You are on page 1of 40

TOC

Chapter 1

Using Corel TEXTURE

Getting started with Corel TEXTURE

Defining lighting properties .

Setting lighting properties

Applying color to lights .

Understanding surface properties .

Understanding shader layers.

Defining shader layers .

Manipulating shader layers

Applying color to layers

11

Applying blend settings

13

15

27

Form and geometry algorithm settings .

27

Creating three-dimensional effects with edges .

32

33

Shader layer algorithm settings


Defining form and geometry

Rendering textures

Table of contents

USING COREL TEXTURE

Corel TEXTURE lets you create patterns from rock, marble, clouds, or
other materials. A texture is the surface revealed by slicing a
three-dimensional object. For example, when you slice a block of wood at
different angles, you create surface features that show growth rings, a
straight grain, or a veneer effect. You can control the appearance of the
pattern to reflect the cutting knife, the direction of the cut, and how the
edges of the cut are beveled. You can also control the color and lighting
effects that enhance the appearance of a texture.
You create textures by combining four properties:

Lighting manipulates one, two, or three spotlights that shine onto a


textures surface

Shader layers contain a material, a color, and a blend

Topography defines the surface contour of a texture. The shape of the


surface, such as waves, ripples, and bumps, is controlled by the shape of
the knife that slices the material.

Edge creates a round, beveled, or flat border for a texture

You can design and edit textures at any time. You can make natural textures,
such as wood, stone, ripples, clouds, and bumpy surfaces. You can also create
patterns of checkers, dots, and lines or combine natural textures with these
patterns. The textures you create have consistent characteristics over their
entire surface and may be produced at resolutions suitable for either
electronic or paper formats.

Creating a surface by slicing an object


A texture is a surface created by slicing a solid object. Resolution, object
dimensions, and pattern irregularity are important concepts to understand
when slicing a surface.

Object dimensions
You can slice a material in any direction and from any angle. A texture is the
surface revealed by slicing the object. Depending on the type of material, you
can produce a wide range of surface features. For example, when cut at
different angles, a marbled surface can have veins or spots.
You must define the size and characteristics of your texture: narrow and thin,
or wide and short. You can view the image from up close or far away to gain

Using Corel TEXTURE

different perspectives. When you render a texture or transform it into a


bitmap image the size and resolution you choose determines how much of
the surface detail is shown.

Details in rendered resolutions


The resolution of a rendered texture affects surface detail. Fine details
appear as you move closer to the object. This means that larger images are
not blow-ups of smaller images. The resolution detail remains the same and
the quality does not degrade as the image is enlarged.

Pattern irregularity
The internal structure of the materials used to create textures often has a
regular pattern. This pattern, in wood or granite for example, appears when
the material is sliced. You control the regularity of a pattern by creating a
uniform texture or allowing the pattern to degrade randomly. You can also set
up a pattern in which half the elements are uniform and half are random.

Unrendered texture designs


Unrendered texture designs include all the properties of a texture, as well as
a thumbnail image used to draw the texture.
The textures you create, along with preset patterns, are in a texture file
format. These textures simulate surfaces, such as stone, clouds, and waves.
Corel TEXTURE files share a few characteristics:

Texture designs can be edited and modified at any time.

Texture designs have a relatively small file size (40-50Kb.)

Texture designs must be rendered before being used in other applications.

Rendered texture designs


A rendered texture is converted to a bitmap that may be imported into other
applications. You can render a texture to your screen, where the image may
be reviewed for any final changes. Remember the following points about
rendered textures:

You can use rendered textures in other applications.

You can specify the size and resolution of a rendered texture. Resolution
depends on the intended use of the texture. Electronic documents require
a low resolution, while printed documents require a high resolution.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Rendered textures are saved as .BMP files.

You cannot edit or alter a rendered texture in Corel TEXTURE. However,


you can import the rendered image into another program and edit it as a
bitmap.

Getting started with Corel TEXTURE


You create unique textures for use as backgrounds for a Web site, wall paper
on your desktop, or part of a design you are making in another application.
You can create a new texture by designing one from a blank texture, from a
preset texture, or using Texture wizard.

Creating a texture from a blank texture


Starting with a blank texture lets you create a custom design. You begin with
a blank slate in which two lights shine on a flat, black, featureless surface.
Creating a new texture is the best way to experiment with designs.

To create a texture from a blank texture


1

Click File, New.

Enable the Blank Texture button.

Click the New button.

Creating a texture by modifying a preset texture


Corel TEXTURE provides preset textures that you can modify to create new
images. Use the Texture gallery to browse through the available textures.

To create a texture by modifying a preset texture


1

Click File, New.

Enable the Texture Preset button.

Click the New button.

Click a tab to view the contents of the page.

Choose a shade from the Texture Type list box.

Double-click the image in the gallery.

To avoid overwriting the preset texture, save the texture with a new
filename.

Using Corel TEXTURE

Creating a texture using the Texture wizard


The Texture wizard helps you create complex, custom textures from scratch.
The Texture wizard guides you through all the steps required to create a
texture by prompting you for design decisions. At any time, you can back up
and specify different settings.

To create a texture using the Texture wizard


1

Click File, New.

Enable the Texture wizard button.

Click the New button.

Follow the on-screen instructions.

Specifying texture size and resolution


The texture size you specify depends on how you plan to use the texture.
You may use it as a Web page background, as part of a composite image, or as
part of another application. The texture resolution you define depends on
whether the texture is produced as an electronic file or printed on paper.

