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DALI

Designing Applications & Learning


Innovations

mLearning
with iPhone, iPod Touch & iPad SDK
Welcome to the Mobile Web!
Aims: This course is designed and developed to facilitate
Participants Will Shift educators in K-12, professionals in higher education,
administrators, and instructional designers to become
From ➡ To innovators in their field through an exploration of
mLearning and the creation of mLearning applications.
Status Quo ➡ Web 2.0 The course focuses on mLearning and the
development and utilization of iPhone/iPod/iPad
applications for mLearning environments. Participants
Educators ➡ Innovators will explore course content and materials relating to
the pedagogy, technology, research, theories,
Browsers ➡ Developers application, and practice of mLearning. Skills and
Knowledge gained in this course will enable
participants to use and/or create mLearning iPhone/
Static ➡ Mobile iPod/iPad applications for use in online and distance
education settings.

Course topics include:


Course Information:
Course Title: Designing Applications & Learning
Innovations (DALI) mLearning
•mLearning Platforms
Course Number: EDGXXXX
Number and Type of Credit Hours: 3 Elective Credit •mLearning Possibilities
Hours
Term: Fall 2010 •mLearning Theory
Day and Time: Online
Course website: http://online.education.ufl.edu •mLearning Pedagogy
Alexandra Dolan - Course Instructor
Office Hours: By appointment or via the following: •mLearning Applications
Email: aheitel@ufl.edu
Phone: (XXX)XXX.XXXX •mLearning Design
Instant Message: xxxxxxxxxx
Blog: http://www.dalimlearning.blogspot.com
Website: http://web.me.com/alexandradolan
•mLearning Development
Please contact me if you have any other
suggestions for platforms to facilitate communication! I •mLearning Critical Issues
look forward to hearing from you!

[1]
DALI
Course Goals, Objectives,
Framework & Context

mLearning

The amount of time and effort required to be Objectives:


successful in this course will depend Participants will:
largely upon one’s existing knowledge of • Utilize iPhone SDK and tools for Mac OS X Snow
technology and the Objective-C programming Leopard to plan, design, and develop mLearning
language. Students should commit a applications for the iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad mobile
minimum of 16 hours per week to each learning platforms.
course in which they are enrolled, and • Demonstrate knowledge of Objective-C programming
personalized learning plans will be languages.
developed with that time commitment in • Synthesize mLearning research, design, and development
mind. If the following words and phrases with digital-age theories of learning and knowledge
mean nothing to you, expect to spend acquisition.
significantly more time on the technical • Create novel applications and/or optimize web sites for
and programming content of this course use with mLearning platforms for distance education.
than a more experienced programmer • Incorporate instructional design into mLearning
would: xcode, objective-c, (also click developed for distance education settings.
here for more on objective-c programming • Critically analyze the possibilities and challenges that
language) cocoa. mLearning presents.
Goals:

This course aims to encourage participants to become


technological leaders and innovators in the diffusion of
mLearning innovations. The primary focus of this course is The point is not to design a world-
developing mLearning applications for the iPhone, iPod Touch class app (although that would be
and iPad. Participants will go from consumers and users of awesome) but to experience technology
technology to developers and designers of applications. and innovation from the perspective of
Though technology and programming will be the focus, that
focus will be augmented by mLearning theory, pedagogy, a producer, rather than a product’s
research and critical issues. end-user...A lack of prior knowledge is
The following questions will be explored: fine, provided that one exhibits a
• What is mLearning? willingness to learn!
• What learning theories and pedagogies are implicated in
mLearning? This course is not about competing
against everyone else, it is about
• Why is mLearning important?
expanding knowledge and skills. This
• How does the diffusion of innovations apply to mLearning? course aims to foster a cooperative
• What technologies are important for mLearning? community of online learners who mentor
• How can one design applications for mLearning platforms? and support one another in
accomplishing learning goals. The
• What technical skills does one need to develop
applications on the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad? underlying learning philosophy of this
course is based on connectivism,
complexity and critical theory. Click
on any of the links for more
information on these theories.
[2]
DALI
Policies & Procedures

