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FACILITATING CREATIVE THINKING:

New Approaches to
the Long-Form Article
FACILITATOR

COURSE SECTION

PARTICIPATING ENTITY

PROFESSOR

Molly Blessington
KidsHealth

SCAD DMGT 732OL


Regina Rowland, Ph.D.

Figure 1. Photo of six hats aligned with project activities. Authors image.

Table of Contents
VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY

PROJECT OVERVIEW
The Project Goal .....................................................
The Expected Outcome .........................................
The Entity .................................................................
The Location ............................................................
The Participants ......................................................

3
3
4
4
5

Overview ................................................................
Activity in Progress ...............................................
The End Product ..................................................
Takeaways .............................................................
Suggested Improvements ..................................

20
21
22
28
29

PROJECT ACTIVITY PLAN

PROJECT ANALYSIS

The Defined Problem ............................................. 7


Warm-up Activity .................................................... 8
Visual Storytelling Activity .................................... 10
Cool-down Activity ................................................. 12

Workshop Assessment ........................................ 31

WARM-UP ACTIVITY
Overview ................................................................... 14
Activity in Progress ................................................. 15
The End Product ..................................................... 16
Takeaways ................................................................ 17
Suggested Improvements ..................................... 18

Peer-to-Peer Interaction ..................................... 33

APPENDIX
Detailed Design Plan (Warm-up) .......................
Detailed Design Plan (Visual Storytelling) .......
Obtaining Permission ..........................................
Collecting Feedback ............................................
Video Presentation ..............................................
References .............................................................
Tables .....................................................................
Figures ....................................................................

35
36
38
42
43
44
45
46

Figure 2. Photo of tablet device used to frame Table of Contents. Authors image.

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

The Objective
THE PROJECT GOAL

THE EXPECTED OUTCOME

As defined in the context of this course, knowledge acquisition involves complex


cognitive processes including perception, learning, communication, association, and
reasoning (Byrnes, 2009). Through a series of creative exercises, a group of non-designers
recruited from KidsHealth, were required to apply lateral thinking strategies to reshape
how they acquire knowledge.

As one can deduct from the project goals, the intent of both activities was
not to implement a solution to the problem. The outreach was far greater and
transformative in nature.

After communicating with the non-designer group, a problem was defined to serve as
a focal point for facilitation. The goal for the group was to generate a multitude of new
approaches that could potentially solve the defined problem.
For the purpose of this course, the facilitator was responsible for encouraging creative
exploration through a Warm-up Activity and Visual Storytelling Activity. Both creative
activities afforded participants the opportunity to think beyond traditional and
conventional ways of addressing the problem.

As design managers, we were tasked with the responsibility of facilitating


creative thinking strategies to enable our non-designer group to reconnect
with their inner child to nurture creativity and innovation. Through the
application of lateral thinking strategies, the overarching experience has the
potential to foreshadow future opportunities by empowering individuals to
think beyond more traditional, vertical pathways when faced with a problem.
As a result, the expected outcome was to truly explore the problem through
ideation an outcome that was met and exceeded expectations.

After partaking in both creative exercises, there was an opportunity to provide feedback.
Collecting feedback is important as it gauges the success of the experience from
the participants perspective and can be used as a barometer for measuring against
defined goals.

Figure 3. Photo of materials supplied at the onset of the Warm-up Activity. Authors image.

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

The Selection Process


THE ENTITY

THE LOCATION

KidsHealth is a non-profit organization located in Wilmington, DE. Established in 1992 as


part of The Nemours Foundation, KidsHealth is a pediatrician-led group dedicated to the
creation of user-friendly and reliable information about childrens health (Izenberg, 2014).

The site selected for both creative exercises was a conference room located
at the Applied Bank Center in Wilmington, DE. This location is considered a
second home to many of the participants who spend their days evolving the
KidsHealth brand.

In 1995, KidsHealth emerged with an online presence, more commonly referred to as


KidsHealth.org. To date, KidsHealth.org remains the most-visited online resource for
childrens health (Izenberg, 2014). In addition to the website, KidsHealth creates a wide
range of family oriented childrens health media products to name a few examples:
instructional health videos, pediatric-focused patient instructions, sequenced email
newsletters, patient texting programs, and interactive content linking.

Convenience and familiarity with the environment played a part in selecting


this location. Also, it was crucial to find a location that offered the amenities
that would set the stage for a successful execution of both exercises.
Some amenities offered at this location included: a long table to support
collaboration, comfortable chairs to keep the participants relaxed, and
ambient lighting to support the creative climate.

Overall, the experience of entity selection was relatively seamless. As an employee of


KidsHealth, direct contact was made with Dr. Neil Izenberg, Chief Executive and Founder.
Dr. Izenberg was very responsive to the idea, as well as the involvement of proposed staff
members.
Next steps, involved organizing a team most befitting to the project. Through informal
conversations with proposed team members, insights were gathered that led to defining
the problem. A follow-up email clearly defining the problem and outlining expectations
was circulated to the proposed group members. Some questions ensued, but the majority
responded with affirmation that theyd like to partake in the experience.

Figure 4. Photo of conference room prior to participants arriving for Warm-up. Authors image.

PROJECT OVERVIEW:

The Group Composition


THE PARTICIPANTS
After considering the overarching project and
weighting shared interests among KidsHealth staff
members, a group of 7 participants were recruited
from the Clinical, Editorial, and Business Development
teams. The approach to group composition employed
the underlying concepts introduced through the
context of reading, The Medici Effect (Johansson,
2006). By stepping into the intersection of disciplines,
the participants generated a multitude of new creative
approaches to the long-form article.

Figure 5. Photo of Michelle.


Authors image.

Figure 6. Photo of Debra.


Authors image.

Figure 7. Photo of Nicole.


Authors image.

Figure 8. Photo of Mary Lou.


Authors image.

Michelle

Debra

Nicole

Editorial Director

Product Manager/Editor

Senior Editor

Mary Lou, M.D.

Figure 9. Photo of Fiona.


Authors image.

Figure 10. Photo of Ryan.


Authors image.

Figure 11. Photo of Sean.


Authors image.

Figure 12. Photo of Molly.


Authors image.

Fiona

Ryan

Sean

Molly

Senior Medical Editor

All are potential creators and merely


need guidance and effort to realize that
potential. Weiner, 2000

Senior Editor

Manager/Partner Relations

Senior Editor

Group Facilitator

Project
Activity Plan

Figure 13. Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section. Authors image.

PROJECT ACTIVITY PLAN:

Activity Overview
THE DEFINED PROBLEM
According to research findings published in 2014 (Attention Span Statistics), evidence
supports the average human attention span is eight seconds a declining number by
four seconds from the year 2000. For research purposes, attention span is defined as the
amount of concentrated time on a task without becoming distracted (Attention Span
Statistics, 2014).
KidsHealth.org receives approximately a million visits each weekday from parents,
kids, teens, and educators (Izenberg, 2014). These visitors can access a large library,
which includes thousands of articles and other medically reviewed content like videos,
animations, illustrations, quizzes, polls, and slideshows. Due to the nature of healthrelated topics, many articles assume a long-form, in-depth content style. The staff at
KidsHealth have come to define this style as a multi-paginated (optimized for desktop)
and multi-scrolling (optimized for mobile) article of 3000+ words.
While KidsHealth is committed to optimizing long-form articles to increase learning
for users, the growing decline in attention span is a problem that confronts the
childrens health and parenting brand. The long-form article has always been an
integral part of the KidsHealth online offering reaching various audiences across
a multitude of platforms and devices. Some at KidsHealth suspect a new approach
to the long-form article can make inroads on attention span. Herein lies the problem
the group addressed: What new approaches to the long-form, article can KidsHealth
employ to increase learning, while delivering on the promise to engage, educate, and
motivate audiences?