To specify texture size


1

Click File, Image Setup.

Enable one of the Measurement Units buttons.

Type a value in the Texture Width box.

Type a value in the Texture Height box.

To specify texture resolution

Click File, Image Setup.

Enable one of the Resolution Units buttons.

Type a value in the Texture Width box.

Type a value in the Texture Height box.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

The settings you specify affect the rendering time and the size of the
rendered texture file. A large, high-resolution texture file takes longer to
render.

Different printing and display formats require different resolution values.


Textures intended only for screen display should be set at 72 dots per inch
(dpi.) Most printed textures are set at 150 dpi, regardless of the printer
resolution. Geometric patterns with sharp line boundaries require a
higher resolution.

Defining lighting properties


Lighting properties determine the amount, intensity, and quality of the
illumination on a textures surface. You can create lighting effects by
manipulating up to three spotlights hanging above the surface of the texture.
You can turn on some, none, or all of the lights and change their positioning.
You can assign a different color to each light. Lighting is also affected by the
surface properties of the texture.
You can adjust the following properties for each light:

Ambient sets the overall intensity of the light shining on a textures


surface. Increasing the ambient light brightens the surface of the texture.

Shading sets the amount by which color values are reduced to create
shading

Highlights sets the amount of contrast created by each light

Setting lighting properties


You can view a three-dimensional representation of both the texture and the
lights that shine on a surface. Up to three lights may be turned on and
positioned above the texture. You can also change the color of the lights.

Turning lights on and off


Lighting properties control how the light shines on the surface of the texture.
You can specify the number of lights that you want to use. Lighting controls
have no effect on the texture when all three spotlights are turned off.

To turn a light on
1

Click the Lighting Properties layer.

Enable the Light check boxes to turn each light on.

Using Corel TEXTURE

To turn a light off


1

Click the Lighting Properties layer.

Disable the Light check boxes to turn each light off.

Positioning a light on a texture surface


The position of each light is represented three-dimensionally and may be
moved around the texture. The texture is divided into four quadrants; the
arrow in the middle indicates the top of the texture.

To position lights on a texture surface


1

Enable one or all of the Light check boxes.

Drag a light pin to a position on the texture.

Adjusting the ambient light


You adjust the ambient light to alter the intensity of the lighting on the
texture. Higher ambient light values brighten the surface; lower values
darken the surface.

To adjust the ambient light


1

Click the Lighting Properties layer.

Move the Ambient slider to adjust the amount of ambient light applied to
the texture.

Adjusting the shading


Shading controls the amount of shadowing that is created by surface
irregularities. As you increase shading, shadows lengthen and surface
elements stand out more clearly. A low shading level creates a dark image
with less visible features. A high shading level creates a lighter image with
more visible features.

To adjust the shading


1

Click the Lighting Properties layer.

Move the Shading slider to adjust the amount of shading applied to the
texture.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Adjusting the Highlights


Highlight values determine the amount of light reflected from the highest
points on a surface. The tops of bumps, ripples, and waves stand out more
clearly as you increase the amount of surface highlighting.

To adjust the highlights


1

Click the Lighting Properties layer.

Move the Highlights slider to adjust the amount of highlighting applied to


the texture.

Applying a preset lighting effect


You apply a preset lighting effect to give a texture a predefined look. You may
want to use a preset effect if you are creating multiple textures with similar
or identical lighting patterns.

To apply a preset lighting effect


1

Click the down arrow button on the Lighting title bar.

Choose the lighting effect you want to use from the Lighting flyout.

Applying color to lights


Each of the three light sources can have its own color. When you shine a
colored light on the surface of a texture, the color of the light blends with the
colors defined for each shader layer. You can change, create, and edit the
color of lights.

Applying color to a light


You add color to lights by dragging colors from the color swatches bar onto
the light pins. The color of the pin changes, as does the color of the light
reflected on the texture in the three-dimensional representation.

To add color to a light

Drag a color from the Color Swatches Bar onto a light pin.

Changing the color of a light


You can create new colors and edit the brightness and opacity of existing
colors by using the Color Wheel.

Using Corel TEXTURE

To change the color of a light


1

Double-click a color on the Color Swatches Bar.

Drag the color shade indicator in the Color Wheel.

Move the Brightness slider to adjust the brightness of the color.

Move the Opacity slider to adjust the transparency of the color.

Drag the new color from the Color Swatches Bar onto a light pin.

Understanding surface properties


Surface properties are the defining characteristics of a texture. Surface
properties act like a filter, controlling how the lighting properties interact
with the shader layers.

Setting Surface properties


You set the surface properties of the texture by adjusting the roughness,
brilliance, metallicity, and graininess properties until you have the texture
you want. These effects create a realistic surface for the texture.

To set surface properties

Move any of the following sliders:

Roughness adjusts the overhead lighting applied to the texture; a


low roughness setting focuses each spotlight into a small, intense
circle. As you increase the roughness setting, the light gradually
spreads over the surface of the texture.

Brilliance adjusts the length and depth of shadowing applied to the


texture; surface irregularities, such as bumps and wrinkles, stand out
more clearly as you decrease the brilliance setting

Metallicity adjusts the metallicity applied to the texture; at low


metallicity, a large amount of surface lighting appears in the final,
composite texture. At high metallicity, the color is almost entirely
taken from the shader layers.