mLearning

UF COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY:
LETTER GRADE PERCENT GRADE POINTS
The University of Florida is committed to creating a
community that reflects the rich racial, cultural and ethnic
diversity of the state and nation. No challenge that exists in
higher education has greater importance than the challenge A 93+ 4.0
of enrolling students and hiring faculty and staff who are
members of diverse racial, cultural or ethnic minority A- 90-92 3.67
groups. This pluralism enriches the university community,
offers opportunity for robust academic dialogue and
contributes to better teaching and research. The university B+ 87-89 3.33
and its components benefit from the richness of a
multicultural student body, faculty and staff who can learn B 83-86 3.0
from one another. Such diversity will empower and inspire
respect and understanding among us. The university does B- 80-82 2.67
not tolerate the actions of anyone who violates the rights
of another person. C+ 77-79 2.33
ADA STATEMENT:
If you are a student with a disability and would like to C 73-76 2.00
request disability-related accommodations, you are
encouraged to contact me and the Disability Resource C- 70-72 1.67
Center as early in the semester as possible. The Disability
Resource Center is located in 001 Building 0020 (Reid
Hall). Their phone number is 392-8565 (Disability Resource D+ 67-69 1.33
Center, 2010).
"Students requesting classroom accommodation must first D 63-66 1.0
register with the Dean of Students Office.The Dean of Students
Office will provide documentation to the student who must then D- 60-62 0.67
provide this documentation to the Instructor when requesting
accommodation” (UF, 2010, Policy on Course Syllabi).
E,I, NG,S-U, WF _____ 0.0
THE HONOR CODE:
“We, the members of the University of Florida community,
pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest
standards of honesty and integrity. On all work submitted TOTAL COURSE BREAKDOWN:
for credit by students at the University of Florida, the
following pledge is either required or implied: 40% Participation
On my honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid
8 Assignments x 5% of total Grade
in doing this assignment.” (UF, 2010, Student Guide). 40% Design Projects Projects

4 Assignments x 10% of total Grade
20% Discussion/Collaboration
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
4 Assignments x 5% of total Grade
For technical support, please contact the Help Desk:
Phone: 352.273.4158 COURSE GRADING:
Online @: http://helpdesk.education.ufl.edu
Course grades will be based upon performance on assignments submitted,
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION group projects, activities, discussions, and participation. Assignments will be
graded according to rubric for that particular assignment. Group projects
HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: will be judged according to individual and team performance, participation,
and the quality of interaction. Activities will be graded according to
To view the minimum Hardware/Software Requirements completion on a pass/fail basis. Discussions and Participation grades will be
for the College of Education please click the link above. assigned based on quality of work, quality of interaction, degree of
participation, and evidence of critical thought and analysis.
ADDITIONAL HARDWARE/SOFTWARE
REQUIREMENTS FOR THIS COURSE: No penalty will be assessed for work that is less than one week late, which will be
seven calendar days from the day assignment was due. However, no work will be
Students wishing to participate in, develop Apps for the accepted after the last day of the course, except in very rare (and well-
iPhone/iPod/iPad will need an intel-based mac with Mac OS documented) circumstances.Work submitted more than 3 weeks past the due
X Snow Leopard in order to complete the requirements date will not be accepted. Penalties for work submitted more than one week past
for this course. the due date are as follows:
Windows and Linux-Based PCs will not work for this 8-10 days late: 10%
course! Students will also be required to download the 11-14 days late: 20%
latest iPhone SDK, available for download @ http:// 15-21 days late: 50%
developer.apple.com/iphone/index.action#downloads
[3]
DALI
Audience Description