Youve survived 9 months of pregnancy. Youve


made it through the excitement of labor and
delivery, and now youre ready to head home
and begin life with your baby. Once home,
though, you frantically realize you have no idea
what youre doing!
These tips can help even the most nervous
first-time parents feel confident about caring for
a newborn in no time.
 etting Help After the Birth
G
Consider getting help during this time, which
can be very hectic and overwhelming. While
in the hospital, talk to the experts around
you. Many hospitals have feeding specialists
or lactation consultants who can help you get
started nursing or bottle-feeding. In addition,

Figure 14. Sample of long-form KidsHealth article on tablet device (prototype


view). Adapted from A Guide for First-Time Parents, 2014, http://kidshealth.org/
parent/pregnancy_center/newborn_care/guide_parents.html. Authors image.

PROJECT ACTIVITY PLAN:

Warm-up Activity (An Object + An Object = A New Object)


OVERVIEW
The Warm-up Activity, An Object + An Object = A New Object, takes root in the elementary
mathematical operation of addition. It is intended to engage participants in a fun exercise
that helps them creatively interact with one another beyond the everyday exchange of
email. What differientiates this activity from a traditional icebreaker is the lateral twist at
the end strategically staged as a foreshadowing to the the next scheduled session, the
Visual Storytelling Activity.

PURPOSE
WHAT: This activity incorporates creative thinking, sketching, and peer interaction. To
initiate the activity, the facilitator instructs the participants to take a sheet of paper and
write down the name of an object that begins with the first letter of their last name. Next,
the participants draw the object. When finished, they fold the piece of paper and place it
in a hat located on the table in front of them.
WHY: The middle portion of the activity is intended to provide participants an opportunity
to collaborate with a partner to build confidence in creative thinking and drawing. After
each participant places their paper in a hat, they pass their hat to the person on their
right. Pairing with someone nearby, the participants form into small groups. The newly
formed groups combine the two unrelated objects to create an entirely new object. The
pair draw the new object and use creative thinking to name it and write a description.
Each pair of participants share their new object. After all objects are shared, the facilitator
introduces Edward De Bonos thinking strategies.

HOW: During the latter portion of the activity, the introduction to De Bono is
intended to set the stage for ideation during the Visual Storytelling Workshop.
Each hat is selectively chosen to represent the Six Thinking Hats (De Bono,
1990), a group discussion tool, implemented by De Bono. In addition to
aligning each hat with De Bonos color spectrum, the facilitator pasted a
sheet of paper with a description of the thinking mode beneath the brim. Each
participant takes a turn reading the description found in the hat they possess.
When the last person is done reading, the facilitator adds an interesting twist
to the activity. Each participant is asked to use a mode of thinking to reflect upon
the experience through a debriefing exercise. The defriefing brings closure to the
Warm-up session.

RESOURCES
Consent Forms (7)
Small pieces of paper (28)
Large sheet of paper
Pens (7)
Packs of Markers (7)
Packs of Crayons (7)
Video camera (1)
Hats (white, red, black, yellow, green, and blue)

PROJECT ACTIVITY PLAN:

Warm-up Activity (An Object + An Object = A New Object)


Table 1
Overview of Warm-up Activity Plan (Consolidated View)

STEP

TIME

INSTRUCTIONS

DEBRIEFING

Welcome & Consent

4 minutes

Welcome to this Warm-up Activity. Lets spend a few minutes


reviewing the consent form before diving into the creative exercise.

Overview

3 minutes

This activity takes root in the elementary mathematical operation


of addition. Its a fun exercise that will help you creatively get-toknow one another beyond the everyday work conversation.

After the activity is finished, a Debriefing exercise helps


participants reflect upon the experience. The exercise is
designed to be unconventional and highly, creative. It
reshapes the experience of providing feedback to a facilitator.

Think creatively

1 minute

Dig deep into you inner child, be creative and think of an object
that begins with the first letter of your last name. Write it down.

Sketch independently

3 minutes

Draw the object on sheet of paper. When youre done, fold and
place the paper in the hat appearing on your table.

Exchange collaboratively

1 minute

Pass the hat to the person on your right. In turn, open the sheet of
paper and pair the object with someone nearby.

Experience ideation

5 minutes

Working in pairs, combine the two unrelated objects to form a new


object. Draw, name, and write a description of the object.

Share innovation

3 minutes

When finished, each paired group will share their newly formed
object.

Introduce Six Hats

2 minutes

Starting with the person holding the white hat, each person will
read the description taped beneath the brim.

Debriefing

7 minutes

Using De Bonos six modes of thinking, lets create a persona


that consolidates our learning and provides feedback in an
unconventional way.

Wrap-up

1 minute

Thanks for your participation! Hopefully, you had fun and learned
something new. I look forward to our next workshop on 2/18.

The Debriefing begins by asking a participant to draw a largescale outline of a person intended to represent a KidsHealth
persona. Each participant evolves the persona by drawing
and writing responses to a series of directives aligned with
the new modes of thinking. Participants are encouraged
to have fun, while consolidating all that was learned and
experienced.

30 minutes

PROJECT ACTIVITY PLAN:

Visual Storytelling Activity (Six Hats & a Problem)


OVERVIEW
The Visual Storytelling Activity helps participants identify new approaches to the problem
and explore creative ways to potentially solve it. Through the application of lateral
thinking strategies, the group revisits the Six Thinking Hats (De Bono, 2007) to frame the
creative process.

PURPOSE
WHAT: To initiate the activity, the facilitator presents six easels to the group. Each easel,
combined with an easel pad, supports the evolution of new approaches. To provide a
visual connect to purpose, each easel is adorned with one of the colored hats introduced
during the Warm-up. Prior to beginning with the White Hat Activity, the facilitator directs
the groups attention to a dry erase board mounted in the room. The facilitator reads the
problem as stated on the board, which serves as a frame of reference for the ensuing
activities. After a brief introduction to the props, the facilitator presents guidelines for the
White Hat Activity.
WHY: Beginning with the white hat and ending with the blue hat, individual activities are
staged to facilitate various modes of thinking. The intent is to combine creative thinking
with material supplies to unveil new approaches to the problem. As reflective of the
mode, the creative experience is intended to reach a climax when the group engages
with the green hat. During this mode, participants are encouraged to break from the
conventional, long-form article and create a new approach to the KidsHealth article
framework. Each participant is given a sheet of paper with a border serving as the only
conventional element. Additionally, each participant is given other material supplies to
combine lateral thinking with incongruous elements to form an article storyboard.

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HOW: During the blue mode, the group uses the Ladder of Abstraction (Prather,
2010) to make the approaches from the green mode of thinking more actionable.
The following question serves as a staging ground for this process: How can this
approach become more actionable, while delivering on the promise to engage,
educate, and motivate audiences? The group is required to answer the How
three times for each storyboard to ladder down the idea to be more specific and
actionable. In addition to making the storyboards more actionable, this process
fosters an environment of refinement. After the Blue Hat Activity is finished, a
Debriefing Exercise and Cool-down Activity ensue.

RESOURCES
Easels (6)
Easel pads (6)
Hats (6)
Markers (7 packs)
Crayons (7 packs)
Gluesticks (7)
Scissors (7)

Small sheets of paper (21)


Post-it sticky notes (7)
Long-form article template (7)
Sheet with content types (14)
Blank paper (14)
Dry Erase Board

PROJECT ACTIVITY PLAN:

Visual Storytelling Activity (Six Hats & a Problem)


Table 2
Overview of Visual Storytelling Activity Plan (Consolidated View)

STEP

TIME

INSTRUCTIONS

Welcome

1 minute

Welcome and thanks for being a part of this workshop. Today, well
be using lateral thinking strategies to explore a defined problem.