Graininess adjusts the graininess applied to the texture; as you


increase the graininess setting, the texture becomes more obscure

Understanding shader layers


You can use shader layers to apply color, surface features, or pictures to a
layer in a texture. Each texture is composed of one or more shader layers.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Since a texture is created by looking down through each layer, you should
define the bottom layer first and then work your way up.

Defining shader layers


Shader layers are opaque, transparent, or semitransparent layers that alter
the color, texture, and blend of the texture. You define the blend and surface
features, as well as the color, for each layer in the texture.

Defining shader layers


Each shader layer contains adjustable parameters, such as opacity, pattern,
and color that contribute to the overall appearance of the texture.

To define shader layers


1

Select the bottom shader layer.

Choose an algorithm from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the surface detail applied to the texture

Rotation slider rotates the texture

Turbulence slider adjusts the textures smoothness

Variance slider sets the uniformity of the turbulence setting

Click the Preview Selected Layer button to preview the changes made to
the bottom layer.

The blend setting for the bottom layer is always opaque.

You can use the preview command to preview the effect of combining all
the shader layers.

Manipulating shader layers


You can delete, reorder, copy, or save shader layers for use in other textures.
Disabling a shader layer lets you see how the texture looks with a layer
removed.

Deleting a shader layer


You delete shader layers from the stack if you no longer want them in the
texture. Once the layer is deleted, the texture loses all the properties defined
in that layer.

Using Corel TEXTURE

To delete a shader layer


1

Click the shader layer you want to delete.

Click Texture, Remove Layer.

You can also use the Delete Layer button on the property bar to delete the
layer.

Changing the order of a shader layer


Shader layers are represented in the three-dimensional model as layers in a
stack. You change the appearance of the texture by changing the order of the
layers.

To change the order of a shader layer


1

Click the shader layer you want to move.

Drag the layer to a new position.

Copying and pasting a shader layer into another texture


You can move shader layers from one texture to another. Once you insert the
layer into the stack, the texture reflects the properties of the new layer.

To copy a shader layer


1

Click the shader layer you want to copy.

Click Edit, Copy Layer.

To paste a shader layer


1

Click File, Open.

Open the texture into which you want to paste the shader layer.

Select the layer onto which you want to paste the new properties.

Click Edit, Paste.

Saving a shader layer in a texture


Shader layers in textures can be saved and used in different textures. If you
are creating multiple textures with similar characteristics, you may want to
save particular shader layers.

10

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

To save a shader layer in a texture


1

Click a shader layer.

Click the Down Arrow button on the Shader Layer title bar.

Choose Save Layer from the Shader Layer list box.

Type a name for the layer in the Save Layer dialog box.

Enabling and disabling a shader layer


Shader layers can be temporarily excluded from the stack. If you are
experimenting with the look of a texture, you may want to disable a
particular shader layer.

To enable a shader layer

Enable the Shader Layer check box in the upper left corner of the Shader
Layer title bar.

To disable a shader layer


1

Click a shader layer.

Disable the Shader Layer check box in the upper left corner of the Shader
Layer title bar.

Applying color to layers


You can add, remove, save, and load preset color patterns. All available colors
are located on the color swatches bar. You move colors from the color
swatches bar to the color gradient bar to apply a color or several shades of
color to any shader layer in a texture. The color gradient bar lets you use
color pins to define exactly how colors will blend. The placement of a color
pin indicates the highest point of intensity for that color. On either side of the
color pin, the color gradually fades and blends into the color defined by the
next closest pin.
Colors marked with an X are transparent colors solid colors with
transparent bands that allow colors and other elements from lower layers to
show through.

Adding a color pin to the color gradient bar


Color pins are used to transfer colors from the color swatches bar to the
color gradient bar. You can view the changes to the layer as you drag color
pins to the Color Gradient bar.

Using Corel TEXTURE

11

To add a color pin to the color gradient bar


1

Drag a color from the Color Swatches Bar to the Color Gradient Bar.

Drag the color pin to the location you want.

Removing a color pin from the color gradient bar


You remove a color from the color gradient bar by removing color pins. You
can view the changes to the shader layer as you drag color pins from the
color gradient bar.

To remove a color pin from the color gradient bar


1

Click the color pin you want to remove.

Drag the pin off the Color Gradient Bar and out of the work Area.

Changing the color of a color pin


You can add colors to the color gradient bar by changing the color of the color
pins. This lets you alter the colors of the texture but maintain the original
color pattern.

To change the color of a color pin


1

Click a color pin on the Color Gradient Bar.

Drag the new color from the Color Swatches Bar to the color pin.

Saving a color set contained in the color gradient bar


You can save the color set used in your texture for future use. If you are
creating multiple textures with the same color pattern, you may want to save
a color set.

To save a color set


1

Click the Down Arrow button beside the Color Swatches Bar.

Choose Save Color Set from the Color Swatches Bar flyout.

Type a name for the color set in the Save Color Set dialog box.

Loading a preset color set into the color gradient bar


You can load preset color patterns. If you are creating multiple textures with
the same color pattern, you may want to load a preset color set.

12

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

To load a preset color set


1

Click the down arrow button beside the Color Swatches Bar.

Choose the color set you want to import from the Color Swatches Bar
flyout.

Applying blend settings


Blend settings define how a layer combines with the layers underneath it to
create a composite texture. You can use 11 blend settings to create distinct
effects. For example, by combining opaque shader layers with layers of
varying transparency, you control how dark or how light the features of the
texture appear.