mLearning

"If love for life is


to develop, there
must be SOCIAL Most will be employed at least part-time. All participants will have
BACKGROUND:
freedom 'to': other major obligations aside from course participation, such as
freedom to work, family, or other coursework.
create and to
construct, to
wonder, and to EXPERIENTIAL Participants will come from a variety of personal and professional
BACKGROUND:
venture.  Such backgrounds, vary in age, experience, gender, nationality, technical
freedom competence, programming knowledge, attitude, motivation, needs, and
requires that the expectations. They will encompass a variety of learning styles and
individual be preferences, and have different needs and goals.
active and
responsible, not DEVELOPMENTAL Participants are all adult learners, at the graduate level, participating in
LEVEL:
a slave or a well- an online course. Due to their level of education, it is assumed that
fed cog in the participants are self-motivated enough to accomplish course goals in a
machine" distance learning setting.
(Fromm, 1964,
p. 52). MOTIVATION: The ‘typical’ course participant will be a student taking a graduate
level course as either a degree-seeking student, to earn a graduate
certificate, or for professional development.
KNOWLEDGE Graduate-level participants will have a variety of strengths that due to
"Imagination is LEVEL:
more important the diversity of the participants involved, can be viewed as a collective
than knowledge. strengths in the context of distributed cognition.
For knowledge is LEARNING STYLE: Participants will encompass a variety of learning styles and
limited, whereas
preferences, and have different needs and goals.
imagination
embraces the IMPLICATIONS: The course plan and framework for evaluation and assessment will
entire world,
have to be flexible and adaptable enough to accommodate the
stimulating
variations that exist between leaners. Simultaneously, the course
progress, giving
design and framework for evaluation and assessment must also be
birth to
structured enough to provide these leaners with clear expectations
evolution"
for performance, and support and direction needed to accomplish the
(Einestein, as
course objectives.
cited in Viereck,
1929, p. 17).
[4]
DALI
Materials , Media & Technology
Considerations

mLearning

REQUIRED COURSE TEXTBOOK:

Ally, M. (Ed.). (2009). Mobile Learning (eBook.). Athabasca,


Technology Considerations:
Canada: Athabasca University Press. Retrieved from http://
www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120155   In order to work with the iPhone
This book is available for download by free of charge by visiting SDK, the student will need an
the link. intel-based Mac with Mac OS X Snow
Leopard.
REQUIRED MATERIALS:
PLEASE NOTE: Technical assistance
• The iPhone/iPod/iPad SDK (Software Development Kit) is for developing applications for
required for this course, and must be downloaded to an intel-
based Mac running Mac OS X Snow Leopard. Download the mobile devices other than iPhone,
SDK by clicking here. iPod Touch, and iPad cannot be
• Additionally, resources located on the Apple Development provided through this course at this
Center http://developer.apple.com/iphone/index.action will be time. Due to this caveat, this
required to complete this course.
course is not recommended for
• The iPhone Developer University Program (http://
developer.apple.com/iphone/program/university.html) is a free students without an Intel-based Mac
program that allows professors and students to work together with Mac OS X Snow Leopard. This is
as a development team of over 200 students. This program a new course, and instructional
does not provide apple code-level technical support, and
support for developing applications
programs designed are NOT eligible to be sold. This program
does not provide access to iPad development resources for multiple platforms cannot be
through the Univeristy Developer Program, only iPhone and provided.
iPod Touch.
• If you wish to develop your own apps to sell through the app The iPhone SDK is based on the
store, or if you wish to access iPad development resources, you Objective-C programming language,
will need to apply to become a standard developer at a cost of
$99 from http://developer.apple.com/iphone/program/
while Blackberry and Android SDKs are
apply.html. This will allow you to distribute apps through the based on the Java programming
app store, as well as providing code-level technical support. If language. Both Objective-C and Java
you wish to own the intellectual property rights for your are object-oriented, imperative, and
developed application, you may wish to consider enrolling in the
reflective programming languages.
iPhone Developer Standard Program.
However, content of this course is
SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS: geared primarily towards the iPhone,
iPod Touch, and the iPad as platforms
Frederick, G., & Lal, R. (2010). Beginning Smartphone Web for mLearning, and will address the
Development: Building Javascript, CSS, HTML and Ajax-Based
Applications for iPhone, Android, Palm Pre, Blackberry,Windows Mobile iPhone SDK.
and Nokia S60 (1st ed.). New York: NY: Apress.  
ISBN-10: 143022620X ISBN-13: 978-1430226208
Amazon.Com Price New: $26.39
[5]
DALI
Course Technologies
+

mLearning Rationale

Technology
Click Hyperlink to view examples Roles & Functions
Print - Textbook, Course Notes • Impart important information-dense material in ways that other mediums cannot.
Study Guide, Technical Manuals, Newspapers & • Present, communicate, and relate directions, research, best practices, ideas, theories and information.
Newsletters, Journal Articles, Documents, Syllabus • Provides students with a hard-copy of print information that they can refer to while viewing web-based
course materials

ePrint- Online or electronic versions of textbook,


course notes, Study Guide, Technical Manuals, • Impart important information-dense material in ways that other mediums cannot.
Newspapers & Newsletters, Journal Articles, • Present, communicate, and relate directions, research, best practices, ideas, theories and information.
Documents, Syllabus, Blog Posts, Wiki posts. • Provides students with an electronic copy of textual content that is highly accessible and portable.

