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Fig & Flower Creative Workshops

Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015


Figure 1. Fig & Flower logo. Created by Fig & Flower, 2014.

Table of Contents

Project Overview

Project Documentation: Visual Storytelling Activity

25

Introduction & Project Goals

Ice-breaker: Animal Charades

26

Company Selection

Fig & Flower Content Stories I

27

Workshop Participants

Fig & Flower Content Stories II

29

Group Selection Experience

Activity Summary

31

Problem Statement

Final Reflections

32

Workshop Video

33

Project Plan: Warm-Up Activity

Ice-breaker: When is Your Birthday?

10

The Fig & Flower Feeling

11

Who Are Our Customers?

12

Appendix

34

Cool-down Activity

13

Removed Visual Storytelling Activity

35

Post-Activity Survey Template

36

Project Plan: Visual Storytelling Activity

14

Post-Activity Surveys

37

Ice-breaker: Animal Charades

15

Detailed Design: Warm-Up Activity

38

Fig & Flower Content Stories

16

Detailed Design: Visual Storytelling Activity

39

Cool-down Activity

17

List of Fig & Flower Content Cards

40

List of Fig & Flower Feeling Adjectives

41
42

Project Documentation: Warm-Up Activity

18

Consent Form Template

Ice-breaker: When is Your Birthday?

19

Consent Forms

43-46

The Fig & Flower Feeling

20

List of Tables & Figures

47-49

Who Are Our Customers?

22

Activity Summary

24

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Figure 2. Fig & Flower front counter. Authors image.

Project Overview

Introduction & Project Goals


Facilitating Creative Thinking is a class that introduces and applies concepts of
creative thinking for a non-designer group. Design Managers are tasked with
identifying an entity in need of such creative thinking and to develop a series of
workshops that introduces lateral thinking and activities. These activities will
ultimately help create the conditions for innovation within the entity.

Figure 3. Inside the Fig & Flower store. Created by Fig & Flower, 2014.

Project Goals:
Quickly apply the creative process to a defined problem within an entity.
Introduce lateral thinking to group participants as a series of exercises.
Diffuse creative thinking into the participants way of thinking and doing.
Use these activities as catalysts for future innovation within the entity.

Expected Outcome
It is expected that the chosen entity will use their new creative skillsets to not only
solve this projects stated problem, but to apply this knowledge to all facets of the
business.
Figure 4. Fig & Flower owners. Created by Fig & Flower, 2014.

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Figure 5. Natural makeup on display in the Fig & Flower store. Authors image.

Project Overview

Company Selection
Fig & Flower is an Atlanta-based online and brick-and-mortar retail store that sells natural beauty products such as makeup, skincare, and hair products. I chose this company
because it meets each of the criteria for recruiting companies for my final project.

Criteria for choosing a participating company:

Why I chose this criteria:

1. The company must be at least one-year-old.

1. Companies who are least one-year-old demonstrate a more mature type of behavior than that of a company who is one-month old.
Companies who are at least one-year-old are often struggling with legacy management styles but are still open and flexible enough o
develop and test ideas for improvement.

2. The company must already have a defined product and/or service offering.

2. A company who hasnt yet identified their product or service offering is not an appropriate company for this study because I am not
creating the business, but rather creating the conditions for improvement of existing processes.

3. T
 he company must clearly be in a growth transition; define by an inappropriate
management style and series of other related symptoms.

3. There are times when companies are in a comfortable part of their growth journey and dont see a reason to change or improve.
Companies who are in a clear growth transition exhibit symptoms related to an underlying management problem which is easier to
address as a Design manager.

4. The company must provide at least six people during each creative workshop.

4. Workshop groups of six or more participants will provide a better challenge for me as a facilitator, and more opportunity to practice
with a variety of participants.

5. The company must be available to work with me for the next six months.

5. I intend to use the participating company in this class as the company for my Final Project Study, which will end in June.

6. The company owner mus have an open-mind for improvement.

6. In order for any change to happen in an organization, it is easiest to implement change when the stakeholders at the top are on-board
and selling the message to the rest of the organization. It does not help the Design Manager if employees are on-board with change,
but the CEO is not.

7. The companys industry must align with my personal values and past experiences.

7. If I choose a company that does not align with my personal values or isnt relevant to what I like in life, I will not have fun and eventually
become disengaged.

Table 1
Criteria for Company Selection

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Project Overview

Workshop Participants

Sara

Rebecca

Taylor

Katie

Owner & Manager

Makeup Artist

Makeup Artist

Customer

Megan

Erin

Erin

Angela

Customer

Customer

Customer

Customer

Figures 613. Fig & Flower participant headshots. Authors images. Reprinted with permission.

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Project Overview

Group Selection Experience:


After deciding to work with Fig & Flower, it was important to build the appropriate
workshop group to work with. Fig & Flower consists of one owner/manager and
two employees, making the group quite small. But by adding three of their most
influential customers, the group grew to six people which ultimately was a perfect
size for the complex activities in each workshop.

Figure 14. Participants discussing creative activities. Authors image.

Concerning thoughts:
There was a chance that the combination of employees and customers would
cause confusion in some of the objectives of the workshops. As a facilitator, I made
sure to provide the right types of activities that benefited from both employee and
customer contributions.
Because of the problem statement (stated on the next page), it was identified that
there was tension among a few of the employees who had differing ideas of how the
Fig & Flower brand should be publicized. Therefore, the activities were designed to
ensure a positive environment that did not address any sensitive issues and open up
new lines of creative communication between the employees.
Figure 15. Fig & Flower skincare on display. Authors image.