Applying a transparent color to a shader layer


Using transparent colors is similar to placing a colored filter over a camera
lens light shines through, but it is subtly altered or colored. By combining
different opacity settings with transparent colors, you can control how each
layer contributes to the final texture. Transparent colors are marked with an
X on the color swatches bar. A layer that contains a solid color and has a
fully opaque setting blocks all light coming from below. The bottom shader
layer is automatically assigned an opaque blend setting.

To apply a transparent color to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Drag a transparent color swatch from the Color Swatches Bar to the Color
Gradient Bar.

Adjust the position of the color pin until you are satisfied with the color
effect.

Applying the additive blend setting to a shader layer


In an additive blend setting, the color values of the additive layer are added to
the color values of the lower layers. An additive blend lightens the texture.
White in the additive layer blocks out any color from the lower layers. Black
in the additive layer has no effect on color from the lower layers.

To apply the additive blend setting to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Additive from the Blend list box.

Using Corel TEXTURE

13

Applying the subtractive blend setting to a shader layer


In a subtractive blend setting, the color values of the subtractive layer are
subtracted from the color values of the lower layers. A subtractive blend
darkens the texture.
White areas are converted to black in a subtractive blend. Black areas do not
change the underlying colors.

To apply the subtractive blend setting


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Subtractive from the Blend list box.

Applying the lighten blend setting to a shader layer


The lighten blend setting brightens all the colors in a texture.

To apply the lighten blend setting


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Lighten from the Blend list box.

Applying the darken blend setting to a shader layer


The darken blend setting darkens all the colors in a texture.

To apply the darken blend setting to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Darken from the Blend list box.

Applying the shade blend setting to a shader layer


The shade blend setting turns a solid colored layer into a layer in which
colors gradually shift from light to dark.

To apply the shade blend setting to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Shade from the Blend list box.

Applying the hue shift blend setting to a shader layer


The hue shift blend setting inverts all the color pins in the layers below the
hue-shifted layer. For example, a red color pin becomes a green color pin.

14

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

To apply the hue shift blend setting


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Hue Shift from the Blend list box.

Applying the multiply blend setting to a shader layer


The multiply blend setting acts like a color filter, allowing some color to show
through and blocking other colors. In a layer to which the multiply blend is
applied, white lets all colors show through, a color with a medium brightness
lets some color show through, and black does not let color show through.

To apply the multiply blend setting


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Multiply from the Blend list box.

Shader layer algorithm settings


An algorithm is the type of graphic effect contained in the shader layer. For
example, the clouds algorithm creates the effect of a cloudy sky. You control
the look of each texture by changing, for example, the magnification,
contrast, or orientation of an algorithm. The following sixteen algorithms can
be applied to a shader layer:

colored applies a solid color to a shader layer

clouds creates the effect of a cloudy sky

marble creates marble patterns, such as streaks and spots

wood creates wood grain, veneer or growth rings

checkers creates a checker pattern

spots creates a spotted pattern

agate creates a blue or gray quartz pattern

granite creates a uniform, sandpaper pattern

polka dots creates a polka dot pattern

wrapped creates a spiral pattern of circles

fractal creates a design of circular streaks

weave creates a pattern of interlocking bands

wisps creates a pattern similar to clouds

noise creates a pattern similar to television static

Using Corel TEXTURE

15

cellular creates a honeycomb network of bumps

picture lets you import a picture from another application

Applying a preset algorithm to a shader layer


You can apply preset algorithms or graphic effects to any shader layer. If you
are creating multiple textures with the same pattern, you may want to apply
a preset algorithm.

To apply a preset algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select the shader layer you want to change.

Choose an algorithm from the Algorithm list box.

Applying the colored algorithm to a shader layer


The colored algorithm applies a solid color to a shader layer. You can use the
colored algorithm to add a tint to a texture or to create different shades by
combining different colored layers. The amount of color added by each layer
to the overall texture is controlled by the blend setting. For example, blend
settings can be transparent, semi-transparent, or opaque.
When you apply the colored algorithm to a shader layer, you must choose a
gradient for the color. Gradients are used to create surface designs by
applying the color as either a solid color or a wash that flows from light to
dark.

To apply the colored algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Colored from the Algorithm list box.

Choose a gradient option from the Gradient list box.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

Applying the clouds algorithm to a shader layer


The clouds algorithm creates the effect of a cloudy sky. This algorithm is
derived from the spots algorithm, with added settings for turbulence. If you
want a cloud pattern without turbulence, try modifying the spots algorithm
until you get the results you want.

To apply the clouds algorithm to a shader layer


1

16

Select a shader layer.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Choose Clouds from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small clouds. A high
level of magnification creates a few large clouds.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


changes the orientation of the clouds.

Turbulence slider adjusts the amount of turbulence applied to the


layer; a low level of turbulence creates smooth, rounded edges for each
cloud. A high level of turbulence gives each cloud a jagged appearance.

Variance slider adjusts the variance setting; with low variance most
elements in the pattern have the same turbulence setting. With high
variance, turbulence settings are applied randomly.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the marble algorithm to a shader layer


You create marble patterns by slicing a simulated block of marble in different
directions. The direction of the cut determines whether the surface contains
streaks, bands, or spots.

To apply the marble algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Marble from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small spots or veins in
the marble surface. A high level of magnification results in a few large
spots or veins.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


determines the direction of the veins or streaks.

