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AGENDA

Ordinary Meeting of Council


6.00pm Wednesday 26 August 2015

*** Broadcast live on Phoenix FM 106.7 ***

VENUE:
Reception Room,
Bendigo Town Hall,
Hargreaves Street, Bendigo

NEXT MEETING:
Wednesday 16 September 2015
Bendigo Town Hall
Copies of the City of Greater Bendigo Councils Agendas & Minutes
can be obtained online at www.bendigo.vic.gov.au

PAGE 1

Council Vision
Greater Bendigo - Working together to be Australia's most liveable regional city.

Council Values
Council wants the community to continue to have reason to be proud of the city and will
do this through:

Transparency - Information about Council decisions is readily available and easily


understood;
Efficiency and effectiveness - Council provides services based on evidence of
need and demonstrates continuous improvement in the delivery of services;
Inclusion and consultation - Council uses a range of engagement strategies to
ensure community members can understand and take part in discussion that
informs the development of new strategies and actions;
Clear decisive and consistent planning - In a rapidly growing municipality, Council
undertakes to plan effectively for our long-term future;
Respect for community priorities and needs - Council will advocate for improved
services for community members and will consider community impact and
feedback the decisions it makes.

Themes
1.

Planning for Growth

2.

Presentation and Vibrancy

3.

Productivity

4.

Sustainability

5.

Leadership and Good Governance

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ORDINARY MEETING
WEDNESDAY 26 AUGUST 2015

ORDER OF BUSINESS:
ITEM

PRECIS

PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

PRAYER

PRESENT

APOLOGIES

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

CR LYONS' REPORT

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

1.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

1.1

Further Response to Petition and Adoption of


Strathfieldsaye Township Traffic Management Plan

2.

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

20

2.1

Proposed Lot 1, PS716365 - 55 Somerville Street, Flora Hill


3550 - Partial Demolition of Existing Building; Use and
Develop Land for an Education Centre (Training Facility)
and Reduction in Car Parking

20

2.2

Planning Scheme Amendment C201 - New Heritage Places


and Heritage Efficiency Review - Adoption

37

2.3

Private Planning Scheme Amendment Policy Review

51

2.4

Priorities for Planning Scheme Amendments - Progress


Report for 2014/2015 & Plan for 2015 & Beyond

64

2.5

Connecting Greater Bendigo: Integrated Transport & Land


Use Strategy (ITLUS)

71

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2.6

Proposed Sale of 8 Rennie Street, Huntly

94

3.

PRESENTATION AND VIBRANCY

102

3.1

Bendigo Easter Festival Community Reference Group

102

3.2

An Official Bendigo Scottish Tartan

104

3.3

Women Showing the Way Forum 2015

107

4.

PRODUCTIVITY

110

5.

SUSTAINABILITY

111

5.1

Graeme Robertson, National Trust, Cast Iron Collection

111

6.

LEADERSHIP AND GOOD GOVERNANCE

117

6.1

Nomination for a Council Nominee for Election to the


Board of Bendigo Stadium Limited

117

6.2

Record of Assemblies

119

6.3

Contracts Awarded Under Delegation

124

7.

URGENT BUSINESS

125

8.

NOTICES OF MOTION

126

8.1

NOTICE OF MOTION

126

9.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

128

10.

MAYOR'S REPORT

128

11.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

128

12.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

128

12.1

Confidential Report in accordance with Section 89(2)(d)


and (e) of the Local Government Act 1989, relating to a
contractual matter and proposed development.

128

____________________________
CRAIG NIEMANN
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY
PRAYER
PRESENT
APOLOGIES
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Cr Mark Weragoda
SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS
That Standing Orders be suspended to allow the conduct of Public Question Time.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME


Public Question Time Guidelines
Public Question Time Purpose
Council has provided the opportunity for members of the public to ask questions of broad
interest to Council and the community. Matters relating to routine Council works should
be taken up with Councils Customer Service Officers through its Customer Request
System.
By the time planning matters have reached the council agenda, they have been through
an extensive process as required by the Planning and Environment Act. In addition, in
most instances mediation has been held between the parties involved. Throughout the
process there are many opportunities for the people to ask questions. Therefore, no
questions relating to planning matters on the Agenda will be accepted.
Public Question Time Where, When And Who
The public question time is held at every Ordinary Meeting of Greater Bendigo City
Council. Meetings of Council commence at 6.00pm in the Reception Room, Bendigo
Town Hall, Hargreaves Street, Bendigo.
The public question time is held at the start of the meeting as close as practical to
6:00pm. A maximum of 30 minutes has been provided for registered and unregistered
questions.
Residents are encouraged to lodge questions in advance so that a more complete
response can be provided.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Questions will be put to the Council by the individual posing the question; the question
will be answered by the Mayor or CEO, or where appropriate, Councillors or Council
Officers.
Acceptance of Questions
Each person asking a question of Council is required to stand, state their name, and
address the Mayor. Public Question Time is not an opportunity for making of statements
or other comments. Councils Meeting Procedure Local Law does not allow for other
questions or comments during the remainder of the meeting.
1.

An individual may only ask one question per meeting, a follow-up question may be
permitted at the discretion of the Mayor.

2.

In the event that the same or similar question is raised by more than one person, an
answer may be given as a combined response.

3.

In the event that time does not permit all questions registered to be answered,
questions will be answered in writing or referred to the next meeting if appropriate.

4.

The Mayor and or CEO have the right to decline registration on basis of:
Prosecution, summonses or any other litigation;
Most appropriately addressed by other means;
Vague, irrelevant, insulting or improper, defamatory;
Answer likely to compromise his / her position;
Confidential, commercial-in-confidence.

5.

Each individual whose registration form has been accepted or declined will be
advised by the Friday of the week prior to the scheduled meeting.

6.

In the event of a registration form being declined the registration form will be
circulated to the Mayor or Councillors for information.

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS


That Standing Orders be resumed.

CR LYONS' REPORT

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST


Pursuant to Sections 77, 78 and 79 of the Local Government Act 1989 (as
amended) direct and indirect conflict of interest must be declared prior to debate
on specific items within the agenda; or in writing to the Chief Executive Officer
before the meeting. Declaration of indirect interests must also include the
classification of the interest (in circumstances where a Councillor has made a
Declaration in writing, the classification of the interest must still be declared at the
meeting), i.e.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)

direct financial interest


indirect interest by close association
indirect interest that is an indirect financial interest
indirect interest because of conflicting duties
indirect interest because of receipt of an applicable gift
indirect interest as a consequence of becoming an interested party
indirect interest as a result of impact on residential amenity
conflicting personal interest

A Councillor who has declared a conflict of interest, must leave the meeting and
remain outside the room while the matter is being considered, or any vote is taken.
Councillors are also encouraged to declare circumstances where there may be a
perceived conflict of interest.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES
Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Wednesday 5 August 2015.
The following items were considered at the Ordinary Council meeting held on
Wednesday 5 August 2015 at 6:00pm.

Petition/Joint Letter: Request for Sealed Walking/Bicycle Track at the Rear of


Properties in Towers and Wirth Streets, Flora Hill
Fosterville God Mine - Nominations for Community Representatives
Bendigo Early Learning Centre Update July 2015
Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan
Reconciliation Action in Bendigo
2015-2018 Partnership Grants
Annual Report - Road Management Plan Version 2.0
La Trobe University: Work Ready Tertiary Students for Bendigo and Region
Response to Revised Draft Victorian Floodplain Management Strategy
Councillor Conduct Panel Decision
Chief Executive Officer Performance Review 2014/15
Progress Report: Independent Review Implementation
Customer Request System Satisfaction Survey 2015
Record of Assemblies
Contracts Awarded Under Delegation
Section 89 Confidential Report: Personnel and contractual matters
Section 89 Confidential Report: Contractual matter and proposed development

The unconfirmed minutes have also been posted on the City of Greater Bendigo website
pending confirmation at this meeting.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on Wednesday 5 August, 2015
as circulated, be taken as read and confirmed.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

1.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

1.1

FURTHER RESPONSE TO PETITION AND ADOPTION OF


STRATHFIELDSAYE TOWNSHIP TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PLAN

Document Information
Author

Brett Martini, Manager Engineering & Public Space

Responsible
Director

Rachelle Quattrocchi, Acting Director, Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to adopt the Strathfieldsaye Township Traffic Management
Plan and other measures to address traffic safety concerns raised by the Strathfieldsaye
community.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2015-2016 Update):
Theme: 1

Leadership and Good Governance

Strategy 1.2

Maintain strong and positive relationships with Federal and


State Government and relevant departments and agencies,
and advocate to ensure that the required infrastructure, key
projects, policies and services are in place as our
community grows.

Action 1.2.3

Advocate to other levels of government for funding for


required infrastructure, key projects and services to be in
place for our growing and liveable municipality.

Theme: 2

Planning for Growth

Strategic Objectives

Greater Bendigo plans for the needs of our growing


population through the preparation of long-term strategies
and the development of 'major new assets' and supporting
infrastructure.

Action 2.2.3

Prepare and implement Urban Design Frameworks for the


Maiden Gully and Strathfieldsaye commercial centres
through the planning scheme.

Action 2.3.2

Increase resources for new footpaths, shared path


construction, including connectivity of pedestrian and cycle
paths.
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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Regional Strategic Plan Reference:


Strathfieldsaye Township Plan - Strategy 1.16:
Commence negotiations with VicRoads to upgrade the following key intersections:
Strathfieldsaye Road & Club Court potential roundabout
Strathfieldsaye Road & Uxbridge Street potential traffic lights
Strathfieldsaye Road & Blucher Street potential traffic lights
Background Information
Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s):
A joint letter was received at the Council meeting on 18 December 2013 from students of
the Strathfieldsaye Primary School concerned about the safety of parents and children in
Strathfieldsaye because of traffic conditions around the two primary schools Strathfieldsaye Primary School and St Francis of the Fields.
At that meeting, Council resolved:
"that the joint letter be received and noted and that a Council report be prepared
following a formal response from VicRoads."
A report was then considered by Council at its meeting of 26 March 2014. In summary,
the report highlighted the following matters:
1.

Strathfieldsaye Road is an arterial road and is the responsibility of VicRoads.

2.

The Minister for Transport has advised that intersection improvements in


Strathfieldsaye Road have been considered in the past but, based on the relative
priority against other projects across the State, funding was not allocated. The
Minister has also indicated that these would continue to be considered for funding
in future Victorian Government road programs.

3.

Strategic planning for Strathfieldsaye and the associated road network has been
undertaken in the development of a number of documents. The Strathfieldsaye
Township Plan (2009) and the Bendigo 2020 Transport Study (1993) both support
the duplication of Strathfieldsaye Road when traffic volumes dictate. A count
undertaken in July 2013 found an average annual daily volume of 7,050 vehicles on
this road.

4.

The Strathfieldsaye Township Plan identifies potential treatments at five


intersections along Strathfieldsaye Road including Club Court / Tannery Lane,
Uxbridge Street, Wellesley Street, Blucher Street and Emu Creek Road.

5.

The above strategies are considered to be current and relevant for the improvement
of the road network and associated infrastructure such as bike and walking paths,
and parking in the area. Further strategic work specific to the area is not considered
warranted.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

6.

Councils primary role in relation to improvements to arterial roads is to advocate to


VicRoads and the State Government on behalf of the Greater Bendigo community.

7.

While pressure on Strathfieldsaye Road is growing, other parts of the citys arterial
road network are also suffering from this problem. In particular, considerable
concern has been raised in the community about Napier Street through White Hills
and the difficulty with entering and crossing it from local roads. Similarly, the growth
of Maiden Gully is putting increasing pressure on the Calder Highway and the
intersections in that area.

8.

Understanding the individual benefits and impacts of the intersection improvements


to Strathfieldsaye Road (as identified in the Township Plan) would require a Traffic
Impact Assessment that is estimated to cost $30,000. Council could lobby the State
to undertake this work given that it relates to work on the arterial road network.
Alternatively, Council could fund this work on the basis that it would help it
understand (and therefore manage) the local road impacts of any intersection
upgrade pursued. The consultant's report would provide Council with technical
information to help lobby the State about the preferred order of intersection works in
Strathfieldsaye Road.

9.

A very important consideration is whether Council deems it appropriate to itself


initiate a shift of a State Government cost burden onto ratepayers by funding any
works or activities associated with improving traffic conditions on Strathfieldsaye
Road.

10. In recent years, the City has constructed shared off-road paths in the vicinity of both
primary schools in Strathfieldsaye and a network of proposed cycling and walking
paths has already been identified to service the townships of Strathfieldsaye and
Junortoun. These projects compete for funding annually against other potential
capital works projects identified across the Municipality.
In response to the above summarised report, Council resolved:
"That an estimate be prepared for the next meeting of Council for the preparation of
a comprehensive professional plan to address the problems being generated by the
rapid growth in vehicular, and importantly pedestrian and cycling, traffic in the
township of Strathfieldsaye.
It is anticipated that such a plan would include appropriate statistical analysis of
existing traffic; evaluate future growth of all traffic; examine all possible options
available to meet demands; establish the most appropriate solutions and give
attention to likely costs, funding options (for both the plan and works) and
prioritisation and timetabling of works. Further it would examine what role various
stakeholders could play to minimise costs in the collection and evaluation of
relevant data and that the Strathfieldsaye Primary School be provided with minutes
of this meeting."
Following this Council resolution, a further report was provided to Council at its Ordinary
Meeting on 7 May 2014 to consider the cost estimate prepared as per its resolution on
26 March 2014. At this meeting, it was resolved:

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

" That Council, having considered the report on the likely scope, cost and timing to
complete a comprehensive plan to address the problems being generated by the
rapid growth in vehicular, and importantly pedestrian and cycling traffic in the
township of Strathfieldsaye, allocate up to $50,000 from the Developer
Contributions Reserve to undertake the plan no later than February 2015 and
further, that traffic behaviour be professionally observed at school sites to
establish if any interim measures could be implemented immediately to enhance
safety for school children."
Following this resolution, a consultant's brief was prepared in line with the outline in the 7
May 2014 report to Council. A number of suitably qualified consultants were invited to
submit proposals that reflected the objectives identified in the brief:

The prioritisation of intersection upgrades on Strathfieldsaye Road / Wellington


Street;
Develop opportunities for improved traffic flow and management throughout the
study area;
Consideration towards the linkage of local and collector roads, and the
construction of 'paper roads' to improve the internal circulation of residential traffic
movements;
Appropriate statistical analysis of existing traffic;
Evaluate future growth of all traffic;
Examine all possible options available to meet demands;
Establish the most appropriate solutions and give attention to likely costs, funding
options and prioritisation of works.
Investigate changes to traffic movements and the impacts on local streets due to
intersection upgrades on Strathfieldsaye Road;
Investigate the possibility of a bypass of the Strathfieldsaye township; and
Establish a regime for ongoing monitoring to the level of service through
Strathfieldsaye, now and into the future.

A tender evaluation panel, including a representative from VicRoads, assessed the


proposals, with Trafficworks Pty Ltd being appointed for the project. Trafficworks'
proposal included the following methodology:

Review of existing studies, policies and plans provided by the City of Greater
Bendigo (CoGB).

Site inspection of the study area.


Keep the community informed of the study and gain its input via various means.
Liaison with relevant Government authorities including VicRoads and Public
Transport Victoria.
Meetings with key stakeholders such as the two primary schools and
Strathfieldsaye and District Community Enterprise.
Capture current traffic data.
Review available recent relevant VicRoads and Council traffic count data.
Review casualty crash data for Strathfieldsaye available from VicRoads
Crashstats database.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Estimation of likely future traffic volumes on key roads in central Strathfieldsaye.


Determine appropriate intersection treatment options for Wellington Street
intersections with Tannery Lane / Club Court, Uxbridge Street, Blucher Street and
Emu Creek Road.
Determine likely performance of existing intersection conditions and possible
treatment options for current years and future years 2016, 2021, 2026 and 2031.
Determine suitable timings for intersection improvements to occur.
Prepare strategic level cost estimates for proposed traffic improvements.
Identify with CoGB and VicRoads potential sources of funding for traffic
improvements.
Consider at a strategic level option/s for an eastwest aligned alternative route for
traffic to avoid travel through central Strathfieldsaye.

Figure 1: Central Strathfieldsaye study area shown in red

Following review of existing documentation, Trafficworks undertook extensive data


collection based on existing movements of traffic, pedestrians and cyclists. To
supplement this data, community consultation was undertaken by Trafficworks' subconsultant, CommunityVibe. This included targeted consultation with the Strathfieldsaye
and District Community Enterprise (SDCE) and local primary schools, along with broader
consultation via online and paper surveys.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Utilising the existing traffic data and the projected growth of development in
Strathfieldsaye based on planning strategies and the current zoning, traffic growth was
predicted at specific timeframes through to 2031. This information was used to assess
the performance of key intersections at these specified timeframes and determine the
required timing of any major upgrades.
Report
The draft Strathfieldsaye Township Traffic Management Plan (STTMP) report included
detailed information on the traffic investigation and community consultation conducted.
Focusing on intersections along Wellington Street, the report outlined recommendations
for timing and treatments for major intersection improvements.
The intersection of Wellington Street and Tannery Lane was acknowledged as the
highest priority treatment with significant works required almost immediately. This need
has been recognised by the Victorian Government and a commitment of funding for this
intersection has been announced with planning currently underway.
The development of the intersection of Blucher Street is identified as the next highest
priority with requirement for upgrade anticipated by about 2021. Also considered was
Uxbridge Street, in both the current 'T' intersection and with the inclusion of the southern
leg as a cross intersection. The upgrade of this intersection is anticipated to be required
by 2026.
The report considered and evaluated the upgrade of intersections through the installation
of either roundabouts or traffic signals. The use of roundabouts produced a better traffic
performance when compared to traffic signals. Roundabouts also have a superior safety
record for motor vehicles, largely due to the lower vehicle speeds and the reduced
severity of impact compared to cross intersections. However, roundabouts do not cater
well for pedestrian movements and are often difficult for cyclists to navigate, particularly
on roads with traffic volumes similar to Strathfieldsaye Road and Wellington Street.
Nonetheless, data collection undertaken by the consultants did not identify particularly
high volumes of pedestrian movements during the research period. This can be
attributed to two factors. Residential development within walking distance of the primary
schools and the commercial centre is relatively low for a centre the size of
Strathfieldsaye. The other constraint is the limited facilities for pedestrians to cross
Wellington Street. Currently the school crossing provides safe access during school
periods however there are no other facilities to assist in the crossing of Wellington Street.
Development of land to the south of Wellington Street is progressing, with full
development of this area expected in the short term. Being in such close proximity to the
schools and commercial centre, this development will generate greater desire for
pedestrians to cross Wellington Street.
Based on this anticipated growth in pedestrian movement across Wellington Street and
ultimate growth in traffic volume along Wellington Street, traffic signals were
recommended by the consultants in preference to roundabouts. The report also
recommended that pedestrian operated signals be installed in the longer term between
Uxbridge and Blucher Streets to facilitate safe pedestrian movement across Wellington
Street.
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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Submissions to the draft Report:


The draft report was distributed to key stakeholders being the primary schools, SDCE
and VicRoads. Information was also prepared for the public with submissions on the draft
report invited until 22 May 2015. Submissions were received from Strathfieldsaye
Primary School, SDCE and VicRoads. To discuss these submissions, a meeting was
held with the SDCE and several meetings were held with VicRoads.
The submission from VicRoads and subsequent meetings with CoGB officers largely
centred on the type of intersection treatments recommended. As outlined above, the
installation of roundabouts provides improved traffic performance and safety benefits but
can adversely impact pedestrian movements. Where the consultant's report has
recommended installation of traffic signals to accommodate pedestrian movement,
VicRoads has suggested a roundabout in conjunction with pedestrian operated signals
(POS) as an alternative treatment.
Given that the estimated cost of either a roundabout or traffic signals at the Wellington
Street and Tannery Lane intersection is in excess of the current funding committed by
the State Government, there is a risk that the installation of a roundabout at this location
could happen without the installation of POS. In order to accommodate the current and
future pedestrian demand, it is considered that POS on at least the Wellington Street
legs of the roundabout construction should be included as part of the project.
VicRoads also recommended that a combination of treatments, signals and roundabouts
be modelled for the length of Wellington Street to determine if this would produce a
better outcome. This modelling could produce many different combinations of treatments
based on a roundabout with and without POS / traffic signals at each of the three main
intersections. This request was considered to be beyond the scope of the STTMP and it
is not proposed that CoGB undertake this work. If VicRoads consider this work important
to their management of Wellington Street, or as part of their concept design for the
Tannery Lane intersection then VicRoads should commission this work.
As outlined, the movement and safety of pedestrians and cyclists were key issues for the
community and Council, and as such, traffic signals were recommended by the
consultant. If VicRoads undertake further modelling of all the intersections in Wellington
Street this may produce a satisfactory combination of traffic lights and roundabouts.
However if VicRoads consider roundabouts appropriate at some intersections then
provision is required to be made for the safe movement for pedestrians and cyclists as
part of the roundabout works. Provision for these users should not be subject to
additional funding or works at a later time.
The submission from the Strathfieldsaye Primary School was supportive of much of the
report but expressed community concern about the ultimate number of intersection
treatments and in particular, the recommendation of three traffic signalised intersections
and POS between Tannery Lane and Blucher Street (inclusive of these two
intersections). Whilst it is recognised that the Trafficworks recommendation would result
in four sets of signals within approximately 700m, the ultimate treatments may be subject
to more detailed modelling outlined above and the timing to complete these works on
each of the intersections is subject to the actual growth of traffic and future funding. It is
noted that signalisation of all key intersections is the recommended long term treatment,