Activity Overview

4 minutes

The goal for the group is to generate a multitude of new


approaches that could potentially solve the defined problem.

Defining the Problem

3 minutes

The defined problem is the long-form KidsHealth article, which has


been defined as 3000+ words.

White Hat Activity

5 minutes

Using the white mode of thinking, lets identify ideas that align with
what we know or need to know about the long-form article.

Red Hat Activity

4 minutes

Using the red mode of thinking, lets identify feelings, hunches, and
intuition that can help us further explore the problem.

Black Hat Activity

6 minutes

Using the black mode of thinking, lets create a web of judgment.


Record your ideas on Post-its, then well share and post to our web.

Yellow Hat Activity

4 minutes

The suns rays will provide a forum for each of you to share and
post ideas that reflect the yellow mode of optimism.

Green Hat Activity

9 minutes

Using the article sheet and materials supplied, lets create some
new approaches to the long-form article.

Blue Hat Activity

7 minutes

Using the article storyboards, lets address the How three times to
ladder down the idea to be more actionable and refined.

Debriefing

7 minutes

Applying De Bonos six modes of thinking, lets reflect upon the


experience and create some personas using paper cutouts.

Cool-Down & Closure

10 minutes

Creating memory cards, lets consolidate what was learned. Thanks


for your participation in this creative experience!

DEBRIEFING
After the activity is finished, a Debriefing helps participants
reflect upon the experience. Building upon the Warm-up
Debriefing, the exercise is designed to be unconventional
and highly creative. Once again, it reshapes the experience of
providing feedback.
At the outset, each participant is given a small-scale cutout
of a person intended to represent their KidsHealth work
persona. Each participant draws and writes in response to a
series of directives aligned with De Bonos modes of thinking.
Participants are encouraged to have fun, while consolidating
all that was learned. Upon completion, each participant
combines and discusses their personas while designing a
surrounding community.

60 minutes

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PROJECT ACTIVITY PLAN:

Cool-down Activity
OVERVIEW

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

A Cool-down Activity is organized to take place after the Visual Storytelling Debriefing.
While the Debriefing provides an opportunity to reflect upon the experience and offer
feedback, the Cool-down Activity provides a final creative opportunity to consolidate
acquired learning.

After partaking in the activity, expected outcomes will include:


The group will use verbal-visual associations to consolidate learning into
a collection of memory cards.
The activity will provide the non-designer group an experience beyond
convention.

PURPOSE
While the project parameters do not include a plan for implementation, closure is an
important part of making participants feel as though the experience is complete. So,
too, closing provides an opportunity to gauge what was learned and retained by the
participating group.

RESOURCES
Markers (7 packs)

Crayons (7 packs)

Small blank index cards

Using small cards, the group is asked to create a memory game to share with other
KidsHealth staff members unable to partake in the experience. Each participant creates 3
pairs of memory cards. Each pair includes a picture on one card that pairs with words on a
totally separate card. The picture and words highlight key takeaways from the workshop.
On the reverse side of each card, the participants are asked to draw the KidsHealth logo
a nice way to identify with the entity and bring closure to the session.

Figure 15. Illustration of memory cards prepared for Cool-down Activity. Authors image.

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Warm-up Activity

Figure 16. Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section. Authors image.

WARM-UP ACTIVITY:

Documentation
OVERVIEW

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

As defined in the Project Activity Plan, the Warm-up is an icebreaker that encouraged
participants to use creative thinking and drawing independently and within paired
groups. The goal was to foster creative exploration in an environment that allowed
participants to build confidence in drawing, while making verbal-visual associations with
identifiable objects. The participants were encouraged to have fun and invite humor into
the equation.

The outcomes that were met and exceeded expectations included:


The participants were inspired to draw with enthusiasm and confidence.
The activity motivated participants to think outside the box.
The group established a supportive environment of collaboration and open
communication with one another.
The experience served as a transitional gateway to the Visual Storytelling
Workshop.

ACTIVITY RATIONALE
Since the task at hand was to facilitate a creative exercise with a non-designer group, an
activity grounded in rudimentary arithmetic set the stage for ideation. The rationale was
to keep it simple while allowing participants to become comfortable in using creative
thinking to generate an idea that would materialize on paper with art supplies provided
by the facilitator.
As an aside: Having worked with the participants for quite a few years, the facilitator
knew the introduction of crayons and other art supplies within a conference room setting
would be an anomaly. Materializing on this knowledge helped shape the experience for
the non-designer group.
Figure 17. Sample of Warm-up Activity created by facilitator. Authors image.

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WARM-UP ACTIVITY:

Documentation
ACTIVITY IN PROGRESS
The excitement was evident from the moment the participants entered the room and
were greeted with an array of art supplies and six colored hats. Eager to use the supplies
placed on the table, the participants were asked to hold the excitement for a few short
minutes namely, to allow for a formal introduction and review of the consent forms. It
wasnt long before the activity ensued.
As planned, the particpants were instructed to draw an object that began with the first
letter of their last name. After a slight pause to consider possible options, the participants
began laughing and joking while drawing their objects. Some wore the colored hats
as they engaged in the creative experience. After placing their drawings in a hat and
swapping them with one another, collaboration reached a height when the participants
were paired and asked to create a new object. The relaxed climate nurtured creative
thinking for the duration of the activity.

Figure 18. Photo of Fiona and Michelle drawing their new object entitled hedgy basket. Authors image.

Figure 19. Photo of Ryan, Sean, and Debra drawing an object that begins with the first initial of their last name.
Authors image.

Figure 20. Photo of Debra and Mary Lou drawing


their object entitled goatscab. Authors image.

Figure 21. Photo of Michelle presenting the new


object, hedgy basket. Authors image.

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WARM-UP ACTIVITY:

Documentation
THE END PRODUCT
The participants created a fantastic collection of objects, which they were asked to
present in the form of an equation. The newly formed objects included the following:
skate + marble = skate-able
Skates with marbles placed in the wheels. As you skate, the marbles form a beat and
connect with your iPod to play music.
goat + scab = goatscab
A medical condition caused by a hipsters overzealous trimming of his goatee. Lesion is
characterized by superficial abrasion and crusting associated with generalized anxiety
about appearance.

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hedgehog + basket = hedgy basket


For your prickliest thoughts and secrets!

Figure 23. Photo of goatscab created by Mary Lou and Debra. Authors image.

Figure 22. Photo of skate-able object created by Ryan and Sean. Authors image.

Figure 24. Photo of hedgy basket created by Fiona and Michelle. Authors image.

WARM-UP ACTIVITY:

Documentation
TAKEAWAYS
As planned, the Debriefing provided a unique opportunity to offer feedback through
a shared activity. The group created a KidsHealth persona by using the six modes of
thinking to consolidate what was learned and experienced. Arms, legs, and other areas
were populated by the participants with hand drawn and written responses. It wasnt
long before the group became attached to the new persona.
When project planning, a physical attribute seemed to be a predictable finishing touch.
To the contrary, the final manifestation involved name selection. The group consensus
was Short-Form Phil a transformative name intended to set the stage for the defined
problem, the long-form article.
Based on the responses to the various modes of thinking, it was obvious the group
thoroughly enjoyed the Warm-up Activity. So, too, having the freedom to engage in lateral
thinking when giving feedback provided an experience well beyond the norm of a
conventional survey. The yellow mode of thinking seemed to encapsulate the experience
and summarized the Warm-up Activity with a breath of optimism. Some terms which
surfaced from the participants included: closeness, lightheartedness, positive energy,
inspired, brainstorm, and thumbs-up.

I normally dont like meetings where you have to stand-up and do


something, but I have to say movement equals engagement.
Debra, February 4, 2015

Good beginning!
Michelle, February 4, 2015

Figure 25. Photo of Debra drawing in the green mode of thinking. Authors image.

