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Biopuncture and Antihomotoxic

Treatment
The Extra Dimension of Local Injections
IAH Presentations Library

IAH 2008

Biopuncture describes the use of biotherapeutics for injection in specific


spots or areas. These biotherapeutics stimulate natural healing in a direct
and efficient way because they are injected directly into the target area.
This technique offers medical professionals new possibilities in their goal
to help their patients where other measures have failed or have produced
too many side effects.
These slides will inform physicians about the extra power of giving local
injections with antihomotoxic remedies.

History of Biopuncture
1991:
First use of the word biopuncture by Dr. Jan Kersschot on a
medical congress on sports medicine in Belgium to describe
injections with biotherapeutics
1995:
First book on biopuncture (Dutch)
1998:
First English book on biopuncture
(later available in Spanish and Russian)
2004:
Biopuncture in General Practice
2008:
Biopuncture and Sports Injuries (USA)
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The use of injections of biotherapeutics was introduced in Germany more


than 50 years ago. Millions of ampules are injected worldwide every year.
Meanwhile, the use of biotherapeutic injections did not acquire a specific
name in medicine until 1991, when the term biopuncture was introduced
during a medical congress in Belgium, organized by Bruno Van Brandt.
Kersschot J, Biopunctuur, Oostende (Belgium): Biomedical Therapy
Congress, November 17,1991.
As a result, Dr. Jan Kersschot is worldwide considered as the father of
biopuncture. Over the years, he further developed the use of
antihomotoxic remedies in injection form, by blending ideas and
techniques from for example neuraltherapy, mesotherapy, prolotherapy
and trigger point therapy.
Having a specific name to describe this technique gives it more exposure,
both for medical professionals as well as for patients. The books, lectures
and workshops worldwide have further promoted the use of antihomotoxic
injections.

Definition of biopuncture
Biopuncture is a bioregulatory therapy method in which specific
biotherapeutics are injected in indication or tissue related bodily
zones or points on the basis of clinical and functional diagnosis.

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Specific biotherapeutics
Each patient and each condition may need a specific product for healing.
For example: Gelsemium-Homaccord for neck pain radiating into the arm,
Zeel for joint degeneration, Hepeel for liver drainage.
Indication or tissue related bodily zones or points
We inject into pain zones, reflex zones
We inject into pain points, trigger points
Clinical and functional diagnosis
-We use a Western diagnosis and conventional terminology
(not based on Chinese medicine nor a homeopathic diagnosis).
-We add specific questioning, clinical and functional testing to guide our
decision making.
--Questioning: e.g., what makes your pain worse? How did it start?
--Clinical and functional testing: e.g., testing the strength of a particular
muscle, looking for pain points or trigger points, testing the range of
motion in a joint.

Extra dimension of injection


INJECTION = TURBO EFFECT:

A. Direct effect on the tissues:


Local effect of the medication
B. Indirect reactions at a distance
Segment therapy
Trigger point injections

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Why should we give injections?


A. Direct effect on the tissues: Traumeel injected in a muscle injury
influences the local muscle fibers immediately.
We have direct influence on the matrix.
We have also a deeper tissue penetration than with an ointment (=
max 2cm).

B. -Jnjections under the skin in the stomach area will influence the
function of the stomach (= segmental reaction).
-Injections under the skin in the thorax will influence the function of the
bronchi (= segmental reaction).
-Injections in a trigger point in the quadriceps muscle can take away
pain in the knee.
-Injections in a trigger point in the gluteus minimus muscle can take
away pain in the lateral side of the leg.