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Figure 16. Facilitator smiling before the workshop. Authors image.

Problem Statement

Fig & Flowers brand is not clear to each


employee which is preventing them from
spreading a consistent message.
Consequently, it has been observed that when employees do create content related to
Fig & Flower, there is internal debate whether or not the content is appropriate for the
brand which turns into a conversation of blame rather than learning. This has caused an
environment that doesnt fully support trust, openness, and the freedom to create.

Figure 17. Fig & Flower skincare on display. Authors image.

PROJECT PLAN:
The Warm-Up Activity

Figure 18. Participants waiting for directions. Authors image.

Table 2

Warm-Up Activity

Ice-Breaker: When is Your Birthday?


Activity Purpose:
The ice-breaker was meant for participants to quickly introduce themselves to
one-another, break any mental barriers for creative potential, and to push
participants to step outside of their usual communication patterns.

Warm-Up Activity Guide: Ice-breaker: When is Your Birthday? A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The
Components of The Activity

Step

Time

Instructions

Activity
Instructions

1 min.

Facilitator announces instructions of the


Ice-Breaker activity.

When is Your
Birthday?

5 min.

Participants will make a single-file line of


birthdays from youngest to oldest (month/
date/year) without using words or writing.

Reflection

2 min.

Discuss which parts of the activity were easy,


difficult, what you learned, and why.

Activity Details:
Participants were asked to work as a team to identify what each others birthdays
were, and arrange into a line of youngest to oldest by month/date/year...without
speaking or writing a word. This required participants to step outside of their comfort
zones when it came to everyday communication. Once participants discovered the
proper order, there was a short reflection period to discuss which parts of the activity
were easy, which parts were difficult, and why.

Supplies & Resources:


To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Consent Forms.
Camera for photo and video documentation.

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8 min.

Table 3

Warm-Up Activity

The Fig & Flower Feeling


Activity Purpose:
The Fig & Flower Feeling activity was meant for participants to begin opening their
mind to the possibilities of the feeling of the Fig & Flower brand. Although a few
of the participants had already thought of their own words, this activity provided a
safe and collaborative space to work together towards an aligned vision of the brand

Warm-Up Activity Guide: The Fig & Flower Feeling. A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The Components of
The Activity

Step

Time

Instructions

Activity
Instructions

2 min.

Facilitator announces instructions of the


Fig & Flower Feeling activity.

Partner Up

1 min.

One employee and one customer gather as


partners.

Feeling Cards

5 min.

Write a word that describes the feeling of Fig


& Flower on a notecard. Keep writing words
on notecards for five minutes.

Present Feelings

5 min.

Present to the group which feelings were


created, which work well, and which dont for
the Fig & Flower brand.

feeling. This activity also provided an opportunity for employees to collaborate with
customers to express the feeling of the brand.

Activity Details:
Participants were asked to partner up with a group dynamic of one employee and
one customer as partners. The activity consisted of partners working together to
write words on notecards of how they aspirationally felt about the Fig & Flower
brand. This included words such as Fresh or Sophisticated, which were discussed
in the Present Feeling portion of the activity.

Supplies & Resources:


To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Notecards.
Writing utensils.
Camera for photo and video documentation.

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13 min.

Table 4

Warm-Up Activity

Who Are Our Customers?


Activity Purpose:
The Who Are Our Customers activity was meant for participants to begin thinking
about customers on a more intimate level and to learn the basics of creating
personas for their business. Not only were employees able to create personas, they
had the opportunity to work with customers to validate each personas details.
Activity Details:

Warm-Up Activity Guide: Who Are Our Customers? A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The Components of
The Activity

Step

Time

Instructions

Activity
Instructions

2 min.

Facilitator announces instructions of the


Who Are Our Customers? activity.

Assign Personas

1 min.

Participants are given an opportunity to


switch partners and are then assigned a
persona.

Customer Activity

10 min.

Partners will write characteristics and details


on post-it notes and post them on the
persona template.

Present Personas

5 min.

Introduce to the group who your persona is


and what details you came up with.

Participants were given the opportunity to switch partners (so as to be dynamic


with the group energy). Each partner group was provided with a previously-created
persona template and worked together towards defining the details of their assigned
persona. Details were not predetermined and each partner group was challenged to
come up with a variety of details.
18 min.

Examples of persona details that were given to participants:


How did she discover Fig & Flower for the first time?
How much money does she make annually?
What is personal fashion style?
What does she like about Fig & Flower?
What does she not like about Fig & Flower?
What are some interesting things about her?
Supplies & Resources:
To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Persona template.
Post-its and writing utensils.
Camera for photo and video documentation.

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Table 5

Warm-Up Activity

Warm-Up Activity Guide: Cool-Down. A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The Components of The Activity

Cool-down
Activity Purpose:

Step

Time

Instructions

Activity Review

5 min.

Discuss the experience of each activity and


how they can be applied to business and
personal life.

Workshop
Feedback

5 min.

Fill out the post-activity survey and hand to


the facilitator.

The Cool-down activity was as a wrap-up of the entire workshop. It provided a few
minutes for group-reflection on each activity, which included what participants
learned and how they could apply this thinking to their business and personal lives.
At the end of the Cool-down, participants were asked to provide feedback on the
workshop and the facilitator.
10 min.

Supplies & Resources:


To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Post-activity survey.
Writing utensils.
Camera for photo and video documentation.

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PROJECT PLAN:
Visual Storytelling Activity

Figure 19. Participants drawing stories. Authors image.