• Provide students with material that they can listen to as they commute
• Provide students with commentary, talks students through text
Audio - CD’s, Streaming Audio, Podcasts, MP3, • Helps students to synthesize information from different resources
AudioChat, Phone Conversation, Audio- • Provide student with audio assistance while performing a task or practicing a skill
Conference • Providing step-by-step guidance, listening to expert input
• Providing one-on-one assistance and feedback
• Functions to provide social presence, which helps to in constructing affiliation and community.

• Provide students with material that view, to help them visualize skills, practices, or real-world implications
and illustrations,
• Provide students with commentary,
• Talks students through text, helps students to synthesize information from different resources
• Provide student with visual assistance while performing a task or practicing a skill, providing step-by-step
Video - DVD, Streaming Video, Podcasts, MP4, guidance, listening to expert input,
Multimedia Conference, Multimedia Presentations • Providing one-on-one assistance and feedback.
• Functions to impart knowledge in a format that imparts social presence and promotes community, point of
view,
• Provides a 2-d representation of 3-dimensional objects.
• Project ideas, information, data, research, real-world examples, ideas, information, and communication.

Computer-Based Learning - Online Course, Blogs,


Wikis, Websites, Online Audio and Video, Podcasts • Provides students with online computer-based access to course content and related data and information.
Hardware, Software, eBooks, ePrints, Web-Based • Medium which organizes and structures all other technologies and content in order to reach educational
objectives.
Learning Systems, Knowledge Management • Includes hardware and software necessary to access content and to develop and demonstrate requisite
Systems skills and knowledge.

Mobile-Based Learning - Mobile Applications and • Provides students with mobile wireless access to course content and related data and information.
Content Accessible from Mobile Media Devices, • Medium which organizes and structures all other technologies and content available in a mobile platform
including eBooks, ePrints, Learning System, to reach educational objectives anywhere, and anytime.
Knowledge Management Systems • Includes hardware and software necessary to access content and to develop and demonstrate requisite
skills and knowledge.

[6]
DALI
Course Concerns
+

mLearning Compensating Designs

Course Concern: Discussion: Design Methods for Increased Learner


(Moore & Kearsley, 2005, p. 173) Success:

Relevance of Relationship Does the learner see a meaningful  Establish and maintain clear expectations for performance,
participation, course scheduling, communication, interaction,
between individual goals, connection between course content and investment of time and attention needed to complete
interests, and course content. and their individual goals and inter course objectives. While course content and objectives may be
adapted to individual learners, this establishes a foundational
framework that gives both form and function to course design.
 Structure content to be flexible by providing a general
Complexity of course content How does the course balance the framework that is adaptable to a variety individual needs,
and workload need to stimulate and challenge goals, aims, motivations and interests.
learners without overburdening them?  Apply principles of learner-centered instruction and
connectivism to instructional design.
 Conduct formative evaluations of students to accurately
Velocity of Course Itinerary How can course design challenge the assess entry characteristics of learners, to tailor content,
learner without overwhelming them? schedule, instruction, support, feedback, and interaction to
meet their needs and interests.
 Structure content to be flexible by scaffolding instruction
and content to accommodate a variety of students and a
Demands for Time and Can learner devote the time and focus variety of knowledge, skills, and orientations.
Attention necessary to be successful in the  Encourage more advanced students to assume mentorship/
course? expert roles to expand knowledge, skills, and interests and
reinforce existing competencies. Provide mentorship and
support to less-advanced students to enable them towards
Scheduling Constraints Can structure and organization of expanding knowledge and skills. This also enhances feedback,
course be balanced with learner’s communication, collaboration, social presence and interaction.
need for flexibility?  Use ICTs in a manner that promotes the technologies
positive qualities. Realizing the benefits and drawbacks of using
a particular technology in facilitating learning in order to use it
Form and Function Information How do the technologies used help or for optimum effectiveness. Choose the best medium for a
and Communications hinder interaction, communication, particular function from among available technologies.
Technologies (ICTs) used and accomplishment?  Provide and promote access to tools and support for
learners to obtain assistance whenever needed. Clearly state
where and when assistance is provided by various support
structures - instructor, tech support, mental health, disability
Accessibility of assistance and Is the learner provided with the assistance, etc.
support necessary tools and reinforcements  Establish and maintain expectations for feedback and
for learning success? assistance from instructor and support personnel as part of
the learning process.
 Provide multiple channels for student interaction, feedback,
and communication with instructor, material, interface, and
Volume and Type of Feedback How can course design assure peers embedded within course environment.
Provided learners are provided with a variety of  Provide clear expectations for course prerequisites and
requirements at beginning of course. Expectations may include
feedback in a timely and relevant pre-requisite skills, knowledge, experience, time, energy,
manner? materials, software and hardware needed.
 Provide clear expectations and objectives for participants to
Measure and Manner of How can course design provide a conduct formative, summative, and confirmative self-
evaluations of performance. Standards, benchmarks, self-
Interaction framework for various types of assessments, evaluations, rubrics, and synchronous and
interaction and communication? asynchronous communications and feedback can all serve to
communicate and reinforce course objectives and assist
participants in meeting and exceeding them.