What to inject?
Biotherapeutics are medical products that
stimulate natural healing
do not suppress the immunological response of the body
do not interfere with the neural reflexes
do not suppress pain
do not suppress the local inflammatory response

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The majority of products used in biopuncture are microdoses : we dont


use ampules which only contain dilutions beyond Avogadros number.
The majority are antihomotoxic remedies.
Sodium chloride and dextrose may be added.
Other products may be added at the physicians own responsibility (e.g.,
local anesthetics), but are not considered as biopuncture in the strict
sense, but as supplementary tools which can improve the efficacy of
biopuncture.
In biopuncture, a lot of physicians add low concentrations of lidocaine or
procaine to make the injection less painful and to evoke an additional
effect on the neural system (as in neuraltherapy).
In some cases, conventional medication such as tramadol or piroxicam
are added to avoid injections of corticosteroids or to avoid an operation.
This again is not biopuncture in the strict sense. Corticosteroids and
phenol are not used.

Differences between biopuncture and other


injection techniques (see also table next slide)
Difference with mesotherapy (MS):
MS only injects superficially
MS only injects locally
Difference with homeosiniatry (HS):
HS only injects in acupuncture points
HS uses a Chinese diagnosis
Difference with neuraltherapy (NT):
NT uses only local anesthetics
NT also injects into autonomic ganglia

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Biopuncture describes the use of biotherapeutics for injection in specific


spots or areas.
These biotherapeutics are mainly injected in muscles, tendons and
ligaments as well as subcutaneously. Some techniques described in
biopuncture books, such as injections into joints and near peripheral
nerves are becoming less popular. They are not regarded as standard
treatment protocols any more.
In the beginning, biopuncture also allowed the use of acupuncture
injections, but since 2004 we leave the injections into acupuncture points
to homeosiniatry.
The next slide gives an overview.

BP

MS

Homeopathic single remedy (>D23)

HS
x

Microdose (>D23), complex homeopathic


medication

(x)

(x)

Antihomotoxic medication

(x)

(x)

(x)

Local anesthetics

NT

Undiluted medication, e.g., minerals and vitamins

Local injections

Trigger points

x
x

Acupuncture points

Subcutaneous

Muscle, ligament

Autonomic ganglia (e.g., stellatum)


Joint injections

x
x
x

(x)

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In mesotherapy (MT), they only inject superficially. Usually these


techniques are used for esthetic medicine. Originally, mesotherapy used
conventional medication (Dr. Pistor) and not homeopathic products. Later
on, also natural products were used for subcutaneous injections. The
latter is also described as homeo-mesotherapy or bio-mesotherapy.
In homeosiniatry (HS) according to Dr. de La Fuye, they use
homeopathics (originally only single remedies) on acupuncture points.
Both homeopathy and Chinese Medicine (Siniatry) are used for diagnosis
and treatment protocols. Later on, the description homeosiniatry has also
been used for injection of antihomotoxic remedies in acupuncture points.
Neuraltherapy (NT) only injects local anesthetics. They also inject into
organs (e.g., prostate, thyroid) and into autonomic ganglia the latter
techniques are never applied in biopuncture.
Prolotherapy injects mainly into ligaments and bands, not subcutaneously
or in muscles. They also use phenol, a product which is not allowed in
biopuncture for safety reasons.
Trigger point injections (according to Travell) only describe injections of
local anesthetics into myofascial trigger points (not subcutaneously, not in
muscle gellings or in ligament pain points).

Frequency and needles


Frequency:
Injections are usually given once a week
Needles:
0.3 x 13 mm
0.4 x 20 mm
0.4 x 40 mm

30G x "
27G x 3/4"
27G x 1 "

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Frequency:
-When dealing with an acute situation (e.g., an acute sports injury),
we can inject two or even three times a week (In most acute cases,
we need only between 1 and 3 sessions to have complete healing).
-When dealing with chronic problems, we start with weekly
sessions and can lower the frequency as soon as the patient gets
better (once every two weeks, once every four weeks). After about
six weekly sessions, we sometimes wait for about six weeks to see
how the clinical picture evolves before continuing the injections (the
6-6 rule)
Needles: as thin as possible
0.3 x 13 mm

30G x "

0.4 x 20 mm

27G x 3/4"

0.4 x 40 mm

27G x 1 "

0.5 x 40 mm

25G x 1 "

0.6 x 80 mm

23G x 3 1/8"

Reaction after injection


Sometimes there is an immediate improvement within a few
seconds (or minutes) after injection. But usually this doesnt last.
Thats why we have to repeat the treatment (sometimes layer
by layer) until complete cure is established.