Table 6

Visual Storytelling Activity

Ice-Breaker: Animal Charades


Activity Purpose:
This ice-breaker was meant for participants to loosen up and disconnect from their
daily thoughts, which allowed participants to raise their energy, open their creative
minds, and be ready for the rest of the workshop.

Visual Storytelling Activity Guide: Ice-breaker: Animal Charades. A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The
Components of The Activity

Step

Time

Activity
Instructions

1 min.

Facilitator announces instructions of the


Ice-Breaker activity.

Animal Charades

9 min.

Think of an animal. One-by-one, act out the


animal of your choosing and participants will
try to guess what you are.

Activity Details:
Participants were asked to think of an animal and not disclose the animal to the rest
of the group. The first participant acted out their animal and the rest of the group
tried to guess what they were. One-by-one, all other participants did the same until
all animals were guessed.

Supplies & Resources:


To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Consent Forms for any new participants.
Camera for photo and video documentation.

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10 min.

Instructions

Table 7

Visual Storytelling Activity

Fig & Flower Content Stories


Activity Purpose:
The Fig & Flower Content Stories activity was meant for participants to stretch
beyond their comfort zones in the realm of creating new user stories and content
types that are set in a variety of different and unexpected business situations. For
example, participants were presented with Customer type one with the card Blog

Visual Storytelling Activity Guide: Fig & Flower Content Cards. A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The
Components of The Activity

Step

Time

Instructions

Activity
Instructions

5 min.

Facilitator announces instructions of the


Fig & Flower Content Cards activity.

Partner Up

1 min.

Gather into partner groups, one employee


and one customer.

Select Cards

2 min.

Take one card from each of the categories and


begin crafting stories about how the customer
interacts with the Fig & Flower brand based on
chosen cards.

Create Your
Content

10 min.

Partners will work together to combine


all three cards and come up with as many
stories and content ideas as possible.

Present Content

5 min.

Partners will present their stories.

Select New Cards

2 min.

Take one card from each of the categories and


begin crafting stories about how the customer
interacts with the Fig & Flower brand based on
chosen cards.

Create Your
Content

10 min.

Partners will work together to combine


all three cards and come up with as many
stories and content ideas as possible.

Present Content

5 min.

Partners will present their stories.

article and Wedding season and challenged with coming up with a user story
based around this new content type.
Activity Details:
Participants partnered up with the dynamic of one employee and one customer.
Each team grabbed three cards from each category listed below, and used the cards
as influencers of their new user stories and content ideas related to the Fig & Flower
brand.
Card Categories:
Content types: events, blog articles, pictures, tweets, products, and services
Customer types: customer one, customer two, and customer three (identified
from the previous Warm-Up activity.
Wild cards: holidays, special occasions, retail seasons, food ingredients, local
Atlanta venues, weather patterns, money price-ranges, telecommunication
devices, etc.

Supplies & Resources:


To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Content cards.
Large memo-paper and writing utensils for idea notes.
Camera for photo and video documentation.
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40 min.

Table 8

Visual Storytelling Activity

Cool-down
Activity Purpose:
The Cool-down activity was a wrap-up of the entire workshop. It provided a few

Visual Storytelling Activity Guide: Cool-Down. A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The Components of The
Activity

Step

Time

Instructions

Activity Review

5 min.

Discuss the experience of each activity and


how they can be applied to business and
personal life.

Workshop
Feedback

5 min.

Fill out the post-activity survey and hand to


the facilitator.

minutes for group reflection on each activity, which included what participants
learned and how they could apply this thinking to their business and personal lives.
At the end of the Cool-down, participants were asked to provide feedback on the
workshop and the facilitator.
10 min.

Supplies & Resources:


To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Post-activity survey
Writing utensils
Camera for photo and video documentation

17 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

PROJECT DOCUMENTATION:
Warm-Up Activity

Figure 20. Participant drawing Fig & Flower feeling word on index card. Authors image.

Warm-Up Activity

Ice-breaker: When is Your Birthday?


The Experience:
When I explained the activity to participants, one of them participated in this activity
in a previous workshop, so they were excited to try it again. A few other participants
already knew the birthday of a couple other participants, which helped them during
the activity. I noticed a few different communication styles during this activity:

Figure 21. Participants listening to activity directions. Authors image.

1. Leaders: There were two leaders who determined the communication style, which
was using their hands and fingers to figure out months and dates of birthdays.
2. Followers: Followers were very good at observing and listening to the
communication cues from leaders and the helper. They quickly understood the
leaders prompts and took their place in the line.
3. Helper: There was one helper who noticed some followers not understanding the
initial mode of communication, so they changed the communication so the follower
would understand and eventually find her place in the line.

Figure 22. Participants figuring out each others birthdays. Authors image.

Activity Takeaways:
Participants were very pleased with themselves when I told them they were the
fastest group Ive ever worked with. I noticed that this was a perfect activity to get
the participants moving around together and problem solving in an unconventional
non-verbal way.

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Figure 23. More participants figuring our each others birthdays. Authors image.

Warm-Up Activity

The Fig & Flower Feeling


The Experience:
There were four groups of two people each, and when given the prompt to begin
thinking and writing down words for the Fig & Flower feeling, they talked amongst
their groups to bounce ideas off of each other. After about five minutes of talking,
the groups became silent and began working individually. This was an interesting

Figure 24. Participant looking over Fig & Flower feeling adjective list. Authors image.

observation, and ended up working out well as we were able to get a variety of words
from each person. When the group was done writing, each person had an average
of 10 words. I asked each to choose two of their favorite words which really allowed
the group to narrow down the most important and quality words for the Fig & Flower
feeling. Participants spent about three minutes explaining both of their words.

