bound
shell, this is not true for the Self as the
greater notion. In this sense the Self con-
tains the ego, but not vice versa. The Hindu
notion of atman as the higher self that is
considered as an outflow of the universal
spirit or oversoul, brahman, may be a good
conceptual aid. It is in this sense that the
Indian sage Ramana Maharshi uses the no-
tion of self and this comes very close to my

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own idea of selfhood. However, my idea has
been influenced also strongly by the psy-
chology of Carl Gustav Jung. In Jungian
psychology, the self is the archetype sym-
bolizing the totality of the personality. It
represents the striving for unity, wholeness,
and integration. As such, it embraces not
only the conscious but also the uncon-
scious.

Soul Power

Soul Power, which I synonymously call Pri-
mary Power or Self-Power is a concept I
have created to connote our original power,
and which is distinct from the harmful sec-
ondary powers or worldly powers that pro-
foundly mark our current society, and which
are clearly violence-inducing, and in the
long run damaging the human potential
and natural human spirituality.

Synchronicity

Synchronicity is a term attributed to Carl-
Gustav Jung; it may be of older and peren-
nial origin. It is a quite handy expression
that connotes that two apparently unrelated
events are behaving in sync, in a sense of
being linked by an information field. In fact,

96
GLOSSARY

what was found by research is that such in-
formation fields truly exist. When two parti-
cles are linked in an information field, that
is, entangled, they behave exactly in the
same way, be they light years away from
each other. How we explain this with terms
like quantum connectivity, a ‘holographic’
universe or morphogenetic resonance is of
secondary importance; the fact cannot be
denied and has been observed in all ex-
periments of quantum mechanics.

Synchronistic events are typically increasing
when emotional tension and release are
high, which often occurs during therapy and
cathartic events. Typical examples are given
by all our famous psychoanalysts, as by
Jung himself. One of his patients for exam-
ple suffered from a phobia against frogs
and on the last day of the therapy, when a
breakthrough was reached, and the patient
finally utters that she can now meet any
frog without panic, a frog was sitting on the
window sill of the psychiatric practice. This
is a case for synchronicity because the two
events are not just randomly connected,
but are intelligently linked in an information
field and thus are to be considered as syn-
chronistic.

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—Michael Talbot, The Holographic Universe
(1992), Amit Goswami, The Self-Aware Universe
(1995), Lynne McTaggart, The Field (2002), Frit-
jof Capra, The Hidden Connections (2002), Vale-
rie Hunt, Infinite Mind (2000), Ervin Laszlo, Sci-
ence and the Akashic Field (2004), Rupert Shel-
drake, A New Science of Life (1995), Ken Wilber
(Ed.), Quantum Questions (2001).

Zen

The Japanese word Zen comes from the
Chinese ch’an which in turn has its origins in
India. The establishment of Chan (Zen) is
traditionally credited to the Indian prince
turned monk, Bodhidharma.

—Roshi Philip Kapleau, Three Pillars of Zen
(1967), Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
(1971), Trevor P. Leggett, A First Zen Reader
(1972), Paul Reps, Zen Flesh, Zen Bones (1989),
Alan W. Watts, The Way of Zen (1999).

The meaning of Zen may be meditation;
however the deeper and more mystical in-
terpretation is that Zen means ‘revelation’
or ‘enlightenment’.

Zen emphasizes dharma practice and expe-
riential wisdom, particularly as realized in

98
GLOSSARY

the form of meditation known as zazen, in
the attainment of awakening. As such, it
putatively de-emphasizes both theoretical
knowledge and the study of religious texts
in favor of direct, experiential realization.
Zen is within the Buddhist tradition, but it’s
not really a practice that is ‘religious’ in the
sense of Buddhist religion. It’s rather a
down-to-earth, practical and all about self-
empowerment in the everyday routine of
ordinary life. None of these are emphasized
by traditional Buddhism.

One doesn’t need to be a Zen master or
monk to practice Zen. Suffices to start with
a desire to be a complete novice with the
‘beginner’s mind‘—a clean slate. Practicing
Zen means to clear the mind from material
clutter, stripping thoughts away to the point
of ‘realization’—an all-embracing aware-
ness. This realization or awakening is known
as wu in Chinese, and satori or kensho in
Japanese. Besides meditation, Zen uses the
Koan, riddle-like poems, to scramble the
intellectual and conceptual mind and to
bring about a state of innocent and fresh
awareness. Koans are enigmatic little or
question-and-answer dialogues that can be
used to prompt to help understand the Zen
approach to enlightenment. Scholars and
followers of Zen say you don’t need words

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to explain Zen. It is all about a direct expe-
rience of the ‘here and now,’ with an empty
mind—what Zen practitioners call ‘no-
mind’. In its free-form minimalist approach,
Zen is wholly concerned with the self and
with finding reality through realization.