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WARM-UP ACTIVITY:

Documentation
SUGGESTED IMPROVEMENTS
While the experience of the Warm-up and Debriefing Activities was overwhelmingly
positive, here are some areas that could be adapted and improved. Most suggestions
apply to the Debriefing, also referred to as the Persona Activity.
Avoid the yellow marker. To further associate the color with the mode of thinking, markers
were appropriately paired and used. It became apparent during the course of the activity
that yellow marker can be difficult to read on white paper in particular, when reading
from a distance.
Allow more time for debriefing. The Debriefing was extremely well received. The
participants had fun reflecting upon the experience with creativity at the helm. While the
activity was completed in full, it would have been advantageous to provide additional
time to shape a more finished end product a product that includes more facial features,
accessories, etc.
Push beyond horizontal boundaries. Although the persona took shape on a sheet of
paper approximately six feet long, the participants tended to write and draw in confined
spaces on a horizontal axis. Encouraging participants to push beyond conformity and
allow themselves to freely fill the space both vertically and horizontally could further
enhance the experience.

This has started off really well, so I have high expectations.


Mary Lou, February 4, 2015

Well run!
Fiona, February 4, 2015

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Figure 26. Photo of KidsHealth persona created during the Debriefing. Authors image.

Visual Storytelling
Activity

Figure 27. Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section. Authors image.

VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
OVERVIEW

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

The Visual Storytelling Activity is designed to use the Six Thinking Hats (De Bono, 2007) to
frame the creative process. Using the various modes of thinking, participants engaged in
activities to explore the defined problem. The white, red, black, and yellow modes set the
stage for creativity to peak in the green mode. During the green mode, participants created
an article storyboard that visually depicts a new approach to the long-form article. After
the storyboards were created, the group used the Ladder of Abstraction (Prather, 2010)
during the blue mode to make the new approaches more actionable.

The outcomes that were met and exceeded expectations included:


The participants engaged in hands-on creative thinking exercises to explore
the defined problem.
The group acquired knowledge through lateral pathways.
The activity inspired a climate of ideation through peer-to-peer collaboration
and shared humor.
Multiple new approaches to solving the problem emerged from the
non-designer group.

ACTIVITY RATIONALE
Since the defined problem has many layers of complexity, the rationale was to keep
participants on track by using parallel thinking strategies. This approach was intended
to encourage participants to generate as many ideas as possible that align with
the appropriate mode. In theory, this rationale cultivates ideation and eliminates
controversy namely, since the ideas and ensuing discussion stay grounded in the facts,
feelings, and subject matter.

Figure 28. Photo of Molly reviewing the consent form with the group prior to the Visual Storytelling Activity.
Authors image.

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VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
ACTIVITY IN PROGRESS
From the outset, the participants were greeted with three activities to explore the longform article on parallel tracks. Ideas were recorded on sticky notes, then shared with the
group. Due to time constraints, the Yellow Hat Activity was slightly altered. However, the
change was seamless to the flow of the session.
As the group explored the green mode, the creative climate varied from those who were
overwhelmed with the task of designing a storyboard to those who embraced the task with
ease. The creative jitters settled as the group was informed there was no right or wrong
approach. All worked diligently as they amassed their ideas on paper. Cutting, gluing, and
coloring added a dimension of humor and comfort. When finished, the participants took
great pride as they shared their ideas. Laddering gave closure to the modes of thinking
and provided an actionable method of approaching the defined problem.
Figure 30. Photo of Sean drawing web of judgment for Black Hat Activity. Authors image.

Figure 29. Photo of Mary Lou, Debra, Nicole, and Ryan creating article storyboards. Authors image.

Figure 31. Photo of Michelle creating article


storyboard. Authors image.

Figure 32. Photo of Fiona writing on sticky notes


during Black Hat Activity. Authors image.

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VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
THE END PRODUCT: WHITE HAT
The White Hat Activity was designed to use sticky notes to share information known or
needed. To initiate the process, one of the participants drew a replica of a tablet device
on a large sheet of paper. In addition to providing a framework for the sticky notes, the
tablet was used to create a visual connect to purpose.
The sticky notes ranged from known facts to questions in need of further exploration.
One of the more relevant knowns defined the long-form article as it relates to KidsHealth
content as 3000+ words. As for information needed, a content inventory and baseline
metrics were among the ideas generated.
One of the participants shared some industry trends aligned with the defined problem.
The trends seemed to reflect a need for both content forms. Some of the more pertinent
trends included:
Attention span is on the decline.
Social blogging sites (i.e. Twitter) limit character counts lends itself to short-form
content snippets.
Google SEO (search engine optimization) seems to favor long-form content.
Some video sites are featuring 6-second clips to convey messaging.
Digital books are on the rise and offer a potential alternative for long-form content.

Figure 33. Photo of sticky notes posted to tablet during the White Hat Activity. Authors image.

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VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
THE END PRODUCT: RED HAT
At the outset of the Red Hat Activity, a participant drew an outline of a person on an
enlarged sheet of paper that would serve as a backdrop to the feelings, hunches, and
intuition recorded on sticky notes.
The responses shared by the participants offered a wide range of ideas including, but
not limited to the following:
People want to find what they need quickly. They dont need a history lesson.
People want immediate, specific information especially, when it comes to healthcare.
Most people are turned off by large chunks of text.
Cant compromise the voice of KidsHealth.
Longer format is not ideal on smaller, mobile devices.
Better consumer engagement, but at what risk to searchability?
Build engagement by adding videos, slideshows, etc.
Keep legacy articles, but change presentation (i.e. collapsible headers).
Low literacy level is a concern, which equates to a need for shorter-form articles.
There is a time and place for long-form articles (i.e. the newly diagnosed).
Create shorter content pieces that link together.
Incorporate more tools for reinforcement learning (i.e. quizzes, polls, etc.).
Short-form articles would provide stickiness and more return visitors.
Nothing beats a legacy article in Google long- or short-form.
Avoid replacing the long-form, but enhance it.
Long articles = too much reading.
Figure 34. Photo of sticky notes posted to person during the Red Hat Activity. Authors image.

23

VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
THE END PRODUCT: BLACK HAT
As the group transitioned to the Black Hat Activity, a participant drew a black web to serve
as a web of judgement. The group began to record ideas on sticky notes to differentiate
what is and isnt working for the long-form article.
Some ideas introduced by the group included:
Provides a sense of completeness and is comprehensive.
Ensures medical accuracy.
KidsHealth should make no judgments without baseline metrics.
One size doesnt fit all.
Provides a one-stop-shop for information.
People need all the facts to make informed decisions about their health.
Very little health information is medically reviewed online. KidsHealth long-form
articles provide free advice that is medically vetted a rare and valuable advantage.
No stickiness. Visitors read an article, then leave the site.
Provides better SEO (search engine optimization).

Figure 35. Photo of sticky notes posted to web during the Black Hat Activity. Authors image.

24

VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
THE END PRODUCT: YELLOW HAT
During the yellow mode of thinking, the activity was adapted in the interest of time. A
participant drew a sun with rays extending outward for the group to record ideas aligned
with brightness and optimism. An orange marker was used to make the drawing and
writing more visible.
As it turns out, the group enjoyed the departure from sticky notes when sharing and
posting ideas befitting the yellow mode of thinking. Some of the pertinent ideas, which
radiated from the defined problem included:
Provides comprehensive content.
Offers a whole-healthy perspective.
Establishes more personality and voice.
Supports the idea that depth = expertise.
Tells a story.

Figure 36. Photo of sun with ideas posted during the Yellow Hat Activity. Authors image.