I loved hearing what our customers thought


about us and how it really aligned with our original
intentions. Participant, 2015
Activity Takeaways:

Figure 25. Participant writing a Fig & Flower feeling on an index card. Authors image.

This activity was a great way to have participants open their minds to thinking
creatively. The list of words that was provided was a great way to get their creative
juices flowing. After using this list for a few minutes, they began coming up with
their own words to describe the Fig & Flower feeling. By the end, I noticed a few of
the participants became more confident in their creative thinking abilities.

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Figure 26. Finished Fig & Flower feeling cards on the floor. Authors image.

Warm-Up Activity

The Fig & Flower Feeling


Final words chosen by group:

Conscientious
Brave
Healthy

Community

Other words written down:

Independent

Pioneering
Pretty
Sincere
Natural

Safe

Humble

Warm

Informative

Chit chat

Fresh
Thoughtful

Figure 27. Final Fig & Flower feeling words. Authors image.

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Helpful

Friendly

Happy

Stylish

Organic

Energetic

Open

Clean

Local

Welcome

Earthy

Radiant

Playful

Successful

Cute

Comfortable

Peaceful

Innovative

Modern

Unique

Beautiful

Social

Warm-Up Activity

Who Are Our Customers?


The Experience:
During the activity, participants worked with a predetermined structure for filling out
their customer information. As a group, we discussed which customers we would
focus on and ended up choosing, Young professional, Mature woman, and New
mom. Each one of these customers were chosen because they are the main target

Figure 28. Participants writing customer expectations for the Fig & Flower brand. Authors image.

markets for the Fig & Flower brand. A specific question frame was provided to help
participants describe each customer type: My expectations of Fig & Flower, What
I actually experience at Fig & Flower, What I appreciate about Fig & Flower, and
What I want/need more of from Fig & Flower. Participants expressed that using
this framework made it easy for them to think of information about their customer
and how it related to the brand.

Activity Takeaways:
This activitys purpose was to introduce customer storytelling on a very surface level
so as to prepare participants for the deeper visual storytelling that was required for
the second workshop. Participants succeeded in telling rich stories for their customer
groups.
Figure 29. Participants discussing customer experiences at Fig & Flower. Authors image.

After the activity, participants expressed their insights about how they used to
design events because they thought it would be fun, and because of this activity, it
has taught them to design events from the customers point of view instead.

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Figure 30. Participants presenting final customer story to group. Authors image.

Warm-Up Activity

Who Are Our Customers?

Figure 31. Final customer profile for New Mom. Authors image.

Figure 33. Final customer profile for Mature Woman. Authors image.

Figure 32. Final customer profile for Young Professional. Authors image.

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Warm-Up Activity

Activity Summary
Overall Experience:
Overall, the experience was very rewarding for me as a facilitator, and participants
expressed that the workshop was rewarding for them as well. I expressed that the

PA R T I C I PA N T F E E D B AC K

I enjoyed learning a more creative/


integrative approach to thinking.

intent of the workshop was to introduce creative thinking concepts to the group,
resulting in low participant expectations. When the workshop was finished, they
were very satisfied with the fidelity of activities and understood that the next
workshop would delve deeper into creative thinking concepts.

Overall Takeaways:

I experienced a great sense of


community during the workshops.

One of the biggest takeaways from the Warm-Up activity was the realization of how
I could better utilize my time as a facilitator. Consequently, I was able to alter the
Visual-storytelling activity to make it more appropriate for reflection-time among
participants.

I love that we got real ideas that are


worth implementing.

I wish we had a more complete recap,


but we ran out of time.

I wish we had additional time


for brainstorming.

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PROJECT DOCUMENTATION:
Visual Storytelling Activity

Figure 34. Participants storyboarding customer experiences. Authors image.

Visual Storytelling Activity

Ice-breaker: Animal Charades


The Experience:
I didnt expect participants to get so into this activity as it can seem intimidating at
first. However, participants expressed their satisfaction of this activitys ability to
open them up even more to working with each other without creative limitations.
Figure 35. Participant acting out a bear. Authors image.

I swear I thought she was a turtle. Its amazing that


someone else guessed Armadillo because we would
have been guessing forever. Participant, 2015

Activity Takeaways:
Because of the Warm-Up workshop that was conducted a week earlier,
participants were much more open to doing the animal charades. If not for the first
workshop, I believe participants wouldnt have been comfortable enough to move
around and act so silly.
Figure 36. Participant acting out an elephant. Authors image.

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Figure 37. Participant acting out a bird. Authors image.

Visual Storytelling Activity

Fig & Flower Content Stories I


The Experience:
This activity consisted of two groups of participants pulling one card from each
category: customer card, content card, and wild card. Groups started by writing a
detailed story of how the three cards could be combined into something useful for
future design. As a facilitator, I encouraged them to focus only on the story and not

Figure 38. Participant writing a customer story based on Fig & Flower cards. Authors image.

business ideas yet. Participants wrote out detailed stories and then were prompted
to use another sheet of paper to tell the same story in a visual way using keyframes
and stick-figure people.