[7]
DALI
Benchmarks & Standards

mLearning

Type of Tenets/Requirements of Standards for: Examples of Tenets/Requirements/Resources


Benchmarks: Demonstrating Standards & Benchmarks:

Institutional Technology Plan UF Web Administration Policies & Guidelines


Support
Security & Privacy Measures UF Information Technology Security
UF Web Privacy Statement

Reliable, Secure Course Management System COE Online


UF CMS Governance Committee

Distance Education Infrastructure UF IT Action Plan


UF Academic Technology
UF IT

Course Course Development Multimedia & Online Course Development Tips Presentation
Development COE Conceptual Framework

Performance International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) - National


Educational Technology Standards (NETS)
ISTE Technology Leadership and Technology Facilitation Standards
NCATE Program Standards & Report Forms

Materials/Methods Review: UF Center for Instructional Technology and Training

Engagement/Interaction Review: UF Academic Technology Teaching Excellence Workshop

Teaching/ Facilitating Interaction: UF Ed Online Community of Practice


Learning:
Providing Feedback: Moodle Tips
UF Ed Online Instructor Help - Providing Feedback

Student Research & Evaluation Methods: UF Libraries Guide to Finding Resources:


UF Education Library Educational Technology Research Guides
Internet Reference Sources for Education

Course Aptitude for Distance Education: UF Distance Learning: Is Distance Learning Right for Me? Student
Structure: Self-Assessment
Educational Technology: Is Online Learning for Me?

Technology Requirements: University of Florida Education Online Computer Requirements

Supplemental Information: UF COE Online


COE STL Teaching Handbook

Library Materials/Resources: COE Online Libraries Tutorial


UF Libraries Services for Distance Learners

Completion of Coursework/Program Schedules: UF Registrar: Critical Academic Dates


Program of Study Forms
UF Ed Online Critical Dates
[8]
DALI
Benchmarks & Standards

mLearning

Type of Tenets/Requirements of Standards for: Examples of Tenets/Requirements of Standards:


Benchmarks:

Faculty Program Development/Assistance UF Center for Instructional Technology and Training


Support
Transitioning to Distance Education UF Web Resources for Developing Sites

Training & Professional Development COE Forms, Procedures, & Policies for Faculty Development

Acceptable Use/Copyright/Legal Issues UF Academic Technology Accessibility Guidelines/Policies


UF IT Acceptable Use Policy
UF Ed Online Copyright Information

Student College/Program Information & Data UF Education Online


Support College of Education Online
COE Fact Sheets & Annual Reports

Platform/Resource Navigation/Utilization COE Online Student Help Center

Technical Support UF Help Desk

Guidance/Assistance UF Disability Resource Center

Evaluation & Analysis of Teaching/Learning/Objectives COE Educator Assessment System for Students & Teachers
Assessment
Analysis of Methods/Standards/Outcomes UF University Council on Teacher Education (UCOTE)
COE Title II Institutional Report
UF Libraries Guide to Educational Statistics

Review of Course Objectives/Inputs COE Conceptual Framework Assessment Indicators


COE Conceptual Framework Knowledge, Skills & Dispositions
(NCATE) Standards

Misc. Standards-Based Mobile Web Development W3C


Open Mobile Alliance (OMA)
dotMobi
Open Mobile Terminal Platform (OMTP)
Apple Developer Center