Using Corel TEXTURE

17

Turbulence slider adjusts the amount of turbulence applied to the


layer; a low level of turbulence creates a flat surface marked with a few
irregularities. As the turbulence is increased, more irregularities
appear in the marbles surface.

Variance slider adjusts the layers variance setting; with low


variance most elements in the pattern have the same turbulence
setting. With high variance, turbulence settings are applied randomly.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the wood algorithm to a shader layer


The wood algorithm simulates the growth rings in a block of wood. By
altering the cut or rotation, you can make textures such as grain or veneer.

To apply the wood algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Wood from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates a fine wood grain. A high
level of magnification creates a course wood grain.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


changes the orientation of a wood grain or veneer.

Turbulence slider adjusts the amount of turbulence applied to the


layer; a low level of turbulence creates a straight wood grain. A high
level of turbulence creates a blurred wood grain.

Variance slider adjusts the layers variance setting; with low


variance most elements in the pattern have the same turbulence
setting. With high variance, turbulence settings are applied randomly.

18

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the checkers algorithm to a shader layer


The checkers algorithm applies a pattern created by slicing a cube made of
small, rectangular blocks. With magnification set to 1.00, the texture has
eight blocks on each side. Checkers are ideal for making tablecloth patterns.

To apply the checkers algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Checkers from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small blocks. A high
level of magnification creates a few large blocks.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


creates diamond or diagonal patterns.

Contrast slider adjusts the contrast level of the layer; the contrast
setting determines the shades of colors that are taken from the color
gradient bar

Turbulence slider adjusts the amount of turbulence applied to the


layer; as turbulence increases, the edges of each block become more
ragged until a salt and pepper pattern is produced

Variance slider adjusts the layers variance setting; with low


variance most elements in the pattern have the same turbulence
setting. With high variance, turbulence settings are applied randomly.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the spots algorithm to a shader layer


The effect of the spots algorithm is created by looking down on a surface
rather than slicing an object. The model for the spots algorithm is an

Using Corel TEXTURE

19

irregular mountain range. Peaks and valleys are assigned colors from
opposite ends of the color range shown in the color gradient bar.
Intermediate elevations are assigned colors from the middle of the color
gradient bar.

To apply the spots algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Spots from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small spots. A high
level of magnification creates a few large spots.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


changes the orientation of the spots.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the orientation of
the layer.

Applying the agate algorithm to a shader layer


The agate algorithm simulates a cut from a block of agate a translucent
quartz that is commonly pale blue or gray, with a waxy luster.

To apply the agate algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Agate from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; magnification increases the grain of the stone

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. The texture of
agate is almost random and will show only small changes when rotated.

20

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the granite algorithm to a shader layer


The granite algorithm creates a uniform, sandpaper texture. The texture
looks like the mottled grain of a block of granite. Like the spots algorithm,
the granite algorithm is a flat surface, not a sliced solid.

To apply the granite algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Granite from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; magnification increases the grain of the stone

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. The texture of
granite is almost random and will show only small changes when
rotated.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the orientation of
the layer.

Applying the polka dots algorithm to a shader layer


The polka dots algorithm creates a uniform pattern of polka dots.

To apply the polka dots algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Polka Dots from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small polka dots. A
high level of magnification creates a few large polka dots.

Using Corel TEXTURE

21

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


changes the orientation of the polka dots.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the wrapped algorithm to a shader layer


The wrapped algorithm creates a spiral pattern of circles.

To apply the wrapped algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Wrapped from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification produces many small circles. A high
level of magnification produces a few large circles.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


changes the orientation of the wrapped surface.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the fractal algorithm to a shader layer


The fractal algorithm creates a design of circular streaks. The pattern has no
uniformity and looks like oil spots on water.

To apply the fractal algorithm to a shader layer

22

Select a shader layer.

Choose Fractal from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many smaller fractal shapes.
A high level of magnification creates a few large fractal shapes.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation angle of the layer. Rotation


changes the orientation of the surface.

Complexity slider adjusts the complexity of the pattern; a higher


level of complexity creates more detailed fractal patterns

Inversion slider inverts the colors of the fractal

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the weave algorithm to a shader layer


The weave algorithm creates a pattern of individual shapes that interlock in a
uniform pattern.

To apply the weave algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Weave from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slide adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
weaves. A high level of magnification creates a few large weaves.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation of the weave pattern. Rotation


determines the direction of the weaves. For example, horizontal,
vertical, or diagonal.

Bias slider adjusts the bias of the pattern; a low bias setting uses the
colors found on the left side of the color gradient bar. A high bias
setting uses the colors found on the right side of the color gradient bar.

Gain slider adjusts the amount of space between the individual


weave patterns

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

Using Corel TEXTURE

23

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the wisps algorithm to a shader layer


The wisps algorithm creates a pattern similar to clouds. The wisps are
ragged and the pattern is not uniform.

To apply the wisps algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Wisps from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small wisps. A high
level of magnification creates a few large wisps.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation of the weave pattern. Rotation


changes the orientation of the surface.

Turbulence slider adjusts the amount of irregularity in the pattern; a


low level of turbulence creates a few, less ragged wisps. A high level of
turbulence creates many ragged wisps.