Drawing out our story helped us simplify


it quite a bit. Its better now! Participant, 2015
Activity Takeaways:
This activity taught me that I had an ability of using my intuition to change the
activity as I saw participants responding in a certain way. Originally, I was only
going to have them write detailed stories to get them used to thinking deeper about

Figure 39. Participant presenting their visual story to the group. Authors image.

stories. Throughout the activity, I understood that they were catching on to the
concepts a lot easier than I originally thought, so I changed the activity to involve
deeper visual storytelling techniques while still keeping the proper time.

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Figure 40. Participants presenting their visual story to the group. Authors image.

Visual Storytelling Activity

Fig & Flower Content Stories I

GROUP 1
Cards Chosen
Customer: Teenager
Content: New Service Offering
Wild card: Coconut Oil Ingredient

GROUP 2

Wild card: Fall Season


Cards Chosen
Customer: Baby
Content: Conference Talk
Wild card: New Years Season

Figure 41. Final Group 1 customer story and storyboard. Authors image.

Figure 42. Final Group 2 customer story and storyboard. Authors image.

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Visual Storytelling Activity

Fig & Flower Content Stories II


The Experience:
This part of the activity focused less on telling stories and more on using the prompt
cards for Fig & Flower ideas that they could potentially implement. I encouraged
participants to use their skills of detailed storytelling to tell the story in their mind or
through group discussion, and use these stories to inform product/service/content

Figure 43. Participants discussing their cards while writing a customer story. Authors image.

ideas for Fig & Flower.

I never even thought about teenagers coming


in here because Im not one; theyre not in my
daily thought process. But I was really excited
to design for them. Participant, 2015
Activity Takeaways:
This activity taught me that, as a facilitator, I was able to instill a level of confidence
in each participants creative abilities. Consequently, the energy in the room was

Figure 44. Participants drawing out their customers storyboard. Authors image.

very high, and they continued to create amazing and fun concepts.

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Figure 45. Participants presenting their final storyboard to the group. Authors image.

Visual Storytelling Activity

Fig & Flower Content Stories II


GROUP 1
Cards Chosen
Customer: Gay Male
Content: Workshop
Wild card: Rainy Day

Cards Chosen
Customer: Young Professional
Content: Picture Gallery
Wild card: Humid Day
GROUP 2

Cards Chosen
Customer: Straight Male

Cards Chosen

Content: Hosted Event


Wild card: iPhone

Customer: Mature Woman

Wild card: Cocoa

Content: New Product


Wild card: Mothers Day
Cards Chosen

Figure 46. Final Group 1 Fig & Flower ideas. Authors image.

Customer: Informed Customer


Content: Blog Article
Wild card: Hot Day

Figure 47. Final Group 2 Fig & Flower ideas. Authors image.

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Visual Storytelling Activity

Activity Summary
Overall Experience:
I was very happy with the visual-storytelling activity. I was unsure how participants

PA R T I C I PA N T F E E D B AC K

Thinking about things from someone elses


perspective helped us create more ideas.

would understand and respond to the storytelling activities. I believe, because of


my empathy and preparation around Fig & Flowers problems, the activities were
very easy to understand and highly valuable for all participants. The results of each
activity will give Fig & Flower the creative thinking skills and lots of ideas to move
forward with in the future.

It was helpful to think laterally instead of


linearly. Im very linear in my thinking.

Overall Takeaways:
The biggest takeaway after the visual-storytelling activity was a theme of
Confidence. I received validation that my activities were appropriate for the intent
of each workshop and provided lots of value for each participant, which gave me
more confidence as a facilitator. I also realized that it is my job to instill the same
confidence in each participant so it can continue to be an open environment that is
free from judgment and creative blocks.

This type of thinking is not the type of


thing that I do in my day-to-day life, so
it was a bit of a stretch.

The cards gave us a parameter to work within.


When people are like Brainstorm, go! Its
just, too much.

I liked having a semi-guided brainstorm ideas


session where we were given little things that might
be parts of our customers experiences.
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Final Reflections

Facilitating creative thinking was


an exciting challenge for me.

Although I enjoyed each activity and am satisfied with the direction these workshops took
towards addressing the initially stated problem, there are a few things I need to practice:
1. Time Management
It will be important that I practice better time management in the planning of each
activity, as well as adhering to the time intervals of each activity during the workshops.
2. Documentation
It is imperative that I pay attention to documenting the process more efficiently in future
workshops. Although I had help, I realized I needed to write down clear and concise
standards for photo and video documentation.
3. Confidence
I realize, as a facilitator, confidence will come with time and practice. With the
combination of practicing time management, documentation, and facilitating more
workshops, I will be able to build my confidence over time.

Workshop Video

Fig & Flower Workshop Documentation


This video gives an overview of the activities covered in DMGT 732,
Facilitating Creative Thinking, Winter 2015, with Professor Regina
Rowland, Ph D.
Producer: Lauren Peters
Participants: Fig & Flower Owner, Employees, and Customers
Music: Morning Story by Music For Alarm Apps, 2011 (Purchased 2015)
Video URL: https://vimeo.com/121566712
Password: DMGT

Figure 48. Fig & Flower video screenshot. Authors image.

33 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

APPENDIX

Figure 48. Facilitator conducting final participant feedback interviews. Authors image.

Appendix

Removed Visual Storytelling Activity

Figure 7. Visual Storytelling Activity Guide: Hello. Im Fig & Flower. A step-by-step plan to organize

Visual Storytelling Activity

the components of the activity.

Hello. Im Fig & Flower


Step

Time

Activity
Instructions

9 min.

Team Up

1 min.

Brand
Personification

32 min.

Present Brands

10 min.