—See: James Harrison, Endless Path Zen, Lon-
don: Flame Tree Publishing, 2006.

Personalities

Berne, Eric

Eric Berne (1910–1970) was a Canadian-
born psychiatrist best known as the creator
of Transactional Analysis (TA). He published
both technical and mass-market books on
the subject. In the early 1960s he published
both technical and popular accounts of his
conclusions.

The bestselling book Games People Play
made terms like scripts and tokens part of
the ordinary vocabulary. His Structures and
Dynamics of Organizations and Groups ex-
amined the same analysis in a broader con-
text than one-on-one interaction. His semi-
nar group from the 1950s developed the
term Transactional Analysis (TA) to describe
therapies based on his work. By 1964, this

100
GLOSSARY

method expanded into the International
Transactional Analysis Association. Many
therapists have put his ideas in practice.
Other applications have appeared in the
practice of organization development con-
sultants. By 2003 the various TA organiza-
tions boast over 15,000 worldwide mem-
bers. Berne was famous for his use of ordi-
nary, easy-to-understand words instead of
psychiatric terminology.

Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama

Siddhartha Gautama (563 BC–483 BC) was a
spiritual teacher from Ancient India who
became the founder of Buddhism. He is
generally recognized by Buddhists as the
Supreme Buddha of our age. Gautama, also
known as Shakyamuni, the sage of the
Shakyas, is the key figure in Buddhism, and
accounts of his life, discourses, and monas-
tic rules are believed to have been summa-
rized after his death and memorized by his
followers. Various collections of teachings
attributed to Gautama were passed down
by oral tradition, and first committed to
writing about four hundred years later. The
Zen tradition, while today often seen as de-
tached from Buddhism, was originally
founded as a specific branch of Buddhism
in China, called Chan Buddhism. When this

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tradition came to Japan, it was called Zen,
and this name has survived until today.

Descartes, René

René Descartes (1596–1650) was a French
philosopher, mathematician, scientist, and
writer who spent most of his adult life in the
Dutch Republic. He has been dubbed the
‘Father of Modern Philosophy’, and much of
subsequent Western philosophy is a re-
sponse to his writings, which continue to be
studied closely to this day. In particular, his
Meditations continues to be a standard text
at most university philosophy departments.
Descartes’ influence in mathematics is also
apparent, the Cartesian coordinate system
allowing geometric shapes to be expressed
in algebraic equations being named for
him. Descartes was also one of the key fig-
ures in the Scientific Revolution. As the in-
ventor of the Cartesian coordinate system,
Descartes founded analytic geometry, the
bridge between algebra and geometry,
crucial to the invention of calculus and
analysis. His most famous statement is: Co-
gito ergo sum.

The Cartesian system of thought, philoso-
phy and science is today generally ques-
tioned. One of the most prolific science

102
GLOSSARY

authors who is now world-famous, offering
in his books a comprehensive critique of
Cartesian thought and its limitations, is the
physicist and author Fritjof Capra.

Einstein, Albert

Albert Einstein (1879–1955) was a German-
born theoretical physicist widely considered
one of the greatest physicists of all times.
He formulated the special and general
theories of relativity. In addition, he made
significant advancements to quantum the-
ory and statistical mechanics. While best
known for the Theory of Relativity, he was
awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize for Physics
for his 1905 explanation of the photoelec-
tric effect and ‘for his services to Theoretical
Physics’. In popular culture, the name Ein-
stein has become synonymous with great
intelligence and genius.

—Joyce Goldenstein, Physicist and Genius
(1995), Albert Einstein, The World As I See It
(1993), Out of My Later Years (1993), Ideas and
Opinions (1988), Albert Einstein Notebook
(1989).

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Freud, Sigmund

I was first reading Sigmund Freud (1856–
1939), in its German original edition, back in
1975, upon entering law school. Freud’s
theory that children’s psychosexual devel-
opment was a process of libidinal (erotic)
identifications with first the same-sex parent
(homosexual identification), and then with
the other-sex parent (heterosexual identifi-
cation), passing through the oral and anal
stages for finally arriving at the genital
stage—is an attractive surrogate for the real
knowledge!