[9]
DALI
Week One
Content Outline for Lesson

mLearning

Lesson Objectives: Tasks:


• Distinguish mLearning from other forms • Complete formative assessment online by
of learning in terms of both technology and completing the form as directed.
pedagogy • Read iPhone OS Technology Overview
• Develop an understanding of mlearning • Bookmark http://developer.apple.com/
• Explore possibilities of mLearning adconitunes and get the tracks for ‘iPhone
• Assess iPhone platform and identify level Getting Started Videos’ and ‘Getting Started
of programming expertise with iPhone SDK 3.0
• Identify underlying architecture of • Sign up as either a standard developer ($99
Objective-C and iPhone/iPad/iPod application cost) or through the University Developer
development Program (see ‘Course Materials’ section of
• Prepare a personalized learning schedule Syllabus for an overview of the differences
for developing knowledge of iPhone/iPad/iPod between the two programs).
programming and application creation • Download and Install iPhone SDK
• If you are a standard developer, sign up for
Lesson Goals: the developer forums and pick a screen name
• What is mLearning? (my developer forum screen name is
• Why is mLearning important? alexagator)
• What learning theories and pedagogies are • in Xcode, subscribe to the content of the
implicated in mLearning? iphone Reference Library (see pages 14-15 of
• What technologies are implicated in iPhone OS Technology Overview for
mLearning? instructions)
• in Xcode, turn on Research Assistant (see
Assignments Due: page 15 of iPhone OS Technology Overview
• Programming Knowledge Self-Evaluation for Instructions)
for the development of Preliminary • View ‘mLearning & Critical Pedagogy
Personalized Learning Schedule Presentation’
• Introductory Discussion • View the iSchool Initiative video.
• Complete Introductory Discussion

Participants should contact instructor if they have any questions, need additional information, or
require any assistance! Ideally, this request for assistance is initiated well in advance of assignment
due dates!

[10]
DALI
Week One
Guidelines for Completing
Assignments

mLearning
Formative Assessment:
• Complete formative assessment online by clicking here
• This is a Google Docs form, so results will be tabulated into a spreadsheet
• This allows the instructor to better analyze the class and tailor instructions to needs, interests, and preferences.
• Pleas answer the questions honestly, indicating the best answer to the best of your current knowledge
• This assessment will assist both learner and instructor in the process of developing a personalized learning plan.
• This plan will be developed according to individual knowledge, skills, needs, and interests.
• This assessment is for a participation grade, and the only ‘right’ answer is an honest one.
• As long as you complete the questions in good faith, you will receive full credit for the evaluation.
• This assignment is worth 5% of your course grade, with percentages allocated as follows:
• 2% for giving thoughtful responses to all questions and submitting answers
• 1% for a thoughtful, informative response to the question of ‘Professional Orientation and Experience’
• 1% for a thoughtful, informative response to the question of ‘Why are you taking this course?’
• 1% for a thoughtful, informative response to the prompt for additional relevant information.
• A ‘Thoughtful, Informative Response’ is more than a few sentences.
• A ‘Thoughtful, Informative Response’ implies that answers should indicate graduate-level thought and analysis.

Introductory Discussion:
• View ‘mLearning & Critical Pedagogy Presentation’
• View the iSchool Initiative video.
• Introduce yourself to others within the course, and share your reaction to the presentation and video.
• Your reaction must be in a multimedia format.
• That means, most likely it will involve text +_______ element of your choosing
• Video, audio, animation, comic, graphics, chart, organizer, etc.
• Be as creative as you would like with your response.
• Within the post, please include the following information:
• Name
• Reason for Taking this Course
• Reaction to the videos and additional resource
• What you think mLearning is - your own definition
• What you hope to achieve by taking this course.
• Please respond to other participants’ posts, and respond as well as participants’ posts to your discussion
• This assignment is worth 5% of your course grade, with points allocated as follows:
• 1% Name + Reason for Taking this Course/What you hope to Achieve in this Course
• 1% Reaction to videos and additional resource
• 1 % Providing your own definition of mLearning
• 1% Citing additional resources + citing resources in proper APA format
• 1% Responding to other’s discussion in the spirit of discourse
• Do not just say ‘I agree’ or ‘I disagree’
• Contribute to the conversation in a meaningful, relevant way
• Discussion and Responses should imply graduate-level thought and analysis.
[11]
DALI
Week one lesson materials & media
+

mLearning
Rationale for selection

Materials & Media: Rationale for Use:


Hub for Developer Information and Resources
Central to the design and development of apps for the iPhone
iPhone Dev Center Platform. In the first week they will use this resource to
download and install the iPhone SDK, sign up as developers, and
access resources, guides, and reference materials.