Activity Purpose:
The Hello. Im Fig & Flower activity will introduce participants to a structured

Instructions
Facilitator announces instructions of the
Hello. Im Fig & Flower activity.

framework for identifying their brand in the point-of-view of the brand itself. This is
intended for participants to have an aligned and objective view on what the brand
stands for as well as being able to apply this personification to all parts of the brands

Participants will get into two groups of three.

content and delivery.

Activity Details:
Participants will be given a Brand Identity Framework, and in two-groups of
three, they will work together to populate the framework. When they are finished
populating the framework, the group will share and iterate their framework
outcomes.

52 min.

Brand Identity Framework Components:


Brand heritage.

Brand personality.

Brand offering.

Brand values/beliefs.

Brand audience.

Brand mission on Earth.

Brand benefits.

Brand vision.

Supplies & Resources:


To complete the activity above, the following supplies were used:
Brand Identity Framework template.
Post-its and writing utensils.
Camera for photo and video documentation.

Figure 1A. Visual-storytelling Activity that was removed because of time constraints. Authors image.

35 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

In four-minute increments, collaboratively


fill-out the Fig & Flower Brand Identity
framework.

Teams will present their framework to each


other and discuss/iterate their outcomes.

Appendix

Post-Activity Survey Template

Post-activity Survey
Fig & Flower Creative Thinking Workshop | Facilitator: Lauren Peters

What I expected from this workshop:

What I experienced from this workshop:

What I appreciate about this experience:

What I would like to have more of:

Figure 2A. Post-Activity Survey template. Authors image.

36 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

Post-Activity Surveys

Figure 3A. Three Post-Activity surveys filled out by participants. Authors image.

37 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

Detailed Design: Warm-Up Activity


Date/Time

February 1, 2015
10:00am10:08am
(8 min.)

Intent

Steps

Materials

Setup

Whats Your Birthday?


Participants will stretch
communication comfort-zones
and break any mental barriers for
creative potential.

Facilitator announces instructions of the Ice-Breaker activity.

Consent Forms (6).


Camera for photo and video
documentation.

Move center-display tables to


the front of the retail space,
so that there is room in the
middle of the room.

Notecards.
Writing utensils.
Camera for photo and video
documentation.

Group will sit on the floor


in a circle with a large piece
of paper in the middle for
brainstorming work-space.

Persona templates (3).


Post-its and writing utensils.
Camera for photo and video
documentation.

Group will sit on the floor


in a circle with a large piece
of paper in the middle for
brainstorming work-space.

Post-activity surveys (6).


Writing utensils.
Camera for photo and video
documentation

Group stands in a circle


around the white paper on
the floor to get their blood
moving.

Participants will make a single-file line of birthdays from youngest to oldest (month/date/
year) without using words or writing.
Discuss which parts of the activity were easy, difficult, what you learned, and why.

10:09am10:22am
(13 min.)

The Fig & Flower Feeling


Provide a safe and collaborative space
to work together towards an aligned
vision of the brand-feeling as well as

Facilitator announces instructions of the Fig & Flower Feeling activity.

to collaborate with customers.

Write a word that describes the feeling of Fig & Flower on a notecard. Keep writing words on
notecards for five minutes.

One employee and one customer gather as partners.

Present to the group which feelings were created, which work well, and which dont for the
Fig & Flower brand.

10:23am10:41am
(18 min.)

Who Are Our Customers?


Begin thinking about customers on
a more intimate level and to learn
the basics of creating personas for
their business.

Facilitator announces instructions of the Who Are Our Customers? activity.


Participants are given an opportunity to switch partners and are then assigned a persona.
Partners will write characteristics and details on post-it notes and post them on the
persona template.
Introduce to the group who your persona is and what details you came up with.

10:42am10:52am
(10 min.)

Cool-down Activity
Acts as a wrap-up of the entire
workshop as well as time for group
reflection and discussion.

Discuss the experience of each activity and how they can be applied to business and
personal life.
Fill out the post-activity survey and hand to the facilitator.

50 min.
Table A1
Detailed Design: Warm-Up Activity

38 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

Detailed Design: Visual Storytelling Activity


Date/Time

February 8, 2015
9:00am9:09am
(9 min.)

9:10am10:30am
(1 hour, 20 min.)

Intent

Steps

Materials

Setup

Animal Charades
Participants will loosen up and
disconnect from daily thoughts,
raise energy-levels, and open their
creative minds.

Facilitator announces instructions of the Ice-Breaker activity.

C
 onsent Forms for any new
participants.
Camera for photo and video
documentation.

Move center-display tables to


the front of the retail space,
so that there is room in the
middle of the room.

Fig & Flower Content Cards


Stretch beyond comfort zones in the
realm of creating new user stories
and content types that are set in
an unexpected variety of business
situations.

(8 min) Facilitator announces instructions of the Fig & Flower Content Cards activity.

Content cards.
Large memo-paper (3) and
writing utensils for idea notes.
Camera for photo and video
documentation.

Group will sit on the floor


in a circle with a large piece
of paper in the middle for
brainstorming work-space.

Post-activity surveys (6)


Writing utensils
Camera for photo and video
documentation

Group stands in a circle


around the white paper on
the floor to get their blood
moving.

Participants break up into small groups. Think of an animal. One-by-one, act out the animal of
your choosing and participants will try to guess what you are.

Gather into partner groups, one employee and one customer.