Freud was the avatar for what later became,
and today still is, the mainstream paradigm
in child psychology and education. One of
the pitfalls of this paradigm is the denial or
exclusion of parameters that serve to build
identity through self-knowledge, intuitive or
inner knowledge, paranormal knowledge,
pre-life knowledge and relational experi-
ence. The identity that is said to be the only
possible one according to mainstream psy-
chiatry is a derived, not a genuine, identity.
It is derived from the parents’ identities. For
a boy, the process will be identification with
the father, as a primary homosexual identi-
fication, during the anal phase and identifi-
cation with the mother, as a secondary het-

104
GLOSSARY

erosexual identification during the genital
phase.

According to Freud, the so-called Oedipus
Complex comes in at that moment in the
child’s psychosexual development. True
identity is built, according to this theory,
when the boy has successfully liquidated
the Oedipus Complex by having developed
enough aggressiveness toward the father
and enough castration of his incestuous de-
sire toward the mother at the same time.

Gandhi, Mahatma

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869–1948)
was a major political and spiritual leader of
the Indian Independence Movement. He
was the pioneer of satyagraha—resistance
through mass civil disobedience founded
upon ahimsa (non-violence) becoming one
of the strongest philosophies of freedom
struggles worldwide. Gandhi is commonly
spoken of as Mahatma Gandhi. Gandhi first
employed his ideas of civil disobedience in
the Indian struggle for civil rights in South
Africa. Upon his return to India, Gandhi
helped lead poor farmers and laborers to
protest oppressive taxation and widespread
discrimination. Leading the Indian National
Congress, Gandhi worked for the alleviation

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of poverty, the liberation of women, broth-
erhood, an end to untouchability and caste
discrimination and for the economic self-
sufficiency of the nation. However, Gandhi’s
work focused upon the goal of Swaraj—
self-rule for India. Gandhi famously led In-
dians in the disobedience to the salt tax
through the 400 kilometer (248 miles) Dandi
March, and in an open call for the British to
Quit India in 1942. Gandhi remained com-
mitted to non-violence and truth even in
the most extreme situations. He was a stu-
dent of Hindu philosophy and lived simply,
organizing an ashram that was self-sufficient
in its needs. He made his own clothes and
lived on a simple vegetarian diet. He used
rigorous fasts for self-purification as well as
a means of protest.

Jackson, Michael

Michael Joseph Jackson (1958–2009) was an
American musician, entertainer and pop
icon, whose successful music career and
controversial personal life have been a part
of pop culture for the last quarter-century.
Throughout his four-decade career, Michael
Jackson has been awarded numerous hon-
ors including the World Music Award’s Best-
Selling Pop Male Artist of the Millennium,
American Music Award’s Artist of the Cen-

106
GLOSSARY

tury Award and the Bambi Award’s Pop Art-
ist of the Millennium Award. From 1988 to
2005, Jackson lived on his Neverland Ranch
property, on which he built an amusement
park and private zoo that was frequently at-
tended by disadvantaged and terminally ill
children. Rumors of sleep-over parties re-
ceived disparaging media coverage after it
was revealed that children frequently slept
in his bed or bedroom. These first came to
light when he was accused of child sexual
abuse in 1993. Michael Jackson’s relation-
ship with children was brought into the
spotlight again in 2003 during the TV
documentary Living with Michael Jackson.
This resulted in Jackson being tried, and
later acquitted, of child molestation allega-
tions and several other charges in 2005.
Jackson died in June 2009 from a cardiac
arrest.

Jagger, Mick

Sir Michael Philip Mick Jagger (1943–) is an
English rock musician, actor, songwriter, re-
cord and film producer, and businessman.
He is best known as the lead singer of the
rock ‘n’ roll band The Rolling Stones.

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Jung, Carl Gustav

Carl Jung’s approach to psychoanalysis had
a strong impact on my understanding of
psychoanalysis. The first text I was reading
by Jung was a rather esoteric essay, Relig-
ious and Psychological Problems of Al-
chemy, and it showed me the depth of
Jung’s research into even highly esoteric
topics.

Soon I became aware that Jung was going
to cover that area that I found was missing
out in the other authors’ view upon the hu-
man psyche, that is, the spiritual dimension.
After having read Archetypes of the Collec-
tive Unconscious, The Myth of the Divine
Child and On the Nature of the Psyche, I
realized that for the first time, I had encoun-
tered something like holistic psychology.

Jung’s writings were also fruitful for my bio-
energy studies and my subsequent attempt
of a scientific vocabulary regarding the
cosmic energy field, which is ultimately
something like a systems approach to hu-
man emotions.