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

however the coordination of signals would enable optimal performance of the signals for
all users.
The STTMP includes traffic modelling based on the best available current information
and projections to 2036. The report recommends the ongoing monitoring of traffic at least
every five years and that the rate of development is also monitored. This will enable the
appropriate timing for funding applications and required works. Other impacts, both
positive and negative, such as changes to the amenity of particular roads through
redirection of traffic and vegetation impacts were not included in this high level
evaluation.
The report also noted the high level investigation of an alternative route around the
commercial centre to the north and south of Wellington Street. These routes were
assessed on the cost of construction versus the savings to vehicle operating costs and
based on this assessment, neither route could be justified.
Pedestrians and cyclists:
The STTMP focussed on the investigation of traffic management and safety
improvements along Wellington Street including the movement of pedestrians across
Wellington Street. The submission to the draft report from the SDCE also raised
improvements to pedestrian movements around the Strathfieldsaye Primary School.
The SDCE has worked with CoGB and joint funded a number of shared paths through
Strathfieldsaye over many years. The survey of pedestrians and cyclists showed that the
path along the Sheepwash Creek is well utilised, particularly by cyclists. The path along
Emu Creek also provides good off-road access to the St Francis of the Fields Primary
School (St Francis). CoGB is discussing the current management arrangements for the
paths along Emu Creek which are on land that is either owned or managed by St
Francis. These paths, traditionally only used by school students, have been extended to
Sullivans Road in recent years and now serve the broader community. Further extension
of this path network from Sullivans Road to Blucher Street remains a key item of
discussion. The bridge across Emu Creek constructed by Villawood will also enable
students to walk or cycle to the primary schools from this development as well as serving
the broader community.
Currently a joint funded proposal to construct a shared path between Junortoun and
Strathfieldsaye is nearing approval from Parks Victoria. This will provide a valuable link
particularly for primary school age students from McIvor Forest Estate to both
Strathfieldsaye primary schools. Likewise, Strathfieldsaye students attending the
Catholic College Bendigo Junortoun campus will also benefit from this path.
The construction of footpaths in Uxbridge and Apsley Streets was raised as part of the
SDCE submission. Upgrade of the existing gravel path in Apsley Street to concrete or
asphalt was the highest priority for SDCE. Given that this existing path is in very good
condition, an upgrade is not the highest priority when compared with other projects and
although it will be considered during the 2016/17 Council Budget process, it is unlikely to
be funded at that time.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Other footpath projects in the area that are being considered as part of the development
of 2016/17 budget include a shared path along Strathfieldsaye Road between Ryalls
Lane and Club Court. This would address the long standing community concerns
regarding the lack of pedestrian or cyclist facilities along Strathfieldsaye Road particularly
at the Sheepwash Creek road bridge. A footpath along Ryalls Lane between Guys Hill
Road and Strathfieldsaye Road is another key link for a large part of the Strathfieldsaye
community. These projects are currently high priorities based on the evaluation criteria.
A number of locations for pedestrian crossings were raised in the SDCE submission to
the draft report. Pedestrian crossings need formal VicRoads approval and must meet
VicRoads warrants in relation to pedestrian and vehicle numbers before installation is
approved. Based on counts that have been undertaken, a pedestrian crossing in Blucher
Street at the Post Office meets these warrants and CoGB is developing a draft design for
VicRoads approval. Subject to final costing, these works are proposed to be undertaken
this financial year.
Although a pedestrian crossing of Uxbridge Street near Wellington Street was requested,
the warrants for a crossing in this location are not met due to the limited pedestrian and
vehicle movements outside of school drop off and pick up times. A school crossing in the
vicinity of the school entry was also considered, however again, this project did not meet
warrants for installation at this time.
A number of students currently cross Uxbridge Street at Apsley Street. This area is
supervised by a teacher from Strathfieldsaye Primary School and operates safely under
this configuration.
Active Travel:
Taking into consideration strategies outlined in the draft Integrated Transport and Land
Use Strategy (ITLUS), it is noted that encouragement of walking and cycling to school
would see traffic congestion around Strathfieldsaye improved at school drop-off and pickup times.
As part of the implementation of ITLUS, each school will be provided with a toolkit which
will assist them to encourage sustainable travel and offer incentive programs for students
that ride or walk to school.
With this assistance provided to Strathfieldsaye schools combined with continued
investment in path infrastructure, students and parents can be effectively supported in
choosing more active transport options.
Encouraging more students to walk or ride all or a part of the way to school is a key
principle of ITLUS and represents the most effective way to reduce traffic congestion
around schools during drop-off and pick-up times.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Consultation/Communication
The development of the STTMP has been undertaken in consultation with the
Strathfieldsaye community. Questionnaires, discussions and on-site meetings have
informed the development of the draft STTMP. In particular, the two primary schools and
the SDCE have been major drivers for this work, with the three groups making important
contributions. Submissions to the draft document have been addressed through revisions
to the STTMP and minor project implementation as part of the City's capital works
program.
Resource Implications
One of the key drivers for the development of the STTMP was the requirement to
upgrade the intersection of Wellington Street and Tannery Lane. The Victorian
Government has committed funding for this work and VicRoads has commenced survey
work at the site with a view to significant funding for works being made available in
2016/17.
Various smaller scale projects, particularly around pedestrian and cyclist movements,
have also been identified. The installation of a pedestrian crossing in Blucher Street will
be considered for funding from the 2015/16 traffic program or mid-year budget review
depending on the final project estimates. As noted above, a number of path projects will
be considered for funding as part of the development of the 2016/17 budget, due to
commence in the next few months.
Conclusion
Strathfieldsaye remains a key residential growth area and the petition received by
Council raised a number of traffic safety concerns that have been building in
Strathfieldsaye in line with the development of the area and subsequent traffic growth.
Along with the further development of land occurring on the edge of Strathfieldsaye, infill
development will also continue, particularly on the south side of Wellington Street. This
development combined with further commercial development on the north side of
Wellington Street will increase the desire for pedestrian movement, across Wellington
Street in particular.
Continued residential development will see the demand for places at the two primary
schools in Strathfieldsaye continue. The encouragement of active transport to school is
the best way to tackle traffic congestion challenges at primary schools. Significant
investment has been made in conjunction with SDCE in the development of shared paths
in the vicinity of both schools. Planning for a shared path between Strathfieldsaye and
Junortoun is well advanced and further works particularly along creek lines are proposed.
The management of shared paths on Crown and freehold land that traditionally only
serviced St Francis but is now servicing the broader community, is also in discussion.
Furthermore, projects to construct additional paths to principally service the schools and
link major residential areas are high on the priority list of footpaths for Council
consideration in coming budgets.

PAGE 18

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The STTMP recommended the installation of traffic signals at the three major
intersections in Wellington Street within the study period. This has been recognised by
the Victorian Government with funding committed for the intersection of Tannery Lane
and Wellington Street. The installation of pedestrian operated signals between Blucher
and Uxbridge Street was also recommended.
The STTMP is a high level document and although the use of signals was recommended
to accommodate the pedestrian movement, alternative treatments that meet these
criteria may be identified through more detailed traffic modelling and design work. CoGB
will continue to work with VicRoads in the development of individual intersection
treatments and the overall planning for Strathfieldsaye Road and Wellington Street.
Attachments
1.

Strathfieldsaye Township Traffic Management Plan

RECOMMENDATION
That Council, in response to the petition from the Strathfieldsaye community and the
development of the Strathfieldsaye Township Traffic Management Plan:
1.

Adopt the Strathfieldsaye Township Traffic Management Plan including support for
intersection treatments on Wellington Street at Tannery Lane, Uxbridge Street and
Blucher St;

2.

Continue to work with VicRoads on the development of designs for these


intersections ensuring that adopted treatment provides for the safe movement of
pedestrians and cyclists across Wellington Street;

3.

Undertake monitoring in conjunction with VicRoads, on the residential and


commercial development of Strathfieldsaye and the timing of the required
intersection treatments and other improvements to facilitate all modes of transport;

4.

Develop plans for the installation of a pedestrian crossing in Blucher Street between
Wellington Street and Apsley Lane for consideration as part of the 2015/16 various
traffic program or, pending cost estimates, for consideration during the mid-year
budget review;

5.

As part of the 2016/17 Council Budget process, consider the construction of paths
in Strathfieldsaye including:
a. Strathfieldsaye Road (north side) between Ryalls Lane and Club Court
b. Ryalls Lane (west side) - Guys Hill Road to Strathfieldsaye Road
c. Apsley Street (north side) Uxbridge Street to Blucher Street
d. Uxbridge Street (east side) - Wellington Street to Apsley Street;

6.

Continue discussion with St Francis in regard to management of paths on land that


they own or manage to recognise the community use of these paths and planning
for a long term linkage to Blucher Street.

7.

Assist Strathfieldsaye Primary School and St Francis in establishing programs for


the encouragement of active travel as part of the implementation of ITLUS; and

8.

Notify

the

submitters

of

the

joint

PAGE 19

letter

of

Council's

resolution.

Planning for Growth - Reports

2.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

2.1

PROPOSED LOT 1, PS716365 - 55 SOMERVILLE STREET, FLORA


HILL 3550 - PARTIAL DEMOLITION OF EXISTING BUILDING; USE
AND DEVELOP LAND FOR AN EDUCATION CENTRE (TRAINING
FACILITY) AND REDUCTION IN CAR PARKING

Document Information
Author

Peter O'Brien, Senior Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
Application details:

Partial demolition of existing building; use and develop land


for an education centre (training facility); and reduction in car
parking

Application No:

DP/863/2014

Applicant:

Loddon Mallee Housing Services Ltd t/a Haven Home Safe

Land:

Proposed Lot 1, PS716365 - 55 Somerville Street, FLORA


HILL 3550

Zoning:

General Residential Zone and adjoins a Road Zone 2

Overlays:

Neighbourhood Character Overlay 1

No. of objections:

Consultation
meeting:

3 March 2015

Key considerations:

Is there policy support for an education centre on this site?


Is the design of the extension to the dwelling acceptable?
Are amenity impacts associated with the use acceptable
and manageable by conditions?
Traffic and parking impacts; and
Objector concerns.

PAGE 20

Planning for Growth - Reports

Conclusion:

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The use of the land for the education centre is limited to


residents of the dwellings on the land (residents of the Sidney
Myer Community only) and amenity impacts are acceptable
and can be managed by conditions.
The built form; whilst flat roofed and contemporary, is an
appropriate response to the Victorian dwelling on the site and
traffic parking impacts are acceptable subject to conditions
drafted to require compliance with the planning scheme.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2015-2016 Update)
Planning for Growth
Housing options provide broader choice in order to meet current and future
community expectations and needs.
Productivity
Council fosters business and industry growth.
Sustainability
The built and natural qualities that make Greater Bendigo an attractive and appealing
place are valued and conserved.
Background Information
This and two other permit applications on adjoining land were received at the same time
(late November 2014). One of the applications (unconnected to the Sidney Myer Haven
project) for 1-3 Keck Street was approved by Council at its 27 May 2015 Ordinary
Meeting.
An application at 57 Somerville Street (adjoining the site of this application) for four
dwellings on that lot was withdrawn from the application process at the request of the
permit applicant in early June. Officers had significant concerns with the 57 Somerville
Street application, which the applicant was trying to address through a redesign.
However, the applicant elected to withdraw the application (and will re-apply at a later
date). This is the reason for the delay as it was intended for both to occur at the same
time (following receipt of a suitable redesign) given both relate to the Sidney Myer Haven
development.
Report
Subject Site and Surrounds
The application site is lot 1 of Plan of Subdivision PS716365 R. The lot which is the
application site was formed part of permit DSD/368/2006 which is the subdivision and
dwelling permit that the applicant is currently completing on the adjoining land. The site
contains an existing Victorian dwelling; which has historically been used for nonresidential uses including a hair dressing salon (approved in 1985) and medical
centre/counselling service (approved in 2005).

PAGE 21

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The lot is 415 square metres in size and has frontage of 16.13 metres to Somerville
Street. The site adjoins a vacant site to the south (57 Somerville Street) and the
common property access to the balance of the site being developed for dwellings to the
north.
Clause 22.14 Flora Hill Residential Character Policy in the Planning Scheme describes
the precinct the site is within as
The area is distinctive because it contains some of the few consistent inter-war period
residential streetscapes in Bendigo. There is also a consistency in the plan forms of
houses, the large, wide-spanned and gabled roof forms, and in the position of each
house on its block. Spaces between the houses provide glimpses of back yard
gardens and trees. The large, heavy roof forms dominate the street scene, lending a
strong horizontal emphasis that is reinforced by the strong horizontals and shadowing
of the verandahs. Front gardens, which are neatly tended, low in scale and mostly
exotic, form part of the street scene because of the low or transparent front fences.
Street tree avenues of medium to large exotics form another important component of
the area's character.
This description is not entirely appropriate for the application site given the site contains
a Victorian dwelling though it is accurate with regard to identifying the dominant land use
in the area the dominant use in the area is that of dwellings.

PAGE 22

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objector dwellings marked with a star.
Note: not all objectors are shown on the map owing to the location of their dwelling in
relation to the subject site.
Proposal
The applicant submission with regard to the proposed use of the land as an education
centre is:

PAGE 23

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The proposal is to re-develop the former dwelling on the site as a training facility that
will be associated with the adjoining Sidney Myer residential development. Key
functions of the new building will include office space, meeting rooms, kitchen, a
large training room and a one bedroom apartment on the upper floor.
The facility will provide living skills development programs to residents of the Sidney
Myer development, such as: learning to cook, classes in home care and
management, financial literacy, parenting classes, self-help learning, computer skills
and pre-learning literacy and numeracy classes
Typical classes will be between 6- 12 people and will include only those living on site
within the Sidney Myer community. It will not be open to the public or non-residents.
The only outside services that will use the site will be invited speakers or services
providing education or living skills classes or assessments to residents. The partners
that will assist in offering the programs will include institutions such as TAFE, YWCA,
BCHC and CAE, which hold appropriate accreditations in their respective courses.
The training facility, including the office, will operate during business hours (8:30
5pm, Monday to Friday); however the overnight staff will be on duty from 5pm-10pm.
There will generally be two staff members on site. A staff member will be on site
during the night, 24 hours per day, and seven days per week.
The architect for the development aspect of the application provided an appropriate
summary of the development as:
Proposed demolition of the existing add-ons at the rear of the house at 55 Somerville
Street. Internal refurbishment of the existing house to create secure staff facilities
and associated amenities.
The construction of a two storey addition connecting into the rear of the house;
training and kitchen facilities provided at ground level, lounge and staff sleepover
space on the first level.
Communal outdoor spaces provided to the North of the extension as well as to the
West of the existing house.

PAGE 24

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Figure 2: Site layout showing landscaping.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Figure 3: Streetscape perspective.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Figure 4: Elevation plans.


PAGE 27

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme


The reasons why a permit is required are:
Use and develop land for an education centre cl 32.08-1 and 32.08-10 (General
Residential Zone)
Partial demolition and building and works cl 43.05-2 (Neighbourhood Character
Overlay)
Reduction in car parking & car parking to the satisfaction of the responsible authority
cl 52.06 (Car Parking)
The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal:
State Planning Policy Framework

Integrated decision making (cl 10.04)


Loddon Mallee South Regional Growth Plan (cl 11.12)
Urban environment (cl 15.01)
Sustainable development (cl 15.02)
Movement networks (cl 18.02)
Education facilities (cl 19.02-2)
Development infrastructure (cl 19.03)

Municipal Strategic Statement

Municipal profile (cl 21.01)


Key issues and influence (cl 21.02)
Settlement (cl 21.02-1)
Reference documents (cl 21.10)

Local Planning Policies


Flora Hill Residential Character Precinct 2 (cl 22.14)
Other Provisions

General Residential Zone (cl 32.08)


Neighbourhood Character Overlay Schedule 1 (cl. 43.05)
Car parking (cl 52.06)
Bicycle parking (cl 52.34)
Decision guidelines (cl 65)

PAGE 28

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Consultation/Communication
Referrals
The following internal departments have been consulted on the proposal:
Referral

Comment

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification
The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and
nearby owners and occupiers.
As a result of advertising, 7 objections were received, with the grounds of objection
being:
Amenity impacts from the buildings (overlooking 53 Somerville Street)
Lack of need for the facility as other facilities offer like services.
Proposed built form out of context with the neighbourhood.
Inadequate parking on site.
The objections and planning merit of the applicant are discussed below.
A consultation meeting in the form of a drop in session was conducted at the application
site in March. This session was attended by the majority of the objectors and all of the
Eppalock Ward Councillors.
The delay in reporting the application was the result of the intention to report both this
and the now withdrawn application to Council at the same time given both permit were
related to the Sidney Myer Haven Community.
Planning Assessment
Is their policy support for an education centre on this site?
The application site has a history of non-residential use, including being used as a
hairdressing salon and a counselling practice. This application proposes to continue the
non-residential use of the building.

PAGE 29

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

State Policy at clause 19.02-2 (Education facilities) has a purpose to assist the
integration of education facilities with local and regional communities this links to
purposes of the General Residential Zone which include allowing educational,
recreational, religious, community and a limited range of other non-residential uses to
serve local community needs in appropriate locations. In this case, the education
centre will serve (and be limited) to the Sidney Myer Haven Community and it can be
seen that policy support for education centres within the community (in this case on the
same site as a community) exists.
Is the design of the extension to the dwelling acceptable?
Councils consideration of the extension to the dwelling is guided by the Neighbourhood
Character Overlay and how the proposal responds to Councils adopted Residential
Character Policy which is found in the planning scheme.
The permit applicants architect submits that the extension to the dwelling is acceptable
as:
A double storey addition at the rear provides the required spaces for the new support
facility, but is a restrained addition. The simple box form doesnt aim to take attention
from the existing house, and the separation provided by the single level transition link
avoids a jarring connection to the existing house and provides the house with the
respect on the site it deserves.
The desired future character for the area is to be achieved by the following objectives
and design responses which are assessed in turn:
Objectives

Suggested Design Response

To retain buildings that contributes to Retain and restore wherever possible,


the valued character of the area.
intact Inter-war era dwellings.
Assessment: The Victorian era dwelling is being substantially retained which meets
this objective.
To maintain and strengthen the garden Prepare a landscape plan to accompany all
settings of the dwelling.
applications for new dwellings.
Retain large, established trees and provide
for the planting of new trees wherever
possible.
Assessment: A landscape plan is not a policy requirement for extension to
dwellings. Despite this, the applicant has submitted a concept landscaping plan with
a total of 134 plants proposed.
The landscape plan noted that a turning area for cars in the front setback of the
building is proposed which is designed so that the tandem car spaces can enter, and
in particular, exit the site in the forward direction.
A proposed modification to the landscape scheme is that the access/parking area be
softened by the use of an earthy exposed aggregate surface treatment as opposed
to natural finish concrete which is currently proposed.

PAGE 30

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Objectives

Suggested Design Response

With the recommended condition regarding surface material the policy objective is
met.
To maintain the consistency, where The front setback should be not less than
present, of building front setbacks.
the average setback of the adjoining two
dwellings.
Assessment: Not applicable as the extension is to the rear of the dwelling.
To maintain the rhythm of dwelling Buildings should be setback from both side
spacing.
boundaries.
Assessment: The existing building and proposed extension is set off the southern
boundary (with the vacant 57 Somerville Street) and the carport is built to the
boundary with the common property accessing the balance of the site. Whilst the
carport is built to its boundary, the intent of the objective is met as the 8 metre wide
access sits between the application site and the other adjoining dwelling at 53
Somerville Street.
To minimise the dominance of the car Locate garages and carports behind the
storage facilities and loss of garden line of the dwelling.
space.
Assessment: A carport and two tandem spaces are proposed. The carport is set
behind the line of the front wall of the dwelling. Some potential garden space is lost
as some of the front setback area of the dwelling is to be used in order to allow for
vehicles to turn to exit in a forward direction.
The objective has been assessed as being met as the carport is appropriately
located, and the landscaping scheme proposed (including exposed aggregate
surface treatment as recommended by conditions) will see the site appropriately
treated.
To respect the identified heritage Where the streetscape contains identified
qualities of the streetscape or adjoining heritage buildings, reflect the dominant
buildings.
building forms in the street, including roof
forms, in the new building design.
Assessment: The immediate surrounds of Somerville Street do not contain
identified heritage buildings (as designated by the Heritage Overlay). The closest
overlay related to a hedge, not a building on both 2 Keck Street and 65 Somerville
Street. This hedge was removed after it became diseased in 2002 having first
obtained planning approval. The anomaly that the control remains on a hedge long
gone has been flagged with the Citys Policy and Process Team to be corrected in a
future tidy up planning scheme amendment.
With the exception of the aforementioned heritage site, there are no other heritage
sites or buildings proximate to the site.
To

ensure

that

buildings

and Respect the predominant building height in


PAGE 31

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Objectives
extensions do
streetscape.

Suggested Design Response


not

dominate

the the street and nearby properties. Where


there is a predominance of single storey,
the height of the dwelling at the front of the
dwelling should match the typical single
storey wall height.