25

VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
THE END PRODUCT: GREEN HAT
During the Green Hat Activity, the participants created an impressive collection of
storyboards. Using a sheet of paper with a border, the participants played the role
of designer selectively choosing how theyd like to present article content. Their
approaches built upon ideas suggested during the other modes of thinking. The final
storyboard collection ranged from abstract to more realistic.
As the participants presented their storyboards,
some suggested approaches that could
potentially heighten engagement and increase
learning included:
Feature a main video supported by collapsible
menus of multimedia content.
Construct a content framework dictated by
enhancement properties.
Create a main landing article that links to
standalone supporting articles.
Curate content into smaller, more digestible
articles with embedded rich media.
Consolidate content through collapsible menus
that users can search if a deep dive into more
in-depth content is desired.

Figure 37. Photo of storyboard created by Michelle.


Authors image.

Figure 38. Photo of storyboards created by participants during the Green Hat Activity. Authors image.

26

VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
THE END PRODUCT: BLUE HAT
The Ladder of Abstraction (Prather, 2010) was used during the blue mode of thinking to
make the storyboards more actionable. Unfortunately, time only supported laddering
down one of the approaches. However, the abstract pathway resulted in a concrete
method of actionability best summarized as resource allocation. This idea was further
expanded to suggest organizing an interdisciplinary team that meets regularly to ensure
new approaches to the long-form article are properly implemented.
To initate the laddering down process, a
selected storyboard was moved to the
topmost opening of the ladder. To reflect
the downward penetration toward a
more actionable outcome, arrows with
responses from the group to the question
How? were placed in the three open
spaces. As the final leg of the visual
storytelling experience, this activity
communicated a clear pathway from
abstraction to a more concrete method
of actionability.

Figure 39. Selected storyboard used during the Ladder of


Abstraction. Authors image.

Figure 40. Photo of Ladder of Abstraction using the blue mode of thinking.
Authors image.

27

VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
TAKEAWAYS
Framing the experience with the Six Thinking Hats (De Bono, 2007) was extremely
effective in establishing lateral pathways of creative exploration. Each mode of thinking
encouraged the group to dissect the problem into digestible chunks of information.
Throughout the workshop, the participants were engaged and adapted well to the
various modes of individual and group interaction.
As reflective of the feedback received during the Persona Activity, the tactile experience of
creating an article storyboard was a welcomed challenge. So, too, the participants duly
noted collaboration combined with creativity were positive attributes of the experience.
Eye-opening, a descriptor appearing on multiple personas, seemed to capture the
essence of the workshop. Participants expressed interest in continuing the conversation
beyond the completed session. As the facilitator, this request was eye-opening and
unanticipated, but a welcome challenge to pursue in the weeks to come.

People are invested in how this turns out.


Michelle, February 18, 2015

Total engagement!
Debra, February 18, 2015

Figure 41. Photo of personas created by participants during the final Debriefing Activity. Authors image.

28

VISUAL STORYTELLING ACTIVITY:

Documentation
SUGGESTED IMPROVEMENTS
While the Visual Storytelling and Debriefing Activities were successful in achieving the
defined project goals, here are some suggested improvements to consider.
Allow more time for discussion. As a novice to facilitation, it was challenging to gauge time
when framing the Project Activity Plan. During the actual workshop, some discussions
needed to be tabled due to time constraints.
Adapt to the surrounding environment. During the prior session, the physical space of the
conference room felt somewhat confining. While this fostered a close-knit community, a
substition was made for the easels namely, to avoid a tripping hazard. The combination
of large sheets of paper and colored hats were hung from the walls on magnetic hooks.
As reflective of the experience, the adaptation supported a more comfortable climate of
ideation.
Schedule Warm-up and Visual Storytelling sessions together. Following the weeks
designated in the course outline, the activities were scheduled on two separate days. In
retrospect, the creative energy that emerged during the Warm-up would have benefited
the Visual Storytelling Activity if they occurred on the same day.

Figure 42. Photo of Nicole during Persona Activity. Authors image.

Insightful. Fun. Wish we had more time!


Nicole, February 18, 2015

Excellent!
Sean, February 18, 2015

Figure 43. Photo of Sean during Red Hat Activity.


Authors image.

Figure 44. Photo of Mary Lou presenting an article


storyboard. Authors image.

29

Project Analysis

Figure 45. Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section. Authors image.

PROJECT ANALYSIS:

Workshop Assessment
LESSONS LEARNED
Being afforded an opportunity to facilitate the creative sessions, equating to a full
Workshop, was a truly rewarding experience. The group successfully engaged in the
activities with creativity, humor, and insight. While there was some initial concern during
the Warm-up, as to how the group would react when presented with an icebreaker that
required drawing, the response was extremely positive both visually and verbally.
This was a lesson well learned as it eliminated preconceived notions and affirmed the
positive attributes of facilitating an experience with non-designers.
Much time and effort went into project planning, which paid dividends when facilitating
the experience. In retrospect, an unexpected lesson learned was to be ready to adapt
to the unforeseen. The morning of the scheduled Warm-up session, there was a
cancellation from a participant due to sickness. A back-up plan was quickly devised,
which offered two alternatives: 1) recruit another participant or 2) regroup the
participants for the activity. As luck would have it, another participant volunteered to
partake in the session a testament to the wonderful personalities of KidsHealth.

Figure 46. Photo depicting the development of the newly formed object entitled goatscab during the Warm-up.
Authors image.

After orchestrating the Visual Storytelling Activity, the lessons learned extend well
beyond the pages of this book. While this book provides a narration of the experience,
the learning can be extracted with a metaphor grounded in planting the seeds of
facilitation. The seeds will only germinate if the following needs are met: a conducive
climate, healthy nourishment, and ample light for ideation. As design managers, we are
tasked to facilitate the germination process and nurture the plant well into adulthood.
Successful facilitation leads to a maturation of the adult plant, unfamiliar with design
thinking, to envision new ideas and propose solutions to defined problems.
Figure 47. Photo of Michelle placing her hand drawn object in the blue hat during the Warm-up. Authors image.

31

PROJECT ANALYSIS:

Workshop Assessment
FINAL REFLECTIONS
While specific areas of improvement have been suggested in prior sections of this
book, this section provides an opportunity for reflection and closure. As a novice to
facilitating the creative thinking process, the course project provided an opportunity
to hone planning, presentation, and communication skills. The activities successfully
introduced the group to new pathways of ideation and lateral thinking strategies.
The results produced a new level of engagement that transformed the experience of
exploring a defined problem.
In the coming weeks, the plan is to continue the conversation with the non-designer
group at KidsHealth. While the course project doesnt require a solution or plan for
implementation, the group is truly invested in honing an approach to the long-form
article. Extending the conversation through future sessions has the potential to intersect
lateral and vertical pathways toward achieving a solution to the defined problem
a win-win for the participants, the facilitator, and the entity of KidsHealth.

Figure 48. Photo of Sean, Fiona, and Michelle during Persona Activity. Authors image.

Figure 49. Photo of Nicole drawing during Red Hat


Activity. Authors image.

32

Figure 50. Photo of Molly facilitating during Green


Hat Activity. Authors image.

PROJECT ANALYSIS:

Peer-to-Peer Interaction
PEER FEEDBACK
Peer feedback proved to be extremely beneficial in shaping the creative activities.
During the weekly webinars, inputs from the group provided fodder to feed the creative
appetite. One of the sessions resulted in a complete revamp of the initial Warm-up
Activity namely, to shape a more collaborative experience between participants.
In addition to the webinars, feedback from an assigned peer group was tremendously
helpful. Depending on the submitted course part, comments posted to the project blog
varied from week-to-week.
The following example related to the change in course with the Warm-up:

Wow! This is great! I like your new ice breaker. It is a nice


introduction to lateral thinking.
- Katherine Bradley, Personal Communication, February 1, 2015
This example provided feedback on the submission of the Project Activity Plan:

The logic of the overall document is great; It was evident that you
had thought and written carefully in a way that prefigured each
next moment in the process, which made it feel like a welldesigned experience.
- Kristofer Skrade, Personal Communication, February 2, 2015

Figure 51. Photo of persona created by Fiona. Authors image.