Sharpness slider adjusts the shape and look of the wisps; a low level
of sharpness creates a smaller wisp, using colors found on the left side
of the color gradient bar. A high level of sharpness creates a larger
wisp, using colors found on the right side of the color gradient bar.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the noise algorithm to a shader layer


The noise algorithm creates a pattern similar to television static. The
algorithm has no uniformity.

24

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

To apply the noise algorithm to a shader Layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Noise from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates more noise. A high level of
magnification creates less noise.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation of the noise pattern. Rotation


changes the orientation of the surface.

Variance slider adjusts the amount of irregularity in the pattern; a


low level of variance creates an evenly distributed amount of noise. A
high level of variance creates a unevenly distributed amount of noise.

Contrast slider adjusts the appearance of the noise; a low contrast


setting uses colors found on the middle of the color gradient bar. A high
contrast setting uses colors found on the entire color spectrum.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the cellular algorithm to a shader layer


The cellular algorithm creates a honeycomb network of bumps or cells.

To apply the cellular algorithm to a shader layer


1

Select the shader layer.

Choose Cellular from the Algorithm list box.

Choose a pattern type from the Type list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
bumps. A high level of magnification creates a few large bumps.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation of the cellular pattern. Rotation


determines the direction or flow of the network of bumps and cells.

Using Corel TEXTURE

25

Turbulence slider adjusts the amount of turbulence applied to the


layer; a low level of turbulence creates well-formed, individual cells. A
high level of turbulence creates blurry cells.

Choose a blend option from the Blend list box.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Importing a picture into a shader layer


You can import a picture from another application into the bottom shader
layer. You can achieve dramatic effects by filtering the picture through other
shader layers. When you import a picture into a shader layer, Corel
TEXTURE attaches the picture file to the texture file. This attachment
ensures that the texture design always contains the most up-to-date version
of the picture file.

To import a picture into a shader layer


1

Select a shader layer.

Choose Picture from the Algorithm list box.

Click the Import button on the work area.

Choose the drive where the picture file is stored from the Look In list box.

Double-click the folder in which the picture file you want to import is
stored.

Double-click the filename.

Do any of the following:

Click the Stretch button to stretch the picture to fit over the entire
texture surface.

Click the Center button to center the picture in the middle of the
shader layer.

Click the Tile button to create a tiled pattern from the imported
picture.

26

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Defining form and geometry


You can use form and geometry settings to apply a contour, topography, or an
edge to the surface of a texture. These properties give the texture a
three-dimensional appearance.
Topographic algorithms create contours on the surface of your texture. You
can create bumps, dents, ripples, waves, or a flat surface. You can adjust the
magnification, height, and frequency parameters of topographic algorithms.
The edge property of a texture specifies the type and size of the textures
border. You can specify a bevel, round, extruded, or picture frame border.

Form and geometry algorithm settings


The form and geometry algorithm settings apply topographic effects to a
textures surface. You can control the look of each texture by changing, for
example, the magnification, turbulence, or frequency of an algorithm. The
following eight algorithms can be applied to the form and geometry layer:

wave creates concentric waves

ripple creates small waves

wrinkles creates the effect of a crumpled piece of paper

bumps creates a pattern of raised bumps

dents creates indentations or pits on a surface

bump maps creates a bumpy surface on imported .BMP and .TIF files

cellular creates a honeycomb network of bumbs or cells

weave creates a pattern of interlocking shapes

Applying the wave algorithm


The wave algorithm creates concentric waves radiating from the center of
the texture.

To apply the wave algorithm


1

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Wave from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small waves. A high
level of magnification creates a few large waves.

Using Corel TEXTURE

27

Height slider adjusts the height of topographic elements; increasing


the height setting creates a more dramatic effect

Frequency slider adjusts the number of visible topographic


elements; a low level of frequency creates a few large waves. A high
level of frequency creates many small waves.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the ripples algorithm


The ripples algorithm creates a pattern of small waves.

To apply the ripples algorithm


1

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Ripples from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
ripples. A high level of magnification creates a few large ripples.

Height slider adjusts the height of topographic elements; increasing


the height setting creates a more dramatic effect

Frequency slider adjusts the number of visible topographic


elements; a low level of frequency creates a few large ripples. A high
level of frequency creates many small ripples.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the wrinkles algorithm


The wrinkles algorithm creates an effect resembling a crumpled piece of
paper that has been opened and flattened.

28

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

To apply the wrinkles algorithm


1

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Wrinkles from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
wrinkles. A high level of magnification creates a few large wrinkles.

Height slider adjusts the height of topographic elements; increasing


the height setting creates a more dramatic effect

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the bumps algorithm


The bumps algorithm creates raised bumps on a textures surface. The
frequency and distribution of the bumps are random.

To apply the bumps algorithm


1

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Bumps from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
bumps. A high level of magnification creates a few large bumps.

Height slider adjusts the height of topographic elements; increasing


the height setting creates a more dramatic effect

You cannot adjust the three-dimensional cut of the bumps algorithm.

Applying the dents algorithm


The dents algorithm creates indentations or pits in a textures surface. The
frequency and distribution of the dents are random.

Using Corel TEXTURE

29

To apply the dents algorithm


1

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Dents from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
dents. A high level of magnification creates a few large dents.

Height slider adjusts the height of topographic elements;


increasing the height setting creates a more dramatic effect

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the bump map algorithm


The bump map algorithm carves text or pictures into wood, stone, and other
textures. The contrasting colors in the picture determine the relative height
of the bumps. Corel TEXTURE uses the following scale to determine how
elements are placed in relation to the surface of the texture:

Black elements are placed below the textures surface.