Assessment: The existing dwelling sits quite high in the street and the single
storey appearance of the dwelling is maintained at the front. The two storey
extension at the rear of the dwelling thus meets the objective.
To use lighter looking building In streets dominated by weatherboard
materials
and
finishes
that dwellings, use timber or other non-masonry
complements the dominant pattern cladding materials where possible, and
within the streetscape.
render, bag or paint brick surfaces.
Assessment: The existing dwelling is weatherboard the proposed colours
/material palette includes lightweight (non-masonry) cladding painted in light colours.
This approach is meets the objective.
To ensure front fences are appropriate Provide open style front fencing.
to the era of the dwellings and maintain
the openness of the streetscape.
Front fences should not exceed 1.2 metres
other than in exceptional cases.
Assessment: No front fences are proposed.
In conclusion the approach taken to the extension is considered to be appropriate with
regard to Policy and the Neighbourhood Character Overlay and means that the existing
Victorian dwelling on the site is retained and appropriately added to.
Are amenity impacts associated with the use acceptable and manageable by conditions?
The permit applicants submission with regard to the use of the land is:
The facility will provide support for people aged generally between 18 and 35 years.
The residents will be known and self-managing tenants of the Haven support program
(i.e. paying rent and no history of disturbance), who have the motivation and will to
make changes in their lives however need mentoring and support.
The purpose of the training facility is to provide a range of learning opportunities to
improve residents access to education, training and employment, enable them to
become involved in their community and broaden their networks socially and for their
wellbeing. The program will provide parenting skills, childhood development and
planning for their future, along with gaining the necessary financial & livings skills to
sustain independence.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Whilst residents may currently be 'getting by', this program is designed to assist
people to 'get ahead'. The program is not for those with a mental illness, drug takers
or on rehabilitation, those in crisis or living in chaotic unstable situations in community.
Attendees would already be model tenants of the supported programs.
In essence it is clear that what is proposed is a somewhat limited use of the land. The
application is clear in that the education training centre is to be used only for residents of
the Sidney Myer Community only and this is a matter that can (and is recommended) to
be formalized by a permit condition.
It is agreed that if the facility were available more broadly (i.e. beyond residents of the
Sidney Myer Community) that the impacts would be different and it may not be
appropriate to allow; particularly participants in a broader use would almost certainly be
wholly reliant on street parking to access the centre. If such a change were proposed
either a new or amended permit (with community consultation) would be required.
An important fact with this application is that the development also caters for
accommodation for a permanent (24 hour a day) onsite staffed presence. Such a
presence should reassure the community that if some sort of issue arose on site, there is
a dedicated staff member who would be available to deal with the issue in the first
instance.
The application submission is also clear that the limited use of the facility would mean
that it is used only in day light hours on Monday to Friday only; unless prior written
consent of the City is first sought and granted. A condition limiting the hours of operation
is recommended.
Traffic and parking impacts
Most submitters to the application raised traffic and parking as grounds of objection. The
planning scheme notes that for an education centre, parking is required to be provided at
a rate of 0.4 spaces.
Nineteen dwellings have been permitted under permit
AM//368/2006/A which equates to the planning scheme requiring seven spaces to be
provided on the land.
Three spaces are shown on the application plan.
Participants/attendees of the education centre/training facility will also be residents of the
Sidney Myer Community hence separate provision of parking for attendees should not be
required.
Parking must therefore be considered for educators/facilitator and any permanent on site
staff. The applicant submission notes that a maximum of three staff would be on site at
any given time (two staff, one educator). The application plans show one covered and
two tandem spaces off the existing crossover to Somerville Street.
A turning area in the front setback of the building is proposed in order to meet Transport
Engineer requirements regarding forward entry and exit to and from the site. The third
space simply does not work as there is no room for the vehicle to easily enter the
turnaround area in the front setback; hence it is recommended that this space be deleted
from the plans.

PAGE 33

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The applicant supported the parking reduction aspect of the application with a parking
survey to ascertain the number of spaces and their availability at different times of the
day.
The spaces on the west and east side of Somerville Street (between Hammer Street and
Keck Street) were counted. The count identified that 20 spaces exist in this part of the
street.
Counts at various times over a number of days found that at any one time a maximum of
seven spaces were in use. Officers are satisfied that any shortfall of parking associated
with this development and use can be absorbed by the on street availability.
Other issues raised by the objections
Officers agree there is merit to the objection from 53 Somerville Street with regard to
their concern about overlooking and a recommended condition is that the deck in
question be screened so as to avoid any view into that property. This requirement has
been discussed with the permit applicant and they are agreeable to providing for this.
The other issue raised (beyond the objections related to the merit of the proposal as
assessed earlier in this report) was the issue of need for this facility having regard to the
presence of education centres/training facilities in Bendigo which could in theory provide
the services proposed by this facility.
With regard to the question of need a number of Tribunal cases have dealt with this
issue. Cases have held that in some circumstances need and community benefit can
in fact offset some amenity impacts of a proposal. This proposal is not a finely balanced
proposition where the above principle ought to be invoked to form a view it is acceptable.
Conclusion
Officers are satisfied that there is a need for the facility and the rationale for having the
facility on the site where participants reside in their dwellings is sound. While there are
other providers of like services, it has been assessed that a limited use of the site for the
manner applied is acceptable subject to the condition recommended. The built form
represents an acceptable planning outcome and subject to modification, parking and
traffic impacts are also acceptable.
Options
Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may
resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit.
Attachments
Objections

PAGE 34

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

RECOMMENDATION
Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo
City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for the partial
demolition of existing building; use and develop land for an education centre (training
facility); and reduction in car parking at Proposed Lot 1, PS716365 - 55 Somerville
Street, Flora Hill subject to the following conditions:
1.

MODIFIED PLAN REQUIRED


Before the use and development starts, amended plans to the satisfaction of the
responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible
authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of
the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and two copies
must be provided. The plans must be generally in accordance with the plans
submitted with the application but modified to show:
(a) Deletion of the third tandem car space;
(b) Screening of the first floor deck avoid any view into any part of 53 Somerville
Street; and
(c) Landscape plan amended in accordance with condition 3.

2.

NO ALTERATION TO LAYOUT
The development and use permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed
plans and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or
modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the
responsible authority.

3.

LANDSCAPE PLAN REQUIRED


Before the development starts, a landscape plan to the satisfaction of the
responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible
authority. When approved, the plan will be endorsed and will then form part of
the permit. The plan must be drawn to scale with dimensions and two copies
must be provided. The plan must show:
(a) Details of surface finishes of pathways and driveways (driveway and
turnaround area amended to be an exposed aggregate finish in earthy tones
instead of natural finish concrete.
(b) Planting schedule of all proposed trees, shrubs and ground covers, including
botanical names, common names, pot sizes, sizes at maturity, and
quantities of each plant.

4.

EDUCATION CENTRE/ TRAINING FACILITY PARTICIPANTS


Participation in the programs offered by the education centre/training facility is
limited to residents of the Sidney Myer community. The centre is not permitted
to be available to participants from the general public or non-residents.

5.

HOURS OF OPERATION
Except with the prior written consent of the responsible authority, the use
permitted by this permit must operate only between the following times:
Monday to Friday 8:00 am to 6:00pm

6.

LOADING AND UNLOADING


The loading and unloading of vehicles and the delivery of goods must at all

PAGE 35

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

times be undertaken within the boundaries of the subject land.


7.

GENERAL AMENITY
The use permitted by this permit must not, in the opinion of the responsible
authority, adversely affect the amenity of the locality.

8.

BAFFLED LIGHTING
Outdoor lighting, where provided, must be designed, baffled and located to the
satisfaction of the responsible authority such that no direct light is emitted
outside the boundaries of the subject land.

9.

CONSTRUCTION PHASE
All activities associated with the construction of the development permitted by
this permit must be carried out to the satisfaction of the responsible authority
and all care must be taken to minimise the effect of such activities on the
amenity of the locality.

10. EXPIRY OF THE PERMIT


This permit will expire if:
(a) The development is not commenced within 2 years; and
(b) The development completed and use commenced within 4 years
The responsible authority may extend the time for the commencement or
completion of the development and the commencement of the use, if a request
is made in writing before the permit expires or thereafter, within the period
allowed by section 69 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987.
Note Noise Emissions
Noise emissions must comply with State Environment Protection Policy (Control of Noise
from Commerce, Industry and Trade) No. N-1.

PAGE 36

Planning for Growth - Reports

2.2

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C201 - NEW HERITAGE PLACES


AND HERITAGE EFFICIENCY REVIEW - ADOPTION

Document Information
Author

Morgan James, Planner Amendments

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Amendment details:

The amendment implements a number of completed


heritage projects and makes changes to improve heritage
policy and controls in the Planning Scheme. Specifically the
amendment:
Implements the Greater Bendigo Thematic
Environmental History, 2013
Implements the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage
Study, 2014 by applying the Heritage Overlay to 23
places.
Amends the Local Heritage Policy
Introduces the Greater Bendigo Heritage Design
Guidelines, 2015
Introduces a new consolidated Incorporated Plan for
planning permit exemptions in the Heritage Overlay.
The Independent Planning Panel supported the majority of
the amendment with only one significant change
recommended regarding the former East Bendigo School
site.

Proponent:

City of Greater Bendigo - Planning Services

No. of submissions:

9 (4 support, 5 object)

Key issues:

Recommendation:

Council adopt Amendment 201 to the Greater Bendigo


Planning Scheme, with minor changes as recommended by
the Panel, and request Approval from the Minister for
Planning.

Making heritage planning policy clearer;


Protecting identified heritage places;
Reducing the need for planning permits;
Considering Panel recommendations.

Inform VCAT at the upcoming hearing for permit

PAGE 37

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

DS/319/2014 - subdivision and removal of native vegetation


at the former East Bendigo Primary School, that Council no
longer supports the granting of a permit in light of the new
information received from the Panel.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2015-2016 Update)
Planning for Growth
Council manages the planning and development of the City through the preparation
of major Strategies and effective amendments to the planning scheme
Continue to review and improve planning systems and procedures
Productivity
Council fosters business and industry growth.
Sustainability
The built and natural qualities that make Greater Bendigo an attractive and appealing
place are valued and conserved.
The history, unique heritage, streetscapes and buildings of Greater Bendigo are
conserved, restored, celebrated and managed wisely for the long term.
Background Information
The key steps in the Amendment process are summarised below:

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Amendment prepared

Council decides whether to seek


Ministerial Authorisation

Public Exhibition of Amendment

Submissions received

Council requests an Independent


Panel to consider submissions

Panel Hearing held

Council decides to Adopt or


Abandon the Amendment

We are at this
point

Send to Minister for Approval


and Gazettal

The Amendment was initiated by the City primarily to introduce into the Scheme a
number of recently completed heritage studies including the Greater Bendigo Thematic
Environmental History, (2013) and the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study,
2014.
It is also necessary to continually improve and keep planning policy up to date. The
amendment implements a number of initiatives to strengthen heritage policy and
guidance in the Scheme whilst being consistent with relevant state and local policy.
Previous Council Decisions
31 July 2013 Council resolved to adopt the Greater Bendigo Thematic Environmental
History, 2013, to prepare an amendment to introduce the document into the Greater
Bendigo Planning Scheme.
20 August 2014 Council resolved to adopt the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage
Study Part 1, 2014, the draft Heritage Design Guidelines and the Incorporated Plan
Permit Exemptions, and to request the Minister for Planning to authorise preparation of
Amendment C201 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. Council also resolved to
seek an exemption to notify all individual owners and occupiers of the amendment due to
the large numbers affected, except for those proposed to be affected by a new Heritage
Overlay, and to exhibit the amendment.
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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

4 March 2015 - Council resolved to accept the late submissions, adopt the
recommendations detailed for each of the submissions, and to request the Minister for
Planning to appoint an Independent Panel to consider all outstanding submissions.
Report
Land affected by the Amendment
The amendment applies to all of the land within the City of Greater Bendigo by making
changes to the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS) and the Heritage Policy at Clause
22.06. It also affects all land within the Heritage Overlay by implementing the Permit
Exemptions Incorporated Plan.
The amendment also affects 23 individual places in the White Hills and East Bendigo
Heritage Study- Stage 2 Phase 1, 2014 which are proposed to be covered by the
Heritage Overlay.
What the Amendment does
The Amendment incorporates a number of changes to improve and strengthen cultural
heritage policy and controls in the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme and can be broadly
grouped into the following key actions:
Implement the Greater Bendigo Thematic Environmental History (TEH), 2013 by:
o Amending Clauses 21.01, 21.02 and 21.08 of the MSS to include new heritage
statements and objectives and to identify further strategic work to be
undertaken.
o Amending Clause 21.10 and 22.06 (Heritage Policy) to include the TEH as a
reference document.
Implement the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study, 2014 by:
o Applying the Heritage Overlay to a total of 23 places; including 18 individual
properties and 5 large sites.
o Introducing Incorporated Plans for planning permit exemptions in the Heritage
Overlay for 4 large sites.
o Including the Study as a Reference Document in Clause 21.10 and 22.06
(Heritage Policy).
Introduce the Greater Bendigo Heritage Design Guidelines, 2015 as an incorporated
document in Clause 22.06 and the Schedule to Clause 81.01 (Incorporated
documents).
Amend the Local Heritage Policy at Clause 22.06
Introduce a new Incorporated Plan for all planning permit exemptions in the Heritage
Overlay at Clause 43.01 and the Schedule to Clause 81.01 by combining the existing
Incorporated Plans for the Ironbark and Strathfieldsaye McIvor Heritage Study areas
and including new exemptions for the large sites in the White Hills Heritage Study and
general Heritage Overlay areas in Bendigo.
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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Consultation/Communication
Exhibition Procedures
The Amendment was exhibited between 23 October 2014 and 22 December 2014.
Submissions
9 submissions were received during the exhibition period (including 4 late submissions)
as per the attached table.
Submissions included:
6 unresolved submissions which were referred to the Panel (including 1 since
withdrawn).
3 supporting submissions of which 2 were not referred to the Panel.
Unresolved submissions generally related to these particular properties from the White
Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study:
Former Bendigo East School, 93 Strickland Road, East Bendigo
Arnold Street Uniting Church, 213 Arnold Street, North Bendigo
3 Stewart Street, North Bendigo
Former Bendigo Freezing Works (Mayfair Park Estate), 10 McDowalls Road, East
Bendigo
St Pauls Coptic Church (former St Johns Church of England), 24 Smith Street,
North Bendigo
Submissions largely related to the following issues:
Why and how is a place is included in the Heritage Overlay;
The condition of a heritage place;
Setting and context of a heritage place;
Impacts of a Heritage Overlay on potential sale and/or development.
The Panel Hearing
The Minister for Planning appointed an Independent Panel to consider all written and oral
submissions and material presented to it in connection with the Amendment.
The Panel Report and Recommendations
The Panel Report supported councils position in the majority and found that:
The methodology of the Heritage Study is robust and accepts the findings of the
Study.
The Heritage Guidelines and Incorporated Plan for Permit Exemptions are tools
that will assist the community and Council in managing and making decisions that
protect and enhance heritage places within Greater Bendigo
Commended Council for this innovative approach to heritage management within
the municipality.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

However the Panel did not support Councils position in relation to the former East
Bendigo Primary School finding that:
The exhibited Heritage Overlay curtilage does not reflect the significance of the
site,
The Anzac Avenue should be included within the Heritage Overlay; and
Its curtilage include frontage to Strickland Road and Murphy Street.
Given the above, the Panel Report (received 15 July) was released early under
Delegation on 16 July 2015 to all submitters and the public to allow for its consideration
at the preliminary VCAT hearing for the Subdivision Permit of the former East Bendigo
Primary School, which was held on 17 July 2015.
All submitters will be notified of Councils decision resulting from this report.
Key issues
Former East Bendigo Primary School, 93 Strickland Road, East Bendigo
As noted above, the Panel did not support Councils position in relation to the former
East Bendigo Primary School, instead finding that:
There is little doubt that as an avenue of honour the 5 trees that remain adjacent to
the footpath from Strickland Road is a diminished form of what was originally there.
However, it is clear that the main entrance to the school was always from Strickland
Road
It is clear that the plantings that have become known as the Anzac Avenue were
undertaken from the time that the school was built and opened. Whilst this occurred
during the middle of the war it was always the intention of the school committee to
commemorate the contribution of local servicemen. It is also clear that the plantings
extended beyond the pathway from Strickland Road. This is supported by the fact
that in December 1920 the school was able to affix plaques to 23 trees. The remnants
of these plantings remain in the area of the school grounds leading down to the
corner of Strickland Road and Murphy Streets.
Regardless of the fact that the number of original trees are diminished and some of
them are in poor condition, it seems to the Panel that the significance of these
plantings to this site have been down played and the Anzac Avenue in its diminished
form should be acknowledged as part of the Heritage Overlay. While some of the
trees may be identified as dangerous, the place can be managed through replacing
and managing the trees as necessary.
The Panel was also concerned about the restricted views that the current proposed
curtilage would provide the school. Having regard to the angled siting of the building,
whilst Strickland Road is a busy road, the view of the school building from the
intersection of Strickland Road and Murphy Street is an important aspect of the site
as is the view to the north along the pathway from Strickland Road.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The Panel concluded that:


The Avenue of Honour contributes to the social and historical significance of the
former East Bendigo Primary School and warrants inclusion within the Heritage
Overlay. It also finds that the proposed curtilage does not adequately cater for the
significant elements of the site and that is should extended.

Image: Exhibited extent of the proposed Heritage Overlay

PAGE 43

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Image: Approximate extent of the Heritage Overlay as recommended by the Panel.


Officers have considered the thorough research provided by the submitter at the Panel
hearing as well as the analysis of the Independent Panel and have concluded that the
overlay should be extended as recommended by the Panel because:
The main entrance and primary views to the school have always been from Strickland
Road, with the Murphy Street entrance available for vehicles, service entry and other
purposes. This primary entrance point and view lines should therefore be
appropriately acknowledged within the overlay to address the contribution they give to
the setting and understanding of the heritage building.
The exhibited overlay only provides restricted oblique views of the school building
from the street and does not sufficiently acknowledge the main view of the building or
its important decorative faade.
The significance of the plantings on the site was informed by the lack of official Anzac
Avenue status as well as the condition of the trees. Primary evidence was provided
by the submitter that the trees were planted by the school soon after the school was
built to commemorate the contribution of local servicemen. Regardless of the fact
that the number of original trees is diminished and some are in poor condition, they
are considered to be of historic and social significance. The trees should therefore be
included within the overlay as the Panel has determined they contribute to the
heritage significance of the site and can be managed, removed and/or replaced as
part of a future planning permit process.
The subdivision and development of the site can still occur with modifications.

PAGE 44

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The findings of the Panel and the above recommendation have implications regarding
Councils decision for the subdivision permit of the land (DS/319/2014 The subdivision
of land into 7 lots and the removal of native vegetation). The subdivision application,
which ran concurrently with the planning scheme amendment process, proposed to
subdivide the site into seven industrial lots ranging in size between 1,075m2 and
2,477m2. The existing brick school building will be retained on one of the lots (Lot 4) and
all existing vegetation on the site will be removed.
The Planning Officer for the subdivision application concluded that the subdivision
design responds appropriately to the site and its context. The site has been ear-marked
for future light industrial development in the East Bendigo Local Structure Plan. The
subdivision will facilitate this outcome. The existing heritage building on the site will be
retained and incorporated into the subdivision design. The loss of vegetation on the site
isnt at odds with the sites industrial setting. The four objections to the permit application
dont justify rejecting or altering the proposal. Overall, the subdivision complies with the
Planning Scheme and it is recommended that a permit be granted.
The permit proposes to remove some native vegetation, some of which is now
considered to be of heritage significance, as well as subdividing the areas (including the
avenue, school and corner trees) determined to be significant. This is now considered to
be an inappropriate outcome given the findings of the Panel.

Image: Merged aerial photo showing both the subdivision plan and exhibited extent of
the Heritage Overlay.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The permit was considered and supported by Council at the 12 November 2014 meeting,
with a Notice of Decision issued by the City on 13 November 2014. The permit has since
been appealed at VCAT by the same objector to the planning scheme amendment and is
to be heard at a VCAT hearing on 9 October 2015.
Council is unable to rescind the above decision to grant a permit unless a review of the
decision is sought by Council at VCAT; however that is considered unnecessary in this
instance.
Council can instead resolve to inform VCAT at the upcoming hearing in October that in
light of recent additional information received from the Panel, which changes the values
to be considered in the permit application, that Council cannot now support the grant of a
permit as it is considered contrary to the new information.
Since the Panels recommendations, Council Officers have met with the permit applicant
who has put forward an opposite view to that of the Panel. Stating that the Panels
recommendations for the site are contrary to the evidence provided by both their expert
witness and Councils and should not be supported. Additionally they have provided
evidence from the Bendigo RSL stating that the RSL recognises the Avenue has
basically gone for all intents and purposes and would support some form of permanent
recognition that it did exist on the site. They have also provided expert evidence on the
poor condition and limited lifespan of the trees in the avenue and the dangerous risk
some of them pose of limb dropping.
Officers advised the applicant that we accept the independent findings of the Panel and
urged the applicant to consider some comprises to their subdivision layout in order to
seek a more balanced outcome. This could include retention of some of the significant
trees via a permit condition, as well as the view line of the building from Strickland Road
by a building envelope on the plan of subdivision. The applicant advised this is
something they would consider.
The applicant has since provided a letter (attached) outlining their views on the panel
recommendations for the site and the reasons why they believe they should not be
supported.
However after considering the independent findings and recommendations of the Panel
and the information provided by the applicant it is recommended that Council adopt the
findings of the Panel and direct that VCAT be informed at the upcoming hearing that
Council no longer supports the granting of permit DS/319/2014 The subdivision of land
into 7 lots and the removal of native vegetation. Instead the development of the site
should be reviewed in light of the new information and Council would welcome a revised
application.
The following table lists the Panel's recommendations and provides a brief comment on
how the recommendation be applied.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Rec.
No.
1.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Panel Recommendation

Officer Recommendation

Amend the White Hills and East Bendigo Accept the Panels
Heritage Study, 2014 to:
recommendation to amend
the Heritage Study.
a) Replace discussion of Incorporated
Plans to Recommended Permit
Exemptions on page 14.
b) Rename the Incorporated Plans
throughout the Heritage Study to
Recommended
Permit
Exemptions.