When chronic or more complicated situations occur, the pain


may get worse the next day. Such a reaction phase usually
occurs within the first 24 hours after the injection and subsides
by itself. Its important to warn the patient about such a reaction
phase.

Sometimes there can also be complications or side effects (next


slide).

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Sometimes there is an exacerbation of symptoms. The latter means that


the patient may actually have more pain, especially the day after the
injection. This is not a side effect or a complication, but a sign that the
body is responding. In biopuncture, this is known as the reaction phase.
Sometimes the pain shifts to another area during a reaction phase, and
such reactions are also considered as positive reactions. Usually it means
that the body is responding through changes in the posture due to
alterations in the muscular tensions in the area. These issues should be
discussed with the patient after each session.

Technical complications
Local complications include
allergic reactions, itching or skin rash
hematomas (superficial or deep)
swelling of the injected area or local stiffness
infections after injection
Damage to organs can occur after accidental injections in the
pleura, kidney, liver, etc.
Accidental injections into important blood vessels, peripheral
nerves or into central nervous system (epidural space)

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Temporary discomfort at the point of the injection is quite common.


Prolonged reactions with stiffness and soreness are observed in some
cases, as well as painful hematomas under the skin or in the injected
muscle - especially when using thick needles. This is particularly liable to
occur in those on steroids/anticoagulants and in the elderly.
Local complications include allergic reactions, skin rash, hematomas,
swelling of the injected area, or local stiffness.
Infections after injection are avoided by using sterile injection techniques.
Damage to organs can occur after accidental injections in the pleura,
kidney, liver, etc. These complications can occur when dealing with
enlarged organs (spleen, liver), anatomical variations or when dealing with
patients that make unexpected movements during injection.
Accidental injections into blood vessels, peripheral nerves or the epidural
space.

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Prevention of complications
By competent clinical examination
By detailed knowledge of local anatomy
By injecting with respect to anatomic limits and/or by using
radiological control (before or during injection)
By taking the thinnest needle possible
By using safe injection techniques (by starting with the safest
techniques first)
By using sterile injection techniques
By using safe products

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Contraindications
An uncooperative patient/psychiatric patient
A patient who doesnt understand the strategy
Fear of the procedure or needle phobia
Patient is in a very bad (unstable) medical condition
Neoplastic lesions in the area
Anatomic deformations in the area
Acute non-reduced subluxations, dislocations, or fractures
Bleeding diathesis secondary to disease or anticoagulants
Allergy to injectable solutions or their ingredients
Allergy/hypersensitivity to botanicals like arnica (e.g., Traumeel, Zeel)
Allergy/hypersensitivity to botanicals like echinacea (e.g., Traumeel)
Allergy to local anesthetics (e.g. procaine, lidocaine)

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Sharing information on biopuncture


Sharing information between doctor and patient:
Every patient should receive a biopuncture pamphlet.

Sharing information between doctors:


Biopuncture forum, biopuncture training, biopuncture books,
biopuncture lectures

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Biopuncture strategy
Part 1. Local strategy for musculoskeletal complaints
Part 2. Local strategy for functional complaints
Part 3. General approach of the patient

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We will now discuss three subjects:


Part 1. Local strategy for musculoskeletal complaints: here we will discuss
how we treat musculoskeletal problems by giving local injections into for
example muscles, tendons and ligaments.
Part 2. Local strategy for functional complaints: here we will discuss how
we treat functional complaints (e.g., asthma, gastritis, bronchitis) by giving
local injections into the segment of the organ; these injections are usually
given subcutaneously.
Part 3. General approach of the patient: this means that in some cases we
dont attack the symptoms (as in part 1 and 2) but we have to treat the
general condition of the patient (terrain treatment). This may include a
detox program with injections, a drainage with injections and a regulation
of the hormonal system with injections. The general treatment is especially
important in chronic and complicated situations.