Helps students connect to the information they need in order to


Getting Started Guides identify areas of strength and weakness in program development

Sample code gives students framework to assist them in the


iPhone OS Reference Library Sample Code design and development of their applications

iPhone OS Reference Library Helps students to quickly find the information that they need.

Assessment will assist both learner and instructor in the


process of developing a personalized learning plan according to
individual knowledge, skills, needs, and interests. It will
Formative Assessment also assist the instructor in analyzing the class needs,
interests, motivations, and preferences, and tailor instruction
accordingly

Provides participants with a positive example of mLearning


iSchool Initiative Video applied to a traditional institutional educational environment.

Provides a radical view of mLearning as ‘disruption in


education’, applying Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed to the
‘revolutionary’ idea of mLearning. This presentations ‘problem-
posing’ provides an ideal platform for prompting participant to
reflect on values, philosophies, and learning theories. Students
will either align for or against the ideas presented in the
mLearning & Critical Pedagogy
presentation, and either way, their responses, as indicated by
Presentation their multimedia discussion postings, will facilitate thought
and critical analysis. So much of this course will focus on
technical knowledge, that it is important to include the
philosophical and theoretical implications of mLearning right
from the start.

Students will create a multimedia discussion posting to


introduce themselves to the class, react to the presentation,
Discussion Forum and present their own personal definition of mLearning. This
will allow students to express themselves and engage in the
social construction of knowledge.

[12]
DALI
Learning Theories &
Course Structure

mLearning

Transactional Differences, Dialogue, Structure, & Leaner Autonomy:


(Moore & Kearsley, 2005, pp. 223-228)
Structure = Determinants of Course Design (Materials +Objectives + Strategies + Technologies+
Theories + Activities)
Dialogue = Determinants of Understanding (Words + Actions + Discussions/Interactions + Purpose
+ Relevance + People + Technologies + Theories + Activities + Comfort + Subject Matter)
Transactional Distance = Determinants of Separation in Understanding and Communication in
Distance Education (Structure + Dialogue)
↑Structure + ↓Dialogue = ↑ Transactional Distance
↓Structure + ↑Dialogue = ↓ Transactional Distance


This course will be developed with a flexible structure and a high degree of guided interactive
dialogue, in order to personalize the learning and lessen the transactional distance between
participants, the instructor, and the materials. Due to the flexible structure of the course, learners
will be expected to display a high degree of autonomy as they follow a personalized learning plan
tailored to their needs, interests, goals, and capacities.

This learning plan will also give guidance and allow a more individualized structure embedded
within the more generalized/flexible course structure. This in turn emphasizes the learner-centered
nature of mLearning, which is the focus of the course and its structure and dialogue.

The foundations of this course are based on connectivism, which posits that connections
determine learning, and knowledge as a process of building those connections (Siemens, 2006, p. 15).
Thus, the four tenets of connective knowledge networks: Diversity, Autonomy, Interactivity, and
Openness will be emphasized throughout the design of this course (Siemens, 2006, p. 16).

Freire’s problem-posing education and theories from Pedagogy of the Oppressed also figures
prominently into course design. This is best exemplified in The Week One mLearning and Critical
Pedagogy Presentation, which can be viewed online at: http://www.slideshare.net/aheitel/m-learning-
welcome-to-the-mobile-web#stats-bottom and also in the course handout on Critical Theory and
Radical Pedagogy available at (in the interest of space they cannot be included here) http://
files.me.com/alexandradolan/rsvnlz

The entire intent of this course will be to stimulate “Critical thinking - thinking which discerns
an indivisible solidarity between the world and the people and admits of no dichotomy between
them. Thinking which perceives reality as a process, as transformation, rather than a static entity,
thinking which does not separate itself from action, but constantly immerses itself in temporality
without fear of the risks involved” (Freire, 2008, p. 92).

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