2.

Amend the Greater Bendigo Heritage


Incorporated Plan Permit Exemptions to
include the list of individual places identified
within the White Hills and East Bendigo
Heritage Study, 2014

3.

For the Former East Bendigo Primary


School, 93 Strickland Road, East Bendigo:

Accept the Panels


recommendation to amend
the Permit Exemptions
Incorporated Plan.

Accept the Panels


recommendation to amend
the Schedule, Map, citation
(a) Amend the Heritage Place column in
within the Heritage Study and
the Schedule of the Heritage Overlay to the Permit Exemptions
include a description The Heritage
Incorporated Plan.
Place is defined as: the school building;
the path; the avenue of honour; land
within 10 metres of the building on the
north and west side; and land within the
Murphy Street frontage of 70 metres
from the corner of Murphy Street and
Strickland Road and land within the
Strickland Road frontage of 20 metres
from the corner of Murphy Street and
Strickland Road.
(b) Amend the Tree Controls column to
include Yes Eucalypts.
(c) Amend the Heritage Overlay map to
incorporate the pedestrian pathway
from Strickland Avenue, surviving
adjacent trees and the planted area to
the south east of the site as far as
Strickland Road consistent with
recommendation 4(a).
(d) Amend the citation within the White
Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study
PAGE 47

Planning for Growth - Reports

Rec.
No.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Panel Recommendation

Officer Recommendation

to recognise the Anzac Avenue as


part of the significant elements of the
site and the Statement of Significance
adjusted accordingly.
(e) Amend the Greater Bendigo Heritage
Incorporated Plan Permit
Exemptions to recognise the Anzac
Avenue as part of the significant
elements of the site.
4.

For the Former Bendigo Freezing Works


(Mayfair Park Industrial Estate), 10
McDowalls Road, East Bendigo:
(a) Amend the citation within the White
Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study
to:
Remove reference to the livestock
pens.
Include the date of the additions to
the killing building as late 1960s.
Include the various names of the
staff amenities building as 'staff
amenities' and 'inspectors
amenities' building.
Note the removal of the upper
section of the chimney stack.
Replace the term 'cottage' with
Caretakers 'residence'.

The Panel found that the


Former Freezing Works
(Mayfair Park Industrial
Estate) warrants a Heritage
Overlay and that the suite of
heritage controls has been
prepared by Council to
achieve practical changes to
the place while at the same
time retaining the historical
significance of the site.
Accept the Panels
recommendation to amend
the citation within the
Heritage Study and the
Permit Exemptions
Incorporated Plan.

(b) Amend the Greater Bendigo Heritage


Incorporated Plan Permit
Exemptions to:
Remove reference to the livestock
pens.
Include the date of the additions to
the killing building as late 1960s.
Include the various names of the
staff amenities building as 'staff
amenities' and 'inspectors
amenities' building.
Include the removal and
replacement of hazardous materials
and timber members to the skin as
exempt actions.
5.

For the Residence, 3 Stewart Street, North


Bendigo:
PAGE 48

The Panel recommended


allowing potential uses

Planning for Growth - Reports

Rec.
No.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Panel Recommendation

Officer Recommendation

(a) Amend Schedule to the Heritage


Overlay to apply yes to the Prohibited
Uses column.

generally prohibited within the


General Residential Zone for
3 Stewart Street, which is at
present being used as
commercial premises.
Accept the Panels
recommendation to amend
the Schedule.

6.

For the Arnold Street Uniting Church


(former Wesleyan Church), 213 Arnold
Street, North Bendigo:

The Panel found that the


Schedule to the Heritage
Overlay should be refined to
better describe the curtilage
(a) Amend the Heritage Place column in
for the Arnold Street Uniting
the Schedule of the Heritage Overlay to Church.
include a description The Heritage
Place is defined as: the church; the
Accept the Panels
hall; and all the land within the frontage recommendation to amend
and within 4 metres from the side and
the Schedule.
rear of the buildings.

7.

Amend the Heritage Design Guidelines and


Permit Exemptions Incorporated Document
to include Councils identified post
exhibition changes that make clerical
corrections and help clarify their readability.

Accept the Panels


recommendation.

Conclusion
It is recommended that Council adopt the Amendment as recommended and forward the
adopted Amendment to the Minister for Planning to approve. This will complete the
Amendment process and the new Heritage Overlays and efficiency initiatives will be
implemented.
It is also recommended that Council advise VCAT for the upcoming hearing that Council
no longer supports the application for the subdivision and removal of native vegetation at
the former East Bendigo Primary School in light of the recommendation from the Panel.
Options
Council has the option of
Adopting the Amendment in accordance with the above Officer Recommendations
and sending to the Minister for Planning for Approval; or
Adopting the Amendment in accordance with the Panels recommendations and
sending to the Minister for Planning for Approval; or
Adopting the Amendment in part.
PAGE 49

Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Resource Implications
The amendment will increase the number of properties included within the Heritage
Overlay and this would ordinarily result in an increase in the number of planning permit
applications. However, the amendment also proposes to introduce the Permit
Exemptions Incorporated Plan, which provides for a number of planning permit
exemptions for minor works in the Heritage Overlay. This is expected to reduce the
number of planning permit applications under the Overlay across the City to balance out
the increase in Heritage Overlay coverage. Major heritage works applications may
increase but minor works permits will decrease.
Officer time will be required to prepare the Amendment documentation for approval and
to liaise with the Minister for Planning.
RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Adopt Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme Amendment C201 with changes
recommended in this report.
2. Inform VCAT at the upcoming hearing for permit DS/319/2014 - subdivision and
removal of native vegetation at the former East Bendigo Primary School, that Council
no longer supports the granting of a permit in light of the new information received
from the Panel.
3. Forward the adopted Amendment to the Minister for Planning for Approval, together
with the prescribed information pursuant to Section 31(1) of the Planning and
Environment Act, 1987.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

2.3

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

PRIVATE PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT POLICY REVIEW

Document Information
Author

Emma Bryant Amendments, Heritage and Compliance


Coordinator

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
The Private Planning Scheme Amendment Policy (2011) has been reviewed as part of a
continuous improvement process, to ensure it remains current and appropriate for users.
The Policy has been successful in its aim of providing a consistent framework for
undertaking private amendments and only minor changes are recommended.
This report also provides information, as previously requested by Council, on the costs
and benefits of undertaking privately sponsored amendments, to both Council and
proponents.
Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2015-2016 Update)
Planning for Growth
Council manages the planning and development of the City through the preparation
of major strategies and effective amendments to the planning scheme.
Housing options provide broader choice in order to meet current and future
community expectations and needs.
Productivity
Council fosters business and industry growth.
Sustainability
The built and natural qualities that make Greater Bendigo an attractive and appealing
place are valued and conserved.
Background Information
A planning scheme amendment seeks to change planning controls that apply to a
specific site or sites, and/or a clause or policy of the Planning Scheme. It is a change to
legislation and must be undertaken in accordance with the Planning and Environment
Act 1987, and to standards developed by the State.
The Act allows for an amendment to be initiated by a council, a Council amendment or a
council can respond to a request for an amendment by any person or body, a private
amendment.
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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

A Bendigo Council amendment is one prepared by the City of Greater Bendigo on


behalf of the Council and community at its own cost, usually because it benefits the
community as a whole, or a large part of the community, rather than an individual.
Examples include an amendment to implement the Residential Strategy, introduce
Heritage Overlays, or for the correction of errors.
A private amendment is one initiated by an applicant or land owner where the main
beneficiary of the amendment is that applicant or owner. Most private amendments will
also have an overall community benefit, as if otherwise they should not be undertaken,
however this is not the primary purpose of the proposal. Examples include rezoning
private land for a residential estate or to allow for the sale of government or church
owned land. The Council is under no obligation to undertake a private amendment
request and can abandon one at any time during the process if major problems arise that
cannot be addressed, or if the City and proponent do not agree on matters.
The current Policy was created to assist those people requesting private amendments,
by making transparent the roles of each party in the process; preparing documentation
and background reports, paying statutory fees and external costs incurred by the City,
and expected timeframes.
It is our understanding that the Policy was the first of its kind in the State and has since
been used by some other Councils as a basis to develop their own policies.
Previous Council Decisions
9 February 2011

Adopted the Private Planning Scheme Amendment Policy.

Report
Nineteen private planning scheme amendments have been undertaken under the terms
of the Policy since its introduction in February 2011, with proponents meeting all the
terms. To inform the Policy review, the planning consultants who undertook the
amendments on behalf of private proponents were surveyed about the Policy.
The survey found that most (>70%) of consultants found the Policy useful in
understanding the Citys overall expectations for undertaking planning scheme
amendments, the different roles and responsibilities of participants and likely future
costs. More than half (57%) found the Policy useful for understanding amendment steps
and timeframes, with the remainder being neutral, probably due to them already
understanding these matters.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

The most controversial aspect of the Policy is recouping external costs (beyond statutory
fees), with most planning consultants strongly objecting to the idea when it was proposed
under the first policy. More than half of the survey respondents now support the concept
of cost recovery, but nearly 30% still strongly oppose it. The biggest concern raised
about cost recovery is the City seeking payment for third party reviews of submitted
technical reports. This item is included in the Policy for situations where the amendment
is controversial and there is a technical aspect to it for which the City does not have the
expertise to comprehensively review a report, and where there are no referral authorities
able or willing to assist; eg odour modelling, noise assessments. These situations are
very rare, and this is clearly explained in the Policy. In fact the item has not yet been
used. It is recommended that the option be kept in the Policy but the wording
strengthened to require the proponents agreement to use a third party.
Survey respondents were also asked if there were any other external costs that should
be included in the Policy, with one suggestion of costs of holding an external information
session during public exhibition, eg venue hire. These are usually only held for large
amendments and the proponent is usually happy to pay for these costs anyway as they
want to hold a session to engage the community. The revised Policy includes this cost
where the proponent agrees to hold a session.
Survey respondents were also asked for other suggested improvements to the Policy.
Responses included providing a consistent case manager and a commitment to
undertaking private amendments without unnecessary delays. Ideally one planner will
take a project from start to finish but this cannot be achieved in all cases due to
competing priorities, staff leaving, etc. Privately sponsored amendments in this City and
across the State are mostly treated similarly to permit applications where they are dealt
with as they come in. However, the City also gives them a priority rating of low, medium
or high based on community benefit and urgency with some high rating amendments fast
tracked, eg Bendigo Hospital and Fortuna.
Legislative and other changes
In October 2012 the Minister introduced set timeframes for each step in the planning
scheme amendment process in Ministerial Direction No. 15. These timeframes are
similar to those included in our original Policy and are publicly available, so it is
recommended that the revised Policy refers to them but does not repeat them. The
revised Policy now includes a statement that a proponent must provide any requested
information in a timely manner so that Ministerial Direction timelines can be met, unless
there is an agreement with the City that more time is needed. Exemptions can be
requested for the timeframes and are often necessary for large, complex amendments
and where objections are received.
The statutory planning department also recommends that the Policy be amended to
remove the detail about processes and level of documentation to be submitted for
amendments and that these be put instead into a set of Guidelines for applicants.
Proposed changes to Policy
Statement that information be provided in a timely manner so that Ministerial
timeframes can be met, rather than including a full list of timeframes;

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Costs of Council holding a public information session to be included in external costs


to be recouped;
The City will seek agreement from the proponent before appointing an independent
technical reviewer;
The City will represent itself at a panel hearing unless the proponent wishes to pay for
legal representation;
Include a statement explaining that scheduling of any private proposals will be
considered against Councils published list of workload priorities;
Removal of some background information about processes and level of
documentation to be submitted and formatting changes.
Benefits and costs for private amendments
Last year Council requested information on the benefits and costs of undertaking private
amendments.
In terms of costs to the City in undertaking a private amendment, the City recoups
external costs under the Policy, such as Panel fees and advertising costs, and receives
statutory fees for staff time; approximately $2,100 per amendment.
Proponents have paid all required statutory fees and external costs under the Policy,
equating to approximately $64,000 for eight amendments in the last financial year,
ranging from $1,400 for a simple amendment to $38,000 for a large complex one.
An estimate has been made of the time taken by staff to manage and process private
amendments to determine an approximate cost to the City (refer to table below):

Amendment
type
Simple
Average
without Panel
Average with
Panel
Complex

Statutory
fees paid

14

Approximate
staff salary
costs, not
including
oncosts
$4,360

30

$9,350

$2,120

40

$12,460

$2,120

90

$28,000

$2,120

Full
time
days

Example

Girton Grammar rezoning


one site to Special Use
CVGT site rezone to
Industrial 3
McIvor Forest rezone to
residential and planning
permit
Forest Park Estate, Farm
Zone to Residential

$1,322

Table 1: Estimated staff resources to undertake a private planning scheme amendment

It is acknowledged that statutory fees paid do not cover all staff costs for an amendment,
particularly for larger, more complex amendments. The State Government is responsible
for setting statutory fees and they havent been reviewed for planning scheme
amendments for many years, beyond CPI increases. However, it is considered that
although the City is contributing resources to private amendments through staff costs,
Council should contribute some resources to reviewing and updating the planning
scheme as part of its statutory planning function.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

To gain a better understanding of the overall costs and benefits of private amendments
to proponents and to the Council and community in general, survey respondents were
asked how much money private proponents spent in broad terms to undertake an
amendment. A third of the amendments (5) were considered simple and cost the
proponent less than $50,000, a quarter (4) were complex and cost more than $200,000
and the remainder (6) were in between. These costs included statutory fees, planning
scheme amendment document preparation, supporting technical reports, community
consultation and panel hearings.
Respondents were then asked whether they believed that this investment was beneficial
to their client, and to the broader community. Approximately 60% of amendments were
considered as beneficial or very beneficial for their client and community, while 35%
were not.
The amendments considered not beneficial were mostly the large more
complex ones that cost the proponent more than $200,000, but no specific reasons were
given as to why they were not beneficial.
As discussed previously, private amendments usually benefit the private proponent but
most also bring benefits, some substantial, to the broader community by increasing the
liveability and economy of the municipality, and by responding to the market. The table
below lists the amendments undertaken under the Policy since its introduction in 2011.
This list shows that most private amendments benefit the broader community by
providing for new schools and school expansions, new residential areas, new
supermarkets and other businesses, and business and industrial land expansion. Each
amendment has a different level of community benefit with some providing a large
community benefit, eg new Catholic school in Maiden Gully, and others less so, eg minor
expansion of APCO service station. However, all the amendments have an overall
positive community benefit, in fact an amendment should not be undertaken if there is
not an overall benefit. As the amendment has resulted in positive community benefits
and the proponent has borne a significant proportion of the costs, it should be that overall
the City and community has benefited, with the level of benefit depending on each
project.
No.

Amendment Description

130

Heathcote supermarket: rezoning to Commercial and remove overlays and


combined permit to expand supermarket and carpark.

131

Compost facility: rezone to special use (withdrawn following exhibition)

145

New Catholic School Maiden Gully: rezoning land to Special Use


Education

150

Coates Hire expansion: rezoning to Business

151

Bendigo Hospital campus: modification Heritage Overlay to facilitate


development

154

Girton Grammar expansion: rezone to Special Use

160

McIvor Forest Estate: Rezone to residential and combined permit

164

CVGT: rezone to Industrial from Education

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No.

Amendment Description

173

Holdsworth Road: rezone to Residential

180

APCO expansion: rezone to business

183

Girton Grammar: rezone to Special Use

190

Edwards Road Maiden Gully (Forest Park): rezone to residential

191

Wellsford Estate: change planning controls to allow broader industrial uses.

192

Evergreen Waters retail hub: rezoning to commercial

193

Calder Highway, Maiden Gully: rezone to residential and combined permit


(adopted and submitted for approval)

195

Ham and Allingham Streets: rezone to industrial to reflect use and allow for
business expansion.

197

View Hill church: rezone to Commercial and design overlay to enable


disposal and reuse.

204

Fortuna: rezone to Comprehensive Development Zone to allow disposal


and reuse.

200

Big Hill Enterprise Park, rezone to industrial.

Table 2: Private amendments undertaken since 2011

In June 2014, Council approved a priority list of planning scheme amendments to be


undertaken over the next 3 years, in response to the Independent Review. This list has
been made publicly available via the website. These amendments were prioritised using
a standard set of criteria and it was determined that any new amendments proposals be
evaluated against the priority list using the same evaluation framework. A model was
also put forward for discussion where if a private amendment was deemed as a low
priority against this list, that the applicant meet the cost not only of technical evidence
and an independent Panel, but the cost of Council resources, eg staff time too.
This list has recently had its annual review and been updated with many Council projects
identified for completion.
Survey respondents were asked about this new priority list. 57% agreed that the public
list was useful but the same percentage did not agree that new private proposals should
be assessed against this list for prioritising. Only 29% supported the proposed model of
paying extra money to resource a low priority amendment. Specific comments on this
option included:
Amendments should be considered like permits and be assessed on their merits.
Any prioritising needs to be consistent and fair with all amendments including Council
ones.
Amendments can save Council money.
Prioritising and requesting extra money could cause ill feeling and be inequitable.
Paying more would lead to higher expectations from proponents of a fast and
favourable outcome.

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Council should have some flexibility to accept private amendment requests at any time to
respond to community issues as they arise. However these proposals should be
evaluated against the current City project list using the same criteria to determine when
and if they should be undertaken, due to limited resources. Council is under no
obligation to undertake a private amendment. If this situation arises, a formal report will
be presented to Council on how to maintain effort on Council priorities, while meeting the
needs for progress on private amendments.
It is true that paying extra money towards staff time over and above the statutory fee, is
likely to lead to high expectations of a fast and favourable result, which cannot be
guaranteed. This could lead to pressure to undertake a lower priority amendment faster
than a higher priority one. Also the State Government has previously told the City that
requesting extra payments to cover staff costs above statutory fees is not appropriate.
Regulation 6 of the Planning and Environment (Fees) Regulations 2000 sets out the
prescribed statutory fees that a proponent must pay Council in respect of planning
scheme amendments. Legal advice previously received is that Council cannot charge
extra fees but can ask for reasonable extra expenses to be paid. If these arent paid,
Council can refuse to proceed a request. In lieu of paying extra money with a lower
priority amendment, proponents could be asked to undertake more staff tasks, eg
drafting a Council report, but there are some tasks that cannot be delegated.
Consultation/Communication
Before the Policy was originally introduced, extensive consultation occurred with
planning consultants who undertake private amendments for developers/landowners.
In reviewing the Policy, all planning consultants who have undertaken an amendment in
the City since the Policys introduction were surveyed about the Policys effectiveness.
Conclusion
The Private Planning Scheme Amendment Policy has worked well since its introduction,
as evidenced by the number of amendments completed, the payment of costs and the
user survey results. The revised Policy has been developed with external consultation
with the main changes recommended to reduce its length and simplify it by preparing
accompanying Guidelines.
Planning scheme amendments are undertaken by Councils to keep a planning scheme
up to date and to facilitate changing land use needs. Privately initiated amendments play
an important part in this evolution in that they provide for changes supported and
required by the market, and they are making improvements to the scheme at a lower
cost to ratepayers.
Options
Council has the option of adopting or not adopting the revised Policy.

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Resource Implications
The Policy has a positive impact on City resources as it requires private beneficiaries of
planning scheme amendments to pay for reasonable additional expenses.
Attachments
Private Planning Scheme Amendment Policy (as amended)
RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Accept the changes recommended to the Policy.
2. Adopt the Private Planning Scheme Amendment Policy 2015.

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2.4

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PRIORITIES FOR PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENTS - PROGRESS


REPORT FOR 2014/2015 & PLAN FOR 2015 & BEYOND

Document Information
Author

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
The Independent Review 2013 - Recommendation 54 is to:
"Formulate a clear and transparent set of priorities for planning scheme amendments for
the coming financial year for approval by Council and communicate these and the
associated processes to the community."
The first priorities report was presented to Council at the Ordinary Meeting of 18 June,
2014. This report details what has been achieved in the last 12 months and confirms the
priorities, strategic work and subsequent Planning Scheme Amendments for the years
ahead, as adopted by Council in June last year. It recommends a work programme for
future years based on that, plus issues and needs that have emerged in the last 12
months.
Policy Context
Council Plan 2013-2017 (2015-2016 Update):
Leadership & Good Governance:
1.1
1.6

Good governance principles are used to guide strategic decision-making.