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Part 1. Strategy for musculoskeletal complaints


Four phases
Four injection techniques

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As an overview, we can say that there are four different phases and four
different injection techniques available in biopuncture to treat orthopedic
complaints.
This overview is a way to illustrate the possible approaches in
biopuncture. This table is not written in stone. Each physician will distillate
his or her own favorite approaches, adapted to the clinical situation.

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Strategy for musculoskeletal complaints: 4 phases


Phase 1: Lymphomyosot
Phase 2: Traumeel
Phase 3: Spascupreel, Colocynthis-Homaccord,
Ferrum-Homaccord, Gelsemium-Homaccord,..
Phase 4: Zeel, Discus compositum,
Coenzyme compositum

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There are four phases when we approach the patient. Theoretically, these
should be followed step by step, but in some cases we can skip the first
phase and/or combine one or two phases (e.g., Phase 1+2 or phase 1+3).
Phase 1: Lymphomyosot is injected to stimulate local blood circulation and
to support local lymphatic drainage. This phase is especially important
when dealing with sensitive patients. It is also a good preparation before
giving more specific remedies.
Phase 2: Traumeel injections to regulate local inflammation through
immunomodulation.
Phase 3: Here we will inject more specific remedies, which match the
symptomatology of the patient. When there is muscle spasm we give e.g.,
Spascupreel. All the Homaccords belong to phase three (e.g.,
Colocynthis-Homaccord, Ferrum-Homaccord, Gelsemium-Homaccord).
Phase 4: Here we use products which are designed for cellular support or
organ support. These are e.g., Zeel and all the compositae like e.g.,
Discus compositum and Coenzyme compositum.

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Strategy for musculoskeletal complaints:


4 techniques
A. SC (segment therapy)
B. IM (myofascial therapy)
C. Tendon/tendon sheath/bursa
D. Ligament/enthesopathy/periost

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There are four major techniques when we approach the patient.


Theoretically, these should be followed step by step, but in some
cases we can skip the first phases and go to the target tissue
immediately. We can also combine one or two different techniques in
one session if necessary.
A. The subcutaneous injection is the easiest one, and works through the
local reflexes, as in mesotherapy (segmental therapy). Its interesting
for physicians who dont have much experience with injections yet.
B. Intramuscular injections are given when the muscles are involved.
C. Injections around tendons, into tendon sheaths or into bursae are given
when these soft tissues are related to the clinical picture.
D. Injections into ligaments, into enthesopathies or to the bone (into the
periost) are given when these tissues are related to the clinical picture.
These injections are more aggressive and more painful, but can be
interesting in difficult and chronic cases. We usually add hypertonic
sugar to the antihomotoxic remedies for these injections.

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Overview:
16 ways to approach the patient
1. Drainage
Lymphomyosot

2. Modulation
Traumeel

3. Symptomatic
4. Cellular
e.g., Homaccords Compositae

A.SC

A1

A2

A3

A4

B.IM

B1

B2

B3

B4

C.Tendon

C1

C2

C3

C4

D.Ligament

D1

D2

D3

D4

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When we combine the four phases (1,2,3,4) with the four techniques
(A,B,C,D), we have sixteen possibilities of approaching the patient.
The more we use an approach in the left higher corner (e.g., A1), the more
gentle the technique (less painful, less side effects, less reaction phase,
easy to perform). These are interesting for patients who are very sensitive
(they had previously serious reactions after other treatments or they show
a jump sign during examination).
The more our approach is in the right lower corner (e.g., D4), the more
aggressive the technique. The results will be quicker, but we see more
reaction phases after the treatment (e.g., pain worse the next day).

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A. SC (segment therapy)
Subcutaneous injections are given when deeper injections are
not possible.
Target tissue cant be reached.
Injection into the target would be too painful.
Injection into the target would be too dangerous.
They are easy and safe to give.
And can be very effective in acute and uncomplicated disorders.
They are also used to prepare the area for more advanced
techniques.