(5 min) Take one card from each of the categories and begin crafting stories about how the
customer interacts with the Fig & Flower brand based on chosen cards.
(15 min) Partners will work together to combine all three cards and come up with a solid and
detailed story. Draw these stories on large memo paper in pictures.
(15 min) Partners will present their stories.
(2 min) Take one card from each of the categories and begin crafting stories about how the
customer interacts with the Fig & Flower brand based on chosen cards.
(20 min) Partners will work together to combine all three cards and come up with as many
ideas as possible.
(15 min) Partners will present their stories.

10:31am10:51am
(20 min.)

Cool-down Activity
Acts as a wrap-up of the entire
workshop as well as time for group
reflection and discussion.

Discuss the experience of each activity and how they can be applied to business and
personal life.
Fill out the post-activity survey and hand to the facilitator.

1 hour, 50 min.
Table A2
Detailed Design: Visual Storytelling Activity

39 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

List of Fig & Flower Content Cards

Customer Cards:

Winter

Argon

Young Professional

Wedding

Salt

New Mom

Back to School

Mature Woman

Prom

Weather:

Baby

Spring Cleaning

Dry

Teenager

Breast Cancer Awareness

Rainy

Gay male

Cold & Flu Season

Humid

Straight Male

Beach Season

Sunny

Informed Customer

Allergy Season

Overcast

Figure 4A. Fig & Flower content card combination. Authors image.

Cold
Content:

Special Occasions:

New Service Offering

Valentines Day

New Product

Christmas

Price Range:

Conference Talk

Birthday

Hosted Event

Mothers Day

$$

Blog Article

4th of July

$$$

Tweet

New Years

$$$$

Natural Ingredients:

Devices:

Cocoa

iPhone

Wild Cards:

Essential Oils

iPad

Retail Seasons:

Chamomile

Laptop

Spring

Coconut

Desktop

Summer

Shea

Landline Phone

Fall

Rose

Hot

Figure 5A. Fig & Flower content card combination. Authors image.

Picture Gallery
Workshop

40 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015


Figure 6A. Fig & Flower content card combination. Authors image.

Appendix

List of Fig & Flower Feeling Adjectives

Credible

Excitable

Hilarious

Playful

Smart

Adaptable

Coherent

Exuberant

Honorable

Majestic

Powerful

Soothing

Adorable

Confident

Mature

Professional

Strong

Adventurous

Cooperative

Modern

Stylish

Versatile

Agreeable

Courageous

Fabulous

Impartial

Motherly

Self-assured

Vintage

Alert

Credible

Fair

Industrious

Quiet

Sensitive

Vigorous

Alluring

Cultured

Fashionable

Instinctive

Quaint

Shrewd

Vivacious

Flirty

Impressive

Nice

Quirky

Silly

Ambitious

Sincere

Amusing

Fierce

Innovative

Natural

Appealing

Dashing

Formal

Inspiring

Nautical

Artistic

Daring

Faithful

Intense

Noisy

Radiant

Athletic

Dynamic

Fantastic

Inviting

Nostalgic

Rebellious

Dazzling

Fearless

Naughty

Reliable

Debonair

Frank

Bold

Discreet

Fresh

Jolly

Breathtaking

Dynamic

Friendly

Sophisticated
Splendid
Steadfast
Stimulating

Rustic

Obedient

Receptive

Old

Reflective

Tasteful

Organic

Relieved

Tranquil

Resolute

Talented

Responsible

Thoughtful

Painstaking

Righteous

Thrifty

Peaceful

Romantic

Tough

Lush

Perfect

Likable

Placid

Lively

Plausible

Sedate

Joyous

Funny

Busy

Royal

Skillful

Brave

Eager

Kind

Bright

Earthy

Generous

Knowledgeable

Eccentric

Gentle

Elegant

Good

Calm

Efficient

Glamorous

Capable

Enchanting

Graceful

Caring

Encouraging

Casual

Enduring

Lovely

Pleasant

Selective

Unconventional

Chic

Energetic

Happy

Productive

Scholarly

Unbiased

Creative

Entertaining

Loving

Hip

Protective

Secure

Unusual

Enthusiastic

Lucky

Charming

Harmonious

Proud

Serious

Urban

Cheerful

Excellent

Helpful

Punctual

Sleek

Upbeat

Figure 7A. List of Fig & Flower feeling adjectives. Authors image.

41 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

W
Whimsical
Wild
Warm
Willing
Wise
Witty

Boundless

Unique

Trustworthy

Wonderful

Y
Youthful

Z
Zany
Zealous

Appendix

Consent Form Template

Informed Consent Form


I voluntarily agree to participate in an interview/inquiry performed by students at the
Savannah College of Art and Design. I understand that this interview/inquiry is being
conducted by _______________________________, in order to identify the following
opportunities for design:
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________

I understand that the evaluation methods may include:

1. recorded (audio, video and/or photography) observations


2. my completion of an evaluation questionnaire
3. my potential participation in a 10 minute interview

I grant permission for the interview/inquiry to be recorded and transcribed, and to be used
only by _______________________________for analysis of interview data. I grant
permission for this datagenerated from the above methodsto be used in an educational
setting.

I understand that any identifiable information in regard to my name and/or company name
will be removed from any material that is made available to those not directly involved in
this study.

_________________________________ _________________________________
Printed Name
Signature
_______________________________________
Date

Informed Consent Form

Figure 8A. Informed Consent Form Template 1. Created by SCAD.

42 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Figure 9A. Informed Consent Form Template 2. Created by SCAD.

Appendix

Consent Forms

Figure 1011A. Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned by Author.

43 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

Consent Forms (Contd...)

Figure 1213A. Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned by Author.