Programs, projects and services are guided by best practice principles and
delivered to respond to community needs.

Planning for Growth:


2.2

Council manages the planning and development of the City through the
preparation of major Strategies and effective amendments to the planning
scheme.

Background Information
The Planning Scheme is the legal framework that sets out the parameters for all
decisions that need to be made about land use and development in the municipality.
Planning Scheme Amendments are the process to change that law. The ultimate
approval for every change is the Minister for Planning. Because they change the law of
the City, amendments must:
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Implement a clearly articulated strategy, that is based on proven technical data and
evidence.
Be legally and technically correct, in accordance with the Planning & Environment
Act.
Everyone who may be impacted by the changes has the opportunity to have their
views considered.
Have a formal, independent process (Panel) where there are different points of view,
between any of the parties involved; the City, community members, agencies.
It is this need for detailed evidence, legal procedures and the time taken to resolve
differences on the way through the process that makes the process lengthy. The process
is set by the State Government and cannot be changed.
Timelines and workplans for amendments can only ever be "best estimates" for reasons
such as:
Applicants change of mind about what is wanted part way through the process. We
have several in this category at the moment.
The State Government imposes a requirement that must be enacted.
It takes much longer than expected to finalise the technical analysis. The Flood
Study, Marong Business Park and Intensive Animal Industries are examples.
The number of submissions and issues raised by agencies or community members
has a significant impact on timelines and workloads.
Council changes its priorities of the work required.
Budget allocation by Council to complete the work.
Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme amendments are undertaken by two units of the
Planning and Development Directorate - Statutory Planning and Strategy.
In general, Statutory Planning prepares amendments that:
Implement site specific amendments prepared by other Business Units (the Marong
Business Park and airport amendments for the Economic Development Unit) or those
proposed by private landowners.
Improve the efficiency of the Planning Scheme such as applying new guidelines or
policies that guide decision-making (eg the Bushfire Management Overlay, Flood
Study), waive the requirement for a permit subject to certain performance criteria or
fix anomalies.
More recently, the responsibility for managing the technical and administrative process of
most amendments has been transferred to the Statutory Planning team.
The Strategy Unit will retain planning scheme amendments that implement major
strategies and policies that it has prepared and which have been approved by Council.
For example, Strategy is managing the amendments arising from the review of the
Residential Development Strategy.
Resources are shared / redirected in response to demand and changing priorities.

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In response to Recommendation 54, each year the Directorate reviews all current,
proposed / planned amendments and prioritises and schedules over a three year period
(see attached). This goes beyond the recommendation which proposed a priority list
covering the financial year. The need for a three year plan is the long project timeline for
amendments.
While simple ones can be completed over one year, large and complex ones can take up
to three years, including the strategy development and planning scheme amendment
process.
In developing the priorities in a clear and transparent manner, the Directorate developed
an evaluation framework which considered each proposal against a set of criteria. Those
criteria are:
The degree to which the amendment delivers the strategic direction and priorities
within the Council Plan;
The importance of the amendment to success in Council's planning for growth,
productivity and liveability;
The degree of urgency, (eg amendments required by State Government legislation);
Whether it is required because it implements State Government policy.
Completing work already commenced, especially completing the planning scheme
amendment where the strategy has been completed;
The level of resources required;
The "logical" roll out of consequential work, where relevant.
Report
It is 12 months since Council adopted the first strategic work program. It is therefore
timely to review the program and plan the work schedule further into the future.
As advised when the previous work plan was adopted, it was very ambitious. I am very
proud of the hard work of the Strategy and Statutory Planning teams in driving this work
forward. Council too has worked hard in considering some complex issues and
determining a policy position.
Completed
In the last 12 months, the following PSAs have been completed:
Bendigo Airport
Signage Policy
Thematic Environmental History
Corrections to the Planning Scheme
White Hills Heritage Study Part A
Heritage Design Guidelines
Heathcote Supermarket
Big Hill Industrial

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Substantial progress has been made on other work but the PSA has not progressed as
rapidly as we would have hoped. The reasons are varied, from the need to complete
complex technical requirements before the project could proceed (Marong Business
Park, Development Contribution Plans, Bendigo Flood Study, Eaglehawk Structure
Plan), taking longer than expected to get Department of Environment, Land, Water and
Planning (DELWP) support or the Minister's authorisation (High Street Boulevard,
Intensive Animal Industries). The impact of those factors has then delayed other work.
We have completed an extensive environmental scan and believe we have identified the
work known. Given our changing environment, it is too unpredictable to plan further
ahead and other issues always arise.
This list does not include any new, site specific amendments sponsored by private
landowners. What is clearly apparent is the extent of work for the benefit of the overall
community, takes the full resources available. While private sponsors do pay the cash
costs, those amendments still take staff time. It is estimated that the McIvor Forest
residential estate took 40 days of staff time; Forest Edge 90 days; Big Hill industrial
estate 15 days. If new private amendments are proposed, a decision will be needed
about whether other work is delayed or additional resources are applied.
If any requests are made and are to be accommodated, this will be reported to Council in
more detail. One model is for the applicant to meet the cost not just of the technical
evidence and Panel costs, but to fund the resources required on behalf of Council in this
process.
Any new proposals for amendments will be evaluated against the priority list using the
same evaluation framework and as listed projects are completed. It will also be adjusted
if Council priorities change.
Revisions to the Priorities List
The following projects are not proceeding:
Ironstone Road Development Plan Overlay - No longer required by applicant.
680-708 Calder Highway, Maiden Gully - Not progressed by applicant and will be
included as part of the Housing Strategy.
LaTrobe University, Osborne Street - Not progressed by applicant and will be
included as part of the Housing Strategy.
Bushfire Management Overlay - the State Government took a different approach.
Other work known to be needed but not scheduled at this stage includes:
Review of Bendigo & Eaglehawk Heritage Study
St John of God Hospital Precinct Plan
Policy response (food or alcohol) to Active and Healthy Living
Ironbark Precinct Plan
Huntly Heritage Study
Review of Infrastructure Design Manual
Parking Precinct Plan in commercial areas
Review of Vegetation Protections Overlay mapping
Review of character policies
Review of rural dwellings and subdivision
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"Backyardscape" policy
Review of Highway Entrances and Boulevard Policy (including fence design)
Development Plans for Golden Square and Kangaroo Flat
Bendigo Transport Hub
Industrial Design Guidelines
Axedale Flood Study
Elmore Flood Study
Maiden Gully Township Centre Design Framework.

Conclusion
This is the "best estimate" for a 3 year plan at this point in time. The final decision will be
for Council each year as it determines its annual actions and budget allocation.
Resource Implications
The budget adopted by Council provides for the 2015/2016 list of works.
Attachments
1.

Planning Scheme Amendment Timing Gantt Chart

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to endorse the plan as outlined.

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2.5

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CONNECTING GREATER BENDIGO: INTEGRATED TRANSPORT &


LAND USE STRATEGY (ITLUS)

Document Information
Author

Katherine Wrzesinski, Senior Integrated Transport Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
The presentation of the ITLUS Strategy in this report is the culmination of:
The community wholeheartedly rejecting a business-as-usual road transport plan and
demanding better outcomes for this City and community;
The Council's foresight and leadership in supporting and resourcing the work and
investment required to complete a much more holistic and integrated approach. This
approach will require concerted effort in the long term to change our approach to
infrastructure provision and community behaviour change to minimise congestion and
improve community health outcomes.
The energy of many agencies, community groups and individuals who have guided
our thinking to this point and will help with implementation.
The adoption of the final Strategy and the preparation of a planning scheme amendment
to assist with the ITLUS implementation are recommended.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 20132017 (updated 20152016)
Planning for Growth
Strategy 2.3
Sustainable transport options are supported in the Integrated Transport
and land Use Strategy (ITLUS)
Strategy References:
Bendigo Road Transport Strategy 2011:
http://www.bendigo.vic.gov.au/Residents_and_Services/Roads_naturestrips_and_drains/
Draft_Bendigo_Road_Transport_Strategy
At its meeting on August 17, 2011 Council considered a detailed report relating to the
outcomes from the public display and consultation on the draft Strategy. Council resolved
to adopt a course of action that set the preparation of the ITLUS in motion.

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The current transportation strategy Bendigo 2020 Transportation Strategy was adopted
in 1993. It was prepared by the then five urban Bendigo Councils and VicRoads.
Councils adopted Bendigo Residential Development Strategy (BRDS) which seeks to
provide for new residential development within the existing Urban Growth Boundary
(UGB); supports the integration of land use and transport and focusing development in
and around designated activity centres, including the city centre and along major transit
corridors; and the development of 10 minute neighbourhoods, where households can
access daily needs by walking and cycling; all of which have transport and general
mobility implications.
The Commercial Land Strategy (2006) is currently being reviewed. The new Commercial
Land and Activity Centre Strategy (CLACS), soon to be presented to Council for
adoption, has transport, access and freight movement implications and is aligned with
both the ITLUS and the BRDS.
Legislative Reference:
The Transport Integration Act 2010 creates a framework for an integrated and
sustainable transport system in Victoria. It recognises transport planning and land-use
are interdependent. The Acts vision calls for an integrated and sustainable transport
system that contributes to an inclusive, prosperous and environmentally responsible
State. Council is required to have regard for the Acts objectives and decision making
principles with respect to any action that may significantly impact on the transport
system.
State and Regional Strategic Plan References:
The State of Cities section of Plan Melbourne identifies that Bendigo will need to
absorb an increasing proportion of the States growth which has both land use and
transport implications.
The Loddon Mallee South Regional Growth Plan forecasts that Greater Bendigo will
accommodate significant growth and consolidate its role as a major regional centre.
Victoria The Freight State (2013) is a Victorian State Government strategy that
acknowledges the regional significance of Bendigo, with principal freight network road
and rail routes servicing the city and a high-productivity freight vehicle route connecting
Bendigo to the wider Melbourne metropolitan area.
Background Information
In September 2014 the Councillor Forum was provided with an update on the work
undertaken during Stages 2, 3 and 4 of the ITLUS development, which culminated in the
drafting of a Stage 4 Consultants Report. The Report set out the consultants
recommended directions, ideas and proposed actions to be considered for inclusion in
the Final ITLUS. It set out a framework for:

an integrated approach to transport and land use planning;


reducing our reliance on cars;

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making the best use possible of the available infrastructure, including road space
and rail infrastructure to meet capacity demands; and
being open to exploring opportunities to do things differently.

The ITLUS Steering Committee in September 2014 resolved to seek community


feedback on the Stage 4 Consultants Report; and to await the completion of key
strategic work; as well as the incoming governments anticipated announcements relating
to transport and land use; all of which were likely to have significant bearing on the final
Strategy.
The Stage 4 Consultants Report was on public display for 9 weeks until 22 December
2014.
In December 2014 Public Transport Victoria (PTV) announced that they were
commencing a review of the Bendigo Bus Network. Subsequently a second review was
undertaken in May/June 2015.
The newly elected Labour Government committed $2M over four years for the Bendigo
Metro Rail initiative.
Through an initiative of the Regional RDA consultants commenced the preparation of a
Loddon Mallee South Regional Transport Strategy.
In April 2015 a Councillor Forum presentation was given detailing the outcomes of
community feedback on Stage 4 Consultants Report; as well as the latest strategic work
and research findings.
The months that followed the public release of the Stage 4 Report have resulted in
unprecedented interest among key businesses and community organisations in ITLUS.
This has culminated in 21 organisations formally agreeing to partner with CoGB to
commit to implement at least one initiative in the ITLUS. Many of them have taken part in
the ITLUS initiatives during the Strategy development.

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This list is expected to expand over time as the ITLUS implementation continues. The
significance of seeing such keen interest among the local transport, business, health and
education sectors, and various community interest groups is not to be underestimated. It
reflects the passion for positive change that the ITLUS advocates and a desire to take an
active part in making it happen. As such, the ITLUS is as much about the process used
to develop it, as it is about what it aims to achieve for Greater Bendigo.
It appears that the idea of having extensive community backing for
partnerships of this type is a ground breaking initiative for transport
strategies in Australia.
The Final ITLUS (Attachment 1) has been drafted in view of all of the above and is the
subject of this report.
Previous Council Decision Dates:
Draft Road Transport Strategy (2009-2011)
2009 (November) - Council adopted a brief for a Road Transport Strategy (consultant
appointment) at the Ordinary Council meeting on 18 November 2009.
2011 (March) - Council adopted a draft Road Transport Strategy for the purpose of public
consultation at the Ordinary Council meeting on 23 March 2011.
2011 (May) Public submissions closed on 26 May 2011 453 submissions were
received.
2011 (July) A report summarising the submissions was tabled at the 6 July 2011
Ordinary Council meeting and a full copy of all written submissions was provided.
2011 (July) A public hearing of written submissions was held on 21 July 2011 and
attended by Councillors together with officers from City of Greater Bendigo and
VicRoads.
2011 (August) A report was presented to the Ordinary Council meeting on 17 August
2011 recommending a way forward for the project. Council endorsed the motion to
support a research project into the likely actions, effectiveness and resource implications
of completing a Sustainable Transport Strategy for Bendigo and Council adopted a
series of detailed positions in regards to elements of the draft Road Transport Strategy.
Integrated Transport Research Paper
2011 (November) - A report was presented to the Ordinary Council meeting on 30
November 2011 at which Council endorsed the Project Brief for the Sustainable
Transport Research Paper and Community Discussions.
Integrated Transport & Land Use Strategy (ITLUS) May 2012 An Integrated Transport
Research Paper was presented to the Ordinary Council meeting on 2 May 2011. Council
endorsed the research paper and recommendations:
1.

That the City of Greater Bendigo immediately commence the development of an


Integrated Transport & Land Use Strategy (ITLUS) to establish a clear long term,
effective and sustainable vision for Bendigos transport network;
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2.

3.
4.

5.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

To engage an appropriately skilled Integrated Transport Planner to scope and


project manage the preparation of an ITLUS in partnership with Department of
Planning and Community Development, Department of Transport and VicRoads;
To ensure that best practice consultation and community engagement is completed
during preparation of the ITLUS including a widely represented steering group;
To allocate $150,000 in 2012/2013, and confirm additional funding support from the
Department of Transport and/or VicRoads and/or the Department of Planning and
Community Development to adequately resource the preparation of an ITLUS; and
That the previous research findings of the draft Bendigo Road Transport Strategy,
together with public submissions received, are considered in the development of an
Integrated Transport and Land use Strategy for Bendigo.

2012 (October) A Senior Integrated Transport Planner was appointed for a period of
three years to scope out the project and manage the development of the ITLUS.
2013 (April) A report was provided to Council with an update on the work undertaken
was tabled and Council approved the proposed ITLUS development process by
endorsing the associated project planning documentation, including the Project Brief,
Project Work Program, Community Engagement Plan and the Project Governance
Structure.
2013 (August) A Councillor Forum presentation provided a progress update and
informed Council on the upcoming community consultation.
2014 (September) Councillor Forum was provided with an update on the work
undertaken during Stages 2, 3 and 4 of the ITLUS development and Council advised on
the Strategy finalisation process, as endorsed by the ITLUS Steering Committee.
2015 (April) - A Councillor Forum presentation was provided to inform Councillors about
the outcomes of community feedback on the Stage 4 Consultants Report; as well as the
latest work and research findings bearing on the finalisation of the ITLUS.
Report
Priority/Importance:
The ITLUS is Councils principal strategy for managing the integration of
transport and land use into the future.
Given the wide breadth of transport, land use, health and wellbeing and economic issues
impacted by the ITLUS, it is of primary importance in guiding the future growth and
development of Greater Bendigo.
Integration of transport and land use is mandated by the Transport Integration Act
(2010). All transport planning and land-use decisions are required to be made with
consideration of the Transport Integration Act (2010. This means Council is required to
have regard for the transport system objectives and decision making principles with
respect to any action that may significantly impact on the transport system.

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Progress:
The ITLUS development took time but it did not delay action. In fact, as the ITLUS
process gained momentum, so did the collaborative work designed to improve the citys
transport options and the communitys perceptions of active travel. This work continued
after the public release of the Stage 4 Consultants Report in December 2014.
Key findings and recommendations resulting from the strategic, technical and
implementation activities outlined below have been incorporated into the final ITLUS.
Refining the detail that needed to be captured by the ITLUS

Review of community comments on the Stage 4 Consultants Report.


Working closely with PTV, VicRoads, and the CoGBs Economic Development Unit,
Healthy Together team and the Engineering and Public Assets Directorate to
establish consensus on responses to community comments and the Stage 4
Consultants Report recommendations.
In depth analysis of the road network based on the latest data - B double routes;
traffic volumes; what road works have been undertaken since Bendigo 2020
Transportation Study (July1993); review of the functioning of the outer box and
implications for Reservoir Road and Olinda/Pyke/Miller Streets.
Evaluation of freight routes and priorities with the freight industry.

Working closely with State Government on initiatives that have direct implications for
ITLUS

PTVs Bendigo Bus Network Review - liaising with PTV, responding to community
concerns and advocating on their behalf for improved services.
Bendigo Metro Rail a Victorian Government initiative which aims to deliver a
commuter train service for Bendigo, with an increased number of services running
from Epsom, Eaglehawk and Kangaroo Flat to Bendigo. The project aligns with the
objectives of ITLUS, which includes increasing public transport patronage,
encouraging alternatives to car usage and facilitating urban renewal and
development opportunities around transport hubs and key activity centres. Council
representatives (the Mayor and the Strategy Manager) and several members of the
ITLUS Reference Group were on the Community Consultative Taskforce to provide
recommendations to the Minister for Public Transport. A Technical Working Group
was established (the Strategy Manager represented the CoGB) to support the
Community Consultative Taskforce.
Regional Network Development Plan a Victorian Government initiative designed
to move Victoria away from ad hoc public transport service improvements, towards
a more coordinated regional public transport network where train and bus services
work together to get people where they need to go quicker and more reliably. The
City has been contributing its knowledge of local and regional transport issues and
planning expertise through the appointment of the Strategy Manager to the Minister
for Public Transports Regional Transport Advisory Group, responsible for
overseeing the development of the Plan. The Plan will set out priorities for regional
public transport services, infrastructure upgrades, network extension, rolling stock
and other investment during the next 20 to 30 years. An extensive process of
community consultation in this region will take place in late August 2015.

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Loddon Mallee South Regional Transport Strategy Council representatives have


joined their counterparts from other Loddon Mallee South Councils, to assist with
the development of the Strategy. The Strategy being prepared by consultants aims
to inform and identify the transport needs of the whole of the region, and will
propose mechanisms to address these needs.
SmartRoads User Hierarchy SmartRoads is a key network planning tool used by
VicRoads in conjunction with Council to better manage road infrastructure by giving
strategic priority to various transport modes (i.e. cars, public transport, walking,
cycling and freight) along routes at various locations and at different times of the
day. Council staff are working closely with representatives from VicRoads and PTV
to deliver the User Hierarchy. Two workshops have been held and the project will
be completed over the coming months.

Working on initiatives that encourage a shift away from cars to public transport, walking
and cycling

La Trobe University (as one of the four major trip generators in the City) has
recently prepared and released a campus Master Plan which includes a transport
strategy. The University will play a key role in working with the CoGB towards a
reduction in the number of single occupant cars on Bendigos roads. Council
representatives provided extensive input into the Universitys Plan. Significantly the
Plan re-routes existing bus services through the campus with a central on-campus
bus stop which is designed to encourage a considerable increase in students and
staff using the bus services to the campus particularly the connection to the railway
station which PTV has identified as a priority route resulting in their review
proposing greater frequency and span of services. The University is anticipating
completing the internal road works to facilitate this prior to the commencement of
semester one in 2016. La Trobe University had a direct input into the ITLUS as a
Member of the ITLUS Reference Group.
Other major employers - CoGB, Bendigo & Adelaide Bank and Bendigo Health are
the major organisations that generate most of the work-associated trips into the City
Centre. Recent ITLUS research found that if one day per week each person at the
three organisations walks, cycles, car-shares or uses public transport instead of
driving alone that will take over 1,000 cars off our roads each morning. A number
of partnership initiatives have been undertaken and continue to be developed which
can be shared, co-funded and otherwise pursued as part of ITLUS implementation.
Map My 10 Minute Neighbourhood The City websites Community Compass tool
has been redeveloped to help children, families and residents learn more about
facilities, places of interest and community groups located within a 10 minute walk
or cycle of where they live. This ITLUS initiative is a result of collaboration between
the City and Bendigo TAFE.
Promotion of public transport work continues, involving the Bus Association of
Victoria and Whitmore's Bus Services, on innovative initiatives to attract more
passengers, particularly those living in Strathfieldsaye, onto the newly improved
service. This includes a promotional tour of the Strathfieldsaye route on one of the
new buses; as well as establishing a trial of bicycle racks on the bus.

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Continued work with schools a large proportion of Greater Bendigos traffic is


associated with school pick-up and drop-off. This not only contributes to congestion
but it also has an adverse impact on childrens safety and wellbeing. Working with
schools to encourage more active travel among their students has been a key focus
throughout the ITLUS development. Most recently, this has involved the preparation
of an active travel toolkit, which has been developed in collaboration with local
schools and with the Healthy Together team, which will be launched in September
and provided for all primary schools in Greater Bendigo.