33

Appendix

Figure 52. Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section. Authors image.

APPENDIX:

Detailed Design Plan (Warm-up Activity)


Table A1
Detailed Design Plan of Warm-up Activity: An Object + An Object = A New Object

TIME

INTENT (WHY)

METHOD & STEPS (WHAT & HOW)

MATERIALS

SET-UP

Date: 02.04.15
12:00 pm -12:04 pm
(4 minutes)

Welcome

Welcome participants and ask them to share what they expect from this activity session. Next,
distribute and review consent form with participants. If all seems agreeable, ask participants
to proceed with signing and collect forms.

Consent forms
Pens

Have consent forms


and pens on table.

12:04 pm -12:07 pm
(3 minutes)

Activity Overview

12:07 pm -12:29 pm
(22 minutes)

Warm-up Activity:

Sheets of paper
(small & large)
Markers (7 packs)
Crayons (7 packs)
Hats (6)
Easel
Easel Pad

Have paper, markers,


crayons, and hats on
table. Place easel in
location visible to all
participants.

Orient participants and address


any initial concerns.
Introduce participants to activity
and begin to build rapport.

An Object + An Object =
A New Object
Use creative thinking strategies
to combine two unrelated
objects into a new object through
verbal-visual associations
shared between paired peer
groups. The activity is intended
to be fun and engaging, while
setting the stage for the Visual
Storytelling Workshop. A final
debriefing affords participants
an opportunity to visually reflect
upon the experience.

12:29 pm -12:30 pm
(1 minute)

Total: 30 minutes

Wrap-Up
Express gratitude and remind
group of next session.

Provide participants with an overview of the Warm-up Activity. Thank them for volunteering to
be part of the creative experience. Ask if anyone has questions and respond accordingly.
1. Ask participants to take a sheet of paper and write down the name of an object that begins
with the first letter of their last name. (1 minute)
2. Next, ask participants to draw the object. When theyre done, have them fold the piece of
paper and place it in the hat on the table. (3 minutes)
3. Ask participants to pass their hat to the participant seated to their right. In turn, that
participant opens the sheet of paper and pairs the object with someone nearby. (1 minute)
4. Working in pairs, combine the two unrelated objects to form a new object. On a separate
sheet of paper, draw a picture of the newly defined object. Use creative thinking to name
and write a description for the object. (5 minutes)
5. Each pair of participants (a total of three groups) will share their new object. (3 minutes)
6. After the last group has finished, the facilitator will introduce De Bonos Six Hats through
group participation. Each participant will locate and read the description found under the
brim of the hat they possess. (3 minutes)
7. As a foreshadowing to the Visual Storytelling Workshop, each participant will apply De
Bonos six modes of thinking to debrief from the activity. The facilitator will ask a participant
to draw an outline of a person measuring approximately six-feet on a large piece of paper. In
turn, each participant will add to the person as follows:
- DRAW a symbol (i.e. smile, heart, etc) to represent how theyre feeling (red hat).
- WRITE one positive learning on the left arm (yellow hat).
- WRITE one need to know for future workshop on the right arm (white hat).
- WRITE a one to two word judgment regarding the experience on the legs (black hat).
- DRAW an accessory (i.e. KidsHealth logo, hat, etc) to add a creative touch (green hat).
- SHARE and discuss contributions made by the group to help manage the process
(blue hat). (7 minutes)
Thank the participants and let them know you look forward to engaging in the creative
workshop scheduled for two weeks from today.

35

APPENDIX:

Detailed Design Plan (Visual Storytelling Activity)


Table A2
Detailed Design Plan of Visual Storytelling Activity: Six Hats & a Problem

TIME

INTENT (WHY)

METHOD & STEPS (WHAT & HOW)

Date: 02.18.15
12:20 pm -12:21 pm
(1 minute)

Welcome

Welcome participants and thank them for being a part of this workshop. Remind participants
the session will utilize lateral thinking strategies to creatively explore a defined problem.

12:21 pm -12:25 pm
(4 minutes)

Activity Overview

12:25 pm -1:10 pm
(45 minutes)

Visual Storytelling Activity:

Reorient group to the physical


space and thinking pathway.
Ensure participants are aware of
their surroundings and the tools
available to assist in the creative
thinking process. Inspire a spirit
of teamwork.

Six Hats & a Problem Activity


Make sure group is familiar with
the defined problem, so they can
effectively engage in the activity.
Use parallel thinking techniques
through the exploration of the
Six Thinking Hats (De Bono,
2007) to develop new ideas that
could lead to potential solutions.
Inspire and motivate participants
through open dialogue and
shared learning. Collect feedback
through creative expression to
provide closure.

36

Note: Action steps continued in chart found on page 25.

MATERIALS

SET-UP

Provide participants with an overview of the activity. Introduce the group to the props, which
will serve as additional players for the workshop including, the six hats used during the
Warm-up Activity. Make sure participants feel comfortable and ready to begin. Ask if anyone
has questions. End with a quote from Marty Neumeier to set the tone for the workshop:
Teamwork is an advanced form of creativity, requiring players who are humble, generous,
and independent-minded (Neumeier, 2014).

Easels (6)
Easel pads (6)
Hats (6)

Have easel and easel


pads positioned
in a highly, visible
location.

1. Proceed to the dry erase board and read the problem as defined. Expand on the problem to
ground participants in the current reality facing KidsHealth. (3 minutes)
2. White Hat: Ask if anyone can recall the thinking mode of the white hat. The correct response
is: information known or needed (De Bono, 2007). Each participant is asked to write down
3-5 ideas on Post-its that align with what we know or need to know about the problem. Ask
a participant to draw an enlarged tablet device on an easel pad. Participants will share and
post their ideas within device (5 minutes)
3. Red Hat: Remind the group the red hat signifies feelings, hunches, and intuition (De Bono,
2007). Ask a participant to draw an enlarged silhouette on an easel pad to represent a
persona that aligns with the KidsHealth parent audience. Utilizing sticky notes, ask each
participant to record and post their red mode of thinking on the persona. (4 minutes)
4. Black Hat: Remind the group the black hat is the devils advocate (De Bono, 2007) and will
be used to express judgment and difficulties as they relate to the problem. Ask a participant
to draw a black web. Next, the participants will use Post-its to record their ideas. The group
will share and post their ideas to the easel pad to create a web of judgment. (6 minutes)
5. Yellow Hat: The yellow hat represents optimism and brightness (De Bono, 2007). A
participant will be asked to draw a sun with 7 rays a ray for each participant. Ideas will be
recorded on each ray representing positive attributes that shape the problem. (4 minutes)
6. Green Hat: Since the focus of this hat is creativity (De Bono, 2007), a new hands-on
opportunity is introduced to the group. Each participant is given a sheet of paper with a
border serving as the only conventional element. Using the article sheet and other materials
supplied, each participant is instructed to create a new approach to the long-form article
in essence an article storyboard. They are invited to use any of the materials supplied to
generate their idea. Upon completion, each participant will take turns posting their
approach and verbally sharing their ideas. (9 minutes)

Markers (7 packs)
Crayons (7 packs)
Gluesticks (7)
Scissors (7)
Small sheets of
paper (21)
Post-it notes (7)
Long-form article
template (7)
Sheet with other
content types (14)
Blank paper (14)
Dry erase board

Make sure material


supplies are
accessible to all
participants. Have
defined problem
written on dry erase
board hanging in the
room.