Elements that are 50 percent gray are placed level with the textures
surface.

White elements are placed above the textures surface.

Black and white pictures create high-contrast images. Grayscale pictures


create softer images. Corel TEXTURE translates color images into grayscale
images before creating the bump map.

To apply the bump map algorithm

30

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Bump Map from the Algorithm list box.

Click the Import button on the work area.

Double-click the folder containing the picture you want to import.

Double-click the filename, and click OK.

Do any of the following:

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Click the Stretch button to stretch the picture to fit over the entire
texture surface.

Click the Center button to center the picture in the middle of the
shader layer.

Click the Tile button to create a tiled pattern from the picture.

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Applying the cellular algorithm


The cellular algorithm creates a honeycomb network of bumps or cells on the
surface of the image.

To apply the cellular algorithm


1

Click the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Cellular from the Algorithm list box.

Choose a pattern type from the Type list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
bumps. A high level of magnification creates a few large bumps.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation of the cellular pattern. Rotation


determines the direction, or flow, of the network of bumps and cells.

Turbulence slider adjusts the amount of turbulence applied to the


layer; a low level of turbulence creates well-formed, individual cells. A
high level of turbulence creates ragged, blurry cells.

Height slider adjusts the height of topographic elements; increasing


the height setting creates a more dramatic effect

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Using Corel TEXTURE

31

Creating a weave pattern


The weave algorithm creates a pattern of individual shapes that interlock in a
uniform pattern.

To apply the weave algorithm


1

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Choose Weave from the Algorithm list box.

Move any of the following sliders:

Magnification slider adjusts the magnification level applied to the


layer; a low level of magnification creates many small, clearly defined
weave patterns. A high level of magnification creates a few large
weaves.

Rotation slider adjusts the rotation of the weave pattern. Rotation


determines if the weaves are positioned horizontally, vertically, or
diagonally.

Height slider adjusts the depth of the patterns; increasing the


height setting creates a more dramatic effect

You can type values for the three-dimensional transformation parameters


in the Layer Orientation dialog box if you want to adjust the cut of the
layer.

Creating three-dimensional effects with edges


Edge properties define the border around a texture. The textures you create
begin as flat surfaces. You can simulate depth by setting the size and shape of
the border that surrounds a texture.

Defining edge properties


Edge properties define the border of a texture. There are many edges to
choose from, including bevel, round, and picture frame.

To define edge properties


1

32

Select the Form And Geometry layer.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Choose a border effect from the Edge list box.

Move the Bevel slider to change the size of the border; moving the slider
to the left decreases the thickness of the border. Moving the slider to the
right increases the thickness of the border.

Rendering textures
Rendering transforms a texture into a bitmap image that you can use in other
applications. You can render a texture to a window or a file. When you render
an image to a window, you can view the final image immediately. Rendering
to a window is faster than rendering to a file, and you can make sure that the
rendered texture matches your design. This feature is useful with large,
complex textures that require a lot of memory to convert to a bitmap. You
can save unrendered texture designs if you are not finished editing the
pattern.

Rendering a texture to a window


Rendering a texture to a window lets you immediately view the image. This
lets you make sure that the settings and the appearance are correct. You can
pause and resume the rendering process any time you want.

To render a texture to a window


1

Click Texture, Render To Window.

Click the Minimize button on the rendered window.

Click File, Save As.

Choose the drive from the Save In list box where you wan to save the
texture file.

Double-click the folder in which you want to save the texture file.

Type a filename in the File Name box.

Click the Save button.

To stop the rendering process

Click the Stop button.

To resume the rendering process

Click the Refresh button.

Using Corel TEXTURE

33

Rendering a texture to a file


Rendering a texture to a file lets you create a bitmap of the texture. This
process is slower than rendering to a window and does not let you preview
the texture.

To render a texture to a file


1

Click Texture, Render To File.

Double-click the folder in the Save In list box where you want to save the
texture.

Type a filename in the File Name box.

Click the Save button.

To stop the rendering process

Click the Cancel button.

You can monitor the rendering process by observing the Status Bar.

Creating a tile pattern from a texture design


A tile pattern is created by placing smaller images of the same texture side
by side.

To create a tile pattern


1

Click Texture, Generate Tiling Image.

Click Preview, Test Tiling to view the image.

Click anywhere on the screen to remove the Pattern window that appears.

Render the tiled texture to a window or a file.

Saving texture designs in an unrendered format


You can save a texture in an unrendered format if you are not finished editing
the pattern. You cannot edit a texture once you render it to a window or to a
file.

To save a texture in an unrendered format


1

34

Click File, Save As.

Corel TEXTURE: Chapter 1

Double-click the folder in the Save In list box where you want to save the
texture.

Type a filename in the File Name box.

Click the Save button.

Save preset textures with a different file name before you edit them,
otherwise you overwrite the preset texture.

Using Corel TEXTURE

35

Index

Index
A

wrinkles algorithm

additive blend

applying to shader layer .

adjusting

13

ambient lighting .

texture highlights .

texture shading

agate algorithm

20

applying to shader layer.

20

algorithm

20

agate

20

cellular

25

checkers .

19

clouds

16

colored

16

fractal

22

granite

21

marble

17

noise

24

polka dots

21

spots

19

weave

23

wisps

24

wood

18

wrapped .