Final Strategy
Development of the Strategy has been a dynamic process embedded
in community engagement, building of partnerships, fostering of
consensus and seeking opportunities to do things smarter and sharing
resources.
The Final ITLUS (Attachment 1) is a culmination of this process. The document is
derived from the themes and recommendations outlined in the Stage 4 Consultants
Report. It constitutes a substantial refinement based on the community feedback
received; as well as the result of the technical, strategic and implementation work
completed since December 2014 (outlined above). Councils attention is brought to
specific refinements detailed in the following sections.
Compact Bendigo
Like the Stage 4 Consultants Report, the Final Strategy groups its overarching goals
under 5 themes.

While Compact Bendigo featured in the Consultants Report, the concept was adopted
within the 2014 Residential Strategy and has now become a basic assumption, upon
which the whole of the ITLUS is based. The key Compact Bendigo objectives and
actions are now captured under Connecting Bendigo. This change is an example of how
the document evolved. The ITLUS should continue to be considered as a living
document after its adoption: to change with the community and be updated over time to
align with other Council and state government strategies.

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Engaging Bendigo
This is a new theme, introduced to capture the importance of delivering the ITLUS
through partnerships between the Greater Bendigo, government agencies, businesses
and community groups. The success of the transport and land use responses outlined in
the ITLUS is highly dependent on a generational shift a shift from a culture that always
prioritises car use to get to daily destinations as more important than getting there in a
healthy way that minimises the impact on others and the environment. This will require
many of us to reassess some of our daily routines and the way we do business. It will
require a concerted effort to build community understanding of the benefits and their
support for Councils long term commitment to:

Visionary leadership endorsement of the Final ITLUS is the first step towards far
sighted, long term and progressive action that results from the cumulative impact of
many projects and initiatives over time.
Consistent decision making that aligns with the ITLUS objectives for transport and
land use when for example, dealing with proposed new subdivisions, medium
density housing proposals or bus network reviews. This undoubtedly will prove to
be challenging in the face of changing governments but is key to reaping the
rewards of a long term commitment.
High level of community engagement and transparency necessary not only to
make decisions which align with evolving community sentiment; but also to build a
sense of community ownership which is essential to motivating people to
progressively change their behaviour. Behaviour change is a key challenge
requiring long term commitment and open conversations with the community. Just
as reducing the road toll took many years of government sponsored education
programs, infrastructure changes and new laws over many years.

Engaging Bendigo is about making the transition possible by building on Greater


Bendigos can do attitude and a strong community and partnership spirit. It builds on the
extensive partnerships and agreements established during the development of the
ITLUS and focuses on:

sharing of knowledge and ideas;


co-funding, promoting and organising behaviour change events;
co-bidding for and co-funding capital works and service delivery.
The emphasis on constructive partnerships, where a whole host of
organisations commit to working with the CoGB to assist in the
implementation of the ITLUS appears to be unparalleled in transport
strategies across Australia. It is a major defining element of the ITLUS
development process and the final Strategy.

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Bendigo Metro Rail


The ITLUS aligns with the Bendigo Metro Rail initiative which recognises and supports
the communitys aspirations for 20 minute peak and 40 minute inter peak services to and
from Bendigo, Epsom, Eaglehawk and Kangaroo Flat. Bendigo Metro Rail deals with
immediate service improvements ($2M commitment). It also looks to progressively
improve V/Line train network through Bendigo to encourage local travel. However, the
Bendigo Metro Rail terms of reference only deals with the provision for the existing
railway stations in Bendigo. The ITLUS aspirations go beyond this and further into the
future. For example, the Strategy advocates for the:

Investigation of the critical success factors including land use and urban
development opportunities as well as productivity, liveability and health dividends
associated with providing additional railway stations at Huntly, Maiden Gully,
Golden Square and Marong, as identified by the Residential Strategy.
Reopening of the Golden Square railway station and the construction of a new
railway station at the Bendigo Showgrounds, in conjunction with urban development
for new stations at Maiden Gully with the capacity for grade separation, a new
station at Marong and a planned station at the Marong Business Park.
The ultimate long term goal being the development of a stand alone urban rail
system to provide for high-speed and high-capacity movement of people to and
from the City Centre and to activity centres located along the railway network.

PTVs Bus Network Review 2014-2015


A high quality bus network is integral to the sustainable growth of Bendigo. Given the
shorter timeframes for delivering bus-based initiatives in comparison to rail based
initiatives, the bus network will be required to lead the change in mode shift away from
private vehicles. Bus services need to be a real alternative if reduced car dependency is
to be achieved. We can only encourage commuters to switch to using the bus if:

their journeys are not made longer (by travel time)


they do not have to wait an unreasonably long time for a bus
the timetable covers the times they need to travel
the entire journey is easier than driving and parking

The ITLUS aligns with the recent Reviews intention for the bus services to complement
new train service improvements, introduced as part of Bendigo Metro Rail; and those
associated with the completion of the Regional Rail Link project. It is our understanding
that this is a first in a series of anticipated reviews designed to progressively build a high
quality urban bus service and network.
The ITLUS however, goes beyond the immediate improvements resulting from the
Review. It advocates for a progressive, significant increase in frequencies, extending of
hours of operation and weekend coverage on all routes, in particular along the four main
transport corridors namely: Kangaroo Flat to City Centre, Huntly to City Centre,
Eaglehawk to City Centre and Strathfieldsaye to City Centre. This while providing a high
level of coverage on the distributer routes which service local neighbourhoods and their
centres. The ultimate ITLUS goal being a 10 minute service at peak times on most
routes; 5 minute services on specialist routes, such as to the La Trobe University and the
Bendigo Hospital; and much more late night coverage.
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The Strategy also emphasises the importance of improving public transport services for
the growing townships. For example it advocates for a consolidation of existing bus
services to improve connections between Heathcote and urban Bendigo with services for
Axedale and Junortoun.
Key actions arising out of ITLUS for Councils consideration and endorsement
Firstly:
As part of the development process of ITLUS consideration has been given to each of
the issues identified in Councils resolution of August 2011. In order to close the loop on
those matters it is recommended that Council adopt the following positions on each of
those resolutions. The resolutions are in italics.
1.

Notes that a complete bypass to the east of Bendigo is not justified and does not
form part of the current draft document.
ITLUS the research undertaken as part of ITLUS and in consultation with
VicRoads has re-affirmed this finding and position.

2.

Supports a research project into the likely actions, effectiveness and resource
implications of completing a Sustainable Transport Strategy for Bendigo. Such a
project would include identification of a proposed methodology and a stakeholder
engagement plan.
ITLUS This whole approach was integral to the ITLUS process.

3.

Supports the removal of ITC 2 Gladstone Street to Nolan Street from the current
draft document.
ITLUS affirmed.

4.

Subject to 3, supports further investigation of possible improvements to promote


better use of underutilised existing major roads, such as Pyke Street, Miller Street,
Sternberg Street, Houston Street, Somerville Street and Belle Vue Road, in the
Quarry Hill and East Bendigo areas. Defers consideration of ITC 2 north of Nolan
Street and east of the railway line until the findings of the research project
described in 2 are known.
ITLUS - does not propose to change the status of these roads. While the 1993
Study recommended substantial upgrading of underutilised existing roads, the
research undertaken as part of ITLUS and in consultation with VicRoads does not
warrant the works envisaged. Other priorities will deliver far more benefits. Further
investigation of possible improvements to promote better use of major roads in
Quarry Hill and East Bendigo will form part of ongoing work between the CoGB and
VicRoads, as addressed in the ITLUS actions relating to SmartRoads and the jointly
funded (with Regional Development Victoria) detailed Bendigo freight study.

5.

Defers consideration of ITC 2 north of Nolan Street and East of the east of the
railway line until the findings of the research project described in 2 are known.

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ITLUS the research undertaken as part of ITLUS and in consultation with


VicRoads does not warrant the works associated with ITC 2 north of Nolan Street
and East of the east of the railway line.
6.

Defers consideration of ITC 1 Allingham Street until the findings of the research
project described in 2 are known.
ITLUS the research undertaken as part of ITLUS and in consultation with
VicRoads does not warrant the works associated with ITC 1 Allingham Street
proposal.

7.

Notes that no change to the draft document is proposed in regard to the


Hattam/Adam Street project (OB3).
ITLUS affirmed.

8.

Notes that no change to the draft document is proposed in regard to the Chum
Street project (OA6).
ITLUS affirmed.

9.

Notes that a further report will be provided on other aspects of the current
document in the coming months.
ITLUS progress reports on ITLUS were provided to Council.

10. Acknowledge the significant contribution made by the Bendigo community in the
development of this document to date.
ITLUS the continuing community engagement with and contribution to ITLUS has
been invaluable.
Secondly:
The Final ITLUS (Attachment 1) provides a refined set of actions which are grouped as
follows:

New actions to implement ITLUS this refers to actions that are specific initiatives
of the ITLUS.
ITLUS actions which support other policies and strategies this refers to actions
which align with other strategic documents and progress on which is already
reported on.
Actions which continue the ongoing work of the ITLUS this refers to actions
which advance/progress/expand on work already undertaken as part of Councils
day to day operations and known long term commitments.

The actions are assigned the following time frames:


Short term actions which cover the next five years;
Medium term actions which cover the period 2020 to 2030;
Long Term actions which cover the period 2030 and beyond with Greater Bendigo
reaching 200,000 residents.
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The Final ITLUS also provides an at a glance summary (pages 8 and 9) which captures
the essence of the detailed actions. The document thus provides for a range of
audiences from the practitioners who will be responsible for day to day implementation;
to the broader public who are interested in the Strategys overall intent.

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The following is a list of actions from the ITLUS which, when endorsed, will formally
mark the commencement of the ITLUS implementation program:
For the purposes of this report, only the short term (up to 5 years) actions have been
listed. The medium and longer term actions are in the full report.
Connecting
1.
Develop transport hub and urban renewal implementation plans for Bendigo,
Eaglehawk, Epsom and Kangaroo Flat railway stations and surrounding precincts
with a focus on improved and safer pedestrian and cycling access and circulation,
improved urban spaces and landscaping, bus network and interchange facilities,
commercial development and medium density housing incorporating affordable
housing options.
This is an initiative of significant regional strategic importance and it is anticipated
that major elements of this are likely to be funded by State Government.
2.

Develop a detailed Precinct Structure Plan for Marong Township to support its
development into a township supporting about 8,000 people, and serviced by high
quality public transport connections to Bendigo, including provision for a rail service.
Due to commence in the first half of 2016. This forms part of Councils ongoing
strategic planning work program.

3.

Recognise and reinforce Pall Mall as Australias premier 19th century boulevard
and ensure that urban design features and transport network planning measures,
balance its heritage architecture and contemporary uses, prioritise the safe and
convenient movement of people across Pall Mall, create a sense of place, support
business activity and provide for safe movement of traffic.
This forms part of Councils ongoing collaboration with VicRoads to prepare a
SmartRoads plan for Greater Bendigo which is underway and is funded by
VicRoads. (medium term)

Healthy
4.
Implement a Design and Development Overlay as part of the Greater Bendigo
Planning Scheme based on the Heart Foundations Healthy by Design Guidelines
and apply the healthy, walkable neighbourhood design principles when undertaking
structure and master planning, urban design frameworks for activity centres,
planning for development near public transport interchanges, particularly railway
stations and along main bus transit corridors.
This is an input to the implementation of the Greater Bendigo Residential Strategy
adopted by Council.
5.

Update the City of Greater Bendigo Road Safety Plan 2007-2011 in line with
VicRoads Towards Zero Strategy principles for minimising road fatalities and
injuries, particularly among vulnerable road users, pedestrians, cyclists, the young
and the elderly.
This forms part of the standard process of aligning local Road Safety policies with
VicRoads plans. In line with current practice, external funding will be sought for this
program by Presentation and Assets Directorate.

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Investigate the relative merits, costs, impediments and approvals required of both:
a. Removing the ban on bicycles in Hargreaves Mall and linking the southern and
northern sections of the Bendigo Creek Trail through the City Centre including
using the Hargreaves Mall by safely integrating cycling with pedestrians and
crossing Pall Mall to link the Trail back to the Creek, and
b. Continuing the Trail within the Bendigo Creek channel and providing for cycle
access points at key locations for access to the city centre, Rosalind Park and
schools. (short term).
This forms part of the proposed program of works by the Presentation and Assets
Directorate

Moving
7.
Collaborate with VicRoads to develop an agreed SmartRoads Network Operating
Plan for urban Bendigo to help identify and prioritise improvements to make the
best use of existing road space, maximise safety, and provide broader
transportation benefits to the community which address traffic growth including by
facilitating the use of sustainable transport modes such as public transport, cycling
and walking.
This forms part of Councils ongoing collaboration with VicRoads to prepare a
SmartRoads plan for Greater Bendigo which is underway and is funded by
VicRoads.
8.

Review the relevant Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme Clauses relating to car
parking provisions so as to align them with the ITLUS strategic directions.
This forms part of Councils ongoing strategic planning work program to implement
ITLUS through a planning scheme amendment which is funded in the 2015/16
budget.

9.

Undertake a detailed, Bendigo specific freight study (co-funded with RDV) to


identify inhibitors that impact on the efficiency of road and rail freight as well as to
explore opportunities for enhancing the productivity of the freight sector and for
minimising its impacts on residential amenity and the citys liveability, such as
through identification of preferred freight hub locations and utilisation of state of the
art information technology based logistics.
This study is proposed to be funded by Regional Development Victoria.

Engaging
10. Provide every Greater Bendigo Primary School with an Active Travel Tool Kit, which
has been developed as an ITLUS active travel initiative, and progressively
implement the key elements so as to increase the level of walking, cycling and
public transport use among their school communities.
This is an ongoing program supported through Healthy Together.

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11. Continue the existing collaboration between the CoGB and Bendigo TAFE to
maintain and progressively expand the My Local Neighbourhood mapping system
as part of the Community Compass platform.
Initial setup is due to be completed by Councils Cadet Social Planner (Strategy)
under the 2015-2016 Budget. The ongoing program will be sustained by TAFE
students as part of their course work and by Councils Online Communications
Officer as part of her approved work program.
Inspiring Bendigo
12. Establish an ITLUS governance structure by formalising the membership of the
current ITLUS Steering Committee and the Implementation Group and defining their
terms of reference.
This requires new Council funding for the appointment of an ITLUS Community
Partnerships and Implementation Officer - as outlined later in this report under
Resource Implications.
13. Formalise an ITLUS delivery, monitoring and reporting framework for crossorganisational integration, coordinated decision-making and measurable
performance against refined targets.
This requires new Council funding for the appointment of an ITLUS Community
Partnerships and Implementation Officer - as outlined later in this report under
Resource Implications.
14. Apply refined processes for the prioritisation of projects and budgeting so as to
implement the ITLUS.
This requires new Council funding for the appointment of an ITLUS Community
Partnerships and Implementation Officer - as outlined later in this report under
Resource Implications.
15. Incorporate the relevant aspects of the ITLUS into the Greater Bendigo Planning
Scheme.
This requires new Council funding for the appointment of an ITLUS Community
Partnerships and Implementation Officer - as outlined later in this report under
Resource Implications.
16. Coordinate an integrated delivery, monitoring and reporting process through
establishing an Implementation Group and ensure that this process is transparent
and well communicated to key stakeholders, project partners and the broader
community.
This requires new Council funding for the appointment of an ITLUS Community
Partnerships and Implementation Officer - as outlined later in this report under
Resource Implications.

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17. Trial a fully integrated and collaborative planning and delivery model comprising
PTV and V/Line for buses, trains (including the roll out of Bendigo Metro Rail) and
taxis working in partnership with the City of Greater Bendigo. This would include a
coordinated approach to community consultation, high level network planning,
timetabling and marketing.
Items 12-17 require new Council funding for the appointment of an ITLUS
Community Partnerships and Implementation Officer - as outlined later in this report
under Resource Implications'.
18. Trial a range of on-road separated bicycle lane treatments, cyclist and pedestrian
priority and safety improvements, including a separated bicycle lane solution
through the City Centre to connect the southern and northern sections of the
Bendigo Creek Linear Trail.
Further investigation of the preferred treatments and a funding bid under Councils
Capital Works Program will be developed by the Presentation and Assets
Directorate.
Support for ITLUS actions from the State Government transport portfolio
The transport portfolio was directly involved in the development of the ITLUS as
members of the project Steering Committee. The portfolio represents the following
government agencies and departments:

The Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport & Resources


(DEDJTR);
VicRoads; and
Public Transport Victoria (PTV).

In a recent formal letter the transport portfolio confirms its in-principle support for the
goals and objectives of the ITLUS. It states its commitment to using the final document
as a key input into future network planning and in its advice to government on transport
policy, programs and funding.
The transport portfolio cannot commit to specific actions that do not have a current
funding commitment. This relates, for example, to the ITLUS aspirational goals
associated with opening new railways stations in Huntly and Marong etc. (refer above for
details) In this case, the Final ITLUS includes actions which advocate for improvements
that reflect the long term aspirations of the Greater Bendigo community.
The transport portfolio however, commits to support the prioritisation, funding and
delivery of ITLUS actions through governments strategies, programs and further detailed
analysis. In fact, their focus on delivering the ITLUS outcomes has been emphasised on
relevant public websites, such as the one dealing with the Bus Network review and the
Bendigo Metro Rail initiative.

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The Council should be commended for committing to the highly collaborative ITLUS
development process from its inception. Likewise, the transport portfolio representatives,
who sat on the ITLUS Steering Committee, should be commended for their cooperation
and inspiring leadership. This firmly established the Strategys capture of unprecedented
level of cooperation, open discussion; and a genuine desire to better integrate
government planning and action that aligns with the community aspirations.
The ITLUS development journey has inspired those involved to look to solutions and to
be hands on in delivering the aspirations, particularly those relating to positive change in
travel behaviour. The following statement from the transport portfolio is illustrative of this
point:
We agree that it is important for organisations to lead by example to successfully
implement ITLUS. In response, VicRoads Northern Region also commits to establishing
an ongoing green travel plan and program for its Bendigo office. We will share the
outcomes of these initiatives with council to add to its evidence of how organisations can
lead travel behaviour change.
Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation:
Staff from City work areas responsible for transport, land use, community health and
wellbeing and associated activities have been continually involved in the ITLUS
development. Many were members of the Technical Working (TWG) Group and have
taken part in workshops, public forums and targeted discussions. Their expertise and city
knowledge was sought in the review of the Stage 4 Consultants Report and the drafting
of the final Strategy.
The adoption of the ITLUS starts the process of staff and Council
approaching a range of issues with a different mindset and looking for
solutions that align with ITLUS.
The staff directly responsible for delivering the ITLUS objectives will be engaged in
regularly scheduled discussions with the Strategy unit on how to apply existing
communications, planning and engineering tools to deliver the desired outcomes. Their
hands-on experience will help to refine current practices and the ITLUS will inform their
recommendations. For example, the Citys Traffic Engineers, who make
recommendations to Council on matters relating to traffic solutions, have already started
to and will need to consider treatments that do not impede or rather promote safe access
by walking and cycling. The City's Statutory Planning staff, on the other hand, will need
to ensure that proposals for subdivision, land use and development embody and deliver
the ITLUS outcomes.
External Consultation:
The Stage 4 Report consultation marked a turning point in a long running community
engagement process involving thousands of people who actively took part in helping to
develop the ITLUS. More than 700 people provided comments on the Report, adding to
an estimated 25,600 persons who already took an interest in the project.

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The vast majority chose to meet face to face:

by attending 11 listening posts across the municipality;


coming to ward meetings;
one-on-one meetings;
group discussions (e.g. with Bendigo Take Action and Sustainability Groups); and
a workshop with the freight and industry sector representatives.

About 200 wrote in, filled out a survey or provided their view over the phone. The
community response to the Consultants recommendations was overwhelmingly positive:

There was a strong support for innovation and doing things differently;
An emphasis on combining health and transport by focusing on children and their
travel to school;
Reiterated statements around the importance of improving bus services.
Strong advocacy for stepped up investment in high quality, safe walking and cycling
infrastructure; and
Great support to deliver ITLUS through partnerships.

There were some in the community who pointed to the difficulty of getting people to
make even relatively modest changes to their daily travel habits while the car still
remains the most convenient and direct mode of transport to many of Greater Bendigos
destinations. This sentiment was particularly pronounced during discussions held in the
rural areas and Citys townships understandably so when we consider the distances
that these residents are having to travel and the lack of public transport. ITLUS responds
to these comments by advocating strongly for urgent and substantial improvements to
public transport services and the Citys walking and cycling paths to offer real choice that
is comparable to driving cars.
It is acknowledged that the issue is more difficult to resolve for rural and township
communities where it is substantially more difficult to provide alternatives. The emphasis
on shifting some trips from a car to active healthy travel, whenever and wherever
possible then becomes paramount and forms the basis of the ITLUS philosophy. For
example, if those who work in the Bendigo city centre and travel by car each day choose
an alternative travel mode (bus, walking, cycling or car sharing) one day out of five work
days; we can get at least 2,000 cars off the roads. The ITLUSs call for 1 in 5 commutes
to work or school to be by active healthy travel has been enthusiastically received by
those in the public transport sector the Bus Association of Victoria has indicated in
discussions with City officers that they are planning to develop a national campaign,
based on the 1 in 5 concept, with Greater Bendigo being promoted as the launching
pad.
There were also some recurring themes raised with relation to the Bendigos road
network recommendations:

Those raised by the industry and freight sector during their workshop; and
Those raised by two resident lobby groups with relation to two specific sections of
the road network - Reservoir Road and Olinda/Pyke/Miller Streets.