44 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

Consent Forms (Contd...)

Figure 1415A. Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned by Author.

45 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

Consent Forms (Contd...)

Figure 1617A. Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned by Author.

46 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

List of Tables & Figures

Table 1
Criteria for Company Selection
Table 2
Warm-Up Activity Guide: Ice-breaker: When is Your Birthday? A Step-By-Step Plan
to Organize The Components of The Activity
Table 3
Warm-Up Activity Guide: The Fig & Flower Feeling. A Step-By-Step Plan to
Organize The Components of The Activity
Table 4
Warm-Up Activity Guide: Who Are Our Customers? A Step-By-Step Plan to
Organize The Components of The Activity
Table 5
Warm-Up Activity Guide: Cool-Down. A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The
Components of The Activity
Table 6
Visual Storytelling Activity Guide: Ice-Breaker: Animal Charades. A Step-By-Step
Plan to Organize The Components of The Activity
Table 7
Visual Storytelling Activity Guide: Fig & Flower Content Cards. A Step-By-Step Plan
to Organize The Components of The Activity
Table 8
Visual Storytelling Activity Guide: Cool-Down. A Step-By-Step Plan to Organize The
Components of The Activity
Table A1
Detailed Design: Warm-Up Activity

47 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

36

Table A2
Detailed Design: Visual Storytelling Activity

37

Figure 1.
Fig & Flower Logo. Created by Fig & Flower, 2014

Figure 2.
Fig & Flower front counter. Authors image

Figure 3.
Inside the Fig & Flower store. Created by Fig & Flower, 2014

Figure 4.
Fig & Flower owners. Created by Fig & Flower, 2014

Figure 5.
Natural makeup on display. Authors image

Figure 6-13.
Fig & Flower Participant Headshots. Authors images

Figure 14.
Participants mingling before the workshop. Authors image

Figure 15.
Fig & Flower skincare on display. Authors image

Figure 16.
Facilitator smiling before the workshop. Authors image

Figure 17.
Fig & Flower skincare on display. Authors image

Figure 18.
Participants waiting for directions. Authors image

Appendix

List of Tables & Figures

Figure 19.
Participants drawing stories. Authors image

14

Figure 30.
Participants presenting final customer story to group. Authors image

23

Figure 20.
Participant drawing Fig & Flower feeling word on index card. Authors image

18

Figure 31.
Final customer profile for New Mom. Authors image

24

Figure 21.
Participants listening to activity directions. Authors image

19

Figure 32.
Final customer profile for Young Professional. Authors image

24

Figure 22.
Participants figuring out each others birthdays. Authors image

19

Figure 33.
Final customer profile for Mature Woman. Authors image

24

Figure 23.
More participants figuring out each others birthdays. Authors image

19

Figure 34.
Participants storyboarding customer experiences. Authors image

25

Figure 24.
Participant looking over Fig & Flower feeling adjective list. Authors image

20

Figure 35.
Participant acting out a bear. Authors image

26

Figure 25.
Participant writing a Fig & Flower feeling on an index card. Authors image

20

Figure 36.
Participant acting out an elephant. Authors image

26

Figure 26.
Finished Fig & Flower feeling cards on the floor. Authors image

20

Figure 37.
Participant acting out a bird. Authors image

26

Figure 27.
Final Fig & Flower feeling words. Graphics created by Author

21

Figure 38.
Participant writing a customer story based on Fig & Flower cards. Authors
image

27

Figure 28.
Participants writing customer expectations for the Fig & Flower brand. Authors
image

22

Figure 39.
Participant presenting their visual story to the group. Authors image

27

Figure 29.
Participants discussing customer experiences at Fig & Flower. Authors image

22

Figure 40.
Participants presenting their visual story to the group. Authors image

27

48 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Appendix

List of Tables & Figures

Figure 41.
Final Group 1 customer story and storyboard. Authors image

28

Figure 4A.
Fig & Flower content card combinations. Authors image

40

Figure 42.
Final Group 2 customer story and storyboard. Authors image

28

Figure 5A.
Fig & Flower content card combinations. Authors image

40

Figure 6A.
Fig & Flower content card combinations. Authors image

40

Figure 7A.
List of Fig & Flower feeling adjectives. Created by the Author

41

Figure 8A.
Informed Consent Form Template 1. Provided by SCAD

42

Figure 9A.
Informed Consent Form Template 2. Provided by SCAD

43

Figure 1011A.
Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned
by Author

43

Figure 1213A.
Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned
by Author

44

Figure 1415A.
Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned
by Author

45

Figure 1617A.
Informed Consent Forms filled out by participants. Provided by SCAD, scanned
by Author

46

Figure 43.
Participants discussing their cards while writing a customer story. Authors
image

29

Figure 44.
Participants drawing out their customers storyboard. Authors image

29

Figure 45.
Participants presenting their final storyboard to the group. Authors image

29

Figure 46.
Final Group 1 Fig & Flower ideas. Authors image

30

Figure 47.
Final Group 2 Fig & Flower ideas. Authors image

30

Figure 48.
Fig & Flower video screenshot. Authors image

33

Figure 1A.
Visual Storytelling Activity that was removed because of time constraints.
Created by the Author

35

Figure 2A.
Post-Activity Survey template. Created by the Author

36

Figure 3A.
Three Post-Activity Surveys filled out by participants. Scanned by the Author

37

49 | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Prepared by Lauren Peters | Winter 2015

Fig & Flower Creative Workshops


Prepared by Lauren Peters | Facilitating Creative Thinking | Winter 2015