Krishnamurti, J. (K)

Jiddu Krishnamurti (1895–1986) was born in
a small village in south India. Soon after

108
GLOSSARY

moving to Madras with his family in 1909,
Krishnamurti was adopted by Annie Besant,
President of the Theosophical Society. She
was convinced that he was to become a
great spiritual teacher, and Reverend Char-
les Webster Leadbeater became his per-
sonal tutor. Three years later she took him
to England to be educated in preparation
for his future role. An organization called
The Order of the Star was set up to pro-
mote Krishnamurti’s anticipated role as a
World Teacher and Maitreya. In 1929, how-
ever, after many years of questioning the
destiny imposed upon him, Krishnamurti
disbanded this organization, turning away
all followers saying that: ‘Truth is a pathless
land, and you cannot approach it by any
path whatsoever, by any religion, by any
sect. Truth, being limitless, unconditioned,
unapproachable by any path whatsoever,
cannot be organized; nor should any or-
ganization be formed to lead or to coerce
people along any particular spiritual path.’
From that time until his death in February
1986 at the age of ninety, he traveled
around the world speaking as a private per-
son, teaching and giving talks and having
discussions. His aim was to set people psy-
chologically free so that they might be in
harmony with themselves, with nature and
with others. K taught that humanity has cre-

109
SOUL JAZZ

ated the environment in which we live and
that nothing can ever put a stop to the vio-
lence and suffering that has been going on
for thousands of years except a transforma-
tion in the human psyche. If only a dozen
people are transformed, it would change
the world. He used to call this transforma-
tion ‘psychological revolution.’

Krishnamurti maintained that there is no
path to this transformation, no method for
achieving it, no gurus or spiritual authorities
who can help. He pointed to the need for
an ever-deepening and acute awareness in
which the limitations of the mind could
drop away. K was a universal and cosmo-
politan mind. Although born of Indian par-
entage, he stated repeatedly that he had
no nationality and belonged to no particu-
lar culture of group. What he hoped his
audience would learn, he himself was the
living example for it, which is, in my view,
the only way a guru can legitimize himself
as a true leader. Only what is brought over
as incarnated can be shared, not what is
merely preached or lectured as true as it
may be.

Education has always been one of Krishna-
murti’s concerns. If a young person could
learn to see his or her conditioning of race,
nationality, religion, dogma, tradition, opin-

110
GLOSSARY

ion etc., which inevitably leads to conflict,
then they might become fully intelligent
human beings for whom right action would
be a natural way of life. K reasoned that a
prejudiced or dogmatic mind can never be
free.

During his life time K established several
schools in different parts of the world where
young people and adults could come to-
gether and explore this possibility further in
actual daily living. Krishnamurti said of the
schools that they were places where stu-
dents and teachers can flower inwardly. Be-
cause, schools are meant for that, not just
merely to turn out human beings as me-
chanical, technological instru-
ments—though jobs and careers are neces-
sary—but also to flower as human beings,
without fear, without confusion, with great
integrity. He was concerned to bring about
a good human being, not in the respect-
able sense, but in the sense of whole, un-
fragmented. He wanted the schools to be
real centers of understanding, of real com-
prehension of life.

Lennon, John

John Ono Lennon (1940–1980) was an
iconic 20th century English rock and roll

111
SOUL JAZZ

songwriter and singer, who gained world-
wide fame as the founder of The Beatles.
Together with Paul McCartney he was es-
tablishing a hugely successful songwriting
partnership—writing songs for The Beatles
and other artists. The Beatles revolutionized
rock music with their lyrics, instrumentation,
harmonies, and electronic effects. In his
successful solo career, Lennon wrote and
recorded songs such as Imagine and Give
Peace a Chance that became anthems of
their age. As so many truly enlightened
souls in our times of turmoil and political
fascism, he was assassinated. Wikipedia
now reports in addition that the Nixon ad-
ministration made an attempt to deport
Lennon from the US because Lennon’s pro-
active anti-war activities and that the FBI
admitted after Lennon’s death to have had
files on Lennon that the FBI resisted to de-
classify.

—The FBI assembled around 300 pages of files
on John Lennon in 1971–72, which was part of
President Nixon’s effort to deport Lennon from
the US, in order to silence him as a critic of the
war in Vietnam

It was only upon court action and twenty-
three years of litigation that a judgment by
the Court of Appeals of the 9th Circuit that

112
GLOSSARY

the Supreme Court of the United States re-
fused to revise, that the justice department
settled the issue and the FBI agreed to
completely declassify the documents.

— Jon Wiener, Gimme Some Truth: The John
Lennon FBI Files (1999). See also the site:
www.LennonFBIfiles.com

Mandela, Nelson

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (1918–2013) was
a former President of South Africa, the first
to be elected in fully representative demo-
cratic elections. Among opponents of
apartheid in South Africa and internation-
ally, he became a symbol of freedom and
equality, while the apartheid government
and nations sympathetic to it condemned
him and the ANC as communists and ter-
rorists. Following his release from prison on
11 February 1990, his embarking upon a
policy of reconciliation and negotiation
helped lead the transition to multi-racial
democracy in South Africa. Since the end of
apartheid, he has been widely praised, even
by former opponents.