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A summary of these comments and recommended responses were presented to the


ILTUS Steering Committee at their 10 April 2015 meeting. Detail of the refined responses
based on the Steering Committee feedback are contained in (Attachment 2) to this report
and have been incorporated into the Final ITLUS.
Resource Implications
All work required to refine the ITLUS after the public release of the Stage 4 Consultants
Report was undertaken under the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 Council approved budgets.
Throughout the process, funds were allocated to implementation alongside of the
Strategy development, particularly in the case of behaviour change initiatives.
Endorsement of the Final ITLUS will have the following resource implications:

The bulk of actions relating to public transport (bus and rail) and arterial road
network improvements will not have significant resource implications as they are
the responsibility of state government departments and agencies (e.g. VicRoads
and PTV). For example, Bendigo Metro Rail funds allocated in the State budget and
the bus network improvements resulting from the recent review which will be fully
funded by PTV Council has been and will continue devoting in house resources to
advocate on behalf of the local community. Similarly, the SmartRoads network
planning initiative, which is already underway, will be fully funded by VicRoads in
house staff resources will constitute Councils contribution to this important
initiative.

Numerous other actions will be resourced in house as part of the Citys day to day
operations which progress the implementation of other strategic planning. For
example, the structure planning and Planning Scheme Amendments resulting from
the Greater Bendigo Residential Strategy and the Commercial Land and Activity
Centre Strategy.

Developing staff thinking and practices in various City departments will also help
deliver the ITLUS outcomes without significant additional resource implications. For
example, through the Planning Scheme Application process that responds to
actions which foster housing diversity; or in the case of delivering an action that
requires staff to apply the latest road, intersection, footpath, pedestrian crossing
and cycle path design solutions to reduce traffic related death and injury in activity
areas and local neighbourhoods.

Actions relating to initiatives that have strategic regional and state wide implications
are likely to be largely funded by other levels of government. For example, the
Bendigo Freight Study; or development of transport hub and urban renewal
implementation plans for Bendigo, Eaglehawk, Epsom and Kangaroo Flat railway
stations and surrounding precincts. The transport portfolio now officially confirmed
the current Governments commitment to support the prioritisation, funding and
delivery of ITLUS actions.

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Actions relating to the provision of new and improved footpaths, shared paths, cycle
paths, trails and bicycle parking will require considerable additional funding over the
coming years. While some of this infrastructure can be funded through partnerships
(e.g. the Strathfieldsaye and District Community Enterprise and CoGB co-funded
the recent completion of a shared path in Strathfieldsaye). It is recommended that
Council agree to consider applying a rolling budget over the coming five years to
advance the progressive rollout of this infrastructure across the municipality.
Ideally, the rolling budget would be equivalent to the one approved ($1.03M) under
the 2015-2016 Council Budget. This kind of resource commitment would go a long
way towards meeting the communitys urgent calls for this type of investment.

The partnerships which underpin the ITLUS implementation will go a long way
towards extending the limited financial reach that all Local Governments, including
this Council has to contend with. The process of co-funding and co-bidding for
funds to deliver ITLUS initiatives has been firmly established during the Strategy
development. This process however requires vigilance and coordinated, strategic
supervision. This task was the responsibility of Councils Senior Integrated
Transport Planner engaged for a period of three years to the end in November 2015
for the purpose of delivering the ITLUS. As the ITLUS moves into its
implementation phase a skill set focused on community engagement, co-bidding for
funding, working with relevant external agencies, detailed implementation, and
building and supporting productive partnerships will be needed. It is recommended
that Council consider the appointment of an ITLUS Community Engagement,
Partnerships and Implementation Officer under the 2016-2017 Council Budget. This
resource will have an estimated cost to Council of $100,000 per annum, but has the
capacity to generate external funding streams well above this figure. In the
immediate future, some of the behaviour change initiatives will continue being
delivered in house

Conclusion
The proposed Connecting Greater Bendigo: Integrated Transport and Land Use Strategy
(ITLUS) is a major new strategic approach to meeting the future transport, development
and housing needs of Greater Bendigo one of Victorias fastest-growing regional cities.
It is underpinned by strong partnerships with business, government and community
organisations.
The strategy will guide where urban growth takes place. It will be a plan
for the type and level of transport infrastructure and services to be
provided now and into the future. It will be a pivotal tool in achieving
Councils vision of Greater Bendigo working together to be Australias
most liveable regional city.
The ITLUS was born out of the communitys recognition that realistic and viable
alternatives to the way the city grows and the way people and goods move within it are
possible. Development of ITLUS was a dynamic process, embedded in community
engagement, building of partnerships, fostering of consensus and seeking opportunities
to do things smarter and share resources. This laid the foundations for the partnerships
and integrated decision making that the ITLUS delivery is based on.

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The ITLUS equips Council with a new understanding about the role and function of
Greater Bendigos road space; gives greater attention to location and type of land uses in
the citys urban and rural areas as well as the citys townships; provides for greater
transport options; and fosters a shift in travel behaviour towards healthier and more
active transport modes. In doing so, the ITLUS goes beyond the standard transport
strategy objective it not only address traffic congestion; it also aims to deliver
substantial productivity, liveability and health dividends for the city and the region.
Endorsement of the Final ITLUS is the first step towards far sighted, long term and
progressive action that results from the cumulative impact of pursuing numerous projects
and initiatives over time. It is recommended that the ITLUS be adopted as Councils
principal strategy for managing growth and change.
Attachments
1.

Attachment 1 Connecting Greater Bendigo: Integrated Transport & Land use


Strategy

2.

Attachment 2 - Refined Responses Based on Steering Committee Feedback

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1.

Adopt Connecting Greater Bendigo: Integrated Transport and Land Use Strategy
(ITLUS) August 2015.

2.

Commence the planning scheme amendment process to implement the relevant


strategic and policy directions of the adopted ITLUS.

3.

Adopt the policy positions in relation to the ten resolutions from the Council meeting
on August 17 2011 as set out in this report and headed Council Resolutions
August 17 2011.

4.

Adopt actions identified in this report which will formally mark the commencement of
the ITLUS implementation program and those outlined under Resource
Implications as high priority.

5.

Refer and consider the additional funding needed in the budget cycles.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

2.6

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

PROPOSED SALE OF 8 RENNIE STREET, HUNTLY

Document Information
Author

Naomi Fountain, Strategic Property Analyst

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
8 Rennie Street, Huntly is the subject of this report and is identified as potentially surplus.
The report documents the feedback provided by community members during public
engagement and makes recommendations as to the future handling of the property.
Policy Context
Council Plan 2013-2017 (2014-2015 Update)
Theme 5: Sustainability
5.1 Resources and assets are used wisely to reduce the environmental footprint.
5.1.5 Implement the Surplus Land Disposal Plan.
Community Engagement Policy (December 2011)
10 Year Financial Plan
Building Asset Management Plan (Draft)
Statutory and Discretionary Reserve Policy (November 2012)
Local Government Act 1989 (VIC)
Background Information
Local Context
The City of Greater Bendigos Building and Property Services Unit manages a portfolio of
about 750 buildings and 100 structures. The land and buildings are valued in excess of
$302M.
As part of the Citys Building Asset Management Plan, properties that may not meet the
current or future needs of the City are being investigated as potentially surplus. Not all
land identified as surplus needs to be sold. The options for disposal include alternative
use, rental, sale, or sale and lease-back1. Ongoing consultation and communication
will inform which method of disposal is recommended, on a case by case basis, informed
by community feedback.
1

The Asset Management Principles Part 1 1995, Victorian Department of Treasury and
Finance
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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Previous Council Decision Date:


S89 Confidential Report:
6 May 2015: That Greater Bendigo City Council resolved to commence public
engagement to seek the view of the community in relation to the potential
disposal of 8 Rennie Street, Huntly and 12A Jacob Street, North Bendigo.
Report
8 Rennie Street, Huntly was identified as potentially suitable for disposal in the short term
because it does not meet the Citys current or future needs. It is not subject to the
Council Plan, any Strategies, Township Structure Plans, Place Based Plan or Reports.
Council resolved to seek the communitys views on this property, its potential future use
and possible disposal.

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Consultation/Communication
Public engagement undertaken in relation to this property:
May 2015 - 100 owners and occupiers of properties in Rennie Street, Hakea Road,
Waratah Road and Tecoma Court, Huntly were written to individually and notified of
Councils wish to seek their views on the future use of the property.
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May 2015 - A listening post was undertaken and Naomi Fountain (Strategic Property
Analyst) met with residents to seek and record their views. Other conversations were
also held with residents and their views recorded.
June 2015 A letter was sent to each respondent listing the views that were
documented and providing an opportunity to amend any information that was missed
or misinterpreted. No responses were received in relation to this letter.
In total, face to face and/or telephone conversations were conducted with 12 people of
the 100 that were contacted. The views presented by the community are documented in
the table below:
8 Rennie Street, Huntly Community views regarding possible future use
Community Feedback

Officer Response

There have been more birds on the property


since the subdivision on Waratah Road

Observation noted.

Would just like to be kept informed as to what


is happening in relation to the block.

There is an open and transparent


process and all engaged residents
will be kept up to date with its
progress.

Had been informed that the property was an


unmade road. Could we put a road through to
Tecoma Court which would allow further
development on either side of the road?

8 Rennie Street is not an unmade


road. It backs onto privately owned
residences in Tecoma Court,
therefore could not be developed
into a road to connect Rennie Street
and Tecoma Court.

Retain the land to provide a buffer between the Suggestions noted.


proposed Childcare Centre and Doctors
Surgery and the residents of Rennie Street.
The adjoining owner should have first option to
purchase the property if it is to be sold. Build
single bedroom aged care units on the
property to provide locals a way to stay in
place as they age (rather than having to move
to Bendigo).
It is a waste just having it sit there, suggest
you sell it. There are other playgrounds in the
area and there is no need for another one.

Suggestions noted.

It would be nice if the trees could be saved


and a few seats put in. There has been a lot of
land clearing in Huntly and there are many
small mammals and birds in the area whose
habitat has been affected.

The trees on this property were


provided by the Shire of Huntly and
planted by the adjoining owner, they
are not remnant vegetation.
Suggestions noted.

Not concerned what happens on the property.

Feedback noted.

As long as the area remains peaceful, not


concerned what decision is made about the
land.

Feedback noted.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

8 Rennie Street, Huntly Community views regarding possible future use


Community Feedback

Officer Response

No problems with the Council doing whatever


it needs to with 8 Rennie Street, Huntly.

Feedback noted.

Create a park land.

Suggestion noted.

8 Rennie Street, Huntly

The aerial below shows 8 Rennie Street, Huntly and its relationship to established play
spaces and Public Open Space in the vicinity.

8 Rennie Street, Huntly in relation to other public open space

Photos of the play spaces and Public Open Space at Staunch Reserve and at the View
Point subdivision are below:

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Strauch Reserve, Huntly play space and tennis courts

Waratah Road / View Point subdivision public open space

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Planning for Growth - Reports

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View Point subdivision play space

Further particulars of 8 Rennie Street, Huntly:


Size
Zone
Use

2,275m
Low Density Residential Zone
Not currently utilized for a community purpose

The land at Rennie Street, Huntly was vested in the Shire of Huntly as Public Open
Space at the time of its subdivision in February 1991. Therefore if it is sold any funds
raised by the sale would need to be returned to the Public Open Space Reserve.
The property could be sold as a residential site. The following preparation would be
required:
Proceed to formal Public Notice, with a 28 day consultation period providing feedback
opportunities in relation to the sale of the land
Removal of the Reserve status from the property
Connection to Coliban waters reticulated sewer system
Projected costs for future financial years:
Funds would go to the Open Space Reserve to fund future open space needs.
Conclusion
Public engagement revealed a range of opinion on both sites.
Of the residents who responded most would prefer the land be retained and further
enhanced as Public Open Space. A minority of responders suggested that we sell the
properties for further residential development.

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There is no strategic purpose, place based plan or report that recommends that Council
retain this property.
This is a site that could be sold for residential development. Proceeds would go into the
Open Space Reserve to fund future purchases and ongoing development of open space
as the City grows and develops.
Options
1. The Council could hold the property; or
2. The Council could sell the property as discussed
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. That Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to sell 8 Rennie Street, Huntly subject to
Section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989;
(a)

That Council authorise public notice of its intention to sell the above property in
accordance with Section 189 of the Act, and advise engaged residents;

(b)

That the three Ward Councillors hear any submissions in relation to the sale of
the above property;

2. If no submissions are received in relation to the proposed sale of 8 Rennie Street,


Huntly that Council resolve to:
(a)

Remove the Public Open Space Reservation;

(b)

Connect sewer to the property; and

(c)

The above property be sold and that the Council authorise the Chief Executive
Officer to sign and seal all relevant sale documents.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

3.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

PRESENTATION AND VIBRANCY

3.1

BENDIGO EASTER FESTIVAL COMMUNITY REFERENCE GROUP

Document Information
Author

Terry Karamaloudis, Manager Major Events

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos, Director City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to recommend that Council appoint two members of the
general Bendigo community to the newly established Bendigo Easter Festival
Community Reference Group.
Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2014-2015 update):
Theme: 1
Strategy 1.3

Leadership and good governance


Community members take an active part in democratic
engagement.

Report
Councillors will recall its recent resolution to form a Bendigo Easter Festival Community
Reference Group, and specifically its decision to advertise and recruit two general
members of the public to sit on the Committee together with Council (1), Chinese
Association (1) and Easter Fair Society Inc. (4) members/representatives.
As Council's representative, Cr Fyffe will Chair the Group.
After a series of public articles and advertisements, we received three expressions of
interest. After considered evaluation, it was concluded that applicants Gary Frank (local
electrical contractor) and Rory Somerville (local real estate agent) would make great
members of the group and are recommended for appointment for a two year term. Both
individuals are well known to staff. They are former members of past Festival Advisory
Groups and are well known positive contributors with strong links to existing and
potential business sponsors.
The Committee will meet quarterly for the purpose of assisting with the planning and
delivery of the annual Bendigo Easter Festival. The first meeting of the group will take
place early in September 2015. We will keep Council informed of progress as we move
forward.

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Resource Implications
N/A

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to appoint Mr Gary Frank and Mr Rory
Somerville to join the newly established Bendigo Easter Festival Community Reference
Group for a two year term as general community members.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

3.2

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

AN OFFICIAL BENDIGO SCOTTISH TARTAN

Document Information
Author

Terry Karamaloudis - Manager Major Events

Responsible
Director

Stan Liacos Director, City Futures

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to seek Councils support for officially registering a Bendigo
Scottish Tartan with the Scottish Tartan Authority in the United Kingdom.
Policy Context Council Plan
3.4 The reputation, profile and attraction of Greater Bendigo and the region are further
enhanced through effective promotion.
3.4.2 Market the Bendigo region to Australian and international visitors and local
residents as a vibrant destination for shopping, dining, the arts and a range of sporting
and recreational attractions.

Background Information
Bendigo has been influenced and shaped by pioneers and enterprising citizens of
Scottish descent since the gold rush era of the 1850s. In more recent years, the
connections between Bendigo and Scotland were illustrated by the 2006 Designs For A
Modern World: Charles Rennie Mackintosh exhibition at Bendigo Art Gallery one of
the first in a succession of international blockbuster exhibitions in Bendigo, and staging
the second ever Commonwealth Youth Games in 2004 following the inaugural event in
Edinburgh, Scotland.
The connection between our city and Scotland heritage is now celebrated with a major
event held annually on the second Saturday of February. Scots Day Out is held in
Rosalind Park and is a major free community event. After just two years, it has quickly
established itself as a major activity on the citys calendar of events and attracts several
thousand people from our region and Victoria more generally.
Discussions have been held on creating a distinctly Scottish tartan that is unique to
Greater Bendigo and Scots Day Out itself to assist with promotion of the city and the
event as well as strengthening sentimental links with Scotland.
In this regard, a tartan has been designed (see below) that is symbolic of Bendigo
yesterday, today and tomorrow. It has been designed and proposed by the lead
organiser of the Scots Day out event, Mr Chris Earl.
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As proposed by Mr Earl, the blue and white are taken from Victorias state colours and
further represent the water and skies and the mullock heaps from Bendigos goldmining
days. The reds are symbolic of the earth and the sun while the green demonstrates our
fondness and awareness for the forests and bush that surround Bendigo. The gold
represents the riches of the past and confidence for the future.
While there are state tartans in Australia and some communities have from time to time
designed event-specific tartans, research indicates that no actual municipal Council in
Australia has its own official tartan.
It is proposed that the Bendigo Scots Day Out tartan would be registered with the
Scottish Tartan Authority (an official agency of the UK Government).
The tartan would be incorporated into promotional material for Scots Day Out and other
appropriate community events that involve Scottish heritage.
If Council approves this proposal it is expected that the Bendigo Tartan will be designed,
registered and sample garments produced within three months of Councils
endorsement.

Consultation/Communication
Several meetings have been held with representatives of the organising group for Scots
Day Out and the Golden City Pipe Band. Both groups are understood to be highly
supportive of the concept and design.

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Discussions have also been held with accredited and acknowledged suppliers of newweave tartans in Australia and the United Kingdom who have indicated their ability and
capacity to weave the proposed design.

Resource Implications
There are no cost implications for Council of this proposal. The proposer (Mr. Chris Earl)
is prepared to meet the financial costs of having the tartan officially registered with the
relevant authority in Scotland.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council endorse the proposal to register an official
Bendigo Tartan design with the Scottish Tartan Authority in the United Kingdom as
outlined in the body of the report.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

3.3

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

WOMEN SHOWING THE WAY FORUM 2015

Document Information
Author

Tiffany OConnell, Councillor Support Officer


Peter Davies, Manager Executive Services

Responsible Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer


Officer

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to advise Council of the outcomes of the Women Showing
the Way forum held on Wednesday 22 July, 2015 at the Bendigo Town Hall.
Policy Context
Growing community resilience, connectedness and social capital.
Background Information
The conduct of this forum was approved by Council at its Ordinary Council meeting held
on 2 October, 2013 as part of the Women Showing the Way initiative.
Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s):
Councils Ordinary meeting 10 November 2010
Councils Ordinary meeting 19 December 2012
Councils Ordinary meeting 15 August 2012
Councils Ordinary meeting 2 October 2013
Report
Cr Lisa Ruffell hosted the fifth Women Showing the Way forum for local secondary
school students within the municipality. The aim of the forum was to inspire and
encourage young women to become involved in community life. The participating
schools were:

Bendigo Senior Secondary College


Bendigo South East Secondary College
Catholic College Bendigo
Eaglehawk Secondary College
Girton Grammar
Weeroona College Bendigo
Crusoe Secondary College

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Participating students were selected by the schools. 180 students attended ranging from
Years 9, 10, 11 and 12 with the majority being in Year 10.
The Forum was officially opened by Lisa Chesters MP, Federal Member for Bendigo. Cr
Ruffell was the master of ceremonies for the forum.
This years keynote speaker was Anna Healey. Anna is a wife, mother, secondary
school drama teacher, writer and international class gold medal winning Paralympic
sailor. Anna was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) at the age of 28.
The forum was supported by inspirational addresses by:
Danielle Snowdon - Danielle is the author of The Nerdy Birdy, which delivers an
important anti-bullying message to its young readers. The Nerdy Birdy was
shortlisted for the 2014 Childrens Book Council of Australia Crichton Award for
New Illustrators. Danielle was awarded the 2015 City of Greater Bendigo Young
Citizen of the Year.
Captain Angela Madden Captain Madden joined the Army in 2006. She
moved from Canberra in order to attend the Australian Defence Academy.
Captain Madden is currently part of the Defence Force Recruiting - Women in
Defence Team. Captain Madden provides support and guidance to all female
candidates during the recruiting process.
Fenella Wagener - Fenella attended Girton Grammar School and graduated in
2008. At just 24 years of age Fenella is a successful singer/songwriter,
journalist and is currently a Today Show producer in Sydney.
Twenty women leaders were invited to host a table of approximately nine girls,
encourage interaction, facilitate round table discussions and help with the formulation of
questions to the guest speakers. The leaders were also encouraged to provide their
business cards to the students on their tables to act as a future mentor.
Cr Ruffell facilitated a round table discussion session focusing on three questions:
1. What is success?
2. Where would you like to be in 5 years' time and/or what are your goals (education,
employment)?
3. What will you take away from today?
A summary of the round table discussions is attached.
Outcomes of the day included:
Encouragement and inspiration for students.
Opportunity for students to meet community leaders.
Interaction with students from other schools.
Students completed a questionnaire providing feedback on the event, the results are as
follows:

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Women Showing the Way


was:

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Very
Good
78%

Good

Average

22%

Strongly Agree
Agree
64%
36%

I enjoyed Women
Showing the Way
I learnt a lot by attending
60%
38%
Women Showing the Way
* This survey was completed by 130 participants

Not Sure
2%

Poor

Very Poor
-

Disagree
-

Strongly
Disagree
-

Some feedback provided by the students was as follows: This forum was absolutely exceptional and I enjoyed every moment.
It was really well organised and flowed very smoothly.
Each speaker was individual and had a unique story, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Thank
you so very much for providing such a wonderful opportunity.
Women Showing the Way changed the way of thinking when choosing a career. This
event that I had the opportunity to attend made me realise that there are more women in
a wide variety of careers then I ever thought possible.
Be comfortable with discomfort and stand out and up for what you believe in!
Such a great opportunity both to hear from the speakers and talking to them personally
on the table, along with discussing success and reams with fellow students.