APPENDIX:

Detailed Design Plan (Visual Storytelling Activity)


Table A3
Detailed Design Plan of Visual Storytelling Activity: Six Hats & a Problem

TIME

INTENT (WHY)

METHOD & STEPS (WHAT & HOW)

MATERIALS

SET-UP

12:25 pm -1:10 pm
(45 minutes)

See description on page 14.

7. Blue Hat: Remind the group the focus of this hat is managing the process (De Bono, 2007).
Using the new article storyboards created during the green mode of thinking, the group will
use the ladder of abstraction (Prather, 2010) to make some of the approaches more
actionable. Time will be a determinant of how many storyboards can be used as a staging
ground for this portion of the workshop. The group will select storyboards to post to an easel
pad, then answer the following question: How can this approach become more actionable,
while delivering on the promise to engage, educate, and motivate audiences? The group will
be required to answer the How three times to ladder down the idea to be more specific and
actionable. In addition to making the storyboards more actionable, this process will foster an
environment of refinement. (7 minutes)

See list on page 14.

See instructions on
page 14.

Small blank index


cards (42)
Markers (7 packs)
Crayons (7 packs)
Logo sample

Have index cards


ready to distribute.
Participants will
have markers and
crayons on hand
from prior activity.

8. Building upon the Warm-up Debriefing, each participant will apply De Bonos six modes of
thinking to reflect upon the experience and provide feedback from the workshop. As a mode
of departure from the prior Debriefing, the facilitator will distribute cutouts in the shape of a
person. When finished, participants will shape a community on an enlarged sheet of paper
showcasing their personas. Each participant will create their persona using these guidelines:
- DRAW a symbol (i.e. smile, heart, etc) to represent how theyre feeling (red hat).
- WRITE one positive learning on the left arm (yellow hat).
- WRITE one need to know for the future on the right arm (white hat).
- WRITE a one to two word judgment regarding the experience on the legs (black hat).
- DRAW an accessory (i.e. KidsHealth logo, hat, etc) to add a creative touch (green hat).
- SHARE and discuss contributions while developing a community on paper to help manage
the process (blue hat). (7 minutes)
1:10 pm -1:20 pm
(10 minutes)

Total: 60 minutes

Cool-down & Closing


Closure is an important part of
making the process feel complete.
The intent of this portion of the
workshop is to have participants
reflect on their experience and
record key takeaways.

As a Cool-down activity, the group is asked to construct a memory game. Each participant will
create 3 pairs of memory cards. Each pair should include a picture on one card that matches
with words on a totally separate card. The picture and words should highlight key takeaways
from the workshop. On the reverse side of each card, the participants will draw the KidsHealth
logo a nice way to identify with the entity and bring closure to the session.
The experience of todays workshop has been tremendously insightful and inspiring. You
participated in activities affording you an opportunity to think beyond convention. Collectively,
youve made inroads to address the defined problem. While this workshop isnt designed
to implement a final solution, I intend to stay the course and find ways to continue the
conversation. I encourage you to embrace lateral thinking as you tackle problems and allow
yourself an opportunity to continually reconnect with your inner child to nurture creativity and
innovation. Thank you again for giving me the gift of your time and creative energy!

Note: Action steps continued from chart found on page 24.

37

APPENDIX:

Informed Consent
OBTAINING PERMISSION
Prior to conducting the workshop sessions, the facilitator reviewed the
defined project scope, which included three parts: a Warm-up Activity, a
Visual Storytelling Activity, and a Post Interview (optional). A description of
the project was given to each participant in printed form prior to signing the
consent form.

Facilitating Creative Thinking:

COLLABORATIVE WORKSHOP
The following information provides an introduction to the collaborative workshop and
post interviews that will be conducted at KidsHealth located in Wilmington, DE, between
January 5th and March 12th, by Molly Blessington, Design Management graduate student
at the Savannah College of Art and Design.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY


The purpose of the study is to facilitate a series of collaborative workshops with a group
of non-designers recruited from KidsHealth. The group will be required to apply lateral
thinking strategies to reshape how they acquire knowledge.

RESEARCH QUESTION
The research will be guided by the following question: What new approaches to the longform, in-depth article can KidsHealth employ to increase learning, while delivering on the
promise to engage, educate, and motivate audiences?

DATA COLLECTION METHODOLOGY


Data will be collected through:
1. recorded (audio, video and/or photography) observations
2. participation in a warm-up activity, a visual storytelling activity, and a post interview
3. completion of a debriefing activity that will elicit feedback

DATA MANAGEMENT
Data will be collected during the live sessions and stored on the facilitators hard drive.
Data will be kept for future use and presentation purposes.

CONTACT INFORMATION
This project is being conducted through the Design Management Department at the
Savannah College of Art and Design. For additional information please contact:
Molly Blessington | 302.332.2704 | mollyblessington@gmail.com

Figure 1A. The project description document given to each participant prior to conducting the workshop.
Sample supplied by Professor Regina Rowland, Ph.D.

38

APPENDIX:

Informed Consent
OBTAINING PERMISSION
After reviewing the project description document, an informed consent
form was distributed and reviewed with the group. All participants were
required to sign the consent form to reflect their willingness to partake in
the recorded activities.

Informed Consent Form


I voluntarily agree to participate in a multi-part workshop performed by a student
at the Savannah College of Art and Design. I understand that a warm-up activity,
a visual storytelling activity, and post interviews are being conducted by Molly
Blessington, in order to fullfill the required coursework for Facilitating Creative
Thinking. The purpose of the activities and post interview is to explore lateral
thinking strategies to suggest new approaches to the long-form article that is part
of the KidsHealth online product offering.
I understand that the evaluation methods may include:
1. recorded (audio, video and/or photography) observations
2. my participation in a warm-up activity, a visual storytelling activity,
and a post interview (Note: Participants are not required to partake in the post
interview experience.)
3. my completion of a debriefing activity that will elicit feedback
I grant permission for the activities and interviews to be recorded and transcribed,
and to be used only by Molly Blessington for analysis of interview data. I grant
permission for this datagenerated from the above methodsto be used in an
educational setting.

_______________________________________________
Printed Name

_______________________________________________

Signature

_______________________________________________
Date

Figure 2A. The informed consent form required to be signed by all participants prior to conducting the workshop.
Sample supplied by Professor Regina Rowland, Ph.D.

39

APPENDIX:

Informed Consent
OBTAINING PERMISSION
Prior to beginning the Warm-up Activity, all participants were required to sign an informed
consent form. The images depicted represent the full collection of signed forms.

Figure 5A. Debras signed consent form.

40

Figure 6A. Fionas signed consent form.

Figure 7A. Nicoles signed consent form.

Figure 3A.Michelles signed consent form.

Figure 4A. Mary Lous signed consent form.

Figure 8A. Seans signed consent form.

Figure 9A. Ryans signed consent form.

APPENDIX:

Informed Consent
OBTAINING PERMISSION
Prior to beginning the Visual Storytelling Activity, all participants were required to sign an
informed consent form. The images depicted represent the full collection of signed forms.

Figure 12A. Debras signed consent form.

Figure 13A. Fionas signed consent form.

Figure 14A. Nicoles signed consent form.

Figure 10A.Michelles signed consent form.

Figure 11A. Mary Lous signed consent form.

Figure 15A. Seans signed consent form.

Figure 16A. Ryans signed consent form.

41

APPENDIX:

Debriefing Activity
COLLECTING FEEDBACK
As described in the Visual Storytelling Debriefing, the facilitator collected feedback in
an unconventional manner. The intent was to reshape the experience through lateral
strategies that build confidence in creativity. Each participant was given a cutout in the
shape of a person. Using the Six Thinking Hats (De Bono 2007), each participant created
their own KidsHealth persona as follows:
- DRAW a symbol (i.e. smile, heart, etc) to represent how theyre feeling (red hat).
- WRITE one positive learning on the left arm (yellow hat).
- WRITE one need to know for the future on the right arm (white hat).
- WRITE a one to two word judgment regarding the experience wherever it fits best
(black hat).
- DRAW an accessory (i.e. KidsHealth logo, hat, etc.) to add a creative touch (green hat).
- SHARE and add persona to an enlarged sheet of paper to manage the process
(blue hat).