Mandela has received more than one hun-
dred awards over four decades, most nota-
bly the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993. Mandela

113
SOUL JAZZ

has frequently credited Mahatma Gandhi
for being a major source of inspiration in his
life, both for the philosophy of non-violence
and for facing adversity with dignity.

McCartney, Paul

Sir James Paul McCartney (1942–) is an Eng-
lish singer, songwriter, and instrumentalist.
Following his departure from The Beatles,
McCartney launched a successful solo ca-
reer and formed the band Wings with his
wife, Linda McCartney. McCartney has also
worked on film scores, classical music and
ambient and electronic music. He has re-
leased a large catalogue of songs as a solo
artist, and has taken part in projects to as-
sist international charities. McCartney is
listed in The Guinness Book of Records as
the most successful musician and composer
in popular music history, with 60 gold discs
and sales of 100 million singles. McCart-
ney’s song Yesterday is listed as the most
covered song in history and has been
played more than 7,000,000 times on
American TV and radio.

114
GLOSSARY

Picasso, Pablo

Pablo Picasso (1881–1973) was a Spanish
painter and sculptor. One of the most rec-
ognized figures in 20th century art, he is
best known as the co-founder, along with
Georges Braque, of cubism. It has been es-
timated that Picasso produced about
13,500 paintings or designs, 100,000 prints
or engravings, 34,000 book illustrations and
300 sculptures or ceramics.

—Brigitte Leal, et al., The Ultimate Picasso
(2000), Hans L.C. Jaffe, Picasso (1996), Brassai,
Conversations with Picasso (1999), Henri-
Georges Clouzot, The Mystery of Picasso (DVD,
2003), Edward Quinn, Picasso: The Man and His
Work, Part 1 (1881-1937) and Part 2 (1938-1973),
New York: Art Series (DVD).

Since high school times, Picasso was for me
the incarnation of the artist-genius, a true
archetype. There was no other visual artist
who ever could trigger so many emotions in
me, and so much admiration, while I also
like Marc Chagall, Juan Miró, Salvador Dali
and many others. But on a simple human
level, Picasso was and is closest to my heart
and soul.

115
SOUL JAZZ

Picasso is known to have not shunned tradi-
tion, but to have surpassed it, as he was
able already at age 14 to paint like the old
masters, which led his father, a reputed
Spanish painter, to put the paintbrush in his
hands in that early age.

Picasso also was a man of courage, a true
hero in the good sense, a lover of nature, of
all that is authentic, honest, great and origi-
nal. As such, he was unwavering even when,
in the 1930s, he was threatened through
Hitler’s getting to power in Germany, and
his friends urged him to leave France and
emigrate to the United States, but Picasso
heroically resisted. He stayed despite the
danger, and nothing happened to him. And
Picasso knew why he did not want to settle
in the USA. If there was one country that
truly shunned Picasso, it was Uncle Sam’s
hero paradise. As Picasso was for a while a
member of the Communist Party, he was
not allowed a visa for entering the United
States of America.

Picasso also was a wonderful father; his
daughter Paloma Picasso became a film
star. She was the child of Picasso and
Françoise Gilot, a French painter. She grew
up wild, first in the relation Picasso-Gilot
when her father was living in the manor La
Galoise, and then with Picasso and his sec-

116
GLOSSARY

ond wife, Jacqueline Roque, in the villa La
Californie in Cannes, France. The photo-
graph of adolescent Paloma was taken by
the American photographer David Douglas
Duncan and published in the photo book
The Private World of Pablo Picasso.

—Donald Douglas Duncan, The Private World
of Pablo Picasso, New York: Harper & Brothers,
1958.

—There is an enormous amount of literature
and media about Picasso. See, for example,
Brassai, Conversations with Picasso (1999), Hans
L.C. Jaffe, Picasso (1996), The Ultimate Picasso
(2000), Henri-Georges Clouzot, The Mystery of
Picasso, DVD (1956), Edward Quinn, Picasso:
The Man and His Work, DVD, 2002.

Warhol, Andy

Andrew Warhola, better known as Andy
Warhol (1928–1987), was an American artist,
avant-garde filmmaker, writer and celebrity.
Warhol also worked as a publisher, music
producer and actor. He had experience in
commercial art, and was one of the foun-
ders of the Pop Art movement in the United
States in the 1950s.

117
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Personal Notes