Resource Implications
The cost of the forum included venue hire, keynote speaker, catering, audio-visual
equipment and staging totalling approximately $10,000. In addition there was a
considerable voluntary effort by community leaders who made themselves available for
the day.
Attachments
1.

Summary of Round Table Discussions

RECOMMENDATION
That Council acknowledge the continued success of the Women Showing the Way
forums.

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Productivity - Reports

4.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

PRODUCTIVITY

Nil

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Sustainability - Reports

5.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

SUSTAINABILITY

5.1

GRAEME ROBERTSON, NATIONAL TRUST, CAST IRON


COLLECTION

Document Information
Author

Dannielle Orr, Heritage Planner, Strategy

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to present options and a recommendation to Council
regarding the Graeme Robertson, National Trust of Australia (Victoria), Cast Iron
Collection.
The Cast Iron Collection consists of two parts:
a collection of Cast Iron objects on a 50 year loan to City of Greater Bendigo (20012051); and
a Cast Iron conservatory that was gifted to the City of Greater Bendigo by the
National Trust of Australia (Victoria) in 2001.

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The National Trust of Australia (Victoria) has asked for both the objects and conservatory
to be returned to them. This report recommends instead that the Cast Iron objects be
returned but the conservatory be retained.
Policy Context
The City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2015-16 Update) states that The
history, unique heritage, streetscapes and buildings of Greater Bendigo are conserved,
restored, celebrated and managed wisely for the longer term (Theme 5 Sustainability,
Action 5.2).
The Cast Iron objects were loaned to the City of Greater Bendigo in 2001 for 50 years
until 2051.
The Cast Iron conservatory was gifted outright to the City of Greater Bendigo in 2001.
The reconstruction of the Cast Iron conservatory in the Bendigo Botanic Gardens, White
Hills is a significant and substantial element of the Master Plan for this sites
redevelopment.
Background Information
In 2000 the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) asked for Expressions of Interest for the
long term loan of their Cast Iron Collection. The Cast Iron Collection is a collection of
architectural and household objects collected by the founding member of the National
Trust Victorian chapter, Dr Graeme Robertson. Robertson had a passion for rescuing
cast iron from Melbourne demolition sites as well as photographing cast iron architecture
in Australia and internationally.
The City of Greater Bendigo submitted an Expression of Interest. The Expression of
Interest proposed that the Cast Iron Collection would assist with the Councils vision to
create a City of which its citizens are proud (Corporate Plan 1999-2002) by:
interpreting the ornamentation of historic buildings;
utilising items for moulds to cast new pieces;
enabling replication of lost ornamentation;
incorporating items into exhibits, displays and extensive education courses; and
positioning items in public places.
The National Trust of Australia (Victoria) accepted the Expression of Interest from the
City of Greater Bendigo and decided to donate the conservatory outright.
The Cast Iron objects were removed from their storage space in Maribyrnong to the
storage units at Cleaves Removals in Eaglehawk and then relocated to council storage
at the Kennington Shed, 128 Reservoir Road, Strathdale, where they are currently
located.
The Cast Iron conservatory continued to be stored outside at Werribee Zoo until 2005,
when it was removed to Bendigo and stored outside at the Adam Street Depot, where it
is currently located.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Previous Council Decision Date:


Agreement by Council to put forward an Expression of Interest.
Report advising Council of the successful Expression of Interest in the Cast Iron
Collection.
Report
The original intention of the City of Greater Bendigo with the Cast Iron Collection was to
have a reference library of cast iron pieces that could assist council staff with the
reconstruction of missing elements in Greater Bendigos architecture. It was anticipated
that this would assist the restoration of the heritage fabric of the magnificent 19 th century
streetscapes of the city and small towns.
However, to put the Cast Iron Collection to this use requires a substantial amount of work
to prepare the collection. There is no known history for most of the objects in the Cast
Iron Collection, items are in poor condition and only 2 items have any connection to
Greater Bendigo. These 2 items are the conservatory which is connected to William
Guilfoyle, a Director of the Royal Melbourne Botanic Gardens, who designed Bendigos
Lake Weeroona and a patent plate possibly manufactured in Australia but purchased for
the collection at an antique store in Bendigo.
A significance assessment of the Cast Iron Collection was completed by Dr Dannielle
Orr, Heritage Planner, as part of the internal consultation process in June 2015. The
significance assessment shows that the Cast Iron Collection has a high level of historic
and social significance to the National Trust of Australia (Victoria), due to the connection
with Graeme Robertson as their founding member. Of the Cast Iron Collection, only the
conservatory can be said to have any local historic significance through the Bendigo
connection to William Guilfoyle.
In order to use the Cast Iron Collection for a reference purpose, appropriate storage and
management of the collection would be required and the following actions would have to
be undertaken:
an audit to determine the extent and condition of the pieces;
research to determine if other pieces have any relevance to Greater Bendigo; and
drawing up a collection framework to determine how to dispose of pieces that are
irrelevant or damaged.
The digitisation of newspaper and photographic collections at a state and national level
has revolutionised research into heritage since the Cast Iron Collection was acquired in
2001. Today it is possible to freely view high resolution images of the buildings in
Bendigo and some of the smaller towns or research the history of buildings in
newspapers. The purpose intended for the Cast Iron Collection is now more easily and
efficiently undertaken at a desktop, giving results that are specific to that particular
buildings history. Whilst recasting from photographs may be expensive for owners, there
are still examples of cast iron elements in situ on Greater Bendigo homes that can be
matched accurately and reproduced faithfully for reinstatement.

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For the same level of resources, management and storage required to make the Cast
Iron Collection useable, Council would be better served by building up a locally relevant
collection from Greater Bendigo examples of cast iron architecture.
This report proposes that the City of Greater Bendigo negotiate with the National Trust of
Australia (Victoria) to return the Cast Iron objects that are currently on loan.
This report also proposes that the Cast Iron conservatory be retained in order to action
the recommendations of the Bendigo Botanic Gardens, White Hills Master Plan.
Priority/Importance:
The Cast Iron objects are of a low priority to the City of Greater Bendigo.
The Cast Iron conservatory will become a high priority when the relevant stage of the
Bendigo Botanic Gardens, White Hills Master Plan are implemented.
Timelines:
Discussions with the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) should finalise the terms of the
return of the Cast Iron objects. Once the terms of the return are agreed, the Cast Iron
objects should be removed from the Kennington Shed at 128 Reservoir Road, Strathdale
as soon as practicable.
A budget bid will be put forward in the 2016/17 financial year to cover the removal costs
and any attendant works required, such as an audit of the objects.
Risk Analysis:
The Cast Iron objects are stacked in crates to ceiling height, other objects are loose at
ground level. There is no clear floor space and the stacks are high and precarious.
Removal of the Cast Iron objects will present very high risks to people and the plant used
to move them and could potentially damage the pieces of the Vahland Drinking Fountain,
also stored at this location. If the more accessible items are removed from the
Kennington Shed first, such as the Vahland Drinking Fountain, then some of the risk will
be eliminated.
There will be some noise impact on the community radio organisation Phoenix FM 106.7
FM located in the front of the Kennington Shed. The radios management committee
should, as a courtesy, be notified of the anticipated noise during 2016 associated with
activities related to both the Vahland Drinking Fountain and the Cast Iron objects. A
management plan should be drawn up to minimise impact.
Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation:
Officers involved with the Cast Iron Collection were consulted on the potential options for
the objects and conservatory, including:
Megan McDougall, Heritage Architect / Advisor (Building & Property)
Dannielle Orr, Heritage Planner (Strategy)
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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Brett Martini, Manager (Engineering and Public Space)


Aaron Lindsay, Coordinator (Public Space Design)
Gemma Fennell, Bendigo Botanic Gardens Development Officer (Public Space
Design)
Brad Crme, Curator, Bendigo Botanic Gardens, White Hills (Parks & Natural
Reserves)
Simon Harrison, Manager (Parks & Natural Reserves)
The outcome of internal consultation was the decision to:
retain the Cast Iron conservatory to honour the commitment of the Bendigo Botanic
Gardens, White Hills Master Plan; and
return the Cast Iron objects to the National Trust of Australia (Victoria).
External Consultation:
The above internal decision was then presented to the Greater Bendigo Heritage
Advisory Committee at the 16 July 2015 meeting.
The Committee unanimously supported the return of the entire Cast Iron Collection (both
objects and the conservatory) to the National Trust of Australia (Victoria).
The Committee also encouraged Council to be timely and expedient with the return of
the objects and suggested that a timeframe be established for the removal.
Resource Implications
The return of the Cast Iron objects may have a financial implication for Council.
Any ongoing recurrent expenditure required:
Removal costs for the Cast Iron objects would be a once-off expense for the 2016/17
financial year.
There will be no further or recurrent expenditure associated with the loaned items.
Conclusion
This report proposes that the City of Greater Bendigo return the Cast Iron objects as
soon as practicable to the National Trust of Australia (Victoria). The City should negotiate
with the National Trust about who will bear the costs of the return.
This report also proposes that the Cast Iron conservatory is retained in order to action
the recommendations of the Bendigo Botanic Gardens, White Hills Master Plan.

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Sustainability - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Retain the Cast Iron conservatory until an additional report on the conservatory is
presented to Council.
2. Return the Cast Iron objects to the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) as soon as
practicable.

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Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

6.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

LEADERSHIP AND GOOD GOVERNANCE

6.1

NOMINATION FOR A COUNCIL NOMINEE FOR ELECTION TO THE


BOARD OF BENDIGO STADIUM LIMITED

Document Information
Author

Peter Davies, Manager, Executive Services

Responsible
Officer

Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to ask Council to nominate a councillor as its nominee for
election to the Board of Bendigo Stadium Limited (BSL) following the advice that Cr Lisa
Ruffell will resign taking effect on the date of the next BSL Annual General Meeting in
October.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference: Council demonstrates good governance and leadership.
Background Information
The Constitution of BSL allows one of the people to be elected to the Board to be
nominated by the Council. The nominee must be an eligible member of BSL.
The Council will be requested by the BSL Secretary to nominate in writing at least 28
days before the Annual General Meeting to be held in October 2015.
In accordance with the Constitution, the name of Councils nominee will be posted in a
conspicuous place in the Stadium for at least 14 days immediately before the election.
The nominee of the Council will be elected to office by a majority of eligible members of
BSL accepting his or her nomination.
Report
Cr Ruffell currently sits on the BSL Board as Councils nominee. Cr Ruffell has, however,
indicated she plans to resign her position before the BSL Annual General Meeting in
October, and so Council will need to nominate a replacement.

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Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Under the existing rules, if the Council fails or neglects to nominate a person, the retiring
nominated member of the Council will be deemed to have been re-nominated unless that
person declines to accept re-nomination. If this happens, the position will be treated as a
casual vacancy and filled by nominees of the members of BSL.
Cr Barry Lyons has expressed an interest in replacing Cr Ruffell and has previously
served as a member of the BSL Board.
Cr Lyons is an eligible member of BSL and qualifies for election in accordance with the
BSL Constitution.
No date has yet been fixed for the Annual General Meeting in October.
Resource Implications
There are no resource implications in Council nominating a person to sit on the BSL
Board.

RECOMMENDATION
That Council put forward Cr Lyons as its nominee for election to the BSL Board by the
members of BSL at the Annual General Meeting in October 2015 following the advice
that Cr Ruffell will resign taking effect at the date of the Annual General Meeting.

PAGE 118

Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

6.2

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES

Document Information
Author

Peter Davies, Manager Executive Services

Responsible
Officer

Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide the record of any assembly of Councillors, which
has been held since the last Council Meeting, so that it can be recorded in the Minutes of
the formal Council Meeting.
Policy Context
Strong leadership to meet future needs and challenges; effective community
engagement.
Background Information
The Local Government Act provides a definition of an assembly of Councillors where
conflicts of interest must be disclosed.
A meeting will be an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be
the subject of a Council decision, or, the exercise of a Council delegation and the
meeting is:
1.
2.

A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors (5) and a
member of Council staff; or
an advisory committee of the Council where one or more Councillors are present.

The requirement for reporting provides increased transparency and the opportunity for
Councillors to check the record, particularly the declarations of conflict of interest.

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Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Report
Meeting Information
Meeting
Heritage Advisory Committee
Name/Type
Meeting Date
16 July 2015
Matters discussed 1. Expenditure of Heritage Advisory Committee budget
2. Commemorative activities for Peter Ellis OAM
3. Feedback from Shire of Mitchell Heritage Advisory
Committee visit
4. Heritage Act Review
5. Demolitions - Encouragement Pack
6. Annual Review of Terms of Reference
7. Planning update: Amendments, Demolitions and
Heritage Restoration Loan Scheme
8. Strategy update: Celebrate Vahland, Graeme Robertson
Cast Iron Collection
9. Bendigo Gasworks
10. Heritage Awards
11. Site watch list
Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Peter Cox
Apology:
Cr Mark Weragoda
Staff/
Ms Megan McDougall
Community
Dr Dannielle Orr
Representatives
Mr Bradd Worrell/
Ms Helen Ashby
Mr David Bannear
Mr Laurie Brown
Mr Jordan Grenfell
Dr Gary Hill
Dr Di Smith
Mr Darren Wright
Apologies:
Ms Emma Bryant
Mr Trevor Budge/
Ms Elaine Doling
Ms Kay MacGregor
Mr Rod Spitty
Mr Calum Walker
Conflict of Interest disclosures
Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
Nil

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Councillor/officer left
meeting

Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Meeting Information
Meeting
Councillors' Forum
Name/Type
Meeting Date
22 July 2015
Matters discussed 1. Presentation on Bendigo Stadium
2. Partnership Grants
3. Road Management Plan
4. Big Hill Primary School
5. Caravans and motor homes
6. Writers Festival
7. Family violence
8. Malone Park
9. Chinese Arch
10. Funeral
11. Payment of contractors - Ulumbarra Theatre
12. Federal and State grants
13. Aquatic strategy
14. Tom Flood Sports Centre
15. Heathcote bus service
16. Women Showing the Way
17. Friends of Kennington Reservoir
18. Use of waiting room and business foyer screens for
Promotion
19. Maubisse deputation
20. Early years' facilities
21. Wellsford Estate
22. Review of meeting
Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Peter Cox
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Elise Chapman
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Cr Mark Weragoda
Cr James Williams
Staff/
Mr Craig Niemann
Community
Ms Pauline Gordon
Representatives
Ms Marg Allan
Ms Prue Mansfield
Ms Rachelle Quattrocchi
Mr Peter Davies
Mrs Alison Campbell
Apologies:
Mr Stan Liacos
Mr Darren Fuzzard

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Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
Nil

Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/
Community

Councillor/officer left
meeting

Meeting Information
Councillors' Forum
29 July 2015
1. La Trobe University Master Plan
2. White Hills Investigation
3. Victorian Floodplain Management Strategy
4. Special Charge Scheme for Guys Hill Road Drainage
Project
5. Wellsford Estate
6. Graffiti wall
7. Flooding in Condon Street
8. Primary schools
9. Motorhome parking
10. Marong SES
11. Malone Park
12. Leadership
13. Economic Development roundtables
14. Rural Strategy
15. CEO Performance Review
16. Community Engagement Workshop
17. Customer Request Satisfaction Survey
18. Review of draft Ordinary Meeting agenda
19. Rural Exhibition Centre
20. Kerbside access
21. Code of Conduct
22. Youth Action Group
23. Parking - Kangaroo Flat station
24. Council Plan and Budget
25. Review of meeting
26. Economic Development Strategy
Attendees/Apologies
C Peter Cox
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Elise Chapman
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr Mark Weragoda
Cr James Williams
Apology:
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Mr Craig Niemann
Ms Pauline Gordon
PAGE 122

Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

Ms Prue Mansfield
Mr Stan Liacos
Mr Darren Fuzzard
Mr Peter Davies
Mrs Alison Campbell
Apology:
Ms Marg Allan

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
Councillor/officer left
No.
meeting
Nil

RECOMMENDATION
That Council endorse the record of assemblies of Councillors as outlined in this report.

PAGE 123

Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

6.3

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

CONTRACTS AWARDED UNDER DELEGATION

Document Information
Author

Leeanne Taig, Contract Support Administrator, Contract & Project


Coordination Unit

Responsible Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support


Director

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide information on contracts recently awarded under
delegation.
Policy Context
Delivery of programs, projects and services that respond to community needs.
Report

Contract No

Project

Successful Contractor

Value
(GST Excl)

Delegated
Officer

Date Signed

Service Contracts

CT000163

EPA Approved
Environmental
Auditors

Coffey Environments Pty Ltd


GHD Pty Ltd
Tonkin Taylor Pty Ltd
URS Australia Pty Ltd

Schedule of
Rates

Rachelle
Quattrocchi
Acting Director

22 July 2015

Current annual Council Budget for the goods/services contracted via this schedule of rates is
$158,600.00 excluding GST

CT000183

Quality
Management
System
Auditing
Services

SGS Australia Pty Ltd

Schedule of
Rates

Rachelle
Quattrocchi
Acting Director

23 July 2015

Current annual Council Budget for the goods/services contracted via this schedule of rates is
$24,403.50 excluding GST

RECOMMENDATION
That the contracts awarded under delegation, as outlined in this report, be acknowledged
by Council.

PAGE 124

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

7.

URGENT BUSINESS

Nil.

PAGE 125

Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

8.
8.1

NOTICES OF MOTION
NOTICE OF MOTION

CR HELEN LEACH

That Councillors resolve to meet with Mr Don McKinnon and representatives of the
Kangaroo Flat Leisure Centre Group to discuss the advantages of the new revised plans
for the retention of the Leisure Centre.

Officer comment (Stan Liacos, Director City Futures and Pauline Gordon, Director
Community Wellbeing):
It is Councils prerogative to meet with whomever they collectively choose to meet
with. If Council determines to meet once again with Mr McKinnon and others on this
matter then at very least it is important to reiterate a range of points for Council to recall
including the following:
- Council made a formalised determination to proceed with Aquatic Centre
development at its meeting of 24 June 2015;
- Council issued a planning permit for the Aquatic Centre development (it did this last
year after considerable statutory public consultation);
- Council formally endorsed and released its designs at various stages of public
consultation and engagement in 2013 and 2014 (this included the rationale for the
removal of the Hall on the reserve);
- Councils decision-making was made after several years of careful and sequential
strategic planning and staged analysis, public consultation and political advocacy,
design and planning processes, Community Reference Group deliberations, business
modelling, and funding considerations; and
- Council management has already acted on Councils go ahead resolution of 24 June
2015 including formally advising the Victorian Government of Councils intention to
proceed with the project, drafting a Funding Agreement Contract with the Victorian
Government binding its substantive financial contribution of half/$15,000,000 towards
the project, and in continuing to assist the final few users of the Browning Street Hall
successfully relocate to alternative premises (note: there are no more forward
bookings at the Hall and the YMCA has ceased operating from the premises).

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

It is acknowledged that Mr McKinnon has arranged for an alternative design of the


Aquatic Centre development. Arranging this and promoting it is his prerogative. The
focus of his design is the retention of the Hall on the site, however, the design does not
take account of the obvious desirability of designing for an efficient and functional
Aquatic Centre. There are many and varied major disadvantages and cautionary
aspects worthy of note with Mr McKinnons alternative design. These include the
following:
- The alternative design does not take account of mandatory planning scheme
considerations such as statutory car parking requirements and environment/creek
flood overlays which among other things once accounted for do not permit the
retention of the existing sporting oval and other parkland;
- The alternative design does not take account of essential/desirable Building Code
requirements concerning Design for Universal Access etc. The Council approved
design had accessibility as a very significant consideration;
- Because the alternative proposal is not designed from an Aquatic Centre / Wellbeing
Centre client perspective as such, it would pose several major operational limitations
that would prevent it from operating efficiently and successfully in the future (e.g.
undesirable car parking supply and location, residential area encroachment,
inadequate provision for plant room loading and truck movements, undesirable sight
lines, site orientation and building juxtaposition, a lack of notable easy-to-access street
address and presence etc.;
- The alternative design would trigger the need to recommence design, planning,
engineering and community engagement processes which would set back the project
between one and two years (depending on planning permit processes) at considerable
extra financial cost and community and government frustration;
- Implementation of the alternative site designs would add an additional estimated
$3million - $4million to overall project cost (note: the need to recommence planning,
design and engineering work, construction cost escalation, cost of Hall upgrade, cost
of extra car parking construction etc. all of which were discussed and analysed in
the last major report to Council on this matter and in earlier reports).

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 August 2015

9.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

10.

MAYOR'S REPORT

11.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

12.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

12.1

Confidential Report in accordance with Section 89(2)(d) and (e) of


the Local Government Act 1989, relating to a contractual matter and
proposed development.

RECOMMENDATION
That the meeting be closed to the public to consider a report in accordance with Section
89(2)(d) and (e) of the Local Government 1989, as amended, relating to a contractual
matter and proposed development.

PAGE 128