BICYCLE MASTER PLAN

Appendix A

Part I: Design and Engineering Guidelines

figure a1.12

Split-Path Discourages Motor Vehicle Access

C1B(8) GUIDELINES FOR OFF-STREET PATHS WITH HEAVY USE

A broken yellow center stripe is a good way to separate directional flow if a path is expected to have heavy usage. If an existing path is too narrow to handle user volumes, the path can be widened to provide the necessary capacity. Also, a separate jogger or equestrian path may be constructed with bark mulch alongside the paved path.

C2. Bicycle Lane Design
Bicycle lanes are one-way facilities that carry bicycle traffic in the same direction as adjacent motor vehicle traffic. Bicycle lanes are the preferred facility for urban arterial and collector streets. Bicycle lanes are created by the addition of an 8 inch (200 mm) stripe and stencils. Motorists are prohibited from using bicycle lanes for driving and parking. This does not preclude motor vehicles from using a bicycle lane for emergency avoidance maneuvers or breakdowns.

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BICYCLE MASTER PLAN

Appendix A

Part I: Design and Engineering Guidelines

C. Design Guidelines for Bicycle Facilities
(continued)

C2a. Curbed streets PDOT’s preferred standards for bicycle lane dimensions (Figure A1.13) are as follows:
For a bicycle lane adjacent to curb or parking: • 5 foot preferred width. Bicycle lane widths of 6 feet maximum may be desirable when one or a combination of the following conditions exists: • traffic volumes and speeds are high; • adjacent parking use and turnover is high; • catch basin grates, gutter joints, and other features in the bicycle lane may present an obstacle to cyclists; • steep grades exist; • truck volumes are high; or • bicycle volumes are high. Bicycle lane widths of 4 feet minimum may be acceptable when: • physical constraints exist, for a segment of less than 1 mile that links to existing bikeways on both ends; or • implemented in conjunction with traffic calming devices (see section B7); or • adjacent to parking with [very] low use and turnover; or • adjacent to an uncurbed street shoulder. Additionally, for on-street parking, PDOT recommends that there be an 8 foot preferred (7 foot minimum) parking area width adjacent to the bicycle lane. PDOT recommends that the travel lane width adjacent to a bicycle lane be 11 foot (10 foot minimum). A four-foot bicycle lane should not be used in combination with a 7 foot parking lane and/or a 10 foot travel lane.
Bicycle Lanes on One-way Streets

figure a1.13

Bicycle lanes on one-way streets should be on the right side of the roadway, except where a bicycle lane on the left will decrease the number of conflicts (e.g., those caused by heavy bus traffic or dual right-turn lanes, etc.). Directional arrow pavement markings should be used to indicate the proper direction of travel and discourage wrong way riding. Preferred Travel Lane Width Figure A1.14 shows examples of typical street cross-sections with preferred and acceptable design treatments.
Parking 8’ 5’ (7’) (4-1/2’)

Pref

5’

Min (4-1/2’)

11’ (10’)

11’ (10’)

C2b. Uncurbed streets When providing a shoulder for bicycle use, a width of 6 feet (1.8 m) is recommended. This allows a cyclist to ride far enough from the edge of the pavement to
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BICYCLE MASTER PLAN

Appendix A

Part I: Design and Engineering Guidelines

figure a1.14

Bike Lane Designs for Curbed Streets

= BIKE LANE P = PARKING = DIRECTION OF TRAVEL

P 4.5’ 10’ 36’ 10’ 4.5’ 7’

TWO-WAY STREET 36’ WIDE

P 5’ 11’ 40’ 11’ 5’ 8’

TWO-WAY STREET 40’ WIDE

P 7.5’ 10’ 40’ 10’ 5’

P 7.5’

ONE-WAY STREET 40’ WIDE

P 7.5’ 4.5’ 10’ 44’ 10’ 4.5’

P 7.5’

TWO-WAY STREET 44’ WIDE

P 7.5’ 10’ 10’ 50’ 10’ 5’

P 7.5’

ONE-WAY STREET 50’ WIDE

TWO-WAY STREET P 7.5‘ 5‘ 10‘ 11‘ 56‘ 10‘ 5‘ P 7.5‘ WITH CENTER TURN 56‘ WIDE

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