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Subcutaneous injections are given when we want to influence deeper


layers underneath, for example:
the cutaneo-muscular reflexes to influence deeper muscular layers
underneath without giving injections in those muscles themselves
the cutaneo-articular reflexes to influence joints underneath without giving
injections in those joints themselves

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Injection technique.
Pincer palpation
Always use
Pincer palpation:
you lift the skin with your left hand
while you inject with your right hand

Less painful during injection


Safer (no injection in deep
organs)

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Volume: about 0,1 0,5 ml at each spot


-Injections depth: subcutaneously
Keep your fingers away from the needle to prevent injecting your own
fingers.

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SC injections shoulder

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SC = subcutaneous
This is an example of four subcutaneous injections in the shoulder area for
a patient where the reason for the pain was not clear. By giving these
injections we can evoke a natural healing through the segmental reactions
of our subcutaneous injections.
Sometimes a few sessions on a weekly basis can be enough to have
complete healing. Sometimes we will have to give deeper injections (e.g.,
in the ligaments or the muscles of the shoulder) in order to have complete
healing. But even then, the local SC injections were a good preparation for
the deeper injections.

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Local subcutaneous injections for tennis elbow

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This is an example of four subcutaneous injections in the elbow area for a


patient who was afraid of deep injections. By giving these superficial
injections we can evoke a natural healing through the segmental
reactions.
Sometimes a few sessions on a weekly basis can be enough to have
complete healing. Sometimes we will have to give deeper injections (eg in
the ligaments of the elbow or the muscles of the arm) in order to have
complete healing.

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B. IM (myofascial therapy)
Clinical picture muscle factor (M-factor):
Pain (not obligatory: only if active zone)
Local pain
Referred pain (= trigger point)
Weakness!
Restriction of movement

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M-factor = every patient where the main problem is muscular (even when
other doctors said it was related to osteoarthritis, a hernia, or
psychogenic)
Biopuncturists think about muscles when
there was an overuse before the symptoms came up
there is loss of power in the area
there is restriction of movement because some muscle fibers are
tighter and shorter (continuous contraction)
Patients with muscle-based symptoms often show relief while in
movement and when the area is heated
Muscular pain does not show on X-rays or scans, so:
Look for it during clinical examination

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Muscle tissue infiltration


Always use Pincer palpation:
Less painful during injection (gate control)
Safer (no injection deeper than our own finger tips to avoid
injection in e.g., underlying organs)

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We always use Pincer palpation:


palpation
This means that we take the muscle between our thumb and second
finger and grasp it while lifting it
As a result, the injection is
1. less painful (gate control: the thick nerve fibers inhibit the thin nerve
fibers)
fibers)
2. safer (no injection deeper than our own finger tips to avoid injection in
e.g. underlying organs)

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Muscle tissue infiltration technique


Volume: about 0,5 - 2 ml at each spot
(about 5 to 10 ml can be injected during each session)
Injections: at a depth of about 1 to 4 cm
(up to 8 cm for the gluteus/piriformis)
We inject several layers in one injection (retrograde infiltration
technique)
Frequency: usually once a week

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You can give several injections at several depths in the area


You penetrate until the deepest point in the muscle
Then you continue to inject while withdrawing the needle
So you inject different layers with one needle penetration
You also avoid to give all the liquid into a vessel
In BP we call this the retrograde infiltration technique

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Reaction after IM injections


Reaction phase
Pain is worse the day after (usually within first 24 hrs)
Muscular shift
Pain shifts to another area because the muscle chains are
adapting
Organ regulation
IM injections also have a segmental effect (see later)
Change in posture
Adaptation of the agonists and antagonists also leads to
change in posture

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Reaction phase
Pain may be worse the day after the injections (usually within first
24 hrs, more likely after the first injection).
Muscular shift
The patient thinks that the pain is only moving to another place
while in fact healing is on its way, but the pain shifts to another area
because the muscle chains are adapting after the biopuncture
treatment.
Organ regulation
IM injections also have a segmental effect (see later). For example,
injections in the dorsal paravertebral muscle may influence healing
of stomach problems.
Change in posture
If one muscle relaxes (e.g, biceps), other muscles in the area (e.g.,
triceps) have to adapt as well. Even muscles in the neck may have
to adapt to the new situation. Sometimes the treatment of chronic
muscle tensions leads to change in posture.