22

27

16

algorithm setting

applying preset

form .

27

frequency

27

geometr y

27

height

27

magnification

27

turbulence

27

type .

27

ambient lighting .

adjusting .

applying .

color to lights.

color to shader layers

28

13

color using color gradient bar

11

11

preset algorithms

16

ripples algorithm

28

wave algorithm .

27

weave algorithm

32

B
bias .

blank textures

15

creating textures from

blend setting

13

additive .

13

darken

14

hue shift .

14

lighten

14

multiply .

15

shade

14

specifying

13

subtractive

14

brilliance

bump map .

30

creating .

30

30

29

25

applying to shader layer .

25

importing pictures

bumps algorithm

applying .

C
cellular algorithm

cellular effect

creating .

changing .

light colors

31

shader layer order

10

19

applying to shader layer .

19

16

checkers algorithm .

clouds algorithm

applying to shader layer .

color .

16

applying to lights .

applying to shader layers

applying using color gradient bar

color gradient bar

adding color pins

11

11

11

11

changing color pins .

12

removing color pins .

12

Index

Index
saving color sets .

12

11

adding to color gradient bar .

11

changing color

12

color pins

removing from color gradient bar

12

12

loading

12

preset

12

saving

12

color set

color swatches bar

saving color sets .

12

16

applying to shader layer .

16

15

colored algorithm

complexity

contrast

15

10

copying shader layers

creating .

3D effects

bump maps .

cellular effects

new textures

32

34

22

applying to shader layer .

22

27

algorithm setting

textures from blank textures .

textures from presets .

gain

graininess

textures from texture wizard .

granite algorithm

15

21

applying to shader layer .

21

H
height

algorithm setting

27

14

applying to shader layer .

14

hue shift blend .

I
.

30

bump map pictures .

30

26

15

34
inversion

creating surfaces .

pictures into shader layers


tile patterns .

importing
.

31

30

frequency

3, 30

rendering textures

fractal algorithm

light color

darken blend

14

applying to shader layer .

14

changing .

lighten blend setting


defining .

5
applying to shader layer .

edge properties

14

32
lighting effects

lighting properties

deleting shader layers

preset.

lighting properties

dents algorithm

applying .

disabling shader layers .

defining

setting

turning off

turning on

29

11
lights

E
edge properties .

27

creating 3D effects

32

defining .

32

loading color sets

Index

12

15

algorithm setting

27

manipulating shader layers

file

M
magnification

F
ii

Index
.

17

color sets

12

applying to shader layer .

17

shader layers

10

marble algorithm

metallicity

multiply blend

15

applying to shader layer .

15

unrendered textures .

setting

new textures

creating

noise algorithm .

24

applying to shader layer.

24

O
object dimensions

34

lighting properties

surface properties

14

14

applying to shader layer .

shader layer
.

shade blend .

15

15

applying additive blend .

13

applying agate algorithm

20

applying bumps algorithm

29

applying cellular algorithm

25, 31

applying checkers algorithm .

19

applying clouds algorithm

16

applying colored algorithm

16

applying darken blend

14

algorithm settings

applying dents algorithm

29

applying fractal algorithm

22

applying granite algorithm

21

applying hue shift blend .

14

applying lighten blend

14

parameters

shader layer

pasting shader layers

pattern irregularity

placing lights on a texture

polka dots algorithm

algorithm

color sets

lighting effects

textures

preset textures

9, 15

10

21

16

17

applying multiply blend .

15

applying noise algorithm

24

applying polka dots algorithm

21

applying preset algorithm

16

applying shade blend

14

12

16

applying marble algorithm


21

creating textures from

applying to shader layer .

preset

applying spots algorithm

19

applying subtractive blend

14

applying transparent color

13

applying weave algorithm

23

applying wisps algorithm

24

applying wood algorithm

18

22

15

applying wrapped algorithm

rendering

33

textures .

33

bias .

textures to files .

textures to windows .

blend settings

13

changing order

10

33 - 34

33
complexity

15

contrast .

15

ripples algorithm

applying.

28

15

copying .
rotation.

roughness

10

deleting

S
saving

defining

12

disabling

11

form .

27

gain .

15

geometr y

27

Index

iii

Index
.

26

topographical elements .

27

15

transparent color

13

magnification

15

applying to shader layer .

13

importing pictures

inversion

manipulating .

parameters

pasting

9, 15

10

rotation .

15

saving

10

sharpness

15

turbulence

15

type .

15

variance .

15

shadowing

sharpness

13

spots algorithm .

19

applying to shader layer .

19

14

applying to shader layer .

14

subtractive blend

15

algorithm setting

27

15

algorithm setting

27

type

U
unrendered textures .

saving

34

15

15

specifying blend settings

turbulence

V
variance

W
wave algorithm

surface properties

applying .
setting

27

weave algorithm

23

surfaces
applying to shader layer .
creating

window .

blank .

defined

design

files

geometr y

patterns

placing lights .

preset .

27

highlights.

27

2 - 3

properties.

rendered .

resolution

1, 4

shader layers .

shading

size

unrendered

texture wizard

creating textures from

tile patterns

34

creating .

34

Index

23

33

33

24

applying to shader layer.

wisps algorithm

form .

iv

rendering textures

T
texture

24

18

applying to shader layer .

18

22

wood algorithm .

wrapped algorithm .

applying to shader layer .

wrinkles algorithm .

applying.

22

28

28