42

Figure 17A. A sample of the cutout that will be used to collect feedback.

APPENDIX:

Video Presentation
THE EXPERIENCE
A video was created to reflect the creative activities,
group participation, and post-activity interviews from
the workshop organized with the participants from
KidsHealth. The video is a compliment to the process
book documentation. The video can be accessed at:
https://vimeo.com/121578116

Figure 17A. Photo of video title screen. Authors image.

43

APPENDIX:

References
Byrnes, J. (2009). Unexploded ordnance detection and mitigation: NATO science
for peace and security series B: physics and biophysics. Dordrecht, NL: Springer.
De Bono, E. (1990). Lateral thinking: Creativity step-by-step. New York, NY: Harper
Perennial.
De Bono, E. (2007). Six thinking hats: An essential approach to business
management. New York, NY: Little, Brown & Company.
Izenberg, N. (2014). About KidsHealth. Retrieved from http://kidshealth.org/
parent/kh_misc/about.html.
Johansson, F. (2006). The medici effect: What elephants & epidemics can teach us
about innovation. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.
National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine,
and The Associated Press. (2014). Attention span statistics. Retrieved from http://
www.statisticbrain.com/attention-span-statistics/.
Neumeier, M. (2014). The 46 rules of genius: An innovators guide to creativity.
Indianapolis, IN: New Riders Publishing.
Prather, C. (2010). Managers guide to fostering innovation and creativity in teams.
New York, NY: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Weiner, R. (2000). Creativity & beyond: Cultures, values, and change. Albany, NY:
State University of New York Press.

44

APPENDIX:

Tables
Table 1
Overview of Warm-up Activity Plan (Consolidated View) ............................. 9
Table 2
Overview of Visual Storytelling Activity Plan (Consolidated View) ................ 11
Table A1
Detailed Design Plan of Warm-up Activity: An Object + An Object =
A New Object ........................................................................................... 23
Table A2
Detailed Design Plan of Visual Storytelling Activity: Six Hats & a Problem ..... 24
Table A3
Detailed Design Plan of Visual Storytelling Activity: Six Hats & a Problem ..... 25

45

APPENDIX:

Figures
Figure 1
Photo of six hats aligned with project activities .......................................... 1

Figure 13
Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section ................................ 6

Figure 2
Photo of tablet device used to frame Table of Contents .............................. 2

Figure 14
Sample of long-form KidsHealth article on tablet device (prototype view) ............. 7

Figure 3
Photo of materials supplied at the onset of the Warm-up Activity ................ 3

Figure 15
Illustration of memory cards used as a sample during Cool-down Activity ............. 12

Figure 4
Photo of conference room prior to participants arriving for Warm-up .......... 4

Figure 16
Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section ................................ 13

Figure 5
Photo of Michelle ...................................................................................... 5

Figure 17
Sample of Warm-up Activity created by facilitator ................................................ 14

Figure 6
Photo of Debra ............................................................................................. 5

Figure 18
Photo of Fiona and Michelle drawing their object entitled hedgy basket ............ 15

Figure 7
Photo of Nicole ........................................................................................... 5

Figure 19
Photo of Ryan, Sean, and Debra drawing an object that begins with the first initial
of their last name ............................................................................................... 15

Figure 8
Photo of Mary Lou ..................................................................................... 5
Figure 9
Photo of Fiona .......................................................................................... 5
Figure 10
Photo of Ryan ........................................................................................... 5
Figure 11
Photo of Sean ........................................................................................... 5
Figure 12
Photo of Molly ........................................................................................... 5

46

Figure 20
Photo of Debra and Mary Lou drawing their object entitled goatscab ................. 15
Figure 21
Photo of Michelle presenting the new object hedgy basket ................................ 15
Figure 22
Photo of skate-able object created by Ryan and Sean ....................................... 16
Figure 23
Photo of goatscab created by Mary Lou and Debra ............................................ 16
Figure 24
Photo of hedgy basket created by Fiona and Michelle ....................................... 16

APPENDIX:

Figures
Figure 25
Photo of Debra drawing in the green mode of thinking ............................... 17
Figure 26
Photo of KidsHealth persona created during the Debriefing ........................ 18
Figure 27
Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section ....................... 19

Figure 37
Photo of storyboard created by Michelle ............................................................. 26
Figure 38
Photo of storyboards created by participants during the Green Hat Activity .......... 26
Figure 39
Selected storyboard used during the Ladder of Abstraction ................................. 27

Figure 28
Photo of Molly reviewing the consent form with the group prior to the
Visual Storytelling Activity ......................................................................... 20

Figure 40
Photo of Ladder of Abstraction using the blue mode of thinking ........................... 27

Figure 29
Photo of Mary Lou, Debra, Nicole, and Ryan creating article storyboards ..... 21

Figure 41
Photo of personas created by participants during the final Debriefing Activity ....... 28

Figure 30
Photo of Sean drawing web of judgment for Black Hat Activity .................... 21

Figure 42
Photo of Nicole during Persona Activity ............................................................... 29

Figure 31
Photo of Michelle creating article storyboard ............................................. 21

Figure 43
Photo of Sean during Red Hat Activity ................................................................. 29

Figure 32
Photo of Fiona writing on sticky notes during Black Hat Activity .................. 21

Figure 44
Photo of Mary Lou presenting an article storyboard ............................................. 29

Figure 33
Photo of sticky notes posted to tablet during the White Hat Activity ............ 22

Figure 45
Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section ................................ 30

Figure 34
Photo of sticky notes posted to person during the Red Hat Activity .............. 23

Figure 46
Photo depicting the development of the newly formed object entitled goatscab
during the Warm-up ........................................................................................... 31

Figure 35
Photo of sticky notes posted to web during the Black Hat Activity ............... 24
Figure 36
Photo of sun with ideas posted during the Yellow Hat Activity ..................... 25

Figure 47
Photo of Michelle placing her object in the blue hat during the Warm-up .............. 31

47

APPENDIX:

Figures
Figure 48
Photo of Sean, Fiona, and Michelle during Persona Activity ........................ 32

Figure 7A
Nicoles signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ............ 40

Figure 49
Photo of Nicole drawing during Red Hat Activity ......................................... 32

Figure 8A
Seans signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. .............. 40

Figure 50
Photo of Molly facilitating during Green Hat Activity ................................... 32

Figure 9A
Ryans signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. .............. 40

Figure 51
Photo of persona created by Fiona ............................................................ 33

Figure 10A
Michelles signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ......... 41

Figure 52
Photo of tablet device used to frame title of content section ....................... 34

Figure 11A
Mary Lous signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ........ 41

Figure 1A
The project description document given to each participant prior to
conducting the workshop. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ....... 38

Figure 12A
Debras signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ............. 41

Figure 2A
The informed consent form required to be signed by all participants prior
to conducting the workshop. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. .... 39
Figure 3A
Michelles signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ... 40
Figure 4A
Mary Lous signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ... 40
Figure 5A
Debras signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ....... 40
Figure 6A
Fionas signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ........ 40

48

Figure 13A
Fionas signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ............. 41
Figure 14A
Nicoles signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. ............ 41
Figure 15A
Seans signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. .............. 41
Figure 16A
Ryans signed consent form. Sample supplied by Regina Rowland, Ph.D. .............. 41
Figure 17A
Photo of video title screen .................................................................................. 43