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Four types of IM injections:


MPZ injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in the pain zone
MPP injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in myofascial pain
points
MG injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in muscle gellings
(myogeloses)
MTP injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in myofascial
trigger points

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MPZ injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in the pain zone


You inject IM in the area where the patient says he or she experiences the
pain (PZ = pain zone) or you inject in those muscles who show weakness
or higher muscular tension.
MPP injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in myofascial pain points
You inject IM in the points you find are painful in those muscles who are
painful, show weakness or show a higher muscular tension.
MG injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in muscle gellings
(myogeloses)
You inject IM in the muscle gellings you find during clinical examination.
MTP injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in myofascial trigger points
You inject IM in the myofascial trigger points (at a distance from the pain
zone) you find during clinical examination.

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B1. MPZ injections:


intramuscular in the pain zone
MPZ = Intramuscular injections in the pain zone (PZ)
The physician simply injects the muscles in the area that the
patient has indicated as being the painful zone
Needling technique: at random (as in mesotherapy), but deeper
(into the muscle tissues instead of SC)

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MPZ injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in the pain zone


You inject IM in the area where the patient says he or she experiences the
pain (PZ = pain zone) or you inject in those muscles who show weakness
or higher muscular tension.

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6 MPZ injections low back


in: Musculus Erector Spinae, left and right

fig 33 p. 91 in Biopuncture in General Practice

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B2. MPP injections: intramuscular injections in


myofascial pain points
MPP:
Spots YOU FIND in the pain zone
show an extra sensitivity on compression
The patient indicates that particular muscle area as unpleasant
when you put pressure on it (see next slide)

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MPP injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in myofascial pain points


You inject IM in the points you find to be painful in those muscles who are
painful, show weakness or show a higher muscular tension.

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You look for PPs with your hands in the patients


PZ (pain zone)
While you examine:
You look for hard parts

within the injured muscle.


You check when the
patient has sensations of
pain or discomfort.
A. Feel his body move
away
B. by making grimaces
C. by screaming
D. by moving other body
parts.

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PP = Pain point (you find with finger pressure)


PZ = Pain zone: the zone or area where the patient has the pain
PPs = Pain points you can find during clinical examination
MPPs = Muscular Pain points
The patient indicates MPPs as painful on digital compression:
A. By trying to move away from the digital pressure = jump
sign,
B. by making grimaces (check facial expression!),
C. by saying au! (listen to the patients sounds he makes!),
D. by moving other body parts (sometimes very obvious,
sometimes only subtle movements).

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B3. MG injections:
intramuscular (IM) injections in muscle gellings
Muscle gellings
= Hardened parts in muscles = Myogeloses

Can be felt :
taken between 2 fingers
by snapping palpation
Sometimes painful by palpation
Unpleasant feeling when identified!
Sometimes rope-like bands
Need many treatments with BP (chronic: years)

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Sometimes we find hardened areas in muscles. They are like strings or


nodules and are referred to as "myogeloses" or muscle gellings (MGs).
They are not always painful, but they are related to chronic muscle
tensions, for example in the calf muscles (e.g., runners) or in the piriformis
muscle (car racers).
MG injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in muscle gellings
(myogeloses)
You inject IM in the muscle gellings you find during clinical examination.
Sometimes we can take them between two fingers (see next slide).

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Rope-like bands (MGs)


MG in dorsal back
Disturbed muscle chains
Low(!) back pain

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B4. MTP injections:


IM injections in myofascial trigger points
MTP injections =
Intramuscular injections in the trigger points that you find during
clinical examination
But outside the actual pain zone!
The patient indicates MTPs as painful on digital compression
and by pulling away (= jump sign)
Active MTPs also give referred pain
The latter means the injection is given at a distance from the pain
zone!

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MTP injections: intramuscular (IM) injections in myofascial trigger points.


You inject IM in the myofascial trigger points (at a distance from the pain
zone) you find during clinical examination.
These MTPs are based on the books of Travell and Simons.

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Headache from superficial MTPs in trapezius


muscles

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Referred pain from deep myofascial trigger points


in the hip area
Pain in the leg: from MTP in Glut min

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Looking for MTPs in thigh muscles (adductor


magnus) for patient with pain in the groin

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Looking for MTPs in quadriceps for patient with


pain in the knee

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C. Tendon/tendon sheath/bursa
Tendons are bands of fibrous tissue that connect muscle to
bone
Tendonosis/tenosynovitis/bursitis
Repetitive strain on tendon/tendon sheath
Related to muscle overuse

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D. Ligament/enthesopathy/periost
Ligament injections
(also: bands, fascia, joint capsules)
Injections in the enthesopathy
Injections in the periost

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We will mainly discuss the ligament injuries.


Injections in the enthesopathy and in the periost will not be discussed.

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Ligament injuries
A. Sensory nerve endings irritated
B. Ligamentous tissue damage
Poor blood supply to ligaments
slow healing (may become chronic!)

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Clinical picture of the ligament factor


(in biopuncture: L-factor)
A. Pain
A1. Local pain (LPP)
A2. Referred pain (LTP)
B. Joint instability
B1. Clicking sound
B2. Degenerative changes (if chronic)

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L-factor = every patient whose main problem is a ligament (even when


other doctors said it was related to osteoarthristis, a hernia, or
psychogenic)
Biopuncturists think about ligaments when
there was an accident or trauma
there is nerve-like pain
Patients with ligament based symptoms often show relief while in
movement and when applying ice
Ligamentous pain does not show on X-rays or scans, so:
Look for them during clinical examination.

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Two types: LPPs and LTPs


Ligament injections in LPPS
e.g., LPP in ankle ligament

ankle swelling and local pain


e.g., LPP in acromio-clavicular ligament
pain in shoulder

Ligament injections in LTPS (also referred pain!)


e.g., LTP in nuchal ligament

neck pain/headache
e.g., LTP in iliolumbar ligament
pseudo-sciatic pain

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Part 2. Strategy for functional complaints


Strategy for functional complaints

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Reflex zone injections (RZ):


This is referrred to as SEGMENT THERAPY
These injections have no direct contact with the target organ
These injections are given:
A. Subcutaneously (SC)
They work through the viscero-cutaneous reflexes
B. Intramuscularly (IM)
They work through somato-visceral reflexes

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Overview
1. Drainage
Lymphomyosot

2. Modulation
Traumeel

3. Symptomatic
4. Cellular/Organ
e.g., Homaccords Compositae

A.SC

A1

A2

A3

A4

B.IM

B1

B2

B3

B4

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Four phases
Phase 1: Lymphomyosot
Phase 2: Traumeel
Phase 3: Homaccords, Hepeel, Engystol
Phase 4: Coenzyme compositum or more specific compositae
Two techniques
A. Subcutaneous injections (= most common technique for segment
therapy)
B. Intramuscular injections (usually in the paravertebral muscles)

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Asthma/bronchitis
Phase 1: Lymphomyosot
Phase 2: Traumeel
Phase 3: Drosera-Homaccord, Engystol or Ignatia-Homaccord
Phase 4: Echinacea compositum or Coenzyme compositum
Where?
SC: Front (sternal side)/back (dorsal side)
IM: in the paravertebral back muscles (dorsal level)

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Fig: asthma or bronchitis


(anterior and posterior)

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Tracheitis/Bronchitis
Day after: a lot of sputum
(expectoration)
= reaction phase
= good reaction
You have to tell your patient in
advance!
And always give a BP
pamphlet to each patient.

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Functional disorders of stomach


Phase 1: Lymphomyosot
Phase 2: Traumeel
Phase 3: Nux vomicaHomaccord
Phase 4: Coenzyme
compositum

Where?
SC: Front/back (dorsal
side: midline T2 - T9)
IM: in the paravertebral
back muscles (dorsal level)

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Functional disorders of the intestinal tract


(ileum/colon)
Phase 1: Lymphomyosot
Phase 2: Traumeel
Phase 3: Colocynthis-Homaccord, Spascupreel
Nux vomica-Homaccord or Veratrum-Homaccord
Phase 4: Coenzyme compositum or Podophyllum compositum

Where?
SC: Front + back (dorsolumbar side: midline)
IM: in the paravertebral back muscles (dorsolumbar level)

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Fig: RZ (reflexzone)
Ileum SC

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colon SC

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IM reflex injections for ileum/colon


Segment therapy:
One can give injections with the same remedies (Spascupreel,
Nux vomica-Homaccord)
into the paravertebral musculature
e.g., on the lumbar level on both sides:

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Functional disorders of pelvis


Phase 1: Lymphomyosot
Phase 2: Traumeel
Phase 3: Berberis-Homaccord,

Sabal-Homaccord,
Hormeel
Phase 4: Solidago compositum,
Testis compositum,
Ovarium compositum or
Coenzyme compositum
Where?
SC: front/back (dorsal side:
sacral midline)

IM: in the buttock muscles

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Part 3. General approach using biopuncture


1. Drainage:
Lymphomyosot for lymphatic detoxification

2. Detoxification:
Hepeel (Hepar compositum) for liver
Berberis-Homaccord (Solidago compositum) for kidneys

3. Bioregulation of the hormonal system:


Hormeel (Ovarium compositum or Testis compositum)

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1. Drainage
Lymphomyosot for lymphatic detoxification
Where?
Submandibular area (Waldeyer)
Thoracic area (reflex zone of thymus/bronchi)
Epigastric area (liver/pancreas/gastric area)
Abdominal area (reflex zone ileum/colon)
Pelvic area (reflex zone bladder/genitals)

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Drainage of lymphatic system


Standard treatment with biopuncture:
Airways (BALT): reflex points thorax front/back side (air
pollution, smoking)
Liver/stomach/colon: reflex points front/back side (pollution of
food and medication)
Ileum (GALT): reflex points front/back side also
immunomodulation

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Drainage of lymphatic system


After mononucleosis
Chronic intoxication
Air pollution (airways)
Food, medication (liver, intestinal tract)
As a major detoxification for any chronic disease, such as:
Migraine
Chronic fatigue
Allergy
Multiple pathology

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2. Detoxification
2A. Hepeel (Hepar compositum) for liver
2B. Berberis-Homaccord (Solidago compositum) for kidneys

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Detoxification of the liver


What?
Hepeel (first choice remedy)
Hepar compositum (chronic, tissue damage)
Where?
SC: Front + back
IM: in the paravertebral back muscles
(dorsal level)

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Liver detoxification:
Reflex therapy by using SC injections in liver area

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Detoxification of the kidneys/ureter/bladder


What?
Berberis-Homaccord (first choice remedy)
Solidago compositum (chronic, tissue damage)
Where?
SC: Front + back
IM: in the paravertebral back muscles (dorsolumbar level)

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Kidney detoxification: reflex therapy by using


SC injections in kidney areas

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3. Bioregulation hormonal system:


Hormeel or Ovarium compositum
To treat all symptoms which are related to the female
cycle/hormonal system

E.g., Hormonal migraine injections into the reflex zone of the


ovaries (next slide)

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Reflex zone of ovaria: give two or three SC


injections on each side in the fossa